FROM AFGANISTAN TO ZIMBABWE HOW NCAA CERTIFIES FOR INITIAL ELIGIBILITY AACRAO Mike Donahue Assistant Director

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1 FROM AFGANISTAN TO ZIMBABWE HOW NCAA CERTIFIES FOR INITIAL ELIGIBILITY AACRAO 2012 Mike Donahue Assistant Director

2 Today s Topics Overview of NCAA. Role of International Student Records Committee. Determining History by School and Calendar Year. Overview of 10, 11, 12, and 13-Year Systems. Key Questions to Ask. Delay of Graduation. Core-Course Time Limitations.

3 Overview of NCAA Organization of the NCAA. Division I:

4 NCAA Eligibility Center Responsibilities

5 NCAA Eligibility Center Responsibilities The NCAA Eligibility Center is responsible for determining the eligibility of prospective studentathletes in NCAA Divisions I and II using two prongs: Academic certification. o Does the prospective student-athlete meet the legislated minimum academic requirements? Amateurism certification. o Has the prospective student-athlete maintained his or her amateur status?

6 POP Quiz True or False? In terms of NCAA rules, the actual date of graduation and NCAA expected date of graduation can vary by several years.

7 More Quiz Questions True or False? Expected date of graduation is tied to the start of year nine (9) of schooling and can never be more than four years.

8 Role of International Student Records Committee Establish types of secondary school

9 Initial Eligibility Information: Academics Academic initial-eligibility requirements are different for each of the three divisions. It is possible for a prospective student-athlete to be eligible in one division and not another.

10 Determine History by School Years Examine education history or international education ladder. Review transcripts by calendar year and school year (grade level). Determine which transcript represents year nine (9) of schooling on the international education ladder.

11 Determine History by Calendar Years Caution! Many times, translations will try to equate year eight (8) or year 10 to year nine (9) in the United States educational system. Always verify student s grade with original international documents. Often translators will ignore year nine in 13-year systems to equate to a U.S. four-year system. In some countries, vocational tracks can be longer or shorter than the academic tracks. Many countries will have schools offering a program for another country. For example, a French school

12 10 Year Systems Philippines (some schools are 11 year). Mongolia.

13 11 Year Systems Angola. Azerbaijan. Brazil (changing to 12 year). Brunei. Colombia. Costa Rica. Eritrea.

14 11 Year Systems Guatemala. Guinea-Bissau. Honduras (12-year vocational). Ireland (allows a transition year after year nine). Kazakhstan. Kyrgyzstan.

15 11 Year Systems Myanmar. Nicaragua. Peru. Russian Federation. Sudan. Tajikistan (can also be 10 years).

16 11 Year Systems Tanzania (can also be 13 years). Turkmenistan (can also be 10 years). Uganda (can also be 13 years). Ukraine (can also be 12 years). Uzbekistan. Venezuela.

17 12 Year Systems Albania Afghanistan Algeria Andorra Angola Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Bahrain Bahamas 1 Bangladesh Belgium Bermuda 2 Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia Herzegovina Bulgaria Canada (excluding Quebec) Chile China Croatia Cuba Cyprus Denmark 3 Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Estonia Ethiopia Finland 4 France Georgia 5 Ghana Greece India 1. If student changes to UK system, can be 13 years. 2. Can also be 11 or 13 years. 3. Eleven years of HF diploma. 4. Thirteen year if transition years. 5. Vocational can be 13 years.

18 12 Year Systems Indonesia Iran 6 Iraq Israel Japan 7 Jordan Kenya Korea Kuwait Latvia 7 Lebanon Lithuania Macedonia Malaysia Mexico Moldova Morocco Netherlands 8 Nigeria Pakistan Panama Paraguay Poland 9 Portugal Romania Saudi Arabia 7 Serbia and Montenegro 6. Can be 13 for pre-university year. 7. Vocational can be 13 years. 8. Can be 11 years if HAVO. 9. Some vocational can be 13 years.

19 Another POP Quiz How many different points of graduation can exist for a student in the Caribbean? o o o o One date; Two dates; Three dates; or Four dates.

20 Another POP Quiz How many different points of graduation can exist for a student in England? o o o o One date; Two dates; Three dates; or Four dates.

21 13 Year Systems British-patterned systems can be an 11 year plus two additional years. Includes educational systems using Ordinary Level and Advanced Level exams or CXC and CAPE exams. GCSE, A-S and A-Level exams from the United Kingdom. Burkina Faso. Burundi.

22 13 Year Systems Chad. Czech Republic. Denmark has a 12-year educational system but allows a transition year after year nine (9), which could make an individual s education path 13 years long. Francophone systems using a 13-year system include (Benin, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo (Republic of), Djibouti, Gabon, Guinea, Haiti, Ivory Coast, Madagascar, Niger, Republic of Central Africa (CAR), Senegal, and Togo).

23 13 Year Systems Italy. Kiribati. Luxembourg. Mozambique. Netherlands has a 13-year and a 14-year vocational educational system. New Zealand Level 3 (may be year 12 if only Level 2 is achieved). Norway.

24 13 Year Systems Sierra Leone (if following British Pattern). Slovakia. Slovenia. Suriname (if VWO track). HAVO track 12 years long. Switzerland has 12-year and 13-year educational systems.

25 13 Year Systems Tunisia. Many countries allow technical or vocational stream students to complete high school in 13 years.

26 Beyond 13 Year Systems Iceland has a 14-year educational system. Netherlands - vocational programs may be up to 16 years, including apprenticeships. Germany - mandatory apprenticeships may occur from one to two years beyond the receipt of the Fachochschulreife.

27 Key Questions to Ask Grading scales and units of study. Which references and what protocols do you use? Do not rely on current high school evaluation or placement. Be cautious of translations as they can be incorrect. Did the student repeat a year of schooling? Did the student repeat a course? Did the student graduate in his/her home country before enrolling at a secondary school in a second country?

28 If no credits are posted, protocol is to assign one full Key Questions to Ask What are the protocols used for assigning course credit? If credit hours are posted on an original non-u.s. transcript, credits will be used as assigned on transcript. Four or more credits in a course equals full-year credit. Three hours equals.75 credit. Two hours equals.5 credit. One hour equals.25 credit.

29 Key Questions to Ask A student may appeal this process by providing hours

30 Graduation Dates

31 Graduation Dates The international academic certification team establishes the official NCAA Eligibility Center expected date of upper secondary school graduation for every international prospective student-athlete. The official expected date of graduation is established from official academic documentation. Faxes and scanned academic documents are not acceptable. This includes transfer student-athletes.

32 Multiple Tiered Country Interpretation (Graduation Dates) The academic and membership affairs staff determined the following parameters apply for purposes of identifying the expected date of high school graduation pursuant to the seasons-of-competition legislation for prospective student-athletes from countries with multiple tiers of secondary school education, where successful completion of each of those tiers may equate to high school graduation. Prospective Student-Athlete Completes Secondary School in the Timeframe Prescribed by the Country s Ministry of Education. A prospective student-athlete s expected date of graduation will advance to the date at which the prospective student-athlete s class completes each tier of the country s secondary school system, provided the prospective student-athlete completes the tier within the timeframe prescribed by the country s ministry of education [e.g., a prospective student-athlete achieves General Certificate of Secondary Education certificates (GCSE) in June 2010 and achieves two-year academic Advanced Level (A-Levels) exams in June Grad date advances to June 2012.].

33 Multiple Tiered Country Interpretation (Graduation Dates) Prospective Student-Athlete Delays Completion of Secondary School Tier. A prospective student-athlete s expected date of graduation will advance to the date at which his/her class completes a tier of the country s secondary school system, even if the prospective studentathlete delays his or her completion of the tier. (e.g., a prospective student-athlete achieves GCSE s in June 2009 and delays achieving a two-year academic A-Level exam until June Grad date will only advance to June 2011, when the prospective student-athlete should have graduated with his/her original class.)

34 Multiple Tiered Country Interpretation (Graduation Dates) Prospective Student-Athlete Attempts But Does Not Successfully Complete Secondary School Tier. If a prospective student-athlete begins a tier of the country s secondary school system, but never successfully completes the tier, his/her expected date of graduation will remain the date on which the prospective student-athlete s class completed the previous tier. (e.g., the prospective student-athlete achieves GCSE s in June 2011 and never achieves academic A-Level exams. Grad date will not advance and will remain at the GCSE graduation date.)

35 Multiple Tiered Country Interpretation (Graduation Dates) Prospective Student-Athlete Completes One Tier of Secondary School Tier and Moves to United States. A prospective student-athlete s expected date of graduation who completes first tier of multiple-tiered country graduation and who moves to the United States and graduates from the U.S. school can have his or graduation date advanced one year from first graduation date. (e.g., a prospective student-athlete achieves GCSE s in June 2009 and moves to United States and repeats years 11 and 12 and graduates from U.S. high school in Grad date will only advance to June 2010 and core-course time limitations are in effect for Division I schools.)

36 NCAA Divisions I and II Legislation: Academics

37 Division I Legislation NCAA Division I Bylaw (Exception One Core Course after High School Graduation). If a prospective student-athlete graduates from high school within the core-curriculum time limitation, he or she may use one core course, completed in the year after graduation (summer or academic term), but not later than the end of the academic year immediately after the high school graduation date of the prospective student-athlete's class, to satisfy the core-curriculum or minimum grade-point average requirements or both. The prospective student-athlete may complete the core course at a location other than the high school from which he or she graduated and may initially enroll full time at a collegiate institution at any time after completion of the core course. A prospective student-athlete may not use a core course completed after graduation if he or she receives institutional financial aid while enrolled in the course during the summer after the high school graduation date of his or her class.

38 Division I Legislation NCAA Division I Bylaw (Nontraditional Courses). Courses taught via the Internet, distance learning, independent study, individualized instruction, correspondence, and courses taught by similar means may be used to satisfy NCAA core-course requirements if all of the following conditions are satisfied: a) The course meets all requirements for a core course as defined in Bylaw ; *b) The instructor and the student have ongoing access to one another for purposes of teaching, evaluating and providing assistance to the student throughout the duration of the course; *c) The instructor and the student have regular interaction with one another for purposes of teaching, evaluating and providing assistance to the student for the duration of the course; *d) The student s work (e.g., exams, papers, assignments) is available for evaluation and validation; e) Evaluation of the student s work is conducted by the appropriate academic authorities in accordance with the high school s established academic policies; *f) The course includes a defined time period for completion; and g) The course is acceptable for any student and is placed on the high school transcript.

39 Division II Legislation NCAA Division II Bylaw (Core-Curriculum Time Limitation). A student is permitted to use all core courses completed following the start of grade nine and prior to initial full-time enrollment at a collegiate institution as certified on the official transcript or by official correspondence.

40 References NCAA Guide to International Academic Standards for Athletics Eligibility (found under the Resources tab at Campus admissions and international programs offices.