2016 ICAI Southeast Consortium Regional Conference Agenda

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1 2016 ICAI Southeast Consortium Regional Conference Agenda With Generous Sponsorship by: Kennesaw State University wishes to thank Turnitin.com and Smarter Services for sponsoring this conference and our parent organization the International Center for Academic Integrity for their support. We also extend our gratitude to all presenters and attendees who made this event possible. Final special thanks goes to Ms. Lauren Little whose hard work and outreach efforts as intern in the KSU department of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity brought us all together. Conference registration includes breakfast and lunch on both days. All sessions and meals will be held in Room #300 of the KSU Center (3333 Busbee Dr. NW, Kennesaw, GA 30144). For any questions about this agenda or any other conference information, please contact Mr. Michael A. Goodwin at or 1

2 Thursday, November 17 9:00-10:00 AM Conference Registration & Check-In; Continental Breakfast (If you requested a special meal, please notify Michael Goodwin so that your breakfast can be given to you.) 10:00-10:20 AM Welcome Address Dr. Michael Sanseviro; Associate Vice President and Dean of Students & Dean of Student Success and Part-Time Instructor of Education, Kennesaw State University Mr. Michael A. Goodwin; Director of the International Center for Academic Integrity Southeast Regional Consortium; Assistant Director for Academic Integrity, Kennesaw State University 10:20 11:10 AM Session 1 Dr. Michael Sanseviro; Associate Vice President and Dean of Students & Dean of Student Success and Part-Time Instructor of Education, Kennesaw State University Managing Conflict and Crisis While Maintaining Academic Standards Synopsis: Many students face serious and sometimes overwhelming challenges as a result of personal hardships or conflicts with others, inevitably impacting their academic success. Our institutions must finely balance care and advocacy with maintaining rigorous academic standards. This presentation will take a closer look at common causes for student distress and offer best practice responses aimed at preserving academic integrity. 11:10-11:20 AM Break 2

3 11:20 AM 12:10 PM Session 2 Ms. Hannah Johnson; Administrative Analyst, University of Arkansas Dr. Alishia Ferguson, Assistant Dean and Academic Integrity Monitor for J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences, University of Arkansas A Unified Front: University Wide Commitment to Create a Culture of Honesty & Deter Cheating Synopsis: There are as many perspectives about academic dishonesty as there are faculty on any university campus. Generally, faculty members are sensitive to acts of academic dishonesty and most are willing to address any issues that come up. However, there is no consistency in consequences for dishonesty when individual faculty members address cheating on a case-by-case basis at the classroom level. When integrity is addressed at the faculty level, tracking students who commit acts of dishonesty in additional courses is limited and as a result, there is no acceleration of consequences for these students as a way to stop the behavior. In this presentation, we will address how we promote a culture of honesty and deter cheating while minimizing inconsistencies in the process through an office for Academic Initiatives and Integrity. A part of central university leadership, this office helps to administer a comprehensive faculty written academic integrity policy that all university faculty are required to follow. The office also organizes a by-college network of Academic Integrity Monitors to interact with the students and faculty when cheating occurs. The monitors review each case of potential cheating and make binding recommendations for faculty to follow that includes accelerating consequences for serial cheaters. The office plans an Academic Integrity Week each year and provides education to freshmen during orientation as well as during their first semester at the university. Other initiatives out of this office include the sponsorship of an honor code for students and education about academic honesty for area high school teachers and students. A strong commitment by central university administration and an integrated approach that encompasses both prevention and correction has proven to improve our culture of honesty over time. 12:10 1:00 PM Lunch (If you requested a special meal, please notify Michael Goodwin at the start of lunch so that your lunch can be brought to you.) 3

4 1:00 PM 1:50 PM Session 3 Dr. Joseph F. Brown; Director of Academic Integrity, Colorado State University The Ramtegrity Campaign Synopsis: Colorado State University s 2016 Academic Integrity Week features a positive norm building campaign called Ramtegrity. Students are encouraged to reflect on how integrity, one of the institution s stated Principles of Community, is an intrinsic part of their identity as a student and developing professional. The week features activities and content designed to bring home the five features of Ramtegrity: A Ram: Does honest work: every time. Interacts boldly and ethically with the ideas of others Chooses integrity even under challenging circumstances Understands that doing the right thing isn t a technical problem, it s a character trait that must be nurtured and practiced. Encourages fellow students to make the right decision and serves as a positive model for other members of the CSU community. The presentation will highlight successes and challenges experienced in Ramtegrity s inaugural norm-building campaign. 1:50 2:00 PM Break 2:00 2:50 PM Session 4 Ms. Carol Coman; Associate Professor and Faculty Co-Adviser: President's Council on Honor and Integrity, California Lutheran University Title & Synopsis: From the Ground Up: Fostering a Culture of Honor and Integrity Synopsis: This presentation builds on literature by our keynote speaker Dr. Gary Pavela, laying out the three levels of building a system of promoting and enforcing academic integrity on a campus. The session will outline steps taken, especially in the case of resistance by faculty and administration, show a 7-minute video created by a student club on campus: The President's Council on Honor and Integrity, and discuss the follow-up plans on campus for an April ICAI SoCal Regional Consortium 4

5 mini-conference. Questions and discussion are welcome throughout the presentation. 2:50 3:00 PM Break 3:00 3:50 Session 5 Dr. Jason Ciejka; Assistant Dean and Director of the Honor Council, Emory College of Arts and Sciences Ms. Blaire Wilson; Assistant Director of the Honor Council, Emory College of Arts and Sciences The Honor Council Practicum: An Approach to Training Students Synopsis: In fall 2016 Emory College of Arts & Sciences introduced a course that offers academic credit each semester for all student members of the Honor Council. Examining not only the procedures for investigating and adjudicating academic integrity cases, the Honor Council practicum addresses recent research in the field of academic integrity as well as broad concepts like due process, student development, and intellectual property. This presentation examines the challenges of designing the course and obtaining faculty approval, the opportunities and complications faced in the classroom, and the benefits of this model of training. 3:50 4:00 Break 4:00 4:50 Session 6 Dr. Katherine Hyatt; Associate Professor & Dean of the McCamish School of Business, Reinhardt University Corporate Codes of Ethics as a Model for University Honor Codes Synopsis: This interactive session discusses how corporate codes of ethics can be used as models for implementing university honor codes. Effective corporate codes of ethics have certain characteristics, are communicated appropriately, are accompanied by training, and become part of the culture of the organization. These elements and strategies can be applied by universities in order to deter cheating and other unethical behaviors. 5

6 Friday, November 18 8:00 9:00 AM Conference Registration & Check-In; Continental Breakfast (If you requested a special meal, please notify Michael Goodwin so that your breakfast can be given to you.) 9:00 9:50 AM Session 7 Mr. Michael A. Goodwin; Director of the International Center for Academic Integrity Southeast Regional Consortium; Assistant Director for Academic Integrity, Kennesaw State University Implementing an Informal Resolution Process for Academic Integrity Violations Synopsis: Kennesaw State University utilizes an informal resolution process for first offense academic integrity violations that allows cooperative students to receive leniency when it comes to sanctioning. Such meetings also serve to educate students on the ethical implications of upholding integrity and frequently provide intervention and assistance to students who need additional support or resources to help them not only avoid future misconduct, but improve their performance as a student. This model has been recognized as a best practice by the International Center for Academic Integrity. Through this presentation, faculty and administrators can learn how to build such a system for their own institutions. 9:50 10:00 AM Break 10:00 10:50 AM Session 8 Ms. Margaret Vienne; Coordinator for Student Conduct and Academic Integrity, University of South Carolina What Academic Misconduct Trends and Proactive Academic Integrity Tools Are In Season? Synopsis: It is hard to stay on top of the latest trends and even more of a challenge to implement meaningful proactive education tools for students. We will discuss the trends we are seeing online and in person with our students, provide an overview of proactive education techniques we have attempted, and discuss linking sanctions to the violation through learning objectives. 6

7 10:50 11:00 AM Break 11:00 11:50 AM Session 9 Ms. Julie Garrett; Part-Time Instructor of English, Kennesaw State University Academic Integrity: How Does Cognitive Load Affect Student Performance? Synopsis: In the era of multimedia learning, we must consider the psycho educational aspect of how digital learning differs from traditional face to face learning. This means not only examining Mayer s cognitive theory of multimedia learning, but also the general cognitive load of students who live in a world of easily accessible information. How do we adapt our teaching to accommodate cognitive load or overload? Can we build a better culture of academic integrity through teaching methods that take cognitive load into consideration? 11:50 AM 1:00 PM Lunch (If you requested a special meal, please notify Michael Goodwin at the start of lunch so that your lunch can be brought to you.) 1:00 1:50 PM Session 10 Dr. Teddi Fishman; Former Director of the International Center for Academic Integrity Keeping it Real: Authenticity and Improvisation in the Service of Integrity Synopsis: This session will explore ways of using techniques borrowed from improvisational comedy to jump-start experiential and authentic learning while promoting academic integrity. 1:50 PM 2:00 PM Break 7

8 2:00 3:00 PM Keynote Speech Dr. Gary Pavela; Co-Founder of the International Center for Academic Integrity Protecting and Promoting Academic Integrity Synopsis: Dr. Pavela will explore key points about how to foster a culture of integrity, including an examination of contract cheating as a growing problem in academia. He will then engage the audience in discussion on this issue so that attendees can share their own experiences and insights. Attendees are encouraged to read the following documents ahead of this presentation: Advice From Students to Faculty Members on Protecting Academic Integrity ( Human Beings Are Built for Cooperation Grounded in Trust ( AIS Resource: Academic Integrity and Engagement in Learning ( xuun3hmsbuuo/edit) 8