University of Oregon College of Education School Psychology Program Internship Handbook

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1 University of Oregon College of Education School Psychology Program Internship Handbook School Psychology Program Website

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction... 3 Scope and Breadth of Internship Experience... 3 Clock Hour Requirement... 4 Supervision Requirements... 4 Written Internship Plan... 5 Required Reports for M.S. Students... 6 Remuneration... 6 How Do Students Find Internships?... 7 Master s and Doctoral Internships: Established School Psychology Internship Sites... 7 Master s and Doctoral Internships: Other School-Related Internships... 7 Research, Leadership, or Other Specialized Experiences... 8 Prior Approval Required... 8 Credit Registration... 8 Remediation Contracts Evaluation Forms Log for Internship Hours Quarterly Evaluation of Professional Behavior Intern Evaluation Form Report/Product Cover Sheet Special Education Evaluation Rubric BIP Evaluation Rubric Case Study Evaluation Form Tips for Preparing Case Study... 44

3 School Psychology Program College of Education Internship Handbook Laura Lee McIntyre, PhD, BCBA-D Professor& Internship Coordinator, School Psychology Program 5208 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR Phone: Fax: Revised August, 2017 Introduction Internship is a capstone experience for school psychology graduate students and typically occurs during Year 3 for master s students and during Year 5 for doctoral students. Because the internship is an integral part of students professional development, the time and effort spent prior to the internship year in planning and preparing for internship may pay a critical dividend during internship training. A positive internship experience at an excellent training site can help facilitate students career trajectories. On the other hand, students may be disappointed and frustrated with marginal training sites that do little to enhance their professional development. This handbook has been prepared to help students in the University of Oregon (UO) School Psychology Program plan and prepare for their internship year and complete program internship requirements. This handbook is designed for both master s and doctoral students in the program. Please direct questions about internship to the School Psychology Program s Internship Coordinator, Dr. Laura Lee McIntyre. Scope and Breadth of Internship Experience Internship should provide students with a broad and in-depth training experience to sharpen and refine the professional skills acquired through coursework and practicum experiences, and to assist in the acquisition of the skills needed to be an independent professional. The type and level of professional practice in which students engage as an intern should be consistent with the aims of the UO School Psychology Program. We publicly refer to our program as being behaviorally-oriented, and prevention and intervention-focused. We consider ourselves to be a progressive program, and we do not consider regressive or archaic models of school psychology practice, such as working exclusively in a test and place model, to be appropriate internship experiences for our students. It is also important to remember that the internship should be a training experience, not just a work experience. Thus, we expect that interns will have sufficient opportunities for professional learning (such as mentoring, workshops, seminars, colloquia, research, observation of senior staff), and that interns will not be given the regular workload of a full-time psychologist. The internship must be distinct and clearly unique from a student s prior practica and fieldwork experiences. Students are encouraged to pursue internship experiences in systems other than where they completed their practicum training requirements. If a student desires to conduct part or all of their internship within a local school district where they have completed prior practicum training,

4 4 then the internship plan must make clear how the internship provides the student with a unique advanced professional training experience. Because of difficulties providing appropriate supervision and because of other inherent conflicts, University-based GE positions are typically not appropriate for satisfying the non-school portion of an internship. Clock Hour Requirement Master s students must complete a minimum of 1200 clock hours of supervised internship training, which is the equivalent of about 33 to 34 clock hours per week over the course of a typical 36 week public school year. This clock hour requirement is based on the NASP internship training standards for specialist-level programs. It is expected that all master s students will complete school-based internships in P-12 settings, with a minimum of 600 hours in school settings. Doctoral students must complete a minimum of 1500 clock hours of supervised internship experience. These clock hour requirements are based on the APA, APPIC, and NASP training and accreditation standards. The completion of 1500 hours usually requires 10 or more months. Some internships may require more than 1500 clock hours. APPIC sites that require 2000 clock hours over months are not unusual. As a general rule, doctoral students must complete at least 600 internship hours in a school setting, meaning that if doctoral students do not complete internship exclusively in a school setting, they may accept an internship in a consortium, clinic, hospital, research center, administrative/leadership setting, and so forth, so long as they have made arrangements to conduct at least 600 hours of the internship in a school setting. There is an exception to this rule: doctoral students who have previously earned a master s/specialist degree in school psychology including a 1,200 school-based internship (or who have subsequent full-time experience working as a school psychologist) may do their predoctoral internship in any appropriate setting, without having to comply with the 600 hour rule. Although the internship experience is typically completed on a full-time basis corresponding to a traditional academic year or slightly longer, both NASP and APA internship standards allow for the internship to be completed on a half-time basis over the course of two academic years. Supervision Requirements Because our doctoral program is APA-accredited and NASP-approved and our master s program is NASP-approved, we adhere to the training guidelines of these organizations. Nowhere are these guidelines more specific and critical than in the area of supervision. Please note the following supervision requirements for internships: The internship must be conducted under the direct supervision of a field or site supervisor who is primarily responsible for the intern s work, and who 1. Is a licensed or certified school psychologist 2. Holds a doctoral degree in school psychology or a closely related field (doctoral students) or a minimum of a master s or specialist degree (master s students) 3. Has at least two years of prior professional experience at the internship site For doctoral students only: Our program does not mandate that field supervisors be board-licensed psychologists, so long as they have the appropriate education agency license or certificate to practice

5 5 as a school psychologist, a doctoral degree in psychology, and their credentials are appropriate for practice and supervision in the particular setting in which they supervise. It is important to note that students will not be able to count the internship experience as supervised experience for psychology board licensure if the field supervisor is not board-licensed. Students who intend to pursue board licensure as a psychologist in the future are strongly advised to only consider internship sites where field supervisors are board-licensed (all APPIC and APA accredited sites meet this criterion). If doctoral students complete a non-appic internship, they may wish to arrange supervision by a board-licensed psychologist as part of the internship experience. Master s and doctoral students must receive a minimum of two hours per week of direct, individual, face-to-face supervision with their field supervisors that is focused on the professional services students are providing as interns, as well as overall progress and performance in the internship training. It is acceptable to split the individual supervision arrangements between two different supervisors, so long as this arrangement is part of the written internship plan (see below for a description of the written internship plan). In addition to the individual supervision requirement, doctoral students must receive an additional two hours per week of structured, supervised didactic training. These additional two hours of training may occur in several forms, including: group supervision and case staffing meetings, seminars, workshops, observation of supervisory staff providing services, or other appropriate and approved activities that are conducted under supervision and are part of the student s written internship plan. It is generally not appropriate for UO School Psychology Program faculty to provide field or site supervision for students internship training. Such supervision is the responsibility of the organization that sponsors the internship. Written Internship Plan The intern, in conjunction with their on-site supervisor, develops an internship plan that specifies objectives, goals, and activities to complete during the internship year and during specific academic quarters. The program s Internship Coordinator gives final approval to the internship plan, which must be submitted to the Internship Coordinator, signed by the field supervisor and intern, no later than the first week of internship or the beginning of Fall quarter classes, whichever is first. For students completing APPIC internships, contracts may be submitted to the Internship Coordinator within 1-week of the commencement of their internship. The written internship plan is different from an employment contract, which is usually issued by the employing agency, and specifies conditions of the appointment rather than the types of activities in which the intern will be engaged. Each internship plan or contract should be unique and individualized according to the training interests of the intern, the opportunities, rotations, and demands of the internship site, and the specific assignment of the field supervisor. There is no language template that all internship plans must follow. All internship plans must include information on the following (please place this information in separate sections with appropriate headings): General description of internship site General goals for the internship year Specific goals for each academic quarter if rotations or placements change (especially true of APPIC internship sites)

6 6 Specific, quantifiable objectives for the internship (e.g., types of services provided, populations and problems to gain expertise with, activities to engage in) Supervision; who will provide supervision (name, degree, professional licenses held e.g., TSPC license, NCSP, psychology licensure), hours of supervision per week, and types of supervision (e.g., individual, group) Specification of educational or training components of the internship, such as supervision, groups, in-service training opportunities, research opportunities, etc. If applicable, specification of how much time per week will be released from service activities to allow the intern to work on their thesis or dissertation research A statement regarding procedures and timelines for evaluation of the intern s performance An Internship Plan Addendum should be submitted to the Internship Coordinator for students completing internships with multiple rotations (e.g., two 6-month rotations). At the beginning of the student s second rotation, an addendum to the Internship Plan should be submitted to the Internship Coordinator that reflects additional information regarding the intern s training goals, objectives, activities, and supervision. Sample internship plans may be viewed by contacting the program s Internship Coordinator. Required Reports for M.S. Students All master s students will prepare and submit three separate reports during the internship year: (1) a case study based on the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) requirements for the NCSP, (2) a behavior intervention plan, and a (3) special education evaluation. These reports are due no later than Tuesday of finals week during spring quarter of internship and submitted to the Internship Coordinator via Tk20. NCSP Case Study. The case study describes an actual case that has been completed by the intern using systematic and structured problem-solving procedures. The case study is evaluated using NCSP case study criteria and is designed to provide a structured opportunity for interns to demonstrate knowledge and skills in behavioral problem solving that lead to enhanced schoolage student outcome. Tips for completing the case study and the evaluation rubric can be found in Appendix A. Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP). The BIP is completed for a school-age student experiencing behavior problems and in need of additional supports and interventions. The BIP is based on a functional behavioral assessment that includes a combination of indirect and direct assessment data, specifies the target behavior as part of a competing behavior pathway, and identifies appropriate interventions that are function-based and have contextual fit. The Behavior Intervention Plan is evaluated using a standard evaluation rubric (see Appendix A). Special Education Evaluation. The Special Education Evaluation is completed for a school-age student. Interns conduct comprehensive psychoeducational assessments as appropriate for the referral questions, integrate data, and make recommendations based on ethical codes and educational law in consultation. The Special Education Evaluation is evaluated using a standard evaluation rubric (see Appendix A). Remuneration

7 7 Internship experiences are typically paid with a stipend or salary. We do not encourage or advise our students to accept unpaid internships. There is great variability in compensation for interns. Both master s and doctoral interns in school psychology may occasionally receive a stipend of.50 to.75 of what an entry level psychologist at that site would earn. In some cases, internship stipends may be the same as full-time staff members, and include fringe benefits. The stipend for APPIC internships are often less than school-based internship stipends. The specific terms of financial and other remuneration for the internship experience are between the intern and the employing agency. The more flexibility you have geographically, the more likely it will be that you find an internship that not only provides good training, but also a reasonable stipend. How Do Students Find Internships? The primary means of locating an internship in school psychology are noted in this section. Be aware that the procedures for master s and doctoral internships differ significantly in some respects. Doctoral Internships: The APPIC System The Association of Psychological Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) serves as the largest clearinghouse for psychology internships. The APPIC website at contains extensive information on the application process, accredited internship sites, timelines, etc. Most students in clinical and counseling psychology doctoral programs use the APPIC application process exclusively in their search for an internship. Although many APPIC and APA accredited internship sites are not appropriate for school psychology students (because they focus exclusively on adult populations or do not include a school or educational component), there are many APPIC sites that are appropriate, including children s hospitals, child guidance centers, community mental health organizations, some public school districts, and some consortiums that include a public school rotation within their training experience. APPIC internship sites have undergone a rigorous accreditation procedure, and follow established guidelines for selection and training of interns. APPIC internship sites require completion of a uniform application, which is available on their website and requires a detailed accounting of prior practicum experiences. APPIC sites usually accept applications during the Fall months (with an early November deadline), interview applicants in early Winter, and make selection decisions in February using a computer-matching process. As a general rule, all APA-accredited internship sites are also accredited by APPIC and are part of the APPIC system, but not all APPIC internships are APA-accredited. Master s and Doctoral Internships: Established School Psychology Internship Sites Although most school psychology internship sites are not formally accredited through the APPIC/APA system, there are many sites around the country that have established internship programs. Sites such as these may have a long history of training school psychology interns, and are more likely to have created training experiences that provide excellent supervision and opportunities for professional development. There is no central clearinghouse for identifying these sites, who may recruit at the NASP convention, advertise in the NASP Communique, send announcements to university training programs, or simply rely on referrals from school psychology faculty. Application deadlines for these types of internship sites tend to be in Winter, with selection decisions in March or April. Keep in mind that sites vary with regard to application deadlines and timelines for selection decisions, with some occurring much earlier or later.

8 8 Master s and Doctoral Internships: Other School-Related Internships Although our strong preference is for UO School Psychology students to accept internships only at established internship training sites, many public school districts do not have established internship training programs, but are willing to consider hiring interns for their school psychology staff positions. Some sites will consider interns for any open school psychology position, whereas others will create specific internship positions. There is substantial variation among these types of sites. Some provide outstanding internship training, supervision, and professional development, whereas others simply view the intern as another (lower paid) employee, and do not provide adequate supervision and support. Like school districts in general, there is a wide variety of types of experiences to be had. Some places have a progressive model of school psychology, and others are test-and-place mills. Some school districts will pay interns on the regular professional salary scale, while others will expect the intern to work for free. The message here is: caveat emptor (buyer beware)! If students select an internship through this route, make sure that it will meet not only the program s requirements for supervision and training, but student expectations as well. Research, Leadership, or Other Specialized Experiences Doctoral students who have arranged at least a half-time (600 hour minimum) internship in a school setting may fulfill the remainder of their internship hours by concurrently working in a research role at a research center (such as Center on Teaching and Learning, Prevention Science Institute, Oregon Research Institute, Oregon Social Learning Center) in a leadership/administrative role in an educational agency such as a school district, regional educational laboratory, or state department of education. Other types of non-traditional roles are also possible. These types of appointments are usually individually-developed by the intern. Supervision requirements apply to these sites as well as traditional school psychology sites. It is not appropriate for students to work on their own for this part of an individualized internship experience (i.e., as a private consultant or in a private practice); they must be connected to an established agency, group, or practice. Note that this practice of split internships (half-time at two different sites) is possible, but that it has unique challenges, and in most cases is not recommended as the best option. Keep in mind that if students choose to fulfill a portion of their internship hours in a research role, there may be implications for licensure or certification. The decision about whether a portion of internship hours may be fulfilled in this fashion should be made in consultation with the UO Internship Coordinator and the student s advisor. Prior Approval Required With the exception of doctoral internships that are part of the APPIC system and include a school training component, all internships in the UO School Psychology program are subject to the prior approval of the Internship Coordinator. Once students receive an internship offer, students should contact the Internship Coordinator immediately to discuss the conditions of the internship and make sure it is appropriate. Credit Registration Our program requires interns to earn a minimum of 9 credit hours of internship-related coursework. MS students register for 3 credits of SPSY 704 School Psychology Internship during fall, winter, and spring quarters of their internship year. PhD students may earn 8 of their 9 credit hours of internship by registering for SPSY 605 (Reading in Pre-Internship Planning) during the year prior to completing

9 9 their doctoral internship. PhD students must register for a minimum of 1 credit of SPSY 704 School Psychology Internship during the final term of their internship. Students who choose to complete the internship requirement over a two-year period on a half-time basis must still register for 3 credits each term they are on the internship. This requirement means that students who do the internship in this manner may be required to complete 18 credits of SPSY 704 Internship. Students must follow the program requirements for direct face-to-face supervision (2 hours per week minimum), even if they are only at the internship sites 20 hours per week over a twoyear period of time. The amount of effort required by the program to monitor and evaluate the internship is the same each quarter regardless of whether the internship is completed on a half-time of full-time basis. SPSY 704 Internship registration is currently offered on a letter grade basis only, without a Pass/No Pass option. Internship Evaluation Process An Intern s performance is evaluated throughout the quarter, quarterly, and annually using multiple processes and products. The internship evaluation process is primarily between the student and the on-site supervisor, and it is not appropriate for UO faculty to serve as field supervisors for internship work. A beginning of the year conference between the intern and the program s Internship Coordinator must be held during fall term of the internship year. This conference may be conducted in-person, via telephone, or through other telecommunications (e.g., Skype). In addition, a conference between the intern, the supervisor, and the program s Internship Coordinator must be held mid-term during each academic quarter that the intern is completing internship requirements. This conference is for the purpose of facilitating communication between the program and the internship site, ensuring that program standards and requirements are being met, and to support any consultation or problemsolving that is necessary for the student to have a successful experience. The mid-term conference may be conducted as a three-way conference call, a video conference, or an in-person meeting. The mid-term conference is scheduled sometime during weeks 4, 5, or 6 of the UO academic term. It is the responsibility of the intern to work with his or her supervisor and the program s Internship Coordinator to arrange a time and place for the conference. In addition to supervisory meetings throughout the quarter, on-site supervisors meet at the end of each quarter with the intern to complete and review evaluation forms. All evaluation forms must be received by the School Psychology Program Internship Coordinator (via the Tk20 online portal) by the second day of finals week each quarter. Summer term internship evaluation forms must be received by the Internship Coordinator (via Tk20) no later than Tuesday of the 8 th week of summer session. The specific due dates for each quarter are communicated by the Internship Coordinator to interns. The Internship Coordinator reviews all internship evaluation materials, assigns grades, and is responsible for organizing the involved professionals to settle any disagreements. Grades are assigned on the basis of supervisor evaluations, quality of internship assignments, adequate progress completing goals and objectives associated with the internship experience, including number of hours of internship experience and supervision. Interns and their field supervisors are required to submit the materials listed below to the UO School Psychology Internship Coordinator (via the Tk20 online portal) at the end of each academic quarter of the internship, no later than the second day of finals week for that quarter. These materials will be considered when assigning a letter grade to the intern:

10 10 A completed UO Quarterly Intern Professional Behavior Evaluation form signed/electronically verified by the intern s site supervisor A completed Intern Evaluation Form signed/electronically verified by the intern s site supervisor. A log of the intern s clock hours, broken down by appropriate service and training categories, and signed/electronically verified by the intern s site supervisor. Other relevant materials, such as any evaluation notes, summary letters, or internship site evaluation forms (if applicable). These materials need not be submitted via Tk20. supervisor should complete and submit Evaluation Forms during winter and spring terms. For the final term of internship, a log of the intern s clock hours (preferably a cumulative weekly log), broken down by appropriate service and training categories, and signed/electronically verified by the intern s site supervisor. M.S. students are required to submit a Special Education Evaluation, Behavior Intervention Plan, and a full NASP/NCSP case study with supporting documents by finals week of the final terms of internship. Supporting documentation should include a Microsoft Excel file with baseline and intervention data on the school-aged student s learning or behavior, to enable calculation of a standardized effect size (recommended by NASP). The specification of the target behavior and associated operational definition should be included with the Excel file. Remediation Contracts Should there be areas of weakness or concern in an intern's skills or performance, the intern, the onsite supervisor, and the program s Internship Coordinator may develop a remediation contract. A Program Co-Director and the intern s advisor must be notified and may work in cooperation with the Internship Coordinator and on-site supervisor to determine appropriate goals and actions to take. This contract may include more on-site supervised activity or hours. The program s Internship Coordinator and field supervisors must approve any remediation activity that would require school fieldwork opportunities. The contract will specify how the remediation objectives will be accomplished and evaluated, as well as a timeline. The university will withhold internship grades until this plan is fulfilled to the satisfaction of all parties. Although each situation will be considered individually and remedial activities may be pursued, receiving a failing grade for internship may result in a student s termination from the UO School Psychology Program. Evaluation Forms See Appendix A

11 11 Appendix A Evaluation Forms Log for internship hours Quarterly intern professional behavior evaluation form Intern evaluation form Report Cover Sheet (M.S. students) Special Education Evaluation rubric (M.S. students) Behavior Intervention Plan evaluation rubric (M.S. students) Case study evaluation form (M.S. students) Tips for preparing your case study (M.S. students)

12 12 UNIVERSITY OF OREGON SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM Log for Internship Hours Student: Internship Site: Field Supervisor: Academic Year: Quarter and Year of Current Evaluation Period: Directions: Complete this form at the end of each quarter (based on the UO academic calendar), and submit it with your internship professional behavior evaluation form by the specified due date. Record your internship activities in clock hour units using the general categories on this form. You should also keep (for your own records) a separate detailed log of your internship hours that is updated on a weekly basis and is designed to reflect your specific internship activities. Use the summer record columns only if your internship goes beyond a traditional 10 month academic year of mid-august through mid-june. ACTIVITY SUMMER FALL WINTER SPRING SUMMER Screening and assessment, individual Screening and assessment, group Direct intervention, individual Direct intervention, group Systems-level assessment and intervention Consultation: parents, teachers, other professionals Attend team meetings and staffings Collaborate with community agencies Provide in-service training Preparation time, file reviews, report writing, etc. Professional development activities Research and program evaluation Supervision Other (specify): Other (specify): Other (specify): TOTAL CLOCK HOURS Cumulative Clock Hours to date for internship year: intern s signature date field supervisor s signature date

13 Quarterly INTERN Professional Behavior Evaluation Form University of Oregon School Psychology Program Revised August, STUDENT: FIELD SUPERVISOR: INTERNSHIP SITE: QUARTER AND YEAR OF INTERNSHIP: Supervisor: Evaluate the intern s professional behavior according to these dimensions: UNSATISFACTORY (U): Does not display the required behaviors to the degree necessary for successful employment in schools at this time. MARGINAL (M): Has the necessary behaviors in repertoire but is inconsistent in employing. SATISFACTORY (S): Has the necessary behaviors and employs them appropriately. EXEMPLARY (E): Has the necessary professional behaviors and consistently engages in exemplary conduct appropriate for modeling by other professionals. 1. Evaluate the intern s skill in using existing resources to acquire information necessary to solve problems. U M S E Comments: 2. Evaluate the intern s reaction to feedback concerning her/his work. U M S E Comments: 3. Evaluate the intern s acceptance of responsibility; accepts tasks and assignments and follows through. U M S E Comments: 4. Evaluate the intern s timely performance of assignments: U M S E Comments:

14 5. Evaluate the intern s constructive contribution to group tasks: U M S E 14 Comments: 6. Evaluate the intern s management of professional interpersonal relationships: U M S E Comments: 7. Evaluate the intern s soliciting feedback from others regarding his/her own work: U M S E Comments: 8. Evaluate the intern s ability to assume leadership roles: U M S E Comments: 9. Evaluate the intern s progress towards independence as a school psychologist: U M S E Comments: Internship Clock Hours Logged: This quarter Total internship hours to date: FIELD SUPERVISOR S SIGNATURE/DATE: / INTERN S SIGNATURE/DATE: / UNIVERSITY SUPERVISOR S SIGNATURE/DATE: / After completing this evaluation form, discussing it with the intern, and including signatures of both the field supervisor and the intern, please mail or fax the completed form to: Laura Lee McIntyre, Ph.D., Internship Coordinator, School Psychology Program, 5208 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR Fax: A PDF scan of the completed form may be ed to

15 University of Oregon School Psychology Intern Evaluation Form 15 Intern s Name Date: District On-Site Supervisor s Name University Coordinator s Name: Internship Term: Fall Winter Final Directions: For the domains in which direct supervision has occurred, rate the intern s knowledge and skills by putting a check in the rating column that represents your judgment based upon the intern s functioning at this stage of learning. If an item is not applicable, check that column. Use the following rubric for rating knowledge and then for rating skills: # Initial Category Meaning In the assessed domain, the intern: - NA Not Applicable Has not yet engaged in activities. (Use only in formative evaluation.) 1 NC Not Competent Is incompetent in activities at this time. (A remediation plan must be developed.) 2 NS Needs Supervision Is not yet independent in knowledge and/or skills (may be necessary in formative evaluation). 3 EC Entry-level Competence Is knowledgeable about the area, can plan and conduct tasks sufficiently with scheduled supervision sessions.* 4 AC Advanced Competence Can perform most tasks independently and needs only routine supervision. 5 ExC Exceptional Competence Is competent in tasks at an independent level, with supervision for difficult cases (depth of supervision varies). * All interns must be at least at Entry-level Competence in all domains by the end of the internship in order to pass internship. Then give evidence for your rating and, and on those areas where required, indicate how the intern has had a positive impact on children, families, or schools by his or her competence in this domain. Examples of evidence for your rating include: effectively uses data from WISC-IV, WIAT-III, etc. in the assessment to make recommendations for educational programming; provides a well-organized and delivered in-service training on behavior management; etc. Examples of evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school include: reduction in discipline referrals from 20 a week to 1 a month; grades in class improved from F s to B s; parent stated that the child is doing better in school than he ever has since the intern s recommendation for the behavioral plan was implemented; teacher indicated that she is using some of the techniques that the intern presented in the in-service training. *Adapted from University of Houston-Clear Lake s Assessment Four

16 Standard II/Domain 2.1: Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability Knowledge: Extent to which the intern has knowledge of NA NC NS EC AC ExC Assessment and data collection methods relevant to a comprehensive, systematic process of effective decision making and problem solving for particular situations, contexts, and diverse characteristics Varied methods of assessment and data collection in psychology and education (e.g., norm-referenced, curriculum-based, direct behavior analysis, ecological) and their psychometric properties Assessment and data collection methods useful in identifying strengths and needs and in documenting problems of children, families, and schools Strategies for translating assessment and data collection to development of effective instruction, interventions, and educational and mental health services Assessment and data collection methods to measure response to, progress in, and effective outcomes of services Overall Rating of Standard II: Knowledge Evidence for your rating: 16 Skills: Extent to which the intern exhibits the following skills NA NC NS EC AC ExC Use psychological and educational assessment, data collection strategies, and technology resources as part of a comprehensive process of effective decision making and problem solving that permeates all aspects of service delivery Systematically collect data and other information about individuals, groups, and environments as key components of professional school psychology practice Translate assessment and data collection results into design, implementation, and accountability for evidence-based instruction, interventions, and educational and mental health services effective for particular situations, contexts, and diverse characteristics Use assessment and data collection methods to evaluate response to, progress in, and outcomes for services in order to promote improvement and effectiveness Access information and technology resources to enhance data collection and decision making Measure and document effectiveness of their own services for children, families, and schools Overall Rating of Standard II: Skills Evidence for your rating: Evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school:

17 Standard III/Domain 2.2: Consultation and Collaboration Knowledge: Extent to which the intern has knowledge of NA NC NS EC AC ExC Varied methods of consultation in psychology and education (e.g., behavioral, problem solving, mental health, organizational, instructional) applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems Strategies to promote collaborative, effective decision making and implementation of services among professionals, families, and others Consultation, collaboration, and communication strategies effective across situations, contexts, and diverse characteristics Methods for effective consultation and collaboration that link home, school, and community settings Overall Rating of Standard III: Knowledge Evidence for your rating: 17 Skills: Extent to which the intern exhibits the following skills Apply consultation methods, collaborate, and communicate effectively with others as part of a comprehensive process that permeates all aspects of service delivery Consult and collaborate in planning, problem solving, and decision-making processes and to design, implement, and evaluate instruction, interventions, and educational and mental health services across particular situations, contexts, and diverse characteristics Consult and collaborate at the individual, family, group, and systems levels Facilitate collaboration and communication among diverse school personnel, families, community professionals, and others Effectively communicate information for diverse audiences, for example, parents, teachers, other school personnel, policy makers, community leaders, and/or others Promote application of psychological and educational principles to enhance collaboration and achieve effectiveness in provision of services Overall Rating of Standard III: Skills Evidence for your rating: NA NC NS EC AC ExC Evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school:

18 Standard IV, Element 4.1/Domain 2.3: Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills Knowledge: Extent to which the intern has knowledge of NA NC NS EC AC ExC Biological, cultural, and social influences on cognitive and academic skills Human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes, including processes of typical development, as well as those related to learning and cognitive difficulties, across diverse situations, contexts, and characteristics Evidence-based methods in psychology and education to promote cognitive and academic skills, including those related to needs of children with diverse backgrounds and characteristics Curriculum and instructional strategies that facilitate children s academic achievement, including, for example, teacher-directed instruction, literacy instruction, peer tutoring, interventions for self regulation and planning/ organization, etc. Techniques to assess learning and instruction and methods and technology resources for using data in decision making, planning, and progress monitoring Information and assistive technology resources to enhance children s cognitive and academic skills Overall Rating of Element 4.1: Knowledge Evidence for your rating: 18 Skills: Extent to which the intern exhibits the following skills NA NC NS EC AC ExC Use assessment and data collection methods to develop appropriate academic goals for children with diverse abilities, disabilities, backgrounds, strengths, and needs Implement services to achieve academic outcomes, including classroom instructional support, literacy strategies, home school collaboration, instructional consultation, and other evidence-based practices Use evidence-based strategies to develop and implement services at the individual, group, and systems levels and to enhance classroom, school, home, and community factors related to children s cognitive and academic skills Implement methods to promote intervention acceptability and fidelity and appropriate data-based decision making procedures, monitor responses of children to instruction and intervention, and evaluate the effectiveness of services Overall Rating of Element 4.1 Skills Evidence for your rating: Evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school:

19 Standard IV, Element 4.2/Domain 2.3: Interventions & Mental Health Services to Develop Social & Life Skills Knowledge: Extent to which the intern has knowledge of NA NC NS EC AC ExC Biological, cultural, social, and situational influences on behavior and mental health and behavioral and emotional impacts on learning, achievement, and life skills Human developmental processes related to social emotional skills and mental health, including processes of typical development, as well as those related to psychopathology and behavioral issues, across diverse situations, contexts, and characteristics Evidence-based strategies to promote social emotional functioning and mental health Strategies in social emotional, behavioral, and mental health services that promote children s learning, academic, and life skills, including, for example, counseling, behavioral intervention, social skills interventions, instruction for self-monitoring, etc. Techniques to assess socialization, mental health, and life skills and methods and technology resources for using data in decision making, planning, and progress monitoring Overall Rating of Element 4.2 Knowledge Evidence for your rating: 19 Skills: Extent to which the intern exhibits the following skills NA NC NS EC AC ExC Use assessment and data collection methods to develop appropriate social emotional, behavioral, and mental health goals for children with diverse abilities, disabilities, backgrounds, strengths, and needs Implement services to achieve outcomes related to socialization, learning, and mental health, including, for example, counseling, consultation, behavioral intervention, home school collaboration, and other evidence-based practices Integrate behavioral supports and mental health services with academic and learning goals for children Use evidence-based strategies to develop and implement services at the individual, group, and/or systems levels and to enhance classroom, school, home, and community factors related to children s mental health, socialization, and learning Implement methods to promote intervention acceptability and fidelity and appropriate data-based decision making procedures, monitor responses of children to behavioral and mental health services, and evaluate the effectiveness of services Overall Rating of Element 4.2 Skills Evidence for your rating: Evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school:

20 Standard V, Element 5.1/Domain 2.5: School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning Knowledge: Extent to which the intern has knowledge of NA NC NS EC AC ExC School and systems structure, school organization, general education, special education, and alternative educational services across diverse settings Psychological and educational principles and research related to organizational development and systems theory Issues and needs in schools, communities, and other settings, including accountability requirements; local, state, and federal policies and regulations; and technology resources Evidence-based school practices that promote academic outcomes, learning, social development, and mental health; prevent problems; and ensure positive and effective school organization and climate across diverse situations, contexts, and characteristics Overall Rating of Element 5.1 Knowledge Evidence for your rating: 20 Skills: Extent to which the intern exhibits the following skills NA NC NS EC AC ExC Design and implement evidence-based practices and policies in, for example, areas such as discipline, instructional support, staff training, school improvement activities, program evaluation, student transitions at all levels of schooling, grading, home school partnerships, etc. Utilize data-based decision making and evaluation methods, problem-solving strategies, consultation, technology resources, and other services for systemslevel issues, initiatives, and accountability responsibilities Create and maintain effective and supportive learning environments for children and others within a multi-tiered continuum of school-based services Develop school policies, regulations, services, and accountability systems to ensure effective services for all children Overall Rating of Element 5.1 Skills Evidence for your rating: Evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school:

21 Standard V, Element 5.2/Domain 2.6: Preventive and Responsive Services Knowledge: Extent to which the intern has knowledge of NA NC NS EC AC ExC Psychological and educational principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health Methods of population-based service delivery in schools and communities to support prevention and timely intervention related to learning, mental health, school climate and safety, and physical well-being across diverse situations, contexts, and characteristics Universal, selected, and indicated (i.e., primary, secondary, and tertiary) prevention strategies at the individual, family, group, and/or systems levels related to learning, mental health, and physical well-being Evidence-based strategies for effective crisis prevention, preparation, and response Overall Rating of Element 5.2 Knowledge Evidence for your rating: 21 Skills: Extent to which the intern exhibits the following skills NA NC NS EC AC ExC Promote environments, contexts, and services for children that enhance learning, mental and physical well-being, and resilience through protective and adaptive factors and that prevent academic problems, bullying, violence, and other risks Use assessment and data collection methods to develop appropriate goals for and to evaluate outcomes of prevention and response activities and crisis services Contribute to, design, implement, and/or evaluate prevention programs that integrate home, school, and community resources and promote learning, mental health, school climate and safety, and physical well-being of all children and families Contribute to, design, implement, and/or evaluate services for crisis prevention, preparation, response, and recovery at the individual, family, and systems levels and that take into account diverse needs and characteristics Utilize data-based decision making methods, problem-solving strategies, consultation, collaboration, and direct and indirect services for preventive and responsive services to promote learning and mental health and for crisis services Overall Rating of Element 5.2 Skills Evidence for your rating: Evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school:

22 Standard VI/Domain 2.7: Family School Collaboration Services Knowledge: Extent to which the intern has knowledge of NA NC NS EC AC ExC Characteristics of families, family strengths and needs, family culture, and family school interactions that impact children s development Psychological and educational principles and research related to family systems and their influences on children s academic, motivational, social, behavioral, mental health, and social characteristics Evidence-based strategies to improve outcomes for children by promoting collaboration and partnerships among parents, schools, and community agencies, and by increasing family involvement in education Methods that improve family functioning and promote children s learning, social development, and mental health, including, for example, parent consultation, conjoint consultation, home school collaboration, and other evidence-based practices Overall Rating of Standard VI Knowledge Evidence for your rating: 22 Skills: Extent to which the intern exhibits the following skills NA NC NS EC AC ExC Design and implement evidence-based practices and policies that facilitate family school partnerships and interactions with community agencies to enhance academic, learning, social, and mental health outcomes for all children Identify diverse cultural issues, situations, contexts, and other factors that have an impact on family school interactions and address these factors when developing and providing services for families Utilize data-based decision making, evaluation methods, problem-solving strategies, consultation, communication, and direct and indirect services to enhance family school community effectiveness in addressing the needs of children Design, implement, and evaluate education programs and other types of services that assist parents with promoting the academic and social behavioral success of their children and addressing issues and concerns Overall Rating of Standard VI Skills Evidence for your rating: Evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school:

23 Standard VII/Domain 2.8: Diversity in Development and Learning Knowledge: Extent to which the intern has knowledge of NA NC NS EC AC ExC Individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics of people in settings in which school psychologists work Psychological and educational principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences (e.g., age, gender or gender identity, cognitive capabilities, social emotional skills, developmental level, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, sexual and gender orientation, disability, chronic illness, language, socioeconomic status) Evidence-based practices in psychology and education to enhance services for children and families and in schools and communities and effectively address potential influences related to diversity Strategies for addressing diversity factors in design, implementation, and evaluation of all services Overall Rating of Standard VII Knowledge Evidence for your rating: 23 Skills: Extent to which the intern exhibits the following skills NA NC NS EC AC ExC Provide effective professional services in data-based decision making, consultation and collaboration, and direct and indirect services for individuals, families, and schools with diverse characteristics, cultures, and backgrounds and across multiple contexts, with recognition that an understanding of and respect for diversity and in development and learning is a foundation for all aspects of service delivery In collaboration with others, address individual differences, strengths, backgrounds, and needs in the design, implementation, and evaluation of services in order to improve academic, learning, social and mental health outcomes for all children across family, school, and community contexts In schools and other agencies, advocate for social justice and recognition that cultural, experiential, linguistic, and other areas of diversity may result in different strengths and needs; promote respect for individual differences; recognize complex interactions between individuals with diverse characteristics; and implement effective methods for all children, families, and schools to succeed Provide culturally competent and effective practices in all areas of school psychology service delivery and in the contexts of diverse individual, family, school, and community characteristics Overall Rating of Standard VII Skills Evidence for your rating: Evidence of positive impact on children, families, or school:

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