Primary School Experience Generic Handbook

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1 Primary School Experience Generic Handbook This document can also be downloaded from our website:

2 School Experience Contact Numbers: [1] Academic Staff Head of School Partnership Jane Evans Head of Education Tony Weaden Head of BA PET Programme Vini Lander Head of PGCE Chris Shelton [2] Administrative Staff a) School Experience Administrators University of Chichester Bognor Regis Campus Upper Bognor Road Bognor Regis, West Sussex PO21 1HR b) Programme Administrators PGCE BA(PET) Cathy McGuigan Glyn Saunders (am) Melanie Hopkins Dan Newton Lyn Brown Fax: E.mail addresses for completed school experience documentation : Any advice or suggestions for improving this guide will be welcomed. All comments should be sent to: Further copies of this document may be accessed via the School Partnership Office website : 2

3 Contents Page 1. Introduction 4 2. Roles and Responsibilities The Student Teacher The Mentor The Class Teacher The Link Tutor Quality Assurance Tutor Academic Adviser External Examiners Resolving Issues Student teacher Entitlement Professionalism The School Experience File Organisation of the Planning and Teaching File Planning Evaluation of Teaching Organisation of Monitoring and Assessment File Development Profile Frequently Asked Questions Planning, Teaching, Assessing and Evaluating Assessment of School Experience Grading student teachers Checking Previous Experience in Schools and Formulating an ITP School Experience Comment Sheets to Accompany Lesson Observations Weekly Self Assessment and Review Sheet Final Assessment of School Experience Review of student teacher Progress Notification of Concern Student teachers with Dyslexia or Weakness in Literacy Failure in School Experience 27 Appendices 29 3

4 1 Introduction Welcome to school experience. This handbook provides the generic information for all Primary school experience placements. The aims and intended learning outcomes for each placement are detailed in the module outlines in Appendix A The expectations for each school experience can be found in the relevant School Experience Requirements and Expectations booklet. This handbook directs student teachers, mentors, class teachers and University tutors towards the main elements of school experience so that they all share a common purpose. The aim is to ensure that all student teachers, wherever they are placed in school, have every opportunity to achieve the highest possible standards of teaching commensurate with the stage they have reached in their training. The Primary Partnership Model at the University of Chichester reflects the close association between schools and the University. It includes briefing meetings, lesson observations by mentors and link tutors both singly and jointly, and review meetings. The diagram below shows how school experience is structured within the programmes. The amount of time dedicated to school experience conforms to the Initial Teacher Training (ITT) Criteria (Teaching Agency 2012) Programme/Year School Experience BA PET Year 1 Autumn Term 12 days Summer Term 20 days BA PET Year 2 Summer Term 30 days Spring Term Special Interest Placement 9 days BA PET Year 3 Spring Term 50 days BA (Hons) KS2/3 Year 1 Autumn Term 12 days Summer Term 20 days BA (Hons) KS2/3 Year 2 Summer Term (Secondary placement) 40 days BA (Hons) KS2/3 Year 3 Spring Term 50 days PGCE Autumn Term 34 days Summer Term 48 days Spring Term Enhanced placement 24 days 4

5 Increasingly in education (including initial teacher education, hereafter ITE) collaborative teaching is being recognised as a valuable means of professional development at all stages (i.e. from student teacher to highly experienced/senior member of staff), with people working together and supporting each other in order to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes. Team teaching, mentoring, peer coaching, joint planning and mutual observation and feedback are increasingly becoming a normal part of school life. The University recognises the benefits of such collaborative approaches by building in opportunities for the majority of primary student teachers - i.e. Year 1 BA PET, Year 1 KS2/3 and Primary PGCE School A student teachers - to undertake a paired placement. It is important to note that all student teachers who complete a paired/collaborative teaching placement will still spend the majority of their total school experience time during their training in individual placement settings. For further details see Appendix B. 2 Roles and Responsibilities All Initial Teacher Education Programmes at University of Chichester are based on the principle of partnership between local schools and the University. Within this partnership colleagues have different but complementary roles and responsibilities. 2.1 The Student Teacher Student teachers are expected to demonstrate commitment to their studies both in the University and in school. They are also expected to demonstrate a responsible and professional attitude to all staff in the University and school, to fellow student teachers and to pupils. During their school experience, it is the student teachers responsibility to ensure that they: Familiarise themselves with the school experience handbook and requirements for the placement; Work to support the aims/principles/ethos/philosophy of the school; Demonstrate a positive professional attitude; Work co-operatively with colleagues, parents and other adults in negotiating the curriculum and care of children in school; Make a full and active contribution to the life of the school in line with current school policies (workforce reform, etc) and course requirements; Communicate with other adults involved in children s education; Demonstrate an ability to reflect on and develop their own practice; Respond professionally to advice from University and school-based colleagues; Display a willingness to learn vis-à-vis their development as a teacher; Organize themselves in relation to the various meeting and paperwork related demands of their specific programme/course; Be punctual and dress appropriately in relation to their school experience; Communicate promptly, clearly and appropriately/professionally with all University and school-based colleagues involved in their training as is necessary, including following the University procedures for notifying colleagues of absence from school experience; 5

6 Follow/ abide, (as they all relate to their conduct during school experience), by - both the school s and the University s Health and Safety requirements / procedures and - University Equal Opportunities/Race Equality policies alongside the Standards as set out in the Teachers Standards (DfE 2012) 2.2 The Mentor The mentor is responsible for guiding and supervising student teachers in all aspects of their teaching during school experience. Mentors are expected to meet weekly with their student teacher to discuss all aspects of school life. They are also expected to observe the student teacher s classroom practice, offer critical feedback and take part in the final assessment review. The mentor may or may not be the student teacher s class teacher. If not, s/he will liaise with the class teacher and others in the school. In specific terms, the mentor's responsibilities will include the following:- attending training sessions and meetings in preparation for the mentoring role including cluster briefings; familiarising themselves with course requirements and ensuring that the school element of the partnership calendar for each experience is followed, including ensuring that the student teacher has an appropriate teaching and administrative load as specified in course documentation and workforce reform requirements; liaising with the headteacher/teacher in charge of student teachers and the University link tutor in supporting and assessing the student, (including carrying out joint observations and assessing the student against the standards with the link tutor); negotiating with other members of staff as necessary; liaising with the link tutor on details regarding their visits to the school; ensuring the student teacher is familiar with whole school issues (as appropriate), including briefing student teachers on school policies, procedures, resources, and support services; supporting student teachers in planning effectively for working with teaching assistants and other adults including liaison with outside agencies; observing and formally assessing student teachers' work during school experience and providing prompt feedback thereafter through debriefing and formal reports on teaching as required in the placement schedule; supporting student teachers with the preparation of planning for teaching and interpretation of schemes of work; ensuring that university procedures are followed in regard to student teachers causing concern; supporting the student teacher in planning and completing school based tasks; assessing the student in collaboration with the link tutor; assisting the student teacher to complete the Standards Tracking Document; supporting the progress and professional development of the student teacher; monitor student teacher absences from school; 6

7 reviewing the student s files working with student teacher, classteacher and link tutor on the completion of all relevant course documentation. Completing and returning school experience evaluation forms to the University; (where appropriate) taking part in the selection and interviewing of candidates; being a good role model for student teachers; agree to support the University in its implementation of its Health and Safety requirements / procedures and all Equal Opportunities/Race Equality policies as they relate to the students experience in schools; 2.3 The Class Teacher The class teacher is responsible for offering the student teacher regular support and guidance while they are in their class. The class teacher s responsibilities will include the following: support the student teacher in the classroom; advise the student teacher on all aspects of their class; provide pupils names and key information on their development; facilitate planning and display work; involve student teachers as far as possible in planning; allow a phased introduction to whole class teaching through group work; ensure that student teachers have effective plans for their teaching; provide informal feedback on sessions/lessons taught by the student teacher ; advise student teachers on matters relating to classroom management; support student teachers in the effective deployment of classroom assistants; check student teachers are aware of available teaching resources within the school; advise student teachers on any matters relating to safety of pupils; liaise closely with the mentor regarding student teacher progress 2.4 The Link Tutor The link tutor is the bridge between the University and the school. Normally, the link tutor will have responsibility for a number of schools and will visit schools at specific points during school experience. Specifically the link tutors should: be fully conversant with and follow all relevant course documentation and programme requirements; through meeting with staff develop an understanding of the ethos/philosophy of the school; be flexible and responsive to school and student teacher needs; ensure that mentors fully understand their responsibilities and understand the requirements of each school experience and the Primary Partnership Agreement generally; 7

8 observe and assess teaching with appropriate formal verbal and written feedback as required in the relevant placement documentation; contribute to the assessment of teaching standards with the school mentor and student teacher; liaise with the mentor(s) and member of staff with overall responsibility for ITE in the school to support and monitor the operation of school experience; plan school visits in advance and in agreement with mentors; review action plans and assessment for each student teacher; provide professional support for the school mentor, class teacher and member of staff with overall responsibility for ITE in the school; deal with issues arising out of placements in school; monitor quality and standards in partner schools in so far as they impact upon the training of teachers and the successful delivery of the Primary Partnership Agreement; report any problems or issues relating to school experience (including issues relating to Health and safety and Equal Opportunities/Race Equality as well as student progress and entitlement) to the headteacher and/or the relevant member of staff with overall responsibility for ITE in the school as well as to the Head of Programme and/or Head of School Partnership; 2.5 Quality Assurance Tutor A Quality Assurance (QA) Team of experienced tutors will be involved in the moderation and assessment of student teachers. They liaise closely with the Head of Programme and Head of School Partnership. The purpose is to monitor standards within the Partnership, often with a particular focus on an aspect of school experience, e.g. addressing the standards relating to pupils for whom English is an additional language; to support link tutors and mentors, and to moderate grades in borderline cases. 2.6 Academic Adviser Student teachers are reminded to attend tutorials and keep their academic adviser informed of their strengths, areas for development and targets for each placement, as well as any problems encountered during the year. They should give their adviser copies of the interim formative assessment sheet and the final profile sheet in order to keep them informed of progress. 2.7 External Examiners External examiners are responsible to the Board of Examiners for reporting on standards within components of a programme. They play an important role in moderating and checking overall standards of programme provision and student teacher performance through visiting schools to see a sample of student teachers. The external examiners for school experience are specifically concerned with standards of professional attributes, professional knowledge and understanding and professional skills such as classroom teaching and the professional development of student teachers in school. It is appropriate, therefore, for the school experience examiners to focus on those aspects of the 8

9 programme that relate to student teachers practical teaching. The main areas for the attention of external examiners in relation to school experience would normally include : 1. Moderating a sample of assessment grades against the Standards; 2. Collecting evidence from a range of sources, particularly: observation of teaching; checking teaching files; discussion with student teacher, class teacher and mentor; 3. Assessing student teacher level of preparation: through the teaching and M&A file and interview; 4. Observing teaching to judge standards of classroom practice; 5. Monitoring the effectiveness of supervision and support by mentors and tutors: through lesson reports and discussion; 6. Confirming all fail grades at the final assessment point in Year 2 and 3 or PGCE B through discussion and scrutiny of paperwork; 7. Providing verbal feedback to student teachers, teachers and tutors/mentors; 8. Submitting an annual report on overall standards at the end of each year. In the case of any difficulty over a student teacher placement in a particular class or school, examiners are asked to report the matter to the Head of School Partnership who will be able to consider an appropriate course of action. Examiners are asked not to refer any such issues directly to the school concerned. 2.8 Resolving Issues What to do if: the student teacher has issues with the school/mentor or class teacher Firstly, student teachers are advised to speak to their link tutor in the first instance to solve issues identified by the student teacher; link tutors are asked to speak to the Head of Programme or the Head of School Partnership if there are difficult issues to resolve; student teachers may discuss issues with their Academic Adviser but in order to resolve issues they must do so via the link tutor. Academic Advisers should direct student teachers to their link tutor, unless of course the issues concern the link tutor, in which case they are advised to speak to the Head of School Partnership and/or Head of Programme. the school, class teacher or mentor have concerns about the student teacher Discuss concerns or issues immediately with the link tutor who will then speak to the student teacher and take appropriate advice from the Head of Programme, or the Head of School Partnership and action accordingly. the school has concerns about the link tutor The mentor is advised to discuss their concerns with the Head of School Partnership. 9

10 2.9 Student Teacher Entitlement A student teacher in school has an entitlement to specific teaching loads and levels of support from the mentor and link tutor. It is necessary to clarify entitlement in this way to ensure that as far as possible students are exposed to comparable opportunities to develop teaching skills. There are five key aspects to entitlement. Students should: be placed in an appropriate age-phase class; receive agreed teaching loads and periods of non-contact time in school; expect full mentor and link tutor support according to that specified in course documents (including the Primary Partnership Agreement); be assessed in accordance with agreed indicative criteria as set out in course documents; not be used to cover the absence of a teacher. What a student may normally expect on school experience is set out in detail in the course documents. Student entitlement may be defined in the following terms: Lesson observations by the mentor: agreed frequency and duration link tutor visits: agreed number of lesson observations and review meetings Written feedback: using pro-formas for all formally observed lessons Review meetings: formative or summative assessment point with clear areas for development being identified Teacher support: given according to the stage in training Class contact time: an agreed % teaching load Non-contact time: an agreed % of time for non-teaching activities 2.10 Professionalism When you are on school experience you are taking the role of a teacher and as such you are expected to behave professionally at all times. This includes: abiding by your school s dress code making sure that you know the times you should be in school, in lessons, in tutor time, and being punctual following the school s absence procedure if for any reason you are unable to attend, and informing the university of your absence demonstrating a professional attitude to all staff and pupils in your school at all times being receptive to feedback offered on your teaching complying with your school s Health and Safety guidelines and making sure you are informed of all items on your Health and Safety checklist at the beginning of your school placement. When you refer to your school experience in your written assignments you must not name individuals, or your school, you should use assumed names or anonymous references 10

11 such as school X. When you carry out research in school, even on a small scale, you must complete an Ethics Form and you must secure the permission of your professional tutor. He/she will want to check, for example, any questionnaire which you intend to use with pupils. You are expected to be fully informed about programme requirements and procedures as well as University regulations. Programme information is supplied in your programme handbook, module handbooks, announcements via and via Moodle. You are reminded that any student who fails school experience against Part Two of the Teachers Standards will be deemed to have failed irrevocably and would not normally be offered a re-sit of school experience. You are reminded that any student who leaves their school placement without discussion with, or permission from, their mentor and/or professional tutor will be deemed to have failed school experience. Professional Communication Part Two of the Teachers Standards state that: A Teacher is expected to demonstrate consistently high standards of personal and professional conduct and that they uphold public trust in the profession and maintain high standards of ethics and behaviour, within and outside school. Appropriate professional communication is a significant aspect of your professional behaviour. As such, you would be expected to uphold high standards of professionalism when communicating about any aspect of your training. We would draw particular attention to the appropriate use of forms of e-communication such as social networking sites like Facebook. Please note that under the University s Academic Regulations conduct considered to be in breach of the accepted standards of the profession for which the student is being prepared is considered to be misconduct which would be investigated as a disciplinary matter. Instances of unprofessional behaviour whilst on school experience would normally result in failure of Part Two of the Teachers Standards and therefore failure of the school experience. 11

12 3 The School Experience File The file is an important working document. It should be available for consultation at all times in school. The file must contain full details of planning, class organisation and assessment and evaluations. It should be noted that the student teacher has ownership of the files and may organise them in a way that best supports their professional development over the school experience. The file acts both as a record of development and as a resource for teaching. It should be detailed and professionally acceptable in style and content. You may wish to keep a separate resources file for teaching resources used. The planning teaching assessment evaluation cycle You should use the diagram below as a guide to help you identify aspects of your teaching which need improvement and development. In order to show your professional development as a teacher evidence needs to be available as tangible proof of your ability to teach and meet the Teachers Standards. Much of this evidence will reside in the planning and teaching file and the monitoring and assessment file. These are very important documents. They are public documents which may need to be seen by the headteacher, class teacher, mentor, link tutor, quality assurance tutor and external examiners. You must ensure that in all aspects professional language is utilised in every aspect. 12

13 Planning, teaching, assessment, evaluation and monitoring Clear and detailed planning is one of the keys to achieving learning in your classroom and promoting progress in children s learning. You should use the diagram below as a guide to help you identify aspects of your teaching which need improvement and development. PLANNING Starts with clear focused learning objectives (LOs) which refer to learning (knowledge, skills, attitudes and understanding which the lesson will develop) and not describe what children will be doing. They are derived from the NC/PNS The learning objectives should be differentiated; this differentiation to meet the learning needs of pupils will shape the classroom organisation, the groups, the deployment of other adults, the resources to be used, the differentiated questions you will ask during the introduction, group work and plenary. The planning also needs to take into account the children s social, cultural, emotional and developmental stage. Think about how you will engage and maintain the interest the pupils. Is there an opportunity to be creative? To use teacher in role? Plan specific timings for the lesson and write them down. The LOs will also determine the assessment/success criteria How will you finish the lesson? What will the purpose of the plenary be? For example The children will learn about change is a poor very broad objective which does not precisely identify the stepping stones or bite-size pieces of specific knowledge/skills/attitudes/ understanding you want the children to achieve at the end of the lesson. A good learning objective needs to be precise, e.g. Children will: Observe and recognise that some materials are changed permanently by heat; Observe and identify that changes in some materials can be reversed; Be able to identify the processes of and use the terms melt/solidify; melt/freeze; Be able to use the terms reversible and irreversible change correctly to identify changes in materials. EVALUATE Review the teaching AND LEARNING. What did the children achieve? Were the LOs met? Were children engaged/enthused/interested? How did this influence learning? Which aspects of the teaching were successful? Why? Less successful? Why? Improvements for next lesson. ASSESS Assessment is the process of gathering evidence for learning and making judgements about achievement/attainment What is going to be assessed? Who is going to assess? How are you going to assess? Every child in every lesson should be assessed in some way? How will you record the outcomes of the assessments? How will you use this assessment information? Who needs to know about the outcomes of the assessment? TEACHING This is a dynamic and really exciting process which depends on good planning, the communication and maintenance of high standards. It is not just a case of following the planning rigidly. It has to be responsive to the needs of the pupils as well as maintaining their interest and managing the behaviour to create a positive learning environment. In your planning /write or think through a script of terms/phrases you will use to praise and reward children s efforts/contributions/work. How will you manage off task behaviour? Bad behaviour? Poor behaviour? How will you manage the children in transitions from the carpet to tables or vice versa? How will you respond to and correct misconceptions? How will you manage your time? Who will you work with and why? How will you implement the assessment identified in the planning? How will you monitor learning? How will you respond if the children don t get it? How will you model and explain terms/processes? 13

14 3.1 Organisation of the Planning and Teaching File The file should be organised in sections, clearly headed, to facilitate ease of use. It should contain: the checklist (see School Experience Requirement and Expectations booklet) details about the context of teaching: i.e. school size, catchment, location and organisation (include school brochure, if available); classroom details ie: pupil numbers, names, seating plan, notes on class groupings a timetable showing main teaching sessions and fixed points in pupils day medium-term plans and/or schemes of work weekly plans lesson plans organised in clear curriculum sections including evaluation of teaching and learning evaluations of teaching and learning (these can be kept with the lesson plans if you wish) 3.2 Planning (a) Lesson plans : (N.B. Lesson Plan guidance and planning pro-forma is shown in Appendix F and is provided within the electronic documents) Planning is generally completed in conjunction with established school procedures. However, student teachers are expected to complete, in good time, a lesson plan, using the advised University format for every lesson taught. It is important that student teachers adopt a systematic approach to planning. The sample lesson plans shown in Appendix F offer a format that should be used as a model for the development of lesson plans in the context of specific teaching situations. Mentors and class teachers are strongly advised to check the student teacher s lesson plans, in good time, before they commence teaching from it. Mentors and class teachers are asked to please initial and date the lesson plans and make comments or amendments. This constitutes evidence of checking the plans. (b) Health and safety considerations : Before teaching any lesson with a potentially hazardous content, such as science, design technology or PE, student teachers have a responsibility to make sure they understand the safety implications. Careful planning and risk assessment will ensure that neither children nor adults will be harmed from taking part in lessons. Student teachers should add a full risk assessment to medium term and lesson plans for these lessons. The Health and Safety implications of all lessons should be considered prior to teaching. The class teacher should be present at all times during a lesson with potentially hazardous content. (c) Working with teaching assistants: All planning should clearly indicate how student teachers will deploy LSAs/TAs/other adults in the classroom. Teaching assistants are an integral part of learning and teaching teams in schools and bring valuable experience and expertise to lessons. Student teachers are expected to work with teaching assistants (TAs, including LSAs and HLTAs) under the direction of the class teacher and then later to include them in the planning, brief them prior to the lesson and receive feedback from the classroom assistant at the end of the lesson. 14

15 All student teachers need to work effectively with TAs during school experience. They should find out the background and qualifications of any adults working in the classroom and ask the class teacher and/or link tutor about this. Such adults may have specific training as learning support workers, as nursery nurses, etc. Planning may appropriately make considerable demands of them, but student teachers need to know what to expect beforehand. It is important for student teachers to build a relationship with the TAs as soon as possible. Student teachers should share with them their aspirations as a student teacher and make it clear that they value the TAs presence and expertise. Student teachers should establish a routine of bringing them into their planning. TAs need to know in advance what student teachers intend for the lesson, what is expected of them, and how and when information will be collected from them after the lesson about how their group responded to the tasks set. The phrase 'what is expected of them' may seem a difficult one to swallow if the people concerned are much older than the student teacher and seem to have a great deal of experience. Nevertheless student teachers are working towards QTS and during placements will often have considerable overall responsibility for planning the educational provision for a particular class. At the same time they will need to negotiate plans with the people with whom they are working. Lesson plans should make explicit references to the role of any other adults working in the classroom with student teachers. If student teachers can rely on their presence and effectiveness it may mean that they can plan for two or three teacher intensive group activities in the middle section of literacy or numeracy lessons rather than one. It is appreciated that matters may be more complicated if the adult is there because an SEN child with very specific needs is present in the class. Student teachers should always have back up plans which enable the lesson to be offered effectively in the absence of the TA. Permission should be sought from the TA and class teacher if student teachers want to involve the assistants in assessing the pupils within their group. If they are happy to do this then discuss the assessment criteria and provide a pro forma which is quick and easy to complete. 3.3 Evaluation of Teaching Student teachers are required to write detailed, analytical evaluations of lessons or teaching sequences on every occasion they teach. All teaching must be evaluated. This is in order that: they should be able to reflect on their own teaching and to learn from that purposeful process of reflection and so inform the setting and review of individual Professional development targets; other professionals can retrospectively catch up with lessons which they did not see for themselves, and draw information about the student teacher s professional practice for discussion with them. 15

16 Student teachers are expected to evaluate their own contribution to the lesson as a teacher and the effect on the pupil as a learner. In order to gain any useful idea about the effects of their teaching on pupil learning, student teachers need to be practised observers. This means collecting and recording systematically as much useful and relevant information as possible. They need to make notes, talk with pupils and gather evidence whenever they see something which may help them to illustrate or explain what is happening in terms of pupil response, attitude or learning. Analysis and example are much more useful to student teachers, their mentor, class teacher and link tutor, than simple description. It helps to name individual pupils in each evaluation and say what they did, or said or produced that was interesting, or that illustrated a point. This information provides vital evidence, which should inform subsequent lesson planning, differentiation, groupings, classroom organisation and assessment strategies. Evaluation is best handled systematically by addressing specific questions (See Appendix F). 3.4 Organisation of Monitoring and Assessment File During the first placement in school student teachers will begin to appreciate the value of assessment for learning, i.e. how assessment informs teaching and subsequent learning. The Partnership does not expect student teachers to have perfected the monitoring and assessment processes they use in school. Their knowledge and understanding of monitoring and assessment will be developed by them through proactive questioning of class teachers, mentors, link tutors and the School Assessment Co-ordinator. Student teachers are also expected to pursue their own professional development in this area by noting pupils learning in evaluations, noting misconceptions which some children will show, by recording pupils achievement against the lesson learning outcomes (with guidance from their class teacher). Student teachers should also keep pupil profiles for children. The M & A file should reflect the increasing professional development and involvement in the monitoring assessment, recording and discussions of pupils work with class teacher, mentor and with the pupils themselves. Monitoring, assessing and recording children s work, and reporting this to parents is a fundamental part of the teacher s role. Student teachers should become familiar with the techniques involved and the whole school approach to M & A. For further guidance on the contents of the M&A file consult the relevant School Experience Requirements and Expectations booklet and Section 3.6 of this document. 3.5 Development Profile The Development Profile will form an on-going record of a student teacher s development. When a student teacher is in school it should be made available and open to scrutiny by link tutors, class teachers, mentors and other relevant personnel such as External Examiners, when required. Therefore it is an expected requirement that the student has the file available for every meeting with mentor or link tutor. 16

17 Full details of the purpose of and requirements for the Development Profile can be found in the document itself. In summary it should contain: Initial Needs Analysis (INA) Individual Training Plan (ITP) Standards Tracking Document Scheduled observations of student teacher s teaching Weekly self assessment and review against ITP targets Final assessment report School based learning tasks School based training tasks Observations of teaching across school (see below and Appendix E) Observation of teaching and learning : (NB: Pro-forma Appendix E) Besides learning through teaching, student teachers will spend some of their time in school learning through observing experienced practitioners. To support these observations, they should complete a T & L form for each session formally observed. These sessions will frequently be participant observations which the teacher has planned or the student teacher has planned with support from the teacher and the student teacher may be working with some children during some parts of the session. At other times they may be a non-participant observer. In this case they should define their training focus, related to the standards. NB: Permission should be obtained from those being observed through the mentor and student teachers must be prepared to share their notes in a professional dialogue. Please also note student teachers are NOT assessing or judging the teaching they observe. This would be impolite and unprofessional. 3.6 Frequently Asked Questions Planning, Teaching, Assessing and Evaluating My link tutor wants me to organise my school experience file differently. What shall I do? The organisation of the file as outlined in 3.1 is guidance, but student teachers should organise their files in a way which will allow them and others to easily access the information. This is why the Programme recommends the above format for file organisation. The advice is to follow the guidance 3.1. What is a Monitoring and Assessment (M&A) file? You need a file to gather evidence of your ability to assess pupils, to show the results of your assessment of pupils learning and to show your ability to use these assessments to inform subsequent planning, differentiation and teaching. Evidence for learning forms an essential aspect of assessment for learning. 17

18 What goes in my M&A file? The following need to be in your M&A file: obtain a copy of the school s assessment policy and also find out - how the school integrates assessment for learning; how teachers gather evidence for assessment; what evidence is kept by teachers; how frequently assessments are made; how assessments are recorded; where assessment evidence is kept; what strategies does the school use to moderate standards; if the school keeps records of achievement; You also need your own assessment records - After every lesson you teach you need to note what the children have learnt. You can gauge this using the learning outcomes/objectives defined by your, or the teacher s planning. Ask yourself as a result of my teaching What do the children now know? What are they able to do? What do they now understand? But how do I know the answers to these questions? You will know this from the evidence for learning produced by the children during the lesson/session. For example, what did they say in response to your questions? what did they say in the pair/share discussions? what are the questions they asked you to clarify ideas, misconceptions? What did they draw, junk-model, paint etc? what did their written work show? How often do I assess children? In short, every single lesson. You should know which children you are going to assess in each lesson with a view to assessing every child in every lesson either through group assessment undertaken by you or the TA; or through marking their work. But I haven t got eyes in the back of my head how do I know what each child is doing/learning? This is where detailed planning helps. In your planning and using your knowledge of the children you should know who you are going to assess in detail i.e. you may sit with a group and teach them as well as assess them via questions and answers, and/or observation. The other members of the class may report back to you, complete work set which you will mark and note their achievement against the lesson outcomes/objectives on a whole class record sheets which will note targets for development. 18

19 So it is just a paper exercise? On the contrary, your M&A file shows how well you understand how children learn, what they learn in terms of the learning objectives and other incidental learning. Assessment is the key to unlocking planning and teaching and meeting the learning needs of the children that you have the privilege to teach. Is there anything else I should put in my M&A file? In order to show that you know some children as learners in more depth you will need to keep pupil profiles for children. (the number required is given in the SERE booklet). You should observe this required number of children in your class and make notes (a profile) about their physical, emotional, social and academic development at the start of the school experience and track their progress during the placement through group assessment sheets. These children s progress should be monitor throughout the placement. How do I track their progress? What does this mean? As you complete each group or class assessment these children will be included in the evidence for learning that you gather. You should note each child s achievements on your assessment pro-forma, collect a copy of their work and annotate it indicating where the evidence for the achievement of the learning outcomes is present. For example, if Jagjeet in Reception has just drawn a face you would note if he held the pencil correctly, his pencil control and whether the face had a recognisable pattern of two eyes, a nose and a mouth etc. You may then note that the target for him would be to add hair to his drawing, or to colour in the eyes. For example, Hetty, Year 5 can identify the variables in a science investigation and is already working at level 5 so how will you extend her learning in Sc1? Your profile of the children will note their development in all areas of the curriculum. You can use the headings of the Early Years Foundation Stage to form profile headings for children in the Foundation Stage; or use the headings of the National Curriculum core subjects to note the progress of children in Key Stage 1 and 2. Please note for English or Literacy you should note the children s development in reading, writing, speaking and listening. In your final placement the M & A file should reflect your professional involvement, progress and competence in the monitoring assessment, recording and discussions of pupils work with class teacher, mentor and with the pupils themselves. Help! The school have an Ofsted inspection. They say that they want me to be like a TA when the inspectors come to observe my class teacher. What about my contact time? This is perfectly acceptable. You and your mentor can adjust the contact time in subsequent weeks after the inspection. I am required to have a clear understanding of the needs of all pupils including those for whom English is an additional language. There are no pupils in my class for whom English is an additional language. What should I do? 19

20 In this situation you should: refer to the guidance document on your memory stick. This includes references to A Language in Common. Access Marking progress Training Materials for Assessing English as an additional language. In section 5 you will find case studies. Select a pupil appropriate to your age range and when you plan lessons note how you would provide personalised provision for this pupil. The document can be accessed via the School Partnership Website; 20

21 4 Assessment of School Experience 4.1 Grading Student Teachers In order to pass each school experience module student teachers must meet the Intended Learning Outcomes as detailed in the relevant module outline (Appendix A) student teacher s progress will be monitored in the following ways: Observation of teaching (part or whole lessons) by mentor and/or link tutor Weekly meetings with mentor Meetings with Link Tutor Review of Development Profile by mentor and link tutor Inspection of ITP and Standards Tracking Document by mentor and link tutor Inspection of files by mentor and link tutor Completion of School based training tasks Completion of School based learning tasks 4.2 Checking Previous Experience in Schools and Formulating an ITP It is necessary for Mentors to discuss previous experiences in school with the student teacher; e.g., whilst on work experience or prior to starting their training. In this way the school will be able to provide focused support and encourage student teachers to build on their experiences. This will be noted in the student teacher s training plan. Student Teachers must update their Standards Tracking Document with evidence on meeting the Teachers Standards at least every week. It should not be left until the last week. 4.3 School Experience Comment Sheets to Accompany Lesson Observations School Experience Comment Sheets are completed by mentors, class teachers and link tutors (jointly on some occasions) after each formal observation of teaching this includes assessing documentary evidence in the student teacher s file against the standards - or any other aspect of a student teacher s work in school. It should be noted that this pro-forma is not just to note the results of observations but an opportunity to record a wider range of evidence from the student teacher s placement in school. The extension sheet is available should the need arise for more extended comments. Student teachers will also receive verbal reports and comments from teachers and Mentors during their time in school. Such information is vital to student teachers who need to discuss their practice frequently, but it must not be taken as a substitute for formal written comments. It is helpful if teachers summarise important discussions on a comment sheet or an extension sheet. 21

22 The design of the comment sheets takes into account the need for more directed feedback to student teachers. Mentors and link tutors should note that three grades must be noted (one for each of the three grouping of standards) after every formal observation visit and must match the comments (see the sample in the Good Practice Guide). All grades should be a single number: no + or grades and no amalgam grades ( 3/4 or similar) should be used. Judgements should be made using the guidance document; Good Practice in School Experience: Support and Assessment document which includes Lesson Observation Criteria To aid lesson observation, mentors are provided with a laminated copy of the Teachers Standards and Lesson observation criteria Gradings for BA PET Year 1 - The focus of lesson observations should be in the core curriculum subjects and in the Summer PE. See Appendix G for a blank copy. See the Good Practice Guide for examples of a completed school experience comment sheet. In Year 1 lessons are graded Pass or Fail (P or F) on the school experience Lesson Observation sheets. Description Satisfactory Inadequate/Fail Category Pass Fail In Year 1 only grades pass or fail should be awarded thus reflecting that the final summative assessment for this module is carried out on a PASS or FAIL basis and does not involve numerical grades. Where the student teacher is performing above Satisfactory (grade 3) level this should be reflected in the written comments on the Lesson Observation Sheet. Gradings for BA PET Year 2 and 3, PGCE School A and B All gradings must be on the scale 1-4: Description Category Outstanding 1 Good 2 Satisfactory 3 Inadequate (fail) 4 Performance criteria are provided for each grade (see Good Practice in School Experience: Support and Assessment). These should be consulted in order to harmonise grades with level descriptors. The schedule of mentor, link tutor and moderation visits is provided in the individual school experience handouts for each year. This has been planned to make sure student teachers receive regular support and written feedback. 22

23 The school experience Lesson Observation sheets and final assessment review forms are an important source of information for references It is important to note that the written evidence on the Lesson Observation sheets will be used to form judgements about the student teacher s progress towards meeting the Teachers Standards, and ultimately will contribute towards the final assessment at the end of their school experience. It is very important that student teachers are informed accurately and honestly about the standard of teaching observed at the time and their progress. It is also important to record any concerns, especially any persistent barely satisfactory cases. If a student teacher causes concern in this or any other respect then follow the Notification of Concern procedure outlined in Section Weekly Self Assessment and Review Sheet The purpose of the review is to maintain a record of student teacher progress. It also records time spent with student teachers whether in the classroom or in any other formal context. Copies should be retained by the mentor and the student teacher. All written records should be signed and dated by the staff concerned. The Development Profile evidence must be completed at regular intervals, every week or at least fortnightly (see weekly overview) by the student teacher, providing written evidence and cross references to all documentation. The mentor will check and sign to indicate the accuracy and validity of the evidence. 4.5 Final Assessment of School Experience (a) The Development Profile: All student teachers have a Development Profile which is reviewed before assessment points in all years. This document tracks the progress of student teacher s professional development throughout the school experience. It includes the Initial Needs Analysis, Individual Training Plan, achievement of standards, action plans, self-appraisals and comments by mentors and link tutors. (b) Final Assessment Review Point: A final assessment meeting reports on the assessment of the Teachers Standards. This should normally last an hour and involves a triangulation meeting between the student teacher, mentor and link tutor. Guidelines for the conduct of the meeting are provided in Appendix D. It is at this point that the partnership agree the final grade against the Teachers Standards. Assessment is made according to the University of Chichester Assessment of Trainee Teachers Grading Descriptors. All components in the school experience must be passed, including satisfactory completion of the School based learning tasks. Normally, the assessment made at the Final Assessment Review meeting will reflect the levels of achievement recorded on the lesson observations. The final assessment should reflect the achievement at the end of the school experience. 23

24 Final Assessment Grades for BA PET Year 1: For BA PET Year 1 at the final profile point student teachers should, again, be graded on a PASS/FAIL basis only. Where the student teacher is performing above minimum level this should be reflected in the written comments on the pro-forma. Description Achieved at least minimum level Inadequate/fail Assessment Pass Fail Final Assessment Grades for BA PET Year 2, Year 3, PGCE School A, PGCE School B: Description Meeting standards at High level Meeting standards at Good level Meets minimum requirements Inadequate/fail Assessment Pass Pass Pass Fail 24

25 4.6 Review of Student Teacher Progress Notification of Concern a) Some concern If during school experience there are any concerns (expressed by the link tutor, mentor or headteacher) regarding a student teacher s progress on school experience then a Notification of Concern form should be completed, discussed with, and issued to the student. The completion of a Notification of Concern form should involve the mentor and/or the link tutor meeting with the student (please note that any refusal on the part of a student to acknowledge the nature of the concern, sign the form and/or agree and respond to the identified actions will, normally, be regarded as a failure of Part Two of the Teachers Standards. It is important to note that the completion and issuing of a Notification of Concern form does not automatically trigger a Primary School Experience Action Plan/Warning letter and can be used to identify and notify concerns that are not yet of a grade 4 (fail) level of seriousness and can be used at any point in the placement. It is vital that concerns are notified sooner rather than later. The procedure for Notification of Concern is shown in the flowchart below: A Notification of Concern form is issued by the link tutor and/or mentor. Clear guidance for addressing the concerns is recorded and discussed with the student. The Notification of concern is reviewed within an agreed time span. If all of the concerns have been addressed, no further action is required on this occasion, but the student teacher will be monitored closely. If any of the concerns have not been addressed then an Action Plan and Formal Warning letter must be issued (See procedure for serious concern below) b) Serious concern / unsatisfactory practice If during school experience a student teacher is formally judged to be operating at a grade 4 (ie: fail/inadequate ) level of performance then an action plan process will be implemented which could lead (ultimately) to the termination of the placement if there is no improvement. For example, any student teacher who formally receives a fail grade for an observation lesson, fails to address Notification of Concern or is formally judged as displaying inappropriate (ie: fail/inadequate ) professional conduct, would normally be subject to such a process. This process provides support to the student teacher and includes moderation procedures. 25

26 NB. mentors and/or link tutors must record details of meetings, support and advice given on the Weekly Mentor Meeting Log (Appendix C), and the Notification of Concern Form (Appendix H). The process is designed to give the student teacher every opportunity to redeem the situation, while at the same time working to safeguard children from poor teaching/professionalism. In the event of serious concern/unsatisfactory practice the following process should be followed: A Notification of Concern form and a Formal Warning Letter are issued to the student by the link tutor and/or mentor. A written action plan is set which must be implemented within a stated and appropriate time-span. The Action Plan containing clear and appropriate targets is discussed with the student teacher, to help her/him understand how to redeem the situation. NB: The Formal Warning Letter and Action Plan can both be printed out from Appendix H Copies of all warning letters and action plans issued by the mentor and/or link tutor should be sent to the Programme Administrator. A formal assessment is made at the end of the action plan period. If this formal assessment is graded 3 or better in all areas of the action plan, no further action is required on this occasion, but the student teacher will be monitored closely. If graded 4 for any area of the action plan then the student teacher is deemed to have failed the placement. A meeting / discussion with all parties [student, mentor, link tutor] will be arranged with either an internal moderator or external examiner. This is to review processes and procedures. The moderator / examiner does not have the power to alter the judgement of the mentor / link tutor. Copies of all Notification of Concern forms, Formal Warning Letters and Action Plans issued by the link tutor and/or mentor should be sent to the Programme Administrator. Please see Appendix H for further details of the Notification of Concern Policy. 4.7 Student Teachers with Dyslexia or Weakness in Literacy The Initial Teacher Training (ITT) Criteria (Teaching Agency 2012) states that providers must ensure: That all entrants as part of the provider s selection procedures, have taken part in a rigorous selection process designed to assess their suitability to teach. As a result, as well as ensuring that all entrants to ITT programmes have English GCSE or equivalent at grade C or above, we require applicants to complete a literacy task at interview to inform the selection process. Many applicants with weakness in English are identified at this stage and either rejected, or are offered a place and additional support to ensure they can meet the standards required. Applicants diagnosed as dyslexic may be offered a place if it is felt that with reasonable adjustment and support, they will be able to achieve the Standards. However, although we aim to support all student teachers with special needs, there is no 26

27 requirement for us to lower our academic standards to accommodate student teachers with literacy weakness. During the University-based modules, we monitor student teachers thoroughly. However, it is only when we see how student teachers use of English impacts on their teaching that we can fully evaluate their ability to meet the standards. Student teachers may fall into two categories: those who have been recognised as having dyslexia or other specific language weakness and who are on support programmes. Schools will normally be notified of any special need identified and any particular adjustments that have been or need to be made to support the student teachers; student teachers who demonstrate weakness in literacy during their practice in school. All student teachers therefore, should be monitored in school for their effective use of literacy. Any student teachers finding difficulty in using English must have this recorded in their weekly self assessment and review and on the school experience Lesson Observation sheet as appropriate, and this must be taken into account in the assessment. Student teachers making errors in their written English or failing to identify errors in children s work should be set targets and both the Mentor and Link Tutor involved in assessment. Should the student teacher s English provide cause for concern the full procedure should be initiated and an action plan set for support. Future success depends on the student teachers taking responsibility for their own learning and working in partnership with the class teacher, mentor, link tutor and University Disability and Academic Skills Service to address their needs. 4.8 Failure of School Experience In the case of a failure of School Experience, your circumstances will be considered by the Board of Examiners. If a school experience module within an Initial Teacher Education course is failed, students will not normally be offered the opportunity to repeat the placement. If the two criteria below are met the Board of Examiners may consider a re-assessment: There is evidence that the student is demonstrating a willingness to adopt a constructive approach to the advice received from the mentor, professional tutor and university tutor(s) in relation to their targets and progress towards the Teachers Standards; There is evidence that the student has not deviated from the professional behaviour which is commensurate with The Teachers Standards Part Two and The Role of the Student (stated in the Partnership Agreement and Handbook). Having considered the evidence, the Board of Examiners may decide that: (a) failure is irredeemable, and therefore no re-assessment should be offered, or (b) that there is a case for a further placement and therefore a re-assessment may be offered. If a re-assessment is granted, you are normally permitted to be re-examined on one occasion only (subject to the criteria above being met). The length of a re-assessment placement is determined by the Board of Examiners. Normally you will be required to repeat the length of the failed block of school experience. The dates for the school experience are arranged by the Head of School Partnership/Programme co-ordinator in conjunction with a partnership school. All re-assessments of school experience are subject to the availability of suitable schools and classes. 27

28 Re-assessment placements are subject to satisfactory progress and performance, against an action plan, in the first three weeks of the resit period. If progress against the action plan targets is not at least satisfactory and performance in observed lessons is not at least satisfactory (i.e. Grade 3) by the end of the first three weeks, the placement will be terminated, resulting in an irrevocable fail. In line with University policy on re-examination, student teachers must finance any re-assessment themselves. In the case of school experience, this will include the cost of the partnership fee and administrative charges made by the University based on the cost of a single module. The student is also responsible for any travel expenses incurred. Mitigating circumstances: In situations where there is evidence of circumstances which mitigated against success the University s Mitigating Circumstances rules and procedures apply. Situations resulting in failure The situations under which students will normally be deemed to have failed school experience are: 1. Failure at review point to have satisfactorily addressed an Action Plan drawn up within the Notification of Concern procedure by the Mentor, and/or Link Tutor, and/or Headteacher. 2. A serious breach of professional conduct, or unacceptable negative impact on pupils learning leading to a termination of the school placement by the Headteacher or the Head of School Partnership. Such a termination of a placement results in an automatic Fail grade for the school experience module. 3. Failure to meet all the Teachers Standards as required for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) at the final summative assessment point. 4. If the student teacher leaves the school during the school day without notifying and obtaining permission from the Mentor, Headteacher or Link Tutor (who will liaise with the school). Withdrawal from School Experience Where a student teacher decides not to complete their school experience and withdraw before a final assessment point, and in the absence of medical or other evidence, they will normally be deemed to have failed that specific block of school experience. To withdraw from school experience also constitutes withdrawal from the Programme. A student teacher who has withdrawn from school experience will not normally be offered a re-sit of a School Experience. However, it should be noted that, in some instances, student teachers withdraw from school experience for reasons other than unfitness for teaching (eg: personal/domestic circumstances). If there is evidence that circumstances beyond the student teacher s control (e.g. personal trauma, medical circumstances) mitigated against their success then another school experience may be offered if mitigating circumstances are submitted and if these are accepted by the Board of Examiners. In the case of medical/health issues, the Programme will require that proof of fitness to return to school experience be provided as a condition to offering a re-sit. If mitigating circumstances are accepted by the Board of Examiners the offer of sitting school experience as for the first time may be made. Student teachers should refer to the mitigating circumstances claim form and notes for guidance (available on Portia). All claims must be submitted prior to the assessment point. 28

29 Appendices Page Appendix A School Experience Module Outlines BA PET and PGCE 30 Appendix B A Rationale for Paired Placements/Collaborative Teaching 44 Appendix C Weekly Mentor Meeting Log 53 Appendix D Lesson Observation/FAR: Guidance for Tutors and Mentors 54 Appendix E Observing Teaching and Learning 57 Appendix F Lesson Planning and Evaluation Form 59 Appendix G Lesson Observation Proforma 63 Appendix H Notification of Concern Policy 64 Appendix I Proforma to Support Monitoring and Assessment 69 Appendix J Travel, Transport and Accommodation Information for Students 75 Appendix K Support for Student Teachers 78 Appendix L Three Key University of Chichester Policies: Health and Safety, Equal Opportunities and Race Equality 80 29

30 Appendix A School Experience Module Outlines BA PET and PGCE BA PET Year 1 Module Title: School Experience 1 Becoming a Teacher Module Code: PTX101 Credits: 15 Level 1 Home school and subject area: Education Programmes to which the module contributes: BA (Hons) Primary Education and Teaching BA (Hons) Mathematics & Teaching Key Stage 2/3 Tutor responsible: Jane Evans Entry requirements: Entry to the BA (Hons) Primary Education and Teaching Programme or Entry onto BA (Hons) Mathematics and Teaching KS2/3 Aims: To introduce student teachers to the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to become an effective primary teacher. It is designed to enable student teachers to relate the standards required for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) to their teaching and the broader role of the teacher. To draw on the student teacher s own prior teaching experiences and skills and develop them within the partnership of school-based and university-based training and support. To develop student teachers knowledge and understanding of primary schooling and learning. The structure of the course is based on the understanding that theory informs practice and practice informs theory. To assess the student teachers potential and ability in the long term to become a teacher and in the short term to achieve a pass in this module and progress to the next school experience and the other parts of the programme. Learning Outcomes: On completion of this module, the school-based training sessions, Professional Studies 1 and 2 modules students teachers will: identify and articulate the predominant values which underpin primary education; identify and modify their own preconceptions and values about teaching; begin to identify and articulate learning outcomes and assessment criteria; know the structure and requirements of the Curriculum Guidance for the Foundation Stage and/or the National Curriculum as it relates to their role as a teacher; observe some theories of learning being practised and deploy some of them in their teaching; to begin to plan, teach, evaluate and assess lessons with the support of their mentor and paired placement student partner; observe the use of different behaviour management strategies and begin to develop their own strategies; be able to evaluate and provide informal feedback on their paired placement partner s teaching with a view to developing their own practice and professional skills; respond appropriately to advice given by mentors, tutors and other professionals to improve their teaching; identify areas for their own personal and professional development. In terms of transferable skills student teachers are expected to: communicate effectively in written and spoken English; complete oral presentations; use media and work towards using ICT to research and present data and information for self and different educational audiences to the standard required by the TDA; use Library Resource Centre; demonstrate skills of co-operation and consultation, and the ability to work within an equal opportunities framework when working with children or adults; demonstrate flexibility, purpose and self-knowledge, self-confidence, independence, self-motivation and problem-solving through self-appraisal and target setting, take responsibility for ongoing professional development by responding to professional advice and targets within a limited time-span, and working with mentor, professional tutor, school and university staff as part of a team. 30

31 Indicative Curriculum content: This will be a paired placement with 5 weeks for three days in the Autumn term and three weeks for five days in the summer term. student teachers qualifying for the early years (3-7) age phase will be placed in nursery settings. They will be supported by the same mentor who will assess and monitor their professional development. student teachers qualifying for the primary age phase will be placed in pairs in a class. They will be supported by one mentor who can assess and monitor their professional development. student teachers will attend the first placement for three days per week and spend the other two days at the University attending Professional Studies 1 and 2 module sessions. The placement would take place for five weeks. In the first week student teachers will be expected to observe pupils and teachers across the placement. In the following weeks student teachers will collaborate to plan, teach, evaluate and assess the core subjects for groups of pupils. They will work within the class teacher s weekly planning but they will be expected to plan each lesson they teach and to add their own dimension to the planning and teaching. Towards the end of the placement student teachers will team teach with the teacher and/or their paired placement partner. They will have to maintain their own planning and assessment files throughout this school experience. They will observe teachers in the classroom and other settings, e.g. the playground. They will observe five children and keep records on their achievement and progress across both year 1 school experiences. student teachers will be expected to complete weekly directed tasks associated with the two level 1 Professional studies modules. The tasks will inform the seminar discussions and feedback associated with the professional studies modules. For example, their observations of five pupils will be guided by a professional studies session prior to the placement and will subsequently inform a session on children s learning and how learning is affected by pupils cultural, linguistic, emotional and social circumstances. student teachers will be expected to demonstrate the appropriate professional values and conduct associated with becoming a teacher, satisfactory knowledge about the curriculum, satisfactory personal subject knowledge and classroom management skills at this stage of their initial teacher education. Learning strategy: observation of mentor and other staff engaged in teaching and other duties; observing pupils in a variety of settings complete directed tasks use mentor sessions as learning, as well as, review opportunities; planning, teaching and assessing lessons for pupils in small groups or whole classes; evaluating and reflecting on pupils' and own performance; having their teaching and interaction observed, discussed and evaluated by their paired placement partner, mentors and link tutors; constructing and responding to action planning arising out of interactions with supervising and teaching staff; using the directed tasks to develop their skills knowledge and understanding of the competences required to be a teacher who meets QTS Standards. Mode of assessment: Formative assessment Will be provided by class teachers and mentors providing feedback and advice on a day-to- day basis. Formal scheduled observation sessions by mentor and link tutor or joint observations will provide a record of the progression of the student against the specified standards for Year 1 School Experience. An interim assessment will be completed at the end of the Autumn placement phase which will identify student teachers strengths and areas for development. Summative assessment Will be based on pass/fail indicative performance criteria, of the Standards identified in the Profile of Standards for this school experience. Assessment Criteria In order to pass School Experience in Year 1 student teachers must: Attend school regularly and punctually for the period specified in the School Experience handbook. Demonstrate good professional attitudes and attributes such as good communication, ability to listen and act on advice, the formation of positive and appropriate professional relationships with children, teachers, other adults, parents and their peers. Obtain a pass grade in all standards related to this placement during profiling. Satisfy the judgement of the link tutor and mentor that they have sufficient evidence to support the standards identified for this school experience at level 1. 31

32 Indicative Reading: This is indicated in the Professional Studies 1 and 2 modules, also tasks set for completion in schools will necessitate the use of school-based resources and reading on planning, assessment, behaviour management, child development and learning theories. 32

33 BA PET Year 2 Module Title: School Experience 2 Developing as a Teacher Module Code: PTX201 Credits: 10 Level: 2 Home school and subject area: Education Programmes to which the BA (Hons) Primary Education and Teaching module contributes: Tutor responsible: Entry requirements: Jane Evans Successful completion of Year 1 Level 1 modules Aims: To develop students confidence to teach the whole class across the core subjects and a range of foundation subjects; To develop their subject knowledge in the core and foundation subjects; To develop their understanding of the CGFS, NC, NLS and NNS; To develop students understanding of equal opportunities and inclusion issues such as SEN, race, gender and class; To develop students ability to cater for the needs of pupils with EAL; To develop students planning, teaching, classroom management and assessment skills; To develop their ability to work within a wider team Learning Outcomes On completion of the school based training sessions this module and the Professional Studies 3 (level 2) module student teachers will: demonstrate satisfactory or better subject knowledge and teaching competence in the core, PE, RE and two other foundation subjects; be able to use the CGFS and NC, NLS and NNS to plan and teach lessons; identify their own values in relation to inclusion issues; know how to work within a SEN child s IEP to plan and teach pupils with specified SEN; know how to plan differentiated learning to meet the differing learning, physical or emotional needs of pupils in their class, including those who are GTA and/or those with EAL; demonstrate positive values and high expectations; when appropriate, they recognise and respond to equal opportunities issues in the classroom; use assessment and monitoring information to inform planning and differentiation; critically evaluate own teaching and make improvements; work effectively as part of a team, incorporating and effectively deploying SEN assistants and other adults into their planning and teaching. In terms of transferable skills student teachers are expected to: communicate effectively in written and spoken English; demonstrate skills of co-operation and consultation, and the ability to work within an equal opportunities framework when working in-groups; manage time and resources; demonstrate flexibility, purpose and self-knowledge, self-confidence, independence, self-motivation and problem-solving through self-appraisal and target setting; take responsibility for ongoing professional development by responding to professional advice and targets within a limited time-span, and working with mentor, professional tutor, school and college staff as part of a team. 33

34 Indicative Curriculum content: student teachers will be expected to complete whole class teaching for all the core subjects, PE, RE and two other foundation subjects on this six week placement which will occur in either the spring or summer term (this depends on where Easter occurs). They will be expected to work within the teacher s planning for the first two weeks of the school experience and then to provide assistance with the weekly planning for all subjects they teach. Moving towards undertaking the weekly planning for the final week. student teachers will be expected to plan and assess every lesson they teach. student teachers will have to demonstrate a competent level of subject and pedagogical knowledge regarding inclusion issues, the core subjects, ICT, PE, RE and other foundation subjects. Learning strategy: To gain the professional skills, knowledge and understanding required to meet QTS Standards by: using meetings with the mentor as learning and review opportunities; observation of mentor, SENCO, bilingual support teacher/assistant (where applicable) and other staff engaged in teaching and other duties; planning, teaching and assessing lessons for pupils in a whole class setting; evaluating and reflecting on pupils' and own performance; having teaching performance observed, discussed and evaluated by class teacher, mentor and link tutor; constructing and responding to action planning arising out of interactions with supervising and teaching staff; using own research, assignments and directed tasks to deepen skills knowledge and understanding of the competences required to be a teacher who meets QTS Standards. Mode of assessment: Formative assessment Will be provided by class teacher and mentor providing feedback and advice on a day to day basis. Formal observations by the mentor and link tutor will provide graded feedback on the student teachers progress against the QTS standards. Summative assessment Will be based on the grading (1-4), using the indicative performance criteria, of the standards identified in the Profile of Standards for this school experience. Assessment Criteria In order to pass the level 2 school experience placement student teachers must: Attend school regularly and punctually for the period specified in the School Experience handbook. Satisfy the judgement of their mentor and link tutor that they are capable of achieving the TDA standards for QTS. Demonstrate good professional attitudes and attributes such as good communication, ability to listen and act on advice, the formation of positive and appropriate professional relationships with children, teachers, other adults and parents. obtain evidence to satisfactorily (grades 1-3) complete their profile of professional standards. complete all directed tasks and training sessions satisfactorily. Indicative Reading: This is indicated in the Professional Studies 3 module, also tasks set in school will necessitate use of school-based resources and reading on inclusion, diversity, special needs, equality of opportunity and social justice. 34

35 BA PET Year 3 Module Title: School Experience E Developing as a Professional Module Code SEEL3 Credits 15 Level 3 Home school and subject area: Education Programmes to which the module contributes: BA (Hons) Primary Education and Teaching BA (Hons) Mathematics & Teaching Key Stage 2/3 Tutor responsible: Jane Evans Entry requirements: Successful completion of all Year 2, Level 2 modules, including school experience C and D. Aims: To gain proficiency in whole class teaching and teaching subjects across the primary curriculum; To develop students knowledge about school management and target setting, LEA and national targets; To meet TDA Standards for QTS; To identify key areas for inclusion in Career Entry Profile; To increase understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in education; To develop students professional confidence and competence within a school setting. Learning Outcomes: On completion of the training sessions, this module and Year 3 Professional Studies module students will: be able to identify, articulate and deploy a range of inclusive strategies in their teaching; know the structure and requirements of the EYFS, the National Curriculum and other relevant national strategies as they relate to teaching in the Foundation Stage and KS1 & 2; understand some theories of learning and be able to select and employ such theories as appropriate in a school environment; be able to plan, teach, assess and evaluate lessons at a level that meets the Standards for QTS; be able to use ICT for subject specific lesson delivery and other educational purposes; plan for and deploy other adults effectively; set and monitor targets for pupils; know and understand the role of the subject manager in relation to the curriculum and school management systems; identify their own professional strengths and areas for development; meet all the standards for QTS at a satisfactory or better level. In terms of transferable skills student teachers are expected to: communicate effectively in written and spoken English; complete oral presentations; write reports and essays; demonstrate skills of co-operation and consultation, and the ability to work within an equal opportunities framework when working in-groups; manage time and resources; demonstrate flexibility, purpose and self-knowledge, self-confidence, independence, selfmotivation and problem-solving through self-appraisal and target setting; take responsibility for ongoing professional development by responding to professional advice and targets within a limited time-span, and working with mentor, professional tutor, school and University staff as part of a team. 35

36 Indicative Curriculum content: As specified in School Experience Requirements and Expectations Booklet, students will take on the responsibilities associated with being a class teacher. They will plan, teach, evaluate, assess and monitor pupils progress in all the core subjects, PE, RE and three other Foundation subjects, and - if school circumstances allow - to plan, teach, evaluate and assess those foundation subjects not taught on school experience in Year 2, or those not encountered on the taught course. They will be required to evaluate their progress and set targets with the mentor. They are expected to demonstrate a high level of competence at this stage of the programme; for example, to be fully aware of the requirements of the EYFS, NC, the Primary Framework for Literacy and Mathematics, and the national assessment requirements and the characteristics of the progression from the early learning goals to NC level descriptions. Students will receive training on assessment, target setting, the use of national data, and the role of the subject manager. They will be required to shadow the subject manager for one day, to interview him/her about the role of the subject manager, to observe them (or another subject specialist) teaching the subject they manage and to interview the head teacher or deputy about the role of the subject manger within the management structure of the school and how the subject manager s monitoring of the curriculum contributes to school improvement. Learning strategy: To gain the professional skills, knowledge and understanding required to meet QTS Standards by: using time-tabled mentor sessions as learning and review opportunities; observation of mentor and other staff engaged in teaching and tutoring; planning, teaching and assessing lessons for pupils in a whole class setting; evaluating and reflecting on pupils' and own performance; having school performance observed, discussed and evaluated by Mentors, Professional Tutors and The University staff; constructing and responding to action planning arising out of interactions with supervising and teaching staff; using own research, assignments and directed tasks to deepen skills knowledge and understanding of the competences required to be a teacher and tutor who meets QTS Standards. Mode of assessment: Formative assessment Will be provided by class teachers and mentors providing feedback and advice on a day to day basis. Formal observations by the mentor and link tutor will provide graded feedback on the students progress against the standards. Summative assessment Will be based on the grading (1-4), using the indicative performance criteria, of the standards identified in the Profile of Standards for this school experience. Assessment Criteria In order to pass School Experience E students must: Attend school regularly and punctually for the period specified in the School Experience handbook. Satisfy the judgement of their mentor and link tutor that they have achieved the TDA standards for QTS. Obtain evidence to satisfactorily (grades 1-3) complete their profile of professional standards. Complete all directed tasks and training sessions satisfactorily. Indicative Reading: As indicated in the Year 3 Professional Studies module though tasks set in schools will necessitate use of school-based resources. 36

37 PGCE School Experience Modules Note that there are two patterns of School Experience: Standard Two Placement Pattern School Experience A School Experience B Alternative Three Placement Pattern for MFL route School Experience 1 (Identical outcomes to School Experience A) School Experience 2 School Experience 3 (Identical outcomes to School Experience B) 37

38 Module Title School Experience A (School Experience 1) Module Code Level 3/H Home school and subject area Programmes to which module contributes Tutor responsible Entry requirements Education PGCE Primary Jane Evans Admission to the PGCE Primary programme Aims This initial school experience is intended to introduce student teachers to the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to become an analytical, effective and reflective primary teacher. It is designed to enable student teachers to relate the standards required for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) to their teaching and the broader role of the teacher. The experience will draw on the student teacher s own prior experiences and skills and develop them within the partnership of school-based and universitybased training and support. Learning Outcomes On completion of this module student teachers will: be able to plan, teach, evaluate and assess lessons to a satisfactory standard; identify and articulate the values which underpin primary education; know the structure and requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage and/or the National Curriculum as it relates to their role as a teacher; know about and observe some theories of learning being practised and deploy some of them in their teaching; be familiar with current government initiatives such as the Primary Strategy and Every Child Matters in theory and in practice; make progress towards achieving the Professional Standards for QTS. In terms of transferable skills student teachers are expected to: communicate effectively in written and spoken English; use a range of media to research and present information for different audiences; systematically demonstrate skills of co-operation and consultation, and the ability to work within an equal opportunities framework when working with children or adults; demonstrate the professional attributes required for employment as a teacher. 38

39 Indicative Curriculum content This module will introduce students to the professional practice of teaching and enable them to apply theories from university based courses in the classroom. Students will be based in a partnership primary school and supported by a university link tutor and school-based mentor. They will begin by observing and reflecting on practice in the school including classroom teaching and the wider responsibilities of the class teacher. Over the course of the placement student teachers will be expected to plan, teach, evaluate and assess lessons. Initially, they will focus on teaching small groups of pupils the core curriculum subjects but over the course of the placement, and in negotiation with the mentor, this will be extended to whole class lessons. By the end of the placement, student teachers will be expected to show growing independence in their lesson planning and use some of their own planning across the curriculum whilst still working to the class teacher s weekly plans. Throughout the placement student teachers will be expected to demonstrate the appropriate values and professional conduct associated with becoming a teacher, satisfactory knowledge about the curriculum, satisfactory personal subject knowledge and classroom management skills. They will maintain detailed records of their planning, assessment and reflections. Learning strategy The module will delivered through placement in a partnership primary school or foundation stage setting. Students will observe teaching and other activities within the school and plan, teach and assess lessons. They will evaluate their teaching and reflect on future improvements. They will carry out focused schoolbased investigations to further develop their skills, knowledge and understanding They will meet regularly with a mentor to review their learning and identify areas for development and strategies to address these. Mentors and link tutors will observe, discuss and evaluate students teaching and general performance over the practice. Students will demonstrate their ability to construct and respond to action plans arising out of interactions with supervising staff. Mode of assessment Formative assessment Before the start of the placement, students will create a training plan for the experience as part of their Professional Development Profile (PDP) which will be reviewed over the course of the placement. Class teachers and mentors will provide feedback and advice on a day-to-day basis. Student teachers will be expected to self-assess each lesson that they teach and set targets for their own learning. This will be supported by regular meetings with their mentor. In addition, formal scheduled observation sessions by mentors and/or link tutors will monitor the progression of the student teacher against the TDA Professional Standards for QTS. Summative assessment The final assessment will assess students progress towards meeting the Standards and be graded on the Ofsted 1-4 scale. Assessment Criteria In order to pass School Experience A student teachers must: attend school regularly and punctually for the period specified in the School Experience handbook; complete the Profile of Professional Standards and satisfy the judgement of their mentor and link tutor that they have made satisfactory progress towards achieving the TDA Professional Standards for QTS; complete all school-based investigations satisfactorily. 39

40 Module Title School Experience 2 Module Code Level 3/H Home school and subject area Programmes to which module contributes Tutor responsible Education PGCE Primary Jane Evans Entry requirements Successful completion of School Experience 1 Aims This school experience is intended to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills gained on School Experience 1 through experience of teaching in a contrasting setting. For student teachers on the Modern Languages Route this experience may be completed abroad in Belgium or Tenerife. For students on other routes, this placement will be completed in a difference age-range to that experienced on School Experience 1. The experience will further assist students in becoming analytical, effective and reflective primary teachers. It is designed to enable student teachers to make further progress towards meeting the standards required for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). The experience will draw on the student teacher s prior experiences and skills and develop them within the partnership of school-based and university-based training and support. Learning Outcomes On completion of this module student teachers will: know the structure and requirements of the appropriate curricula for their placement identify and articulate the values which underpin both the education in their placement and their own thinking about teaching; know about and observe some theories of learning being practised and deploy some of them in their teaching; be able to plan, teach, evaluate and assess lessons to at least a satisfactory standard; make further progress towards achieving the Professional Standards for QTS. In terms of transferable skills student teachers are expected to: communicate effectively in written and spoken English; use a range of media to research and present information for different audiences; systematically demonstrate skills of co-operation and consultation, and the ability to work within an equal opportunities framework when working with children or adults; demonstrate the professional attributes required for employment as a teacher. 40

41 Indicative Curriculum content This module will introduce students to the professional practice of teaching in a different school and enable them to apply theories from university based courses in the classroom. Students will begin by observing and reflecting on practice in the school including classroom teaching and the wider responsibilities of the class teacher. Over the course of the placement student teachers will be expected to plan, teach, evaluate and assess as appropriate to the setting. Throughout the placement student teachers will be expected to demonstrate the appropriate values and professional conduct associated with becoming a teacher and maintain detailed records of their planning, assessment and reflections. Learning strategy The module will delivered through placement in a partnership primary school, foundation stage setting, or a school in Belgium or Tenerife arranged through our partnership with another institution. Students will observe teaching and other activities within the school and plan, teach and assess. They will evaluate their teaching and reflect on future improvements. They will carry out focused school-based investigations to further develop their skills, knowledge and understanding Mode of assessment Formative assessment Before the start of the placement, students will create a training plan for the experience as part of their Professional Development Profile (PDP) which will be reviewed over the course of the placement. Class teachers and mentors will provide regular feedback and advice and student teachers will be expected to self-assess each lesson that they teach and set targets for their own learning. This will be supported by regular meetings with their mentor. In addition, formal scheduled observation sessions will monitor the student teacher s progress. Summative assessment For students in UK placements, the final assessment will assess students progress towards meeting the Professional Standards for QTS and be graded on the 1-4 scale. Students teaching abroad will be assessed against the QTS standards and the Common Reference Framework. Assessment Criteria In order to pass School Experience 2, student teachers must: attend school regularly and punctually for the period specified in the School Experience handbook; obtain satisfactory grades at the final assessment. 41

42 Module Title School Experience B (School Experience 3) Module Code Level 3/H Home school and subject area Programmes to which module contributes Tutor responsible Entry requirements Education PGCE Primary Jane Evans Successful completion of previous school experience Aims This final school experience is intended to enable student teachers to gain proficiency in whole class teaching of subjects across the primary curriculum. By the end of the placement, students will be able to demonstrate that they have met all of the TDA Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status. They will have a broader understanding of the relationship between theory and practice in education, the wider context within which schools operate. They will be able to identify areas for future development during their teaching career. Learning Outcomes On completion of this module student teachers will: have met all of the TDA Professional Standards for Qualified Teacher Status at a satisfactory level or above. be able to identify, articulate and deploy a range of inclusive strategies in their teaching; know the structure and requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage, the National Curriculum and other relevant national strategies as they relate to teaching in their age range have a working knowledge of Every Child Matters critically analyse and research some theories of learning and be able to select and employ such theories as appropriate in a school environment; be able to plan, teach, assess and evaluate lessons through a sound professional knowledge and understanding of pupil learning, assessment and monitoring In terms of transferable skills student teachers are expected to: communicate effectively in written and spoken English; demonstrate skills of co-operation and consultation, and the ability to work within an equal opportunities framework when working in groups manage time and resources be able to pursue their own professional learning demonstrate the professional attributes required for employment as a teacher. 42

43 Indicative Curriculum content Over the course of this placement, student teachers will take on the responsibilities associated with being a class teacher. They will plan, teach, evaluate, assess and monitor pupils progress across the curriculum over a sustained period. Students will be expected to evaluate their progress and demonstrate how they have achieved targets set for them. They will make a significant contribution to planning, teaching and assessing the pupils in their class. Learning strategy The module will delivered through placement in a partnership school or foundation stage setting. Students will conduct focussed observations of teaching and other activities within the school and plan, teach and assess lessons. They will evaluate their teaching and reflect on future improvements. They will carry out focused school-based investigations to further develop their skills, knowledge and understanding. They will meet regularly with a mentor to review their learning and identify areas for development and strategies to address these. Mentors and link tutors will observe, discuss and evaluate students teaching and general performance over the practice. Students will demonstrate their ability to construct and respond to action plans arising out of interactions with supervising staff. Mode of assessment Formative assessment Before the start of the placement, students will create a training plan for the experience as part of their Professional Development Profile (PDP) which will be reviewed over the course of the placement. Class teachers and mentors will provide regular feedback and advice. Student teachers will be expected to self-assess each lesson that they teach and set targets for their own learning. This will be supported by regular meetings with their mentor. In addition, formal scheduled observation sessions by mentors and/or link tutors will monitor the progression of the student teacher against the TDA Professional Standards for QTS. Summative assessment The final assessment will assess students progress towards meeting the Standards and be graded on the Ofsted 1-4 scale. Assessment Criteria In order to pass School Experience B student teachers must: attend school regularly and punctually for the period specified in the School Experience handbook; satisfy the judgement of their mentor and link tutor that they have achieved at least grade 3 (Satisfactory) in all the TDA Professional Standards for QTS; complete all school-based investigations satisfactorily. 43

44 A Rationale for Paired Placements/Collaborative Teaching Appendix B A paired/collaborative teaching placement can provide a number of advantages/benefits over an individual placement: Emotional and psychological support. Student teachers can share their anxieties and offer practical support to each other. Most colleagues will recognise the importance of having someone to talk to regarding professional matters and simply having a peer immediately on hand to fulfil such a role can be hugely beneficial. Whilst working with a student teacher does require the mentor and class teacher to give of their time, having two does not necessarily mean twice the work; the two students can give each other an enormous amount of support. Enhanced reflection on University-based sessions. Student teachers involved in a paired/collaborative teaching placement during their school experience will have the opportunity of supporting each other in applying and reflecting further on what they have learnt from their University sessions (and vice versa when they return to the University having completed their school experience). In working collaboratively student teachers can share and deepen the knowledge and understanding they have gained from University based sessions and - as part of this process - try things out in a classroom setting with appropriate support and development from their mentor(s), class teacher and link tutor. As the relationship between the student teachers develops, the level of discussion about, and reflection on, their own professional learning can become richer with a resultant deepening of knowledge, understanding and overall achievement. Subject knowledge support. Most student teachers will encounter gaps in their subject knowledge during their school experience; paired students can share their subject knowledge and help each other respond to/fill these gaps. Positive outcomes for pupil learning. Having two student teachers collaborating in the classroom can have positive outcomes on pupil learning; this can be a major advantage of a paired/collaborative teaching placement. student teachers can plan for learning in more flexible ways, taking advantage of having additional adults in the classroom, e.g. one student working with an identified group of pupils (such as a gifted and talented group) within the class. Some colleagues may argue that a paired/collaborative teaching placement is easier for student teachers than an individual placement, or even that it is unrealistic given that teaching is a solo activity. Based on discussions within the Partnership (including school-based colleagues) and with colleagues at the, then, Training and Development Agency (TDA) and other ITE providers who operate successful paired/collaborative teaching placements the programme team would disagree with such views. The team would argue that professional learning is enhanced - and is in no sense, less challenging or easier - and retention of student teachers (a key concern) is at its greatest where a strong commitment to collaborative practice exists. It is hoped that these paired/collaborative teaching opportunities will help to increase the professional confidence, knowledge, understanding and achievements of our student teachers from an early stage of their training and, that, as a result, they will be better prepared, more reflective and generally more pro-active in subsequent stages of their programme. 44

45 Having considered the benefits of paired placements, it was felt by the Partnership that collaborative practice, as described in this section, could and should be developed and that it be kept under annual review. Accordingly this section of the handbook provides guidance on how to ensure that paired/collaborative teaching placements are as successful as possible. Alongside the advantages of this collaborative/paired approach the University also recognises some of the potential pitfalls of such an opportunity. The guidance given below highlights some of the most common potential pitfalls and makes suggestions about how to avoid these. The University of Chichester Paired Placement/Collaborative Model is flexible and allows for an individual school experience setting to be arranged in extraordinary circumstances and if deemed appropriate by the Head of Programme and/or Head of School Partnership Different Perspectives on Paired Placements/Collaborative Teaching: Possible Student Teacher Perspectives Advantages Sharing ideas and plans Confidence is built up through team teaching, less nervousness etc. Collecting and sharing resources Getting feedback - constructive criticism - from peers on lessons taught Emotional and practical support from peers when faced with difficulties Lessening of feeling vulnerable because other student is in the same position Learning from each other Works well when you get on with the other student teacher Disadvantages Possible competitiveness between peers and inevitable comparisons made by mentor/class teacher Pupil preference for one or other student teacher with the potential for playing one student teacher off against another Learning when to step back and not step on each other s toes Having to rely on a partner, when the partner isn t always reliable Differences in ability; some student teachers are more confident and able than their partners sometimes resulting in them taking over Personality clashes with the other student teacher leading to difficulties 45

46 Possible Mentor/Class Teacher Perspectives Advantages student teachers can talk over ideas, give constructive feedback and support each other The potential to reduce the onus on the mentor/class teacher in some respects; when two students get on with each other, they can discuss issues and come to conclusions without the mentor/class teacher necessarily having to be involved all the time student teachers are able to observe each other as well as the mentor/class teacher and learn more from this peer level observation process student teachers are able to plan together, developing and sharing appropriate resources It has the potential to be less isolating for each student teacher Disadvantages The possibility of one student teacher being over reliant on his/her partner and therefore not pulling their weight A potential mis-match of paired student teachers; one more confident and competitive than the other leading to the other s confidence being undermined Difficulties in giving feedback where student teachers are mis-matched; this may need to be done separately and could double the mentor/class teacher s workload Time Issues. There is a potential problem where the two student teachers travel to/from school together and both arrive late/leave promptly at the end of the school day Guidance Towards Ensuring a Successful Paired/Collaborative Teaching Placement School Culture and Relationship Building. Where student teachers are able to see a culture of collaboration being modelled in the work of the school and classroom, they are more likely to be comfortable with working in a collaborative way themselves. Where possible, schools are encouraged to share examples of their own ongoing or recent collaborative practice with student teachers to illustrate for them the benefits of such an approach. The quality of the experience of student teachers, whether on a single or paired placement, is based in large part on the strength of their professional relationships with their mentor, class teacher and fellow student teacher. In order to be successful in working collaboratively, student teachers will need to develop various interpersonal skills. Timetable. The pair of students should be given an appropriate timetable that supports them in working collaboratively. This timetable should include lessons where one student assumes the role and responsibilities of the lead teacher and the other the role and responsibilities of the support teacher (see the point immediately below for details of these roles and responsibilities). There should also be opportunities for both students to plan and teach lessons on their own so that they can demonstrate their individual, developing planning and classroom practice/skills. If possible the timetable should also include lessons which will be co-planned, co- taught and co-evaluated by the students. The University of Chichester model for paired/collaborative teaching placements in Year 1 of the 46

47 BA PET is based on gradually building up a timetable for each student teacher to approximately (i.e. as close as possible to) 40-45% teaching time. The exact number of lessons may vary. Therefore, in summary, each student teacher will be the lead teacher in some lessons and the support teacher in other lessons. They will also co-plan and co-teach lessons, as well as being solely responsible for some further lessons. To varying degrees it is anticipated that co-planning and co-evaluation will take place across all lessons, except those lessons for which each student teacher has sole responsibility. Roles and Responsibilities. The Tandem teaching model being advocated here relates to the lead and support teacher roles and responsibilities mentioned above. The Tandem collaborative teaching model is intended to facilitate peer support in the classroom, aiming specifically to help each student teacher to gain in confidence and experiment with various learning approaches/activities. Tandem teaching involves a degree of collaborative lesson planning and co-delivery. Tandem teaching provides opportunities at different times for both student teachers to work as the lead and support (student) teacher. The pair of student teachers are allocated a teaching timetable. Through consultation initiated and led by their mentor and class teacher, the timetable is divided into two equal parts, one for each student teacher to lead. It should be clear at the end of this consultation resulting in an agreed timetable for both student teachers which student teacher is in a lead and support teacher role for each lesson to be taught. Once this has been established the student teachers will work collaboratively in terms of observation, planning, delivery, evaluation and Standards tracking for these lessons, as per the specific responsibilities outlined below: The lead (student) teacher role/responsibilities involves all of the usual aspects of teaching including: o o o o o o o o o the final selection of pupil activities after discussion and research: detailed lesson planning; organising the role of the teaching team; the production of resources; responsibility for delivering the lesson; responsibility for management of the class; responsibility for marking; self-evaluation of own teaching; self-evaluation of own management of the support (student) teacher. The support (student) teacher role involves co-operating with the lead (student) teacher in delivering the lesson. In particular: o o o o o o o o assisting with selection of pupil activities, lesson planning, production of resources etc; assisting individual pupils with their work; assisting individual pupils to remain on-task and attentive; assisting with in-class marking of work; sometimes taking small groups for specific purposes; helping to manage resources; helping to ensure that the room is left tidy; observing and noting teaching points of interest for themselves. 47

48 Student Teachers Working Together. Ways in which paired student teachers can collaborate on teaching include, but are not limited to, the following: o o o o o more "adventurous" use of small group work (because two teachers made it easier to manage), modelling a range of teaching and learning strategies within the same lesson experimenting with the use of role play experimenting with effective use of ICT. experimenting with a range of assessment strategies Mentor/Class Teacher Feedback. Throughout the school experience the mentor(s) could meet both student teachers for joint weekly review meetings. On these occasions it may be appropriate and useful for the class teacher (if this is a different person from the mentor) to attend and contribute to these joint meetings, although it is not essential. These joint weekly review meetings do not necessarily have to take place each week but should, when they do take place, be a substitute for weekly review meetings with each individual student teacher. The frequency of these joint meetings should be discussed and agreed between the mentor(s) and student teachers as appropriate for the context. At these joint meetings Weekly Review Sheets can be completed and signed as per normal procedures. It can be very productive to have joint meetings rather than always seeing the student teachers separately. Of course, there will be occasions when a one-to-one weekly review meeting between mentor and individual student teacher is desirable or necessary. Joint weekly review meetings might be the most effective model for some aspects of the training, but it is also recognised that student teachers develop at different rates (or specific individual/personal issues arise) meaning that some one-to-one weekly review meetings will almost certainly be required Guidance on Avoiding Some Potential Pitfalls of Paired/Collaborative Teaching Placements It is important that the guidance in this handbook is read by the student teachers and all who are supporting student teachers (including the class teacher) so they are aware of the requirements and expectations; class teachers and mentors should ensure that each student teacher has, as far as is possible, a broad and balanced teaching timetable as outlined above; Each student teacher should be made aware of who is the best/most appropriate person to speak to when there are issues to discuss (e.g. the class teacher or mentor, dependent on the issue); At the start of the school experience an initial meeting should be set up by the mentor(s) for the student teachers, class teacher (and mentor) to discuss and agree the specific operational details of the paired placement and to pre-empt potential/hypothetical problems as outlined above. This meeting could also include the link tutor if available and able/willing to attend. This meeting, early on in the school experience is crucial in establishing a professional, non competitive and collaborative ethos between the student teachers. Regular weekly review meetings will help in monitoring and ensuring that this professionalism continues throughout the school experience; Clear guidelines should be agreed in order to establish the student teachers roles and responsibilities within the classroom as outlined above (e.g. negotiating 48

49 and exchanging ideas, establishing when each student teacher will take the role of lead and support teacher); If the student teachers are placed in a class where SATs are due to take place, arrangements will need to be put into place in order to plan for and utilise their presence to the advantage of the school and pupils (but without compromising student teacher entitlement), e.g. by giving each student teacher a specific responsibility such as carrying out a Level 1 task or being a reader for a child in engaged in subject-specific activities or helping to administer the Reading Task. It is also a good opportunity for the student teachers to learn how to assess and target set the children as a result of the SATs; When conducting peer observations, student teachers should be helped to focus on a particular aspect and encouraged to report back to each other as well as the class teacher/mentor to ensure that any feedback is constructive and that each student feels valued by the other; When carrying out peer observations, student teachers will need to decide beforehand what they intend to focus on. Each might take a different focus, for example: a) one student looks for how their peer praises the children and/or the children s responses to this praise b) one student looks at what their peer does before the children come into the classroom in the morning and/or how the children react to this when they come in. These observations should then be discussed by the students later on, with the class teacher present if appropriate; Other strategies to overcome/pre-empt difficulties: o Talking with the student teacher(s) early on in the school experience about any concerns, e.g. lateness, and agreeing a way forward o Giving student teacher(s) individual time with the class teacher/mentor so that they get individual feedback; o student teacher(s) talking with the mentor/class teacher/link tutor as soon as possible about any concerns (they have) Guidance on Avoiding Some Potential Pitfalls of Paired/Collaborative Teaching Placements: Some Possible Scenarios Consideration/reflection on the following scenarios may be useful to student teachers, school-based colleagues and University tutors in helping to ensure that each paired/collaborative placement is as successful as possible. All colleagues might like to use these scenarios themselves to decide how they would deal with the issues stated, and compare their responses with those given. Scenario 1 It s May. The urban primary school has three Y2 classes, each with two inexperienced student teachers in them. The class teachers are anxious about having student teachers in at the same time as both KS1 and KS2 SATs are being done. What advice would you give the class teachers and the student teachers so that it is a win/win situation? 49

50 Response: Each class teacher needs to plan activities that can utilise their two student teachers, e.g. being a SATs reader; helping with reading SATs papers; Utilise one student teacher to plan individual reading tasks outside the classroom, whilst the other reads to the class; Student teachers can utilise the opportunity to visit other classrooms to observe levels of assessment and marking; Student teachers can administer specific SATs if they are very structured and prescriptive; Opportunities for student teachers to plan and teach Foundation subjects; student teachers to visit Key Stage 2 classes in relation to transition issues. Scenario 2 A pair of student teachers are on their first placement in a Y1 class in an infants school. The student teachers are unsure exactly what their roles/responsibilities are in the classroom. What advice would you give them and their mentor/class teacher? Direction from the mentor/class teacher from the beginning their roles and responsibilities should be identified from the outset All student teachers should have experience of planning and teaching ALL areas of the curriculum, not just the ones they have most experience and confidence in student teachers can work together rather than separately as two individuals. Scenario 3 A reception class teacher has two student teachers in her classroom. It is obvious there is a bit of a personality clash between the student teachers one is more mature and seems more able and confident than the other. The class teacher and mentor are both very stretched time-wise, but both know they need to deal with the situation. What management advice would you give them about how to deal with this situation? Class teacher/mentor to get the pair to plan and lead a lesson by recognising and highlighting their strengths, so that each student teacher recognises the other s strengths. At the end of the lesson, everyone to sit down and evaluate the lesson; Give the student teachers some time apart, e.g. shadowing a subject leader; Mentor (joined by class teacher as appropriate) to raise the issue(s) directly and professionally with both student teachers - either separately or together as appropriate given the context. The emphasis in the discussion should be on the need for professionalism to transcend differences in personality. If necessary, agree specific actions to restore the situation and review progress on a regular basis. Scenario 4 The class teacher of a Y2 class, with two student teachers in it, can see the children in her class are playing one student teacher off against the other. The class teacher s sympathies lie with the out-going, gregarious student teacher, to the detriment of the other. How would you deal with this situation as the mentor? 50

51 Mentor to get involved in the situation, working alongside the class teacher, to ensure one student teacher is not unfairly disadvantaged. mentor to intervene early or there will be a negative spiral downwards; Mentor to try and facilitate opportunities for the less confident student teacher to shine /succeed and receive praise; Mentor to discuss with the student teachers (together or separately as appropriate given the context) how they feel about the situation and why it is happening. If necessary, agree specific actions to restore the situation and review progress on a regular basis Generic Guidance to Student Teachers on Paired/Collaborative Teaching Placements Meet with your partner (i.e. the other student teacher) before the start of the school experience, so that you can discuss any targets you may have for your professional practice; Work pro-actively to establish an effective, working relationship with your partner; Ensure you are clear about what roles you will be taking when in the classroom, e.g. who is the lead and support teacher in different lessons; Ensure that if you are the lead teacher your support teacher has details of your lesson plan, so that they can use it to plan for their group. If you are taking the role of support teacher, ensure that you plan in detail for the group you have responsibility for; If you are acting as an observer, or using your partner as an observer, be quite clear about what you want observed. If your partner is to be observer in your lesson, ask them to focus on specific aspects of your teaching or on children s responses as they are learning; If you are taking joint responsibility for a lesson that is to be co- planned/taught, negotiate your roles/responsibilities in advance together and be quite clear what they are at all points in the lesson; Ensure that if you are teaching your specialist subject that you take the opportunity to help your partner if this is not their specialism; Ensure that you teach a broad and balanced curriculum not just the literacy or numeracy; Ensure that you meet as a pair with your class teacher regularly and with your School mentor regularly during your school experience. They will offer useful advice and give you a lot of help; Make sure you both arrive in school well before school day starts and leave after you have ascertained whether you can do anything to assist the class teacher. Expect to spend time with your partner in school, jointly planning your lessons. Be prepared to be honest, yet sensitive to others needs. Be prepared to confide in others (class teacher, mentor, link tutor) if you have concerns about your working relationship with your partner. Sharing your concerns early is important; Continue to work professionally with your partner at all times, whether you have a good, friendly working relationship with them or not. You do not have to be close friends to have a positive, professional working relationship; 51

52 Guidance to Student Teachers on Observing and Feeding Back to Each Other Observing teaching Agree a focus for the observation before the teaching begins. For example: o Clarity of lesson introduction o Effectiveness of plenary o Teacher knowledge o Clarity of explanations and instructions o Questioning skills o Strategies to promote inclusion o Class management When deciding on the focus for the observation, take account of: o Feedback from previous observations o Aspects of practice which your partner wishes to develop o The range of skills needed for good teaching o The Professional Standards for QTS Be prepared to: o Share the lesson plan prior to the observation o Discuss the intended or possible learning outcomes o Discuss the intended structure, timings and progression of the lesson Make notes as you observe, describing what you see in relation to your intended focus. Giving feedback Make sure that the feedback takes place in an appropriate place (for example, where it cannot be overheard by pupils); Be respectful and sensitive to the feelings of your partner; Keep to the agreed focus of the observation, describing what you observed; Give positive feedback first and repeat it at the end of the discussion; Aim for an appropriate balance between praise and targets for development. Depending on the relationship (and the confidence level of your partner) this may be an equal number of points for each or a 3:1 (positive: targets for development) ratio; Depersonalise the feedback so that your partner is aware that constructive criticisms are of the observed events and are not personal; Be aware that the aim of the feedback is to help your partner to make progress on his/her learning journey. Perfect practice during your training (or, indeed, at any point in your career) is highly unlikely. Receiving feedback Make it clear to your observer what kind of feedback you want; As you receive feedback, be aware of your own reactions, both intellectual and emotional; Listen closely to what is being said; Resist the impulse to take constructive criticism personally or defensively; Towards the end of the feedback make sure that you understand what your partner is saying and ask for clarification if necessary; Be positive about what you can learn from the experience. 52

53 Mentors should hold weekly meetings with trainee teachers during school experience to discuss and record achievements and targets against the standards. Weekly Mentor Meeting Log Trainee Teacher: School: Date: Course: Subject: Focus: Review of last week s targets / action plan: (to be drafted by trainee prior to meeting) Areas for Discussion: 1. Lesson observations (refer to University of Chichester Lesson Observation Criteria) 2. Check and comment on teaching files - quality of planning, lesson evaluations, monitoring and assessment 3. Check completion of Subject Knowledge Audit 4. Check Teachers Standards evidence 5. Consider Grading descriptors and agree targets 6. Directed Tasks / Training Activities 7. Other Is Notification of Concern required? Yes No If Yes please notify link tutor and also complete a Notification of Concern form and fax to the university or to the programme administrator. Notification of concern can be used at any time to notify concerns that are not yet of Grade 4 level Targets for Development: Mentor to sign: Date: Trainee Teacher to sign: Number of days absent from previous week: Cumulative absences: 53

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