AGENDA for Friday, April 23

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1 AGENDA for Friday, April 23 REGISTRATION OPENS BREAKOUT SESSION A 7:15AM 8:00AM 8:00AM 9:30AM A1. Socially Savvy & Emotionally Equipped : Strategies to Teach Social/Emotional Skills with Jill Kuzma, M.A., ISD Apple Valley, Eagan, Rosemount School District Part 1 of 4: Participants in this workshop will learn about social/emotional units of study with lessons centered around developing social perspective talking skills, increasing awareness of emotions and associated non-verbal cues, controlling impulsive behaviors, and expanding the social awareness skills necessary for reciprocal friendships and social interactions. These units of study incorporate lesson activities utilizing children s literature, a variety of visual learning tools, role-play activities, interactive games, Internet resources, and other technology tools. Jill is widely known for her energetic presentation style and for providing teaching ideas that are user-friendly and immediately applicable in the classroom. Get to know Jill and preview some of her teaching tools and resources by checking out her website at 1. Increase an understanding of how social cognitive deficits impact students academically and socially in the classroom. 2. Learn about social/emotional units of study with lesson activities utilizing children s literature, a variety of visual learning tools, role-play activities, interactive games, Internet resources, and other technology tools. 3. Identify 5-7 specific intervention ideas/strategies participants feel might be personally useful as an educator working with students with social/emotional communication needs. 4. Develop increased familiarity and comfort with writing and measuring social/emotional/behavioral IEP goals and objectives for students. A2. Evidence-Based Treatment Approaches for Aphasia, Alexia, and Agraphia with Pélagie M. Beeson, Ph.D., University of Arizona This course will provide a comprehensive review of the nature and treatment of acquired impairments of spoken and written language. We will review the neural substrates and cognitive processes that support language and characterize the nature-specific alexia and agraphia syndromes that often accompany aphasia. Specific treatment protocols will be described 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION April 23-24, 2010 Arrowwood Resort, Alexandria, MN and illustrated by case examples to provide a clear idea of the approaches and likely candidates. 1. Describe current views of the cognitive processes and neural substrates of spoken and written language processes. 2. Assess and implement treatment approaches for word retrieval deficits in individuals with aphasia, including semantic and phonemic self-cueing strategies. 3. Assess and implement treatment protocols to improve reading. 4. Assess and implement treatment protocols to improve written communication. A3. Understanding the Process of Processing: Strategies for the Real World with Jeanane Ferre, Ph.D., Central Auditory Evaluation & Treatment Part 1 of 4: CAPD, APD, LPD, or something else? Labels confuse the issue. Understanding children s central auditory processing deficits may be complex but it needn t be complicated. This session will describe the process of processing examining the continuum of processing skills needed by school-age children for success. Differential diagnosis of processing disorders and informal techniques to assess levels along the continuum will be described. Types of processing deficits will be discussed. The afternoon session will be devoted to practical deficitspecific management of and treatment for auditory processing deficits among school-age children. 1. Define auditory processing, central auditory processing, and language processing. 2. Describe assessment of processing disorders. 3. Describe behavioral characteristics of various types of processing deficits. 4. Implement effective modifications for various types of processing disorders. 5. Choose effective remediation strategies for various types of CAP deficits.

2 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 2 of 10 A4. Ethics: It s More Than Common Sense with David R. Denton, M.A., J.D., American Speech- Language-Hearing Association Part 1 of 2: Every year, ASHA s Board of Ethics and state regulatory agencies adjudicate ethics complaints against audiologists and speech-language pathologists. Depending on how egregious the conduct is, individuals face sanctions that range from a private reprimand to revocation of ASHA membership and certification, and/or state licensure, for a period of years up to life. Many clinicians found in violation assert that they didn t know that the conduct they engaged in was unethical. Others state that, even when faced with circumstances they know may pose an ethical dilemma, they didn t know how to respond in an ethically responsible manner or where to seek guidance. Therefore, practitioners need to develop sensitivity to ethics and acquire decision-making strategies when confronted with ethical quandaries. One without the other is insufficient. This session will utilize information and case scenarios that represent ethical dilemmas, and suggest practical means the busy practitioner can employ to appropriately respond to them. 1. Identify the types and trends of contemporary professional issues that give rise to ethical dilemmas. 2. Identify ethical decision-making strategies for applying ethical principles and rules to ensure compliance with professional responsibilities. 3. Describe general malpractice risk management strategies and how abiding by their ethical duties may lessen malpractice exposure. 4. Describe the scope and nature of ASHA s ethics program and the work of its board of ethics and how to gain access to ethics resources. 5. Identify those instances in which they have an obligation to report unethical/unprofessional conduct to their professional associations and/or state regulatory agencies. A5. Understanding Your Role: Current and Future Practices of Speech-Language Pathologists in the Area of Literacy with Megan Mahowald, M.A., Minneapolis Public Schools Part 1 of 2: Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working with children and adolescents with varying disabilities will encounter students who are struggling with reading and writing. SLPs are equipped with the specific knowledge and skills to be experts in reading but are often conflicted because it is unknown what the SLP s role is in development, assessment, and intervention of literacy skills. SLPs need to understand the reading process and impacts of speech and language impairments on this process in order to negotiate the scope of practice as outlined by ASHA ( Knowledge and skills needed by speech-language pathologists with respect to reading and writing in children and adolescents ; ASHA 2002). This presentation will give SLPs the basics in the reading process in order to better understand the SLP s role and negotiate what is within the scope of practice. The presentation is designed to empower SLPs with the tools to provide rich intervention that will help students become more successful readers and writers as well effective communicators. 1. Understand the basics of the reading process and how that relates to speech and language skills. 2. Understand the roles and responsibilities of SLPs in order to negotiate their own role in their current position. 3. Understand how to apply the knowledge of reading process in designing speech-language interventions. 9:30AM 10:00AM Visit MSHA s exhibitors and sponsors while enjoying a refreshment break. Don t forget the MSHF Silent Auction! BREAKOUT SESSION B 10:00AM 11:30AM B1. Socially Savvy & Emotionally Equipped : Strategies to Teach Social/Emotional Skills with Jill Kuzma, M.A., ISD Apple Valley, Eagan, Rosemount School District Part 2 of 4; see Session A1 B2. Evidence-Based Treatment Approaches for Aphasia, Alexia, and Agraphia with Pélagie M. Beeson, Ph.D., University of Arizona Part 2 of 4; see Session A2 B3. Understanding the Process of Processing: Strategies for the Real World with Jeanane Ferre, Ph.D., Central Auditory Evaluation & Treatment Part 2 of 4; see Session A3 B4. Ethics: It s More Than Common Sense with David R. Denton, M.A., J.D., American Speech- Language-Hearing Association Part 2 of 2; see Session A4

3 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 3 of 10 B5. Understanding Your Role: Current and Future Practices of Speech-Language Pathologists in the Area of Literacy with Megan Mahowald, M.A., Minneapolis Public Schools Part 2 of 2; see Session A5 VENDOR ACADEMY 10:00AM 11:30AM B6. The Imagery-Language Connection for Language and Literacy Development with Nancy Fifer, B.A., Lindamood-Bell Learning Processes A connection between the verbal and the visual code is essential for proficiency in reading and language comprehension. Successful skill development requires an accurate understanding of what cognitive factors affect language processing, how to diagnose deficits, and how to stimulate those cognitive factors affecting learning. This presentation will provide an overview of Dual Coding Theory (DCT) and how it has been systematically applied to the development and remediation of language processing skills through stimulation of imagery. Current instructional practices include developing symbol and concept imagery. The imagery is methodically applied to decoding and comprehension skills in order to develop the necessary reading skills to be successful. Results and research from clinical practice and school partnerships will be highlighted. 1. Describe a model of language processing skills and what measures reflect those skills. 2. Describe how imagery is used to affect reading and comprehension gain. ASSOCIATION LUNCHEON 11:30AM 1:00PM 1:00PM 1:30PM Visit MSHA s exhibitors and sponsors while enjoying a refreshment break. Don t forget the MSHF Silent Auction! BREAKOUT SESSION C 1:30PM 3:00PM C1. Socially Savvy & Emotionally Equipped : Strategies to Teach Social/Emotional Skills with Jill Kuzma, M.A., ISD Apple Valley, Eagan, Rosemount School District Part 3 of 4; see Session A1 C2. Evidence-Based Treatment Approaches for Aphasia, Alexia, and Agraphia with Pélagie M. Beeson, Ph.D., University of Arizona Part 3 of 4; see Session A2 C3. Understanding the Process of Processing: Strategies for the Real World with Jeanane Ferre, Ph.D., Central Auditory Evaluation & Treatment Part 3 of 4; see Session A3 C4. Military Culture and the Rehabilitation Process: Collaboration with Patients as Expert Consultants with Donald L. MacLennan, M.A., VA Medical Center Military culture carries with it a specific language, value set, and customs. As such, principles of cultural diversity and the effects of culture on the rehabilitation process are relevant when treating service members for the effects of traumatic brain injury. Borrowing from the example of Ylvisaker & Feeney, patients in a transitional brain injury program were employed as expert consultants to identify important elements of military culture and how these elements can be incorporated into rehabilitation. 1. Identify at least three aspects of military culture. 2. Identify at least three examples in which knowledge of military culture may enhance the rehabilitation process. 3. Identify two therapeutic benefits of using patients with traumatic brain injury as expert consultants. C5. Birth-to-Three: New Ideas, Old Experience with David E. Harper, M.A., Health Dimensions Rehab - Challenge Center Part 1 of 2: This presentation will cover a variety of issues in working with infants and toddlers. Part 1 will be devoted to assessment: tools to use, issues which should be covered, and suggestions for adapting testing to fit a variety of disabilities and temperaments. These will reflect ASHA s Practice Parameters and more than 20 years of personal experience. Time will be included for discussion and question-and-answer sessions. 1. List eight types of information that should be included in all birth-to-three assessments. 2. Describe three ways to involve families in their children s therapy. 3. Describe three major approaches to working with very young children suspected of having autism spectrum disorders.

4 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 4 of 10 VENDOR ACADEMY 1:30PM 3:00PM C6. Long-Term Effects of Electronic Anti- Stuttering Devices with Thomas David Kehoe, M.B.A., Casa Futura Technologies In the past six years, at least eight long-term studies of electronic anti-stuttering devices have been published in peer-reviewed journals. Significant differences have been found in several areas, including effectiveness in low-stress vs. high-stress environments (e.g., reading aloud in a speech clinic vs. asking questions of strangers) and effectiveness in training carryover fluency, (i.e., over time, the user s speech improves and he or she needs the device less and less). Differing outcomes will be tied to differing investigative methods, differences in technology, and differences in therapy used in combination with the electronic devices. Participants will also be able to try some of the devices. 1. Describe from personal experience the effects of delayed auditory feedback (DAF), frequency-altered auditory feedback (FAF), and other technologies. 2. Answer clients questions about long-term effects of electronic anti-stuttering devices by referencing studies published in scientific journals. 3. Incorporate electronic anti-stuttering devices into traditional fluency shaping therapy to increase therapeutic effectiveness. 3:00PM 3:30PM Visit MSHA s exhibitors and sponsors while enjoying a refreshment break. Don t forget the MSHF Silent Auction! BREAKOUT SESSION D 3:30PM 5:00PM D1. Socially Savvy & Emotionally Equipped : Strategies to Teach Social/Emotional Skills with Jill Kuzma, M.A., ISD Apple Valley, Eagan, Rosemount School District Part 4 of 4; see Session A1 D2. Evidence-Based Treatment Approaches for Aphasia, Alexia, and Agraphia with Pélagie M. Beeson, Ph.D., University of Arizona Part 4 of 4; see Session A2 D3. Understanding the Process of Processing: Strategies for the Real World with Jeanane Ferre, Ph.D., Central Auditory Evaluation & Treatment Part 4 of 4; see Session A3 D4. A Speech and Language Pathologist With a Brain Tumor? Now That s a Treatment Challenge! with Evan Page, M.A., Regions Hospital; Jerome Marcouiller, M.S., Regions Hospital; Carole Wendell Sellars, Ph.D., Kruse Staffing; and Jennifer Pendrill, J.D., Find Law This presentation explores professional and personal issues related to speech and language therapy for an adult with a left occipital brain tumor. It is unique because the patient is a speech and language pathologist with a long career working with children with traumatic brain injury. Professional content will outline the pathophysiology of a brain tumor before and after treatment and the functional deficits that followed, including visuo-spatial, language, and cognitive problems. Therapeutic strategies will be presented, including evidence based practice. Personal content will include the patient s view of her own rehabilitation. There is humor and extreme vulnerability when the patient understands rehabilitation. What is effective therapy from the patient s view? What really helps the family? The patient s adult daughter shares her insight. The presenters will discuss their personal journey in this unique case. 1. Outline specific symptoms of a left occipital tumor resection, especially language and cognition. 2. List four characteristics of a rehabilitation program that really help a patient and family. D5. Birth-to-Three: New Ideas, Old Experience with David E. Harper, M.A., Health Dimensions Rehab - Challenge Center Part 2 of 2; see Session C5. Part 2 will focus on treatment and involving families. A variety of current issues in treatment will be discussed, again with reference to ASHA standards and personal experiences. Time will be included for discussion and question-and-answer sessions. Part 3 will focus on children with autism spectrum disorders. With the apparent increase in the incidence (or at least the diagnosis) of these disorders comes a real need for more information, particularly about assessing and treating very young children who are suspected of having these disorders. Time will be included for discussion and question-and-answer sessions.

5 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 5 of 10 VENDOR ACADEMY 3:30PM 5:00PM D6. A Systematic Approach to Remediating Auditory Processing Disorders with Cindy Ward, M.S., Super Duper Publications Experts believe that providing sensory stimulation to the auditory centers of the brain helps students improve auditory attention, auditory memory, and auditory processing of verbal information. This session will discuss current auditory processing research and theory and introduce a theory-based, direct, systematic educational-software approach to auditory training. 1. Discuss current theory and research as it relates to auditory processing and APD. 2. Identify the impact of APD on success in the classroom. 3. Explain two systematic approaches to remediation of APD. ASSOCIATION RECEPTION 5:00PM 6:30PM & POSTER SESSION Please join your colleagues and Minnesota s finest students and earn up to 1.5 clock hours while you enjoy light refreshments and a cash bar. P1. A Case Study in Childhood Apraxia of Speech with Lori E. Griffin, M.A., St. Cloud State University 1. Identify challenges in diagnosing childhood apraxia of speech. 2. Apply evidence based practice to the diagnosis and treatment of childhood apraxia of speech. P2. A Review of EBP in Dysphagia Assessment with Katherine Ann Treichel, B.A., and G.N. Rangamani, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University 1. Summarize a few dysphagia assessment tools that are efficacious and effective based on research outcomes. 2. List some dysphagia assessment tools that should be used in tandem with more evidence-based assessment tools. P3. A Survey of the Preparedness of Speech- Language Pathologist Graduate Students to Serve Culturally Diverse Populations with Bethany D. Larson, B.A. and Dana R. Collins, Ph.D., University of Minnesota-Duluth 1. Identify graduate students opinions about their level of preparedness to work with culturally and linguistically diverse clients. 2. Gain awareness of students preceptions for two educational models (course versus infusion) use for preparing them to work with culturally and linguistically diverse populations. P4. Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Oromandibular Dystonia with Sharyl Anne Samargia, M.A., Anne Foust, Jake Haws, and Teresa Jacobson Kimberley, Ph.D., PT, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities 1. Describe what rtms is and its potential benefits with dystonia. 2. Identify how rtms can induce neuroplastic changes. P5. Healthcare Benefits of Speech-Language Pathologists in Various Work Settings with Margery M. Whites, Ph.D., Elizabeth Dyce, B.A., Briana Feeny, B.S., Liz Korbol, B.A., and Karissa Miller, B.S., St. Cloud State University 1. Understand what employers in the medical and educational work settings are doing to make healthcare more affordable and accessible to speech-language pathologists. 2. Understand how healthcare costs, coverage, and benefits have changed over the years for speechlanguage pathologists in the medical and educational work settings. P6. Healthcare Cost Effects on Speech-Language Pathologists and Their Clients with Margery M. Whites, Ph.D., Elise Ericksen, B.S., Chantelle Henning, B.S., Kira Flicek, B.S., and Rhonda Ripplinger, B.S., St. Cloud State University 1. Understand how healthcare costs and availiability affect speech-language pathologists in the medical and educational work settings. 2. Understand how client healthcare availability affects speech-language pathologists in the medical and educational work settings.

6 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 6 of 10 P7. HealthPartners Audiology (C)APD Team Model: An Evidence-Based, Interdisiplinary Approach with Vicki M. Anderson, M.A., David A. Geddes, Au.D., and Amy Sievert O Keefe, Au.D., HealthPartners Audiology 1. Identify domains within a Minimal Test Battery which are consistent with recommendations from both ASHA and AAA, which are based on research evidence, and which address several common concerns around (C)APD practice. 2. Identify characteristics and attributes of individuals who may have CAPD, and determine appropriate candidates to refer for (C)APD screening/evaluation. P8. Job Satisfaction of Speech-Language Pathologists Working in Public Schools with Marcia Leddy and Dana R. Collins, Ph.D., University of Minnesota Duluth 1. Determine what specific factors and/or issues may lead to burnout and (ultimately) the shortage of SLPs in the public schools. 2. Identify similarities and differences in terms of overall job satisfaction for SLPs employed in rural versus city settings. P9. One Patient s Lingual and Lip Strengthening Treatment with Janette Nieuwsma, Kanabec Hospital 1. Understand that lingual strength is measurable. 2. Measure using the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument. P10. One Somali Parent s Perceptions of Intervention for Her Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Survey Research with the Somali Community with Lindsay Dawn Knutson and Theresa Estrem, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University 1. Identify how one Somali parent of a child with ASD perceives the diagnostic process. 2. Describe future survey research to be used with parents and families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. P11. Selected Language Skills of a Child with Moebius Syndrome with Bonnie Lund, Ph.D., and Mary Richter, Minnesota State University Mankato 1. Demonstrate knowledge of Moebius Syndrome. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of qualitative research. P12. SLP Skills and Interdisiplinary Collaboration in Serving Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Clients with Theresa L. Estrem, Ph.D., and Elena Kurinski, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University 1. Describe Minnesota SLPs perceptions of their competencies in serving culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) clients. 2. Identify perceived areas for growth and development in serving the CLD population. 3. Describe preferred methods of obtaining additional training to better serve CLD clients. P13. Speech-Language Pathologists Opinions About Healthcare with Margery M. Whites, Ph.D., Angela Friebe, B.S., Kaitlin Knutson, B.S., Jenna Philippi, B.A.S., and Jocelyn Walsh, B.S., St. Cloud State University 1. Understand how speech-language pathologists feel about their own healthcare benefits and/or insurance in terms of availability and cost. 2. Understand how speech-language pathologists feel about the current status of the United States healthcare system. P14. Taking the Pulse of the Profession Concerning Spirituality with Cindy S. Spillers, Ph.D., Cortney Bongard, Kari DePlazes, Jenny Gerard, and Rachael Narveson, University of Minnesota Duluth 1. Define spirituality and differentiate it from religion. 2. Describe how a client s spirituality might influence her/his adjustment to the communication disorder. 3. Describe how a clinician s spirituality might influence her/his work with clients.

7 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 7 of 10 P15. Verb Retrieval in Expressive Aphasia Using Semantic Feature Analysis with G.N. Rangamani, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University; Jolene A. Day, M.S., Rehabvisions; Gail Lommen, M.S., North Memorial Hospital 1. Describe the theoretical bases of a couple of cognitive-linguistic treatment approaches of aphasia. 2. Identify the outcomes of the Semantic Feature Analysis and the Treatment of Underlying Forms methods of treatment. DINNER (ON YOUR OWN) A restaurant is available in the hotel. AGENDA for Saturday, April 24 6:30PM ASSOCIATION BREAKFAST 7:00AM 8:30AM & BUSINESS MEETING Enjoy early breakfast while listening to updates from MSHA s lobbyists as well as the State of the Association address by our president, Lisa Knudsen Porte. Members will be voting on the proposed MSHA Strategic Plan. Familiarize yourself with the Strategic Plan under the About MSHA member link at Please note: Breakfast will be served from 7:00 to 7:30. Food service will end at 7:30, when the annual business meeting begins. MSHA POLICY COUNCIL 8:30AM 9:00AM OPEN FORUM Earn CEUs while sharing information and concerns for Policy Council members to consider in providing direction to MSHA. 1. Identify an issue impacting the professions of speech-language pathology or audiology in the state of Minnesota that can be addressed by the Policy Council. 2. Identify an issue impacting the professions of speech-language pathology or audiology within your MSHA region that you would like your Policy Council representative(s) to know about. MSHA MEMBERSHIP 9:00AM 9:30AM OPEN MICROPHONE Share ideas, therapy techniques, professional achievements, and other collaborative information with your colleagues. 9:30AM 10:00AM Visit MSHA s exhibitors and sponsors. Don t forget the MSHF Silent Auction (which closes at 10:00AM)! KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 10:00AM 11:30AM K1. Threats to Professional Standards: Lessons Learned with Janet Deppe, M.S., American Speech-Language- Hearing Association With the ever-increasing shortage of qualified professionals and limited oversight and guidance from federal regulators, standards for speech-language pathology and, in some cases, audiology are eroding. Numerous states are developing alternative credentials for the delivery of speech and language services in schools. California is the latest example of a significant threat to the SLP profession. This presentation will focus on the real and perceived threats to professional standards and how state associations, Communication Sciences and Disorders Departments, ASHA, and individuals in the professions must work together to minimize these threats. The presentation will give clear examples of successful efforts of state associations and university training programs and will focus on ASHA s efforts to define SLP and audiology assistant practice through the development of a service continuum ladder. 1. Identify two successful efforts to address shortages by university training programs. 2. Identify three alternative credentials and how to combat them. 3. Name three things that members can do to help maintain professional standards for the professions. 11:30AM 12:00PM Visit MSHA s exhibitors and sponsors, and check the list of MSHF Silent Auction winners to see what you won! Box lunches are available for pickup at this time. BREAKOUT SESSION E 12:00 1:15PM E1. Cognitive Linguistic Treatment Methods in Aphasia with G.N. Rangamani, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University The presentation will address the principles of cognitive linguistic processes of language based on Garrett s (1988) model. Treatment methods based on cognitive linguistic processes will be introduced. Differences between the stimulatory and cognitive linguistic process-based treatment approaches will be discussed. Participants will have the opportunity to evaluate and apply relevant treatment approaches in sample cases.

8 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 8 of Describe the basic cognitive linguistic processes of language. 2. Identify linguistic impairments using the cognitivelinguistic model based approach. 3. Describe at least one cognitive linguistic based treatment approach. 4. Discuss the differences between stimulatory and cognitive linguistic processing methods of treatment. 5. Critically evaluate the signs and symptoms of a case example and apply relevant cognitive linguistic treatment approaches. E2. Core Knowledge of Cleft Care for Speech- Language Pathologists with Anna K. Thurmes, M.A., University of Minnesota School of Dentistry - Cleft Clinic; Kelly Nett Cordero, Ph.D., Center for Craniofacial Services Gillette Children s Specialty Healthcare Part 1 of 2: Clefting is the most common congenital anomaly and has a significant impact on speech. A foundation of knowledge regarding treatments involved and best practices for speech-language pathologists is critical to ensure appropriate care. This course aims to provide an overview of clefting and the purpose of interdisciplinary care. The nature and timing of medical, surgical, and dental treatments typically needed during the lifespan will also be discussed. A large portion will focus on describing velopharyngeal anatomy and physiology and the speech patterns associated with cleft palate, including hypernasality, nasal air emission, and posterior articulation. The essential elements of a perceptual assessment will be reviewed, as well as the role of instrumentation. Case examples and literature review will be used to illustrate development of appropriate treatment goals and the use of various therapy techniques. Finally, the importance of community and cleft team collaboration to maximize quality of care will be discussed. 1. Describe the resonance distortions and articulation errors that are associated with cleft palate and the core components of a speech evaluation used to identify current level of function and develop a treatment plan. 2. Describe the therapeutic hierarchy and techniques that can be used to correct maladaptive articulation errors and learned nasal air emission during speech production. 3. Describe the medical, dental, and surgical treatments typically involved in the care of individuals with cleft lip and palate. 4. Describe mechanisms for collaboration between community speech-language pathologists and the members of the cleft palate/craniofacial team. E3. Communicating Progress: Tools for Data- Based Decision-Making with Theresa L. Estrem, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University; Janet Tilstra, Ph.D., College of St. Benedict Part 1 of 2: Most SLPs are aware of the importance of data collection for accountability and best practice standards. However, data collection can be timeconsuming and may seem intrusive during intervention. As a result, many SLPs do not systematically use daily intervention data to inform clinical decisions. In this session, participants will learn methods for goal setting and repeated measures data collection that can be used to communicate progress and guide changes in intervention methods. 1. Describe three guiding principles for data-based decision-making. 2. Describe data collection methods for mastery monitoring and repeated measures assessment. 3. Develop a goal written in repeated measures form and a method to communicate progress. E4. Teaching Functional Gesture Use to Children with Autism with Jacki Harth, M.S., L.P., Behavioral Dimensions A review of literature indicates that gestural communication is an important part of language development in all children, and children with autism often have significant deficits in this type of early communication. Typical gesture development will be illustrated and analyzed to provide a framework that leads to a scope and sequence of gesture development to guide teaching the functional use of gestures to children with autism. The results of studies that have effectively taught children with autism functional gesture use will be presented with a discussion regarding future implications. 1. Demonstrate an understanding of how gestures develop in typical child development. 2. Demonstrate an understanding of the absence or atypical development of gestures in children with autism. 3. Demonstrate the strategies to teach early gesture use. 4. Demonstrate an understanding of current research on teaching gestures to children with autism. 1:15PM 1:30PM Enjoy a short break with your colleagues.

9 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 9 of 10 BREAKOUT SESSION F 1:30PM 2:45PM F1. Cognitive Linguistic Treatment Methods in Aphasia with G.N. Rangamani, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University Part 2 of 2; see Session E1 F2. Core Knowledge of Cleft Care for Speech- Language Pathologists with Anna K. Thurmes, M.A., University of Minnesota School of Dentistry - Cleft Clinic; Kelly Nett Cordero with Kelly Nett Cordero, Ph.D., Center for Craniofacial Services Gillette Children s Specialty Healthcare Part 2 of 2; see Session E2 F3. Communicating Progress: Tools for Data- Based Decision-Making with Theresa L. Estrem, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University; Janet Tilstra, Ph.D., College of St. Benedict Part 2 of 2; see Session E3 F4. Fostering Our Future: Clinical Supervision and Beyond with Lynette Carlson, M.A., University of Minnesota Duluth; Mark DeRuiter, Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Jessica Jones; Judi Larsen, M.A., St. Cloud State University; Vicki Riedinger, M.S., Minnesota State University Moorhead; Sarah Smits, M.S., University of Wisconsin River Falls; and Angela Sterling-Orth, M.S., University of Wisconsin Eau Claire Clinic directors from graduate speech-language pathology programs in Minnesota and Wisconsin will serve as panelists to discuss supervising students in clinical practicum placements and internships. Participants will gain knowledge of ASHA s documents on supervision, supervision styles and models, basic skills and tasks of the supervisory process, and performance evaluation. 1. Discuss ASHA s documents on clinical supervision. 2. Identify supervision stages and styles. 3. Identify skill areas for certificate of clinical competence. 4. Develop strategies for troubleshooting with challenging students. ROUNDTABLE SESSION 1 1:30PM 2:45PM These small group discussions are an opportunity to sit with colleagues and brainstorm assessment and treatment ideas or discuss current topics related to audiology and speech-language pathology. Tables will be set up for each of the topics listed below. Look for identification signs at each table. R1. Assessment and Treatment of Adolescents from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds with Marilyn Fairchild, MA-TESL, M.A., University of Minnesota Minneapolis 1. Describe one assessment technique that can be used with CLD adolescents. 2. Describe one strategy to facilitate cross-cultural understanding and acceptance of speech-language diagnosis and treatment in adolescents. R2. Assessment and Treatment of the Dizzy Patient with Carrie D. Hathaway, Au.D.; Terry Hamm, B.S., Physical Therapy, Ridegeview Balance Center 1. Understand how current technologies (e.g. CDP, VNG, CHAMP, VENG, rotary chair) are used to assess the dizzy patient. 2. Use balance assessment test results to improve treatment of the dizzy patient. R3. Birth-to-Three: Sharing Ideas, Making Connections with David E. Harper, M.A., Health Dimensions Rehab - Challenge Center 1. List at least five different ideas for use in therapy. 2. Have contact information for at least three other people who work with Birth-to-Three who would be willing to provide information or bounce ideas off of. R4. Concerns and Rewards of the Rural SLP with Pete Amberg, M.S., Big Stone Therapies, Inc. 1. Identify three concerns/challenges of the rural SLP. 2. Identify three rewarding aspects of the being a rural SLP. R5. Mental Health Issues in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology with Rebecca Crowell, Au.D., St. Cloud State University; Julie Hanenburg, MSW, LICSW, Lighthouse Child and Family Services 1. Recommend and apply appropriate counseling techniques to various case studies. 2. Examine various case studies and distinguish situations that warrant professional collaboration and referral.

10 2010 MSHA SPRING CONVENTION AGENDA page 10 of 10 R6. Revisions to Chapter 17 of the Medicaid Providers Manual: What Should I Know? with Melanie R. Theis, M.Ed., Augustana Therapy Services 1. Locate and utilize the documentation standards provided by the Department of Human Services for Medicaid Providers. 2. List three changes to the Rehab Provider Manual for Minnesota Medicaid Services. R7. Treatment of Stuttering: Emotional and Attitudinal Considerations with Linda R. Hinderscheit, M.A., University of Minnesota; Erin Bodner, M.A. CFY, Anoka-Hennepin School District 1. Describe the importance of considering the attitudes and emotions concomitant to stuttering in the treatment of stuttering. 2. Identify resources for treatment that addresses the emotions and attitudes of children and adults who stutter. R8. Visual Phonics in the Classroom with Kellie M. Rhinerson, M.S., Deerfield Community School District 1. Identify ways to collaborate with classroom teachers about phonemic awareness and soundletter correspondance for literacy development. 2. Describe at least two strengths and challenges to piloting a Visual Phonics program. R9. What in the World Is Happening in Aphasia? with Cynthia R. Busch, Ph.D., Minnesota State University Mankato 1. Describe developments in intervention approaches to aphasia in at least three countries. 2. Define key vocabulary that is being used within these developing approaches. 2:45PM 3:00PM Stay at the same roundtable or move to another one. ROUNDTABLE SESSION 2 3:00PM 4:00PM Repeat of Roundtable Sessions 1 9 plus three additional sessions (10 12). (1.0 clock hour) R10. Cognitive Linguistic Treatment Methods in Aphasia with G.N. Rangamani, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University 1. Describe the basic cognitive linguistic processes of language. 2. Identify linguistic impairments using the cognitivelinguistic model based approach. 3. Describe at least one cognitive linguistic based treatment approach. 4. Discuss the differences between stimulatory and cognitive linguistic processing methods of treatment. 5. Critically evaluate the signs and symptoms of a case example and apply relevant cognitive linguistic treatment approaches. R11. Communicating Progress: Tools for Data- Based Decision-Making with Theresa L. Estrem, Ph.D., St. Cloud State University; Janet Tilstra, Ph.D., College of St. Benedict 1. Describe three guiding principles for data-based decision-making. 2. Describe data collection methods for mastery monitoring and repeated measures assessment. 3. Develop a goal written in repeated measures form and a method to communicate progress. R12. Fostering Our Future: Clinical Supervision and Beyond with Lynette Carlson, M.A., University of Minnesota Duluth; Mark DeRuiter, Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Jessica Jones; Judi Larsen, M.A., St. Cloud State University; Vicki Riedinger, M.S., Minnesota State University Moorhead; Sarah Smits, M.S., University of Wisconsin River Falls; and Angela Sterling-Orth, M.S., University of Wisconsin Eau Claire 1. Discuss ASHA s documents on clinical supervision. 2. Identify supervision stages and styles. 3. Identify skill areas for certificate of clinical competence. 4. Develop strategies for troubleshooting with challenging students.