a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding.

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1 Print Concepts 1 Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print. Reading Foundational Reading Skills Phonological Awareness Phonics and Word Recognition Fluency Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes). Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. Read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding. Use combined knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and out of context. a. Read on-level text with purpose and understanding. b. Read on-level prose and poetry orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings. c. Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary. CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 1

2 1 Read Closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it: cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. (B) Key Ideas and s 2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. (L) Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. (IT) 3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character s thoughts, words, or actions). (L) Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. (IT) 4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area. (IT) Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those that allude to significant characters found in mythology (e.g., Herculean). (L) Reading Literature (L) or Informational Texts (IT) or Both (B) Craft and Structure Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (in charts, graphs, diagrams, animations) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears (IT) Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. (IT) Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations. (L) Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text. (L) Explain major differences between poems, drama, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems (e.g., verse, rhythm, meter) and drama when writing or speaking about a text. (L) Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided. (IT) Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text. (IT) 9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics (e.g., opposition of good and evil) and patterns of events (e.g., the quest) in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures. (L) CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 2

3 approaches the authors take. Integrate information from two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. (IT) Range of Reading and Text Complexity 10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4 5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (L) By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 4 5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. (IT) CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 3

4 1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer s purpose. b. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. c. Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. Text Types and Purposes 2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. 3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. a. Orient the reader by establishing a situationand introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. b. Use dialogue and description to develop experiences and events or show the responses of characters to situations. c. Use a variety of transitional words and phrases to manage the sequence of events. d. Use concrete words and phrases and sensory details to convey experiences and events precisely. e. Provide a conclusion that follows from the narrated experiences or events. Writing 4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Production and Distribution of Writing 5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1 3) 6 Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others. With some guidance and support from adults, use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to type a minimum of one page in a single sitting. CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 4

5 7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. Research to Build and Present Knowledge 8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant information from print and digital sources; take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources. 9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. a. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character s thoughts, words, or actions]. ). b. Apply grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.") Range of Writing 10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 5

6 Comprehension and Collaboration 1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. (about grade 4 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and large groups) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacherled) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly. a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. Speaking and Listening 2 3 Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Evaluate a speaker s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric. Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points. 4 Evaluate a speaker s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 5 Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations. Add audio recordings and visual displays to presentations when appropriate to enhance the development of main ideas or themes. 6 Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion); use formal English when appropriate to task and situation. CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 6

7 Conventions of Standard English 1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. a. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why). b. Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses. c. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions. f. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons. d. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag). e. Form and use prepositional phrases. g. Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).* 2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. a. Use correct capitalization. d. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed. b. Use commas and quotation marks to mark direct speech and quotations from a text. c. Use a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence. Knowledge of Language 3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening. b. Choose punctuation for effect. c. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion). Use knowledge of language and its conventionswhen writing, speaking, reading, or listening. a. Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely. Language 4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiplemeaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials, as appropriate. For reading and content Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 4 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. a. Use context (e.g., definitions, examples, or restatements in text) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase. b. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word (e.g., telegraph, photograph, autograph). c. Consult reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation and determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases. Vocabulary Acquisition and Use 5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. c. Demonstrate understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms). a. Explain the meaning of simple similes and metaphors (e.g., as pretty as a picture) in context. b. Recognize and explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. 6 Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown term important to comprehension or expression. Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, including those that signal precise actions, emotions, or states of being (e.g., quizzed, whined, stammered) and that are basic to a particular topic (e.g., wildlife, conservation, and endangered when discussing animal preservation). CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 7

8 SCIENCE Most objects in the solar system are in a regular and predictable motion a. The positions of the earth and moon relative to the sun explain the cycles of day and night, and the monthly moon phases 1. Explain the motion of the earth relative to the sun that causes Earth to experience cycles of day and night. 2. Construct models demonstrating Earth s rotation on its axis, the moon s revolution around the earth, and the earth and moon revolving around the sun. 3. Distinguish between the sun as a source of light and the moon as a reflection of that light. 4. Observe and record the moon s appearance over time and analyze findings to describe the cyclical changes in its appearance from Earth (moon phases). 5. Relate the moon phases to changes in the moon s position relative to the earth and sun during its 29-day revolution around the earth All organisms depend on the living and non living features of the environment for survival a When the environment changes some organisms survive and reproduce, and others die or move to new locations. 1. Give examples of ways that living and nonliving things are interdependent within an ecosystem. 2. Draw diagrams showing how the sun's energy enters and is transferred among producers, consumers, herbivores, carnivoress, omnivores and decomposers in an ecosystem. 3. Analyze food webs to describe how energy is transferred from plants to various animals in an ecosystem. 4. Distinguish between naturally occurring changes in ecosystems and those caused by human activity. 5. Distinguish between naturally occurring changes in ecosystems and those caused by human activity. 6. Predict the effect an environmental change, such as drought or forest destruction, might have on the community of living things. Water has a major roll in shaping the earths surface a Water circulates through the Earth's crust, oceans and atmosphere. 1. Describe the role of the sun's energy (i.e., heating and cooling) in the continuous cycling of water between the earth and the atmosphere through evaporation, condensation and precipitation. 2.Use models to demonstrawte that topography causes precipitation landing on earth to move in strems and rivers from higher to lower elevations. 3.Design and conduct simple investigations to determine how moving water (flowing downhill or in ocean waves) causes changes to the land, the coastline or the course of a stream or river. 4. Pose testable questions and employ simple equipment and measuring tools to collect data about factors that affect erosion (e.g., type of earth material in an area, volume of moving water, slope of land, vegetation coverage). CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 8

9 Earth materials have different physical and chemical properties a. Rocks and minerals have properties that may be identified through observation and testing; these properties determine how earth materials are used 1. Differentiate between rocks and minerals. 2. Use the senses and simple measuring tools to gather data about various rocks and classify them based on observable properties (e.g., shape, size, color, weight, visible markings). 3. Conduct simple tests to determine properties of different minerals (e.g. color, odor, streak, luster, hardness, magnetism), organize data in a table, and use the data and other resources to identify unknown mineral specimens. 4. Summarize nonfiction text to compare and contrast the conditions under which igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks are formed. 5. Observe and analyze rock properties (e.g., crystal size or layers) to infer the conditions under which the rock was formed. 6. Evaluate the usefulness of different rock types for specific applications (e.g., buildings, sidewalks, stone walls, statues or monuments). How is scientific knowledge created and communicated? Scientific Literacy includes speaking, listening, presenting, interpreting, reading and writing about science. Scientific inquiry is a thoughtful and coordinated attempt to search out, describe, explain and predict natural phenomena. Mathematics provides useful tools for the description, analysis and presentation of scientific data and ideas. SOCIAL STUDIES Content Knowledge: Knowledge of concepts and information from history and social studies in necessary to promote understanding of our nation and our world. Standard Demonstrate an understanding of significant events and themes in the United States history. 1.2 Describe the importance of significant events in local and Connecticut history and their connections to United States history 1.3 Demonstrate an understanding of significant events and themes in world history/international studies. 1.4 Demonstrate an understanding of geographical space and place. 1.5 Describe the interaction of humans and the environment. 1.7 Explain the purpose, structures and functions of government and law at the local, state, national nd international levels. 1.8 Describe the interactions between citizens and their government in the making and implementation of laws. 1.9 Understand the rights and responsibilities of citizens Recognize and evaluate the significancde of historical national documanet (e.g. Constitution, Bill of Rights, Declaration of Independence) Identify and locate Earth's various physical features (e.g., continents, oceans, mountains) Create a representation of geographic features (e.g., map, graph, model) Differentiate between absolute and relative locations (e.g., longitude e and latitude versus proximity) Compare and contrast map types (e.g., political, physical, population) Analyze how a constitution provides structure for a government Explain the process for making and implementing laws in states and national Evaluate the impact of specific laws on the state and national level Explain significant characteristics of an effective and responsible resident in one's state (e.g., voting, participating in goverenment) Explain when we buy something we also give up something (opportunity cost) Hypothesize how people use their personal resources (e.g., spending, saving) Compare and contrast barter and cash exchanges Explain how taxes in C Identify the cultures and traditions of Native American peoples before colonizations Analyze the impact of historical changes on the state or region (e.g., location of capital, transportation) Explain the influences that contributed to European exploration and colonization throughout the regions Evaluate the ways in which people affect the environment (e.g., dams, mining, global warming, preservation, recycling) Discuss how geographical features and natural resources shape people's lives Describe how physical systems (weather and climate) have affected people's lives in various regions (e.g. economy, re creation, transportation) Analyze why certain products are produced in specific locations Compare and contrast individual identity (e.g., beliefs, values, abilities) with that of peer group and other ethnic/cultural groups. CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 9

10 History/Social Studies Literacy: Competence in literacy, inquiry and research skills is necessary to analyze, evaluate and present history and social studies information Standard Access and gather information from a variety of primary and secondary sources including electronic media (maps, charts, graphs, images, artifacts, recordings and text). 2.2 Interpret information from a variety of primary and secondary sources, including electronic media (e.g. maps, charts, graphs, images, artifacts, recordings and text) 2.3 Create various forms of writing work )journal, essay, blog, we page, brochure) do demonstrate a n understanding of social studies and history issues. 2.4 Demonstrate an ability to participate in social studies discourse through informal discussions debate and effective oral presentation. 2.5 Create and present relevant social studies material using both print and electronic media(maps, charts, models and displays) Interpret text distinguishing cause and effect, fact and opinion, main idea and supporting details Distinguish between useful and irrelevant information Organize information in outlines and graphic organizers Respond appropriately in a discussion, both listening and participating, with relevant information and/or questions Present information orally answer questions about a social studies topic Create written work (e.g., news articles, brochures) to describe historical events, people and/or places using evidence Prepare accurate charts or graphs depicting relevant social studies information (e.g., immigration, exports, imports, ppopulation growth) Identify the difference between a primary and secondary source Summarize information from primary and secondary sources. Application: Civic competence in addressing historical issues and current problems requires the use of information, skills and empathic awareness. Standard Use evidence to identify, analyze and evaluate historical interpretations. 3.2 Analyze and evaluate human action in historical and or contemporary contexts from alternative points of view. 3.3 Apply appropriate historical geographic political economic and cultural concepts and methods inn proposing and evaluating solutions to contemporary problems Evaluate the evidence related to different points of view of an event Cite evidence to explain to explain the various feelings/points of view of people in a historical situation Predict various points of view people might have on a contemporary issue Analyze articles from appropriate sources that propose solutions to contemporary issues. CCSS_DRAFT_MAP_4th_Grade_ _11_15_11.xls Page 10