7 th Grade SOCIAL STUDIES. CCSS Transitional SCOPE & SEQUENCE

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1 Revised th Grade SOCIAL STUDIES CCSS Transitional SCOPE & SEQUENCE Redlands Unified School District

2 Acknowledgments The Redlands Unified School District would like to acknowledge and thank the following teachers for their contribution in the Common Core Committee and the development of the Transitional Scope and Sequence. Elementary Susan Abt Heidi Alloway Julie Battier Christina Bloomquist Melody Cortese Andy Coyazo Cheryl D Amico Debbie Echternach Jennifer Haddock Krystal Haskins Mary Huckins Nancy Hyson Ann Keegan Kristian Klemm Krissy Koger Christina Kristoffersen Carol Lemoine Mary Love Becky Ludington Kristen Mariani Kim Marchall Elaine Mesa Kelly Napoletano Tamera Pettigew Donna Provencher Patty Ramirez Cristina Ramos Gay Richards Carly Sapp Lisa Smith Brenda Selby Lindsey Sexton Teresa Steinbroner Heather Turner Ruth Thompson Marla Vega Kim Windver Michelle Zofrea Middle School Alan Aceto Mike Arthur Kellee Baker Joshua Barnor Anita Chagolla Steve Clark Debbie Dennis Mariko Dibble Gabrielle Faulkner Robert Foster Denise Freeman Heather Fuentes Nikki Gonzales Sondra Hodson Meg Jenner Paul Klausne Matthew Klemm Jason Knight Ken Knight Annette Leffman Kim Loew Elizabeth Machado Suzanne Donovan- Marlowe Amy Marquis Andrew Mitchell Christina Murray-Baker Joe Nardella Briana Newbold Rhonda Racine Caleb Rothe Eleanor Ruiz David Russell-Nichley Karen Skoog Monica Solis Sarah Spencer John Stevens Colleen Sumner Karen Tompkins Jennifer Vadnais Cindy Van Grouw Sara Vanliechtenstein Nancy Wade Jennifer Whiteside Bob Windver Wendy Zinner High School Karen Alexander Susan Bean Ed Berman Cindy Brand Blaze Brennan Chris Burris Becky Buyak Amy Canizales Kim Caricato Denise Casey Sarah Craw Erik Dahnke Ted Ducey Laura Dunn Jennifer Fieldhouse Marie Fine Cindy Gardner Becky Gidcumb Korrye Krohne Fleury Laycook Phyliss Lozoya Jimmie Maloney J.J. Martinez Ryan Mead Eric Memory Patricia Molnar Jennifer Munoz Heather Murrillo Niki McClain Laurel Nelson Jo Nolin Mollee O Day Rebecca Peplow Patricia Pitts Doug Porter Emil Radoi Wendy Radtke Lisa Reed Brian Rice Tim Ridgway Tom Rey Tim Rochester Robert Rooney Shannon Rooney Eva Shinnerl Elena Smith Richard Smith Ed Stark Dawn Toth Stacy Turnpaugh Linda Uithoven Greg Vazquez Ann Van Mouwerik James Verhoeven Scott Washburn Valerie Williamson Angela Wilson RUSD/C&I October 21,

3 CCSS Transitional Scope and Sequence Introduction Background on the Common Core State Standards While research shows that schools in the U.S. are improving, it also demonstrates that the world is rapidly changing and practices in U.S. education are not keeping up. Research indicates that students in the technology generation do not learn to do, but rather they do to learn. The changing landscape in technology and the globalization of world economies necessitate that students today must acquire skills that will prepare them for jobs that require high levels of critical thinking, collaboration, and communication to solve real problems and adapt to their changing environment. Results from international assessments that measure ability to apply knowledge to real-life challenges, as opposed to merely demonstrating mastery of specific content, indicate that students in the U.S. score average in reading and science and below average in math as compared to the other 74 participating economies. In response, a state-led initiative involving the collaborative effort of 48 states, 2 territories, and the District of Columbia resulted in the development of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) which can be voluntarily adopted by states. Standards have been developed and adopted for K-12 mathematics and English Language Arts (ELA), including standards for literacy in social studies, science, and technical subjects in grades In addition, science content standards are currently being developed. The CCSS were designed by K-12 teachers, content experts, and researchers to prepare students to compete in a global economy. They are research-based, benchmarked against standards in top-performing countries, and include both rigorous content and application of knowledge through high-order thinking skills. They recognize a need to shift focus in an effort to ensure that students develop skills that will help them to succeed in college and careers in a high-tech, rapidly changing world. Crucial skills for student success in a global economy include: Communication and Information skills Thinking and Problem-Solving skills Interpersonal and Self-Directional skills Collaboration skills States that have adopted the CCSS must adopt them in their entirety and cannot delete standards; however they can choose to add additional state-specific standards to the CCSS which cannot exceed 15% of the total standards. California s added standards can be distinguished from the original CCSS in official California Department of Education (CDE) documents, as well as RUSD documents, by their bolded and underlined format. In some cases, entire standards were added by CDE and in other cases; words or phrases were added within standards. Other added standards were Common Core standards that CDE shifted down from a higher grade level. The original source of all added standards is noted on an overview document that immediately follows this introduction. If no source is indicated, then it is a newly written addition. English Language Arts The ELA standards are based on a set of College and Career Readiness anchor standards. The anchor standards were backmapped down to Kindergarten and were designed to build literacy skills in a spiral manner from Kindergarten through 12 th grade. There are 10 anchor standards in reading, 10 in writing, 6 in language, and 6 in speaking and listening which can be found in Appendix A of all ELA, Science, and Social Studies transitional scope and sequence documents. Each grade level has 1 standard directly linked to each anchor standard with clear vertical articulation and direct correlation across all grade levels. There is an emphasis on informational text and expository writing across the curriculum. The following charts illustrate the grade span expectations for reading and writing. RUSD/C&I October 21,

4 Literary Reading Informational Reading K % 50% % 55% % 70% Writing to Persuade Writing to Explain Writing to Convey Experience K % 35% 35% % 35% 30% % 40% 20% The ELA standards are organized into four main strands with the reading strand being further broken down into three substrands. The number coding for the ELA standards is as follows: grade level.strand.standard number The first number indicates the grade level. The letter or letters following this number represents the strand, and the final number represents the specific standard. For example, 7.RI.1 represents seventh grade, reading informational text, standard 1. The following information outlines the ELA strands and their standard abbreviations. RF Reading Foundational Skills (K-5 only) RL Reading Literature RI Reading Informational Text W Writing L Language SP Speaking and Listening The design of the ELA standards is intended to ensure that as students progress through the grades they are able to exhibit the following capacities with increasing fullness and regularity. 1. They demonstrate independence. 2. They build strong content knowledge. 3. They respond to the varying demands of audience, task, purpose, and discipline. 4. They comprehend as well as critique. 5. They value evidence. 6. They use technology and digital media strategically and capably. 7. They come to understand other perspectives and cultures. The detailed language of these ELA capacities can be found in Appendix A of all ELA transitional scope and sequence documents. Science and Social Studies The CCSS includes literacy standards in reading and writing specific to history, science, and technical subjects in grades 6 12 that are intended to complement, but not replace content standards in those subjects. The CCSS recognizes that meeting the demands of literacy instruction related to informational text and expository writing, as outlined in the ELA section above, requires shared responsibility among teachers in all content areas. Each grade level includes 10 reading and 10 writing standards for literacy in history, science, and technical subjects. As with the ELA standards, these standards are directly correlated to the College and Career Readiness anchor standards (Appendix A). The standard coding uses the following abbreviations to designate this set of literacy standards and uses the format grade span.strand.standard number. For example, 6-8.RST.1 indicates standard 1 in grades 6 8 for reading in science and technical subjects. RH - Reading for Literacy in History/Social Studies RST - Reading for Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects WHST - Writing for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects RUSD/C&I October 21,

5 Mathematics In an effort to address the current system of mile wide and an inch deep, the mathematics standards were designed to focus on going more in-depth with fewer concepts to balance deep conceptual understanding with mathematical procedures. The K-5 standards focus on building a strong foundation in number sense and measurement. All grade levels, K-12, stress application to real-world issues through the Standards for Mathematical Practice which emphasize problem solving, reasoning, and communication processes. The following eight Standards for Mathematical Practice apply to all grade levels, K-12, and should be an integral part of the instructional practices for all standards to actively engage students with the content and develop their mathematical and critical thinking skills. 1. Make sense of problem persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable agreements and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attain to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning. The detailed language of these Standards for Mathematical Practice can be found in Appendix A of all math transitional scope and sequence documents. The K-8 CCSS for mathematics content are organized into 11 domains as shown in the table below. Domain Abbrev. K 1 st 2 nd 3 rd 4 th 5 th 6 th 7 th 8 th 1. Counting and Cardinality CC 2. Operations and Algebraic Thinking OA 3. Number and Operations in Base Ten NBT 4. Measurement and Data MD 5. Geometry G 6. Number and Operations Fractions NF 7. Ratios and Proportional Relationships RP 8. The Number System NS 9. Expressions and Equations EE 10. Statistics and Probability SP 11. Functions F The K-7 CCSS were designed to prepare students for Algebra I in grade 8 or grade 9 to allow states flexibility to design an accelerated path to a grade 8 Algebra I. California has adopted this accelerated path which defines a grade 8 Algebra I by pushing some standards from high school into grade 8, from grade 8 into grade 7 and from grade 7 into grade 6. These shifts made by California are considered additions to that grade level and are indicated as bolded and underlined in all documents. Since all 9 12 graders in RUSD are repeating Algebra I, the transitional scope and sequence for high school algebra I is based on the standards defined by CDE for grade 8 Algebra I. The high school CCSS for mathematics content are organized in a way that provides states and districts with flexibility in course design to allow for a traditional pathway (Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II) or an integrated pathway (Mathematics I, II, and III) which follows a typical international model. The high school standards are organized into 6 conceptual categories and place a heavy emphasis on modeling in mathematics in which students use statistics and concepts across mathematical disciplines to analyze quantitative relationships in real-world physical, economic, and social situations. The 6 conceptual categories, their corresponding domains, and abbreviations for Grade 8 Algebra I and high school math are shown in the table below. RUSD/C&I October 21,

6 Conceptual Category Number and Quantity Algebra Functions Geometry Statistics and Probability The Real Number System Quantities Domains for Category The Complex Number System Vector and Matrix Quantities Seeing Structure in Mathematics Arithmetic with Polynomials and Rational Expressions Creating Equations Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities Expressions and Equations Functions Interpreting Functions Building Functions Linear, Quadratic, and Exponential Models Abbreviation High School Gr. 8 Algebra I N.RN N.Q N.CN N.VM A.SSE A.APR A.CED A.REI n/a (gr. 8 only) n/a (gr. 8 only) F.IF F.BF F.LE A1.NQ Trigonometric Functions F.TF n/a Geometry Expressing Geometric Properties with Equations Congruence Similarity, Right Triangles, and Trigonometry Circles Geometric Measurement and Dimension Modeling with Geometry Polar Coordinates and Curves Definitions and Examples n/a (gr. 8 only) G.GPE G.CO G.SRT G.C G.GMD G.MG G.PCC G.DE n/a A1.A A1.F A1.G Statistics and Probability n/a (gr. 8 only) A1.SP Interpreting Categorical and Quantitative Data Making Inferences and Justifying Conclusions Conditional Probability and Rules of Probability Using Probability to Make Decisions S.ID S.IC S.CP S.MD n/a n/a n/a Constructing Viable Arguments n/a (gr. 8 only) A1.CVA Modeling Modeling is best interpreted not as a collection of isolated topics but rather in relation to other content standards. Specific standards for which students should have opportunities for modeling are indicated throughout the standards in all of the conceptual categories. A detailed description for this category in included in Appendix A of all math transitional scope and sequence documents. n/a The number coding for the K-7 math standards is as follows: grade level.domain.standard number The first number indicates the grade level. The letter or letters following this number represents the domain. The final number represents the specific standard. For example, 7.EE.1 represents seventh grade, expressions and equations, standard 1. The number coding for the high school math standards is conceptual category.domain.standard number. For example, N.CN.1 would indicate Number and Quantity The Real Number System, standard 1. RUSD/C&I October 21,

7 California Implementation Timeline The following information outlines the current CCSS implementation timeline for California: Fall 2012 State Board of Education (SBE) approves supplemental materials aligned to CCSS September 2012 SBE adopts revised ELD standards Spring 2013 Pilot testing of summative assessments in a small sampling of schools May 2013 New Math Frameworks aligned to CCSS Spring 2014 Field testing of summative assessments in a broad sampling of schools May 2014 New ELA Frameworks aligned to CCSS Spring 2015 Operational summative assessments for CCSS administered in all schools Math adoption process for implementation of CCSS aligned materials ELA adoption process for implementation of CCSS aligned materials RUSD Implementation Timeline Based on the State timeline for administration of CCSS-aligned assessments, full implementation for the CCSS is expected to occur in the school year. To allow for a smooth transition, RUSD has developed the following timeline Build Awareness and Prepare for Transition teacher committees deconstruct standards and align to curriculum develop transitional scope and sequence documents Increase Knowledge and Awareness and Begin Transition implement transitional scope and sequence offer CCSS related professional development sessions begin identifying supplemental materials for curriculum gaps begin development of CCSS fully aligned K-12 ELA and Math S & S documents Continue Transition continue use of transitional scope and sequence continue professional development sessions complete development of K-12 ELA and math scope and sequence documents develop CCSS fully aligned 6 12 science and social studies S & S documents develop CCSS aligned common assessments Full Implementation Implement CCSS fully aligned scope and sequence and assessments Administer state-mandated summative assessments for CCSS During the school year, awareness was built through volunteer teacher committees that deconstructed the CCSS and aligned them with our current core curriculum. The work of these committee groups was integral in the development of the transitional scope and sequence documents and will continue to be instrumental in the identification of curriculum gaps and resources for addressing those gaps, as well as in the development of fully aligned scope and sequence documents for implementation in the school year. In , the transitional scope and sequence will be utilized, along with professional development offerings, to increase knowledge and awareness of the CCSS. By , the transition process will have included the development of CCSS-aligned resources including new scope and sequence documents and common assessments. It is important to realize that these resources will have to be developed utilizing our current adoption materials as a new adoption implementation will not take place until 2017 for math and 2019 for ELA. In the school year, CCSS will be fully implemented and the Next Generation Assessments will replace the CST. RUSD/C&I October 21,

8 Purpose of the Transitional Scope and Sequence As it is critical that we maintain our focus on the 1997 California State Content Standards which will be assessed through the school year, it should be noted that the intent of the transitional scope and sequence is NOT to teach to the CCSS or officially change the current Scope and Sequence in terms of what is currently being taught and assessed. The purpose of the transitional scope and sequence is for teachers to become familiar with the CCSS, to begin to recognize how the current curriculum does/does not align with the CCSS, and to begin to think through how instruction may need to change with full implementation of the CCSS. Structure and Content of the Transitional Scope and Sequence The transitional scope and sequence document is to be used in the same way as the current scope and sequence. The lessons indicated in bold are the lessons required to teach California state standards, the lessons italicized are optional for California state standards. Teacher committee groups deconstructed the CCSS to identify specific key objectives within each standard. Once the objectives where identified, the committees then aligned them to the current curriculum. All lessons within the adopted curriculum were considered, even if they were not identified as a required lesson in the current scope and sequence. While the content of the scope and sequence has not changed at this time, it looks significantly different in the transitional documents as it is formatted in landscape orientation with the CCSS alignment added to the right-hand side of the text support section. A CCSS aligned to a lesson indicates that the lesson addresses all or a portion of that standard. If there is nothing indicated in the CCSS column, then the lesson does not address any CCSS for that grade level/content area. Teacher committees found a number of CCSS standards either not aligned to our current curriculum at all or aligned to lessons that are not part of the current scope and sequence. As a result, there are some CCSS standards that have not been listed in the CCSS column of the transitional scope and sequence. To help teachers become familiar with all of the CCSS and the degree to which the teacher committees found they are aligned with the current curriculum, an overview document immediately follows this introduction. The two columns furthest to the left indicate the number and language of all of the CCSS. The checkmarks to the right indicate whether the currently adopted core curriculum fully addresses, partially addresses, or does not address the CCSS. Because the CCSS involve many shifts in grade level for a number of math concepts, the K-7 math documents also include a list of the following: Lessons that are in the current scope and sequence but are not aligned to the CCSS and therefore, will no longer be need to be taught with the full implementation of the CCSS in Lessons that currently are not in the scope and sequence but are aligned to the CCSS and therefore, will need to be taught with full implementation of the CCSS in Additionally, many of the math standards include footnotes that provide additional information not explicitly stated in the standard itself, such as the specific fraction denominators worked with at that grade level. The overview document includes all footnote information with the text of the standards. In addition, some footnotes refer to tables in a glossary. That glossary can be found in Appendix A of all math transitional scope and sequence documents. In Closing As we travel down this exciting, yet challenging path toward implementation of CCSS, the knowledge and expertise of all RUSD teachers will be an extremely valuable asset. As a district that has always prided itself on the quality of instruction provided to students, the promise of CCSS to focus instruction and assessment on application of knowledge will no doubt be embraced and met with success. RUSD/C&I October 21,

9 6-8.RH RH RH RH RH RH RH.7 Redlands Unified School District Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Curriculum Alignment Overview Grade 7 Social Studies Standard Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources. Fully Addressed by CORE Partially Addressed by CORE Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions. Identify key steps in a text s description of a process related to history/social studies (e.g., how a bill becomes law, how interest rates are raised or lowered). Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies. Describe how a text presents information (e.g., sequentially, comparatively, causally). Identify aspects of a text that reveal an author s point of view or purpose (e.g., loaded language, inclusion or avoidance of particular facts). Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. Not Addressed by CORE 6-8.RH RH.9 Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text. Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic. 6-8.RH.10 By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6 8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. RUSD/C&I October 21,

10 Redlands Unified School District Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Curriculum Alignment Overview Grade 7 Social Studies 6-8.WHST.1 Standard Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content. a. Introduce claim(s) about a topic or issue, acknowledge and distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and organize the reasons and evidence logically. b. Support claim(s) with logical reasoning and relevant, accurate data and evidence that demonstrate an understanding of the topic or text, using credible sources. c. Use words, phrases, and clauses to create cohesion and clarify the relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. d. Establish and maintain a formal style. e. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. Fully Addressed by CORE Partially Addressed by CORE Not Addressed by CORE 6-8.WHST WHST.3 Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes. a. Introduce a topic clearly, previewing what is to follow; organize ideas, concepts, and information into broader categories as appropriate to achieving purpose; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with relevant, well-chosen facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples. c. Use appropriate and varied transitions to cohesion and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts. d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e. Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone. f. Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented. (See note; not applicable as a separate requirement) 6-8.WHST WHST.5 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed. RUSD/C&I October 21,

11 Redlands Unified School District Common Core State Standards (CCSS) Curriculum Alignment Overview Grade 7 Social Studies 6-8.WHST.6 Standard Fully Addressed by CORE Partially Addressed by CORE Not Addressed by CORE Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and present the relationships between information and ideas clearly and efficiently. 6-8.WHST WHST.8 Conduct short research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question), drawing on several sources and generating additional related, focused questions that allow for multiple avenues of exploration. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources (primary and secondary), using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. 6-8.WHST WHST.10 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis reflection, and research. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences. RUSD/C&I October 21,

12 REDLANDS UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT SOCIAL STUDIES Scope & Sequence INTRODUCTION: The SOCIAL STUDIES Scope & Sequence Committees (made up of social studies teachers) have worked to develop pacing guides for each grade level that ensure RUSD curriculum fully addresses State Standards using the adopted McDougal Littell material. With this in mind, teachers are to use this Scope & Sequence as the core of their social studies instruction. Lessons listed in bold under Text Support are core, and have been selected to ensure that all students have access to the California State Standards. Particular attention has been given to the standards that are emphasized on the blueprint for the California Standards Test (CST). Items listed in italics are suggested activities. The Scope & Sequence has been divided over semesters. Correlated district end of semester exams will be administered. The content of the district end of semester exams will align with the Text Support section of the Scope and Sequence. Supplemental resources that help to provide universal access to the core curriculum have been identified for each lesson. Support lessons for English Language Learners (English Learners) are contained within a double box. Support lessons for below level students (Extra Support) are contained within a dotted box. Support lessons for GATE are listed between the double and dotted boxes. Technology lessons are listed below the dotted box. NOTE: The Formal Assessment resource (FA) has 3 versions: A = Most Basic B = More Difficult C = Most Challenging A WORD ABOUT THE DEVELOPMENT AND REVISION OF THE SCOPE & SEQUENCE: The Scope & Sequence was developed by groups of social studies teachers. Middle school and high school sites had representation on each grade level committee. At some grade levels, the publisher s sequence of chapters/lessons may have been altered. Careful thought and consideration was given to any changes that were made to the order of the textbook series. Changes were made for one or more of the reasons listed below. Please note, prerequisite teaching was not required to move the chapter/lesson. Chapter content needed to be addressed prior to the CST. A change in sequence better meets the developmental readiness of students. Grade level experience with the ease/difficulty of learning a given concept. Content did not address the standards appropriately. Only standards that are directly instructed in the lesson are listed in the Scope & Sequence. Each lesson has been carefully selected for the Scope & Sequence to ensure that all state standards are taught. By teaching each lesson in its entirety all standards will have been adequately addressed by the conclusion of the year. The Scope & Sequence contains the essential teaching of the core social studies program. It does not include teacher-generated or text-based assessments. The teacher has the flexibility to choose the most appropriate chapter assessments to guide classroom instruction. RUSD/C&I October 21,

13 Redlands Unified School District Social Studies 7 Power Standards Study the early strengths and lasting contributions of Rome (e.g., significance of Roman citizenship; rights under Roman law; Roman art, architecture, engineering, and philosophy; preservation and transmission of Christianity) and its ultimate internal weaknesses (e.g., rise of autonomous military powers within the empire, undermining of citizenship by the growth of corruption and slavery, lack of education, and distribution of news). Describe the establishment by Constantine of the new capital in Constantinople and the development of the Byzantine Empire, with an emphasis on the consequences of the development of two distinct European civilizations, Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic, and their two distinct views on church-state relations Trace the origins of Islam and the life and teachings of Muhammad, including Islamic teachings on the connection with Judaism and Christianity. Explain the significance of the Qur'an and the Sunnah as the primary sources of Islamic beliefs, practice, and law, and their influence in Muslims' daily life. Discuss the expansion of Muslim rule through military conquests and treaties, emphasizing the cultural blending within Muslim civilization and the spread and acceptance of Islam and the Arabic language. Understand the intellectual exchanges among Muslim scholars of Eurasia and Africa and the contributions Muslim scholars made to later civilizations in the areas of science, geography, mathematics, philosophy, medicine, art, and literature Describe the reunification of China under the Tang Dynasty and reasons for the spread of Buddhism in Tang China, Korea, and Japan Analyze the influences of Confucianism and changes in Confucian thought during the Sung and Mongol periods Trace the historic influence of such discoveries as tea, the manufacture of paper, wood-block printing, the compass, and gunpowder. Study the Niger River and the relationship of vegetation zones of forest, savannah, and desert to trade in gold, salt, food, and slaves; and the growth of the Ghana and Mali empires. Describe the role of the trans-saharan caravan trade in the changing religious and cultural characteristics of West Africa and the influence of Islamic beliefs, ethics, and law Trace the growth of the Arabic language in government, trade, and Islamic scholarship in West Africa. Describe the significance of Japan's proximity to China and Korea and the intellectual, linguistic, religious, and philosophical influence of those countries on Japan. Describe the values, social customs, and traditions prescribed by the lord-vassal system consisting of shogun, daimyo, and samurai and the lasting influence of the warrior code in the twentieth century Analyze the rise of a military society in the late twelfth century and the role of the samurai in that society. Understand the development of feudalism, its role in the medieval European economy, the way in which it was influenced by physical geography (the role of the manor and the growth of towns), and how feudal relationships provided the foundation of political order. Demonstrate an understanding of the conflict and cooperation between the Papacy and European monarchs (e.g., Charlemagne, Gregory VII, Emperor Henry IV). Know the significance of developments in medieval English legal and constitutional practices and their importance in the rise of modern democratic thought and representative institutions (e.g., Magna Carta, parliament, development of habeas corpus, an independent judiciary in England). Discuss the causes and course of the religious Crusades and their effects on the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish populations in Europe, with emphasis on the increasing contact by Europeans with cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean world. Understand the importance of the Catholic church as a political, intellectual, and aesthetic institution (e.g., founding of universities, political and spiritual roles of the clergy, creation of monastic and mendicant religious orders, preservation of the Latin language and religious texts, St. Thomas Aquinas's synthesis of classical philosophy with Christian theology, and the concept of "natural law") Study the roles of people in each society, including class structures, family life, war-fare, religious beliefs and practices, and slavery Explain how and where each empire arose and how the Aztec and Incan empires were defeated by the Spanish. Describe the Meso-American achievements in astronomy and mathematics, including the development of the calendar and the Meso-American knowledge of seasonal changes to the civilizations' agricultural systems. Describe the way in which the revival of classical learning and the arts fostered a new interest in humanism (i.e., a balance between intellect and religious faith). Describe the growth and effects of new ways of disseminating information (e.g., the ability to manufacture paper, translation of the Bible into the vernacular, printing). Detail advances made in literature, the arts, science, mathematics, cartography, engineering, and the understanding of human anatomy and astronomy (e.g., by Dante Alighieri, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo di Buonarroti Simoni, Johann Gutenberg, William Shakespeare) List the causes for the internal turmoil in and weakening of the Catholic church (e.g., tax policies, selling of indulgences). Describe the theological, political, and economic ideas of the major figures during the Reformation (e.g., Desiderius Erasmus, Martin Luther, John Calvin, William Tyndale). Identify and locate the European regions that remained Catholic and those that became Protestant and explain how the division affected the distribution of religions in the New World. Discuss the roots of the Scientific Revolution (e.g., Greek rationalism; Jewish, Christian, and Muslim science; Renaissance humanism; new knowledge from global exploration). Understand the significance of the new scientific theories (e.g., those of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton) and the significance of new inventions (e.g., the telescope, microscope, thermometer, barometer). Understand the scientific method advanced by Bacon and Descartes, the influence of new scientific rationalism on the growth of democratic ideas, and the coexistence of science with traditional religious beliefs. Know the great voyages of discovery, the locations of the routes, and the influence of cartography in the development of a new European worldview. Examine the origins of modern capitalism; the influence of mercantilism and cottage industry; the elements and importance of a market economy in seventeenth-century Europe; the changing international trading and marketing patterns, including their locations on a world map; and the influence of explorers and map makers. Describe how democratic thought and institutions were influenced by Enlightenment thinkers (e.g., John Locke, Charles-Louis Montesquieu, American founders). RUSD/C&I October 21,

14 Redlands Unified School District Social Studies 7 Power Standards Pacing by Module Semester Standard Study the early strengths and lasting contributions of Rome (e.g., significance of Roman citizenship; rights under Roman law; Roman art, architecture, engineering, and philosophy; preservation and transmission of Christianity) and its ultimate internal weaknesses (e.g., rise of autonomous military powers within the empire, undermining of citizenship by the growth of corruption and slavery, lack of education, and distribution of news). Describe the establishment by Constantine of the new capital in Constantinople and the development of the Byzantine Empire, with an emphasis on the consequences of the development of two distinct European civilizations, Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic, and their two distinct views on church-state relations. Trace the origins of Islam and the life and teachings of Muhammad, including Islamic teachings on the connection with Judaism and Christianity. Explain the significance of the Qur'an and the Sunnah as the primary sources of Islamic beliefs, practice, and law, and their influence in Muslims' daily life. Discuss the expansion of Muslim rule through military conquests and treaties, emphasizing the cultural blending within Muslim civilization and the spread and acceptance of Islam and the Arabic language. Understand the intellectual exchanges among Muslim scholars of Eurasia and Africa and the contributions Muslim scholars made to later civilizations in the areas of science, geography, mathematics, philosophy, medicine, art, and literature. Describe the reunification of China under the Tang Dynasty and reasons for the spread of Buddhism in Tang China, Korea, and Japan. Analyze the influences of Confucianism and changes in Confucian thought during the Sung and Mongol periods. Trace the historic influence of such discoveries as tea, the manufacture of paper, woodblock printing, the compass, and gunpowder. Study the Niger River and the relationship of vegetation zones of forest, savannah, and desert to trade in gold, salt, food, and slaves; and the growth of the Ghana and Mali empires. Describe the role of the trans-saharan caravan trade in the changing religious and cultural characteristics of West Africa and the influence of Islamic beliefs, ethics, and law. Trace the growth of the Arabic language in government, trade, and Islamic scholarship in West Africa. Describe the significance of Japan's proximity to China and Korea and the intellectual, linguistic, religious, and philosophical influence of those countries on Japan. Describe the values, social customs, and traditions prescribed by the lord-vassal system consisting of shogun, daimyo, and samurai and the lasting influence of the warrior code in the twentieth century. RUSD Module Analyze the rise of a military society in the late twelfth century and the role of the samurai in that society. TOTAL RUSD/C&I October 21,

15 Redlands Unified School District Social Studies 7 Power Standards Pacing by Module Semester Standard Understand the development of feudalism, its role in the medieval European economy, the way in which it was influenced by physical geography (the role of the manor and the growth of towns), and how feudal relationships provided the foundation of political order. Demonstrate an understanding of the conflict and cooperation between the Papacy and European monarchs (e.g., Charlemagne, Gregory VII, Emperor Henry IV). Know the significance of developments in medieval English legal and constitutional practices and their importance in the rise of modern democratic thought and representative institutions (e.g., Magna Carta, parliament, development of habeas corpus, an independent judiciary in England). Discuss the causes and course of the religious Crusades and their effects on the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish populations in Europe, with emphasis on the increasing contact by Europeans with cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean world. Understand the importance of the Catholic church as a political, intellectual, and aesthetic institution (e.g., founding of universities, political and spiritual roles of the clergy, creation of monastic and mendicant religious orders, preservation of the Latin language and religious texts, St. Thomas Aquinas's synthesis of classical philosophy with Christian theology, and the concept of "natural law"). Study the roles of people in each society, including class structures, family life, war-fare, religious beliefs and practices, and slavery. Explain how and where each empire arose and how the Aztec and Incan empires were defeated by the Spanish. Describe the Meso-American achievements in astronomy and mathematics, including the development of the calendar and the Meso-American knowledge of seasonal changes to the civilizations' agricultural systems. Describe the way in which the revival of classical learning and the arts fostered a new interest in humanism (i.e., a balance between intellect and religious faith). Describe the growth and effects of new ways of disseminating information (e.g., the ability to manufacture paper, translation of the Bible into the vernacular, printing). Detail advances made in literature, the arts, science, mathematics, cartography, engineering, and the understanding of human anatomy and astronomy (e.g., by Dante Alighieri, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo di Buonarroti Simoni, Johann Gutenberg, William Shakespeare). List the causes for the internal turmoil in and weakening of the Catholic church (e.g., tax policies, selling of indulgences). Describe the theological, political, and economic ideas of the major figures during the Reformation (e.g., Desiderius Erasmus, Martin Luther, John Calvin, William Tyndale). Identify and locate the European regions that remained Catholic and those that became Protestant and explain how the division affected the distribution of religions in the New World. Discuss the roots of the Scientific Revolution (e.g., Greek rationalism; Jewish, Christian, and Muslim science; Renaissance humanism; new knowledge from global exploration). Understand the significance of the new scientific theories (e.g., those of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton) and the significance of new inventions (e.g., the telescope, microscope, thermometer, barometer). Understand the scientific method advanced by Bacon and Descartes, the influence of new scientific rationalism on the growth of democratic ideas, and the coexistence of science with traditional religious beliefs. Know the great voyages of discovery, the locations of the routes, and the influence of cartography in the development of a new European worldview. Examine the origins of modern capitalism; the influence of mercantilism and cottage industry; the elements and importance of a market economy in seventeenth-century Europe; the changing international trading and marketing patterns, including their locations on a world map; and the influence of explorers and map makers. RUSD Module Describe how democratic thought and institutions were influenced by Enlightenment thinkers (e.g., John Locke, Charles-Louis Montesquieu, American founders). TOTAL RUSD/C&I October 21,

16 Redlands Unified School District Social Studies 7 Common Assessment Blueprint Semester Common Assessment # of Standard Questions by Standard Study the early strengths and lasting contributions of Rome (e.g., significance of Roman citizenship; rights under Roman law; Roman art, architecture, engineering, and philosophy; preservation and transmission of Christianity) and its ultimate internal weaknesses (e.g., rise of autonomous military powers within 11 the empire, undermining of citizenship by the growth of corruption and slavery, lack of education, and distribution of news). Describe the establishment by Constantine of the new capital in Constantinople and the development of the Byzantine Empire, with an emphasis on the consequences of the development of two distinct European civilizations, 4 Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic, and their two distinct views on churchstate relations. Trace the origins of Islam and the life and teachings of Muhammad, including Islamic teachings on the connection with Judaism and Christianity. 5 Explain the significance of the Qur'an and the Sunnah as the primary sources of Islamic beliefs, practice, and law, and their influence in Muslims' daily life. 4 Discuss the expansion of Muslim rule through military conquests and treaties, emphasizing the cultural blending within Muslim civilization and the spread and 6 acceptance of Islam and the Arabic language. Understand the intellectual exchanges among Muslim scholars of Eurasia and Africa and the contributions Muslim scholars made to later civilizations in the areas of science, geography, mathematics, philosophy, medicine, art, and 5 literature. Describe the reunification of China under the Tang Dynasty and reasons for the spread of Buddhism in Tang China, Korea, and Japan. Analyze the influences of Confucianism and changes in Confucian thought during the Sung and Mongol periods. Trace the historic influence of such discoveries as tea, the manufacture of paper, wood-block printing, the compass, and gunpowder. Study the Niger River and the relationship of vegetation zones of forest, savannah, and desert to trade in gold, salt, food, and slaves; and the growth of 4 the Ghana and Mali empires. Describe the role of the trans-saharan caravan trade in the changing religious and cultural characteristics of West Africa and the influence of Islamic beliefs, 1 ethics, and law. Trace the growth of the Arabic language in government, trade, and Islamic scholarship in West Africa. 7 Describe the significance of Japan's proximity to China and Korea and the intellectual, linguistic, religious, and philosophical influence of those countries on Japan. Describe the values, social customs, and traditions prescribed by the lordvassal system consisting of shogun, daimyo, and samurai and the lasting influence of the warrior code in the twentieth century. Analyze the rise of a military society in the late twelfth century and the role of the samurai in that society. TOTAL RUSD/C&I October 21,

17 Redlands Unified School District Social Studies 7 Common Assessment Blueprint Semester Common Assessment # of Standard Questions by Standard Understand the development of feudalism, its role in the medieval European economy, the way in which it was influenced by physical geography (the role of the manor and the 6 growth of towns), and how feudal relationships provided the foundation of political order. Demonstrate an understanding of the conflict and cooperation between the Papacy and European monarchs (e.g., Charlemagne, Gregory VII, Emperor Henry IV). 4 Know the significance of developments in medieval English legal and constitutional practices and their importance in the rise of modern democratic thought and representative institutions (e.g., Magna Carta, parliament, development of habeas 4 corpus, an independent judiciary in England). Discuss the causes and course of the religious Crusades and their effects on the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish populations in Europe, with emphasis on the increasing 4 contact by Europeans with cultures of the Eastern Mediterranean world. Understand the importance of the Catholic church as a political, intellectual, and aesthetic institution (e.g., founding of universities, political and spiritual roles of the clergy, creation of monastic and mendicant religious orders, preservation of the Latin 3 1 language and religious texts, St. Thomas Aquinas's synthesis of classical philosophy with Christian theology, and the concept of "natural law"). Study the roles of people in each society, including class structures, family life, war-fare, religious beliefs and practices, and slavery. Explain how and where each empire arose and how the Aztec and Incan empires were defeated by the Spanish. Describe the Meso-American achievements in astronomy and mathematics, including the development of the calendar and the Meso-American knowledge of seasonal changes to the civilizations' agricultural systems. Describe the way in which the revival of classical learning and the arts fostered a new interest in humanism (i.e., a balance between intellect and religious faith). 4 Describe the growth and effects of new ways of disseminating information (e.g., the ability to manufacture paper, translation of the Bible into the vernacular, printing). 4 Detail advances made in literature, the arts, science, mathematics, cartography, engineering, and the understanding of human anatomy and astronomy (e.g., by Dante Alighieri, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo di Buonarroti Simoni, Johann Gutenberg, 5 William Shakespeare). List the causes for the internal turmoil in and weakening of the Catholic church (e.g., tax policies, selling of indulgences). 6 Describe the theological, political, and economic ideas of the major figures during the Reformation (e.g., Desiderius Erasmus, Martin Luther, John Calvin, William Tyndale). 7 Identify and locate the European regions that remained Catholic and those that became Protestant and explain how the division affected the distribution of religions in the New 2 World. Discuss the roots of the Scientific Revolution (e.g., Greek rationalism; Jewish, Christian, and Muslim science; Renaissance humanism; new knowledge from global exploration). Understand the significance of the new scientific theories (e.g., those of Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton) and the significance of new inventions (e.g., the telescope, microscope, thermometer, barometer). Understand the scientific method advanced by Bacon and Descartes, the influence of new scientific rationalism on the growth of democratic ideas, and the coexistence of science with traditional religious beliefs. Know the great voyages of discovery, the locations of the routes, and the influence of cartography in the development of a new European worldview. Examine the origins of modern capitalism; the influence of mercantilism and cottage industry; the elements and importance of a market economy in seventeenth-century Europe; the changing international trading and marketing patterns, including their locations on a world map; and the influence of explorers and map makers. Describe how democratic thought and institutions were influenced by Enlightenment thinkers (e.g., John Locke, Charles-Louis Montesquieu, American founders). TOTAL RUSD/C&I October 21,