Faculty Senate Calls For 12 Percent Salary Hike

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1 > V_ ^5 AI T5 fuunbcb IB85 \ul. \l\ll, No I'll 11 Mill PHI \. Ihursday. November 19, 1**»I i i INBIKNOWNM III I III \\IK\OI safe anil coin l nivmllj tludcm. south l'hill> residents li»» «la> 10 day in the fact ol a itreal threat dial of innnccnl if College To Broaden Teaching of Writing B> DONALD WATNICK I iu- lngii-h Department is developing a program which will expand (he teaching of writing across ihc undergraduate arts and sciences curriculum. "Ihe English Department and the ( oilege office are working on the proposition that writing can be supported across the undergraduate curriculum," College Associate Dean Peter Conn ~aid yesterday. Current plans for the program consist of working with professors and teaching assistants in other departments to design assignments that place a greater emphasis on writing skills. "In these courses, graduate students in ihc specific department will deal with the writing assignments given in the class." Writing Center Director I im Martin, who is involved in the program's planning, said last night. English Department Chairman ERA Fight Robert Lucid called the idea an "ambitious" and "unprecedented" program. "Its design will be to create a program that doesn't confine itself 10 ilie freshman program and the English Department, and move it out 10 wherever it w ill go," he said ycsteiday "We want to address the problem of writing head-on, outside of the department,"he added. The program is a response 10 a faculty and student call for more writing courses of an "interdisciplinary" nature, in addition to the English Department's traditional offerings. Social science courses are the program's main targets. Lucid said he discovered that students wanted a writing program that wasn't limited to the English Department. "As master of Hill House. I'M-come U ontinueil on page S) Davtd Gladstone in. MI ailxcn being transformed Imu cannona ami aimed menacing!) al their i iiaiul anil tiiinliirlahle homes. shown hi n is one Mull confrontalioa. Inside» in Uiii Sireel magazine, a thorough look.ii ihe Philadelphia Orchestra ai a pivotal period in ns si vet' ll s OI\ \ll foui suspensions from the.arsit) football icani this week ere dine related, Ihe result ol what one team nicinhci calls a "witch hunt " Page 8, \ look.ii ihe latest recruits to the Red. and Blue basketball team Visiting Students Recruit Supporters By MICHAEL GERTZMAN Four student activists on leave from other schools visited the University yesterday as part of a nationwide campaign to secure ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment. In order for the ERA to become law, three additional states must ratify the amendment by June 30, bringing the total to the necessary 38. In an attempt to secure the votes of the needed states, the National Organization for Women has initiated the ERA Countdown Campaign, in which Irene McCabe. Deborah Beth DeBare, Jennifer Lynn Jackman, and Deborah 1 ).n is Anthony son play a major role. "Students have the most to gain from the amendment. They have their whole lives ahead of them," Jackman said yesterday, while Davis Anthonyson added. "It seems logical that someone should go out and find the students who support the ERA." This is exactly what the four did yesterday at the University. McCabe, Debarc, Jackman and Davis- Anthonyson have been traveling to college campuses throughout the Northeast to enlist student support for the ERA. Yesterday, they set up tables on Locust Walk to recruit new traveling ERA supporters, as well as campus organizers for (he ratification effort. "Take a leave from school and spend the next nine months working for ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment," DeBare, a Brown University student, advised yesterday at the Christian Association Eatery. Review White Hawk' Flight Marred by Unevenness By MARTIN KIMEL The Unite Hawk, a play illustrating the difficulties and frustrations of the deaf, manages to soar at times, but more often encounters headwinds. Expressive but inconsistent acting cannot rescue the production from the play's difficulties a weak narrative that too often dissolves into the pedantic and a climax which seems at odds with the plot's development. The story centers on John (Bernard Bragg), a totally deaf actor who dreams of showing the hearing world the beauty of non-verbal language, his "visual music." Though talented, John is frustrated by societal prejudice and his own lear of the hearing. John is contrasted to Richard (David Fitzsimmons), his partially deaf friend and translator, who first distrusts the hearing but eventually cooperates with them. Philly O'Brien (Al Carmines), who can hear, joins forces with the two to create a new show for the hearing and the deaf. Unfortunately, the dialogue lacks overall integrity in that the author often loses sight of an artistic base. While Playwright John Basinger writes with humor, too often it seems he is concerned with writing a tract on the problems (Continued on page 7) "We'd rather spend time now working for the ERA than spend the rest of our lives struggling for equal pay and simple justice." McCabe said that much support for the ERA is only passive. "Our goal is to turn a passive supporter into an activist," she added. The four will travel next to Swarthmorc College, and then to Honda. one of several states where ERA supporters have been concentrating their energies. The four students said they had mixed leehngs about the Reagan Administration. They said the current political situation has jeopardized the ERA, though Jackman noted, "Whenever you have a situation like (Continued on page 6) Bernard Bragg ' n scene from The Mhite Hawk Faculty Senate Calls For 12 Percent Salary Hike Hy IKIIII Id I -III l'm(l) 1 he I acuity Senate yesterday called for an increase in faculty compenu lion Kinds of no less than 12 percent in fiscal year and debated the question of tuition benefits for faculty children. The faculty salary resolution, proposed by the Senate's Committee on the Economic Status of the Faculty, passed by a voice vote with no dissent. Insurance Professor J. David Cummins, who chairs the committee, told faculty members assembled in College Hall that the panel was "quite pleased" with the results of last year's salary resolution and expected the administraton to bargain in good faith again. Although the resolution noted that last Mar's increase "fell short of the Faculty Senate target of last year's cost-of-living increase plus two percent." Cummins said the increase still amounted to an average increase of "more than 12 percent," and that the panel was satisfied even though it had called for a 14 percent increase. The new resolution calls for a 2 1 ': percent per year "catch-up figure" to keep pace with purchasing power decreases during the 1970s. I acult) Senate Chairman Phoebe I ebo) said last night that Cummins' figures were "not terribly meaningful" because thev reflect only averages. "In general, the administration did not do everything we asked, but basically what they promised to do." she added. Cummins said the committee was also studying "local modes" of collective bargaining, and that it would consider calling lor a "cafeteria approach" to faculty benefits, in which each faculty member would receive a credit and select the benefits he preferred. The discussion on tuition benefits for faculty members' children centered on a proposal by the University Council Personnel Benefits C ommiltee to limit the benefits toeight semesters That panel's chairman, Mechanical Engineering Professor lia ( olien. said there was concern that "faculty and staff children are under great pressure to come here rather than go someplace else, and that the Admissions (IIIice i- under great pressure to admit them" despite lower scores. Currently, children of faculty members who choose to attend the University receive full tuition rebates. One Medical School profcssoi IBM he had had offers from other institutions, but remained at the University because the tuition benefit! ''can't be replaced elsewhere," while Senate Chairman-Elect Murray Gcrstenhaber.ailed the proposed eight-semester restrict ion-"a mistake." Ihe proposal would also raise the "direct grant" benefits provided for I'HOI III I I Hi is. V/^'/./i's Veil \/ewii/fif/i*i" faculty children who attend othei schools from $9(Ki pet ve.u to hall the University's tuition, not exceeding the other school's tuition. I acuity members generally sup ported the direct grant increase, but objected strong!) lo the eight semesiei limn, and especial!) to < ouncil's role in deciding la,nits benefits I hey were (( onlituifil on pagt '> Officials: Funding Doubts Plague Dietrich Project By ANDREW KIRT/.MAN Doubts about the Wharton School's ability lo fulfill its financial obligation in the Dietrich Hall renovation were raised by trustees and administrators yesterday at the Trustee Executive Board meeting. Trustee Finance Committee Chairman John Eckman saiu "cash-flow projections are not being met," by Wharton, and that Acting Vice President for Finance and Administration Thomas Langfitt will prepare a study soon to determine the full extent of the problem. Trustee Chairman Paul Millet said the situation may warrant "a special fundraising effort" by the University to reverse Wharton's difficulties. In addition, a meeting has been called for top administrators to discuss ihe situation. President Sheldon Hackney, Provost Thomas Ehrlich. Wharton Dean Donald Carroll and I angim are scheduled to participate. Fckman's announcements elicited an annoyed response from Trustee John Ncff, chairman of the Investment Board. "It doesn't sound like a professional way to do it, lo build and let the chips fall where they may," Neff said in reference to the planning for Dietrich's renovation. Eckman replied. "We're prisoners of the numbers the administration gives us." Under the plan approved last year by the Trustees. Wharton will be responsible for financing SI 1.5 million of ihe$l4.7 project. The SI 1.5 million figure is considered to be an unusually high amount of money to come from the operating expenses of a school within the University. Neff called the Dietrich process "bothersome." "It's kind of disturbing - we went through this with a fine tooth comb," (Continued on page 6) Credit Rating Expert Tells Of Shortcuts By NINA LIU "Buy now, pay later" may sound appealing, but try to borrow money and you may hear, "Sorry, we can't give you a loan - you have no credit." "It's a Catch-22," said Stephen Pollan, author of the upcoming book How To Borrow. At a forum sponsored by American Express and the Penn Consumers Board last night, Pollan offered a solution to the runaround, and some how's and why's of establishing credit. "Nowadays, in some cities, you can't rent an apartment unless your credit is approved," Pollan told students at the Fine Arts Building. (Continued on page 2) Julia Smith Ihe Irmil ill I IM nli.in Hall, on Walnut street Renovations To Begin On Presidents Home By MARK BKOIIMAN The renovation of Eisenlohr Hall as the permanent home of the University's president, now pegged at over $400,000. is set to begin within the next few weeks. The Trustee I xccutive Hoard voted unanimously yesterday to fund the project, which has been in the planning stages since the summer. Transforming the building, on Walnut Street between 38th and 39th Streets, from office space lo a private home will cost the University $440,000, Acting Vice President for Operational Services Arthur Hirsch said yesterday. No University funds are being spent on the project; all of the money was raised through Trustees and other private sources. Operational Services opened bidding on ihe project to architects last month. Ihe architecture firm ol Dagii and Sayloi. one ol three hiddeis considered by the University, was chosen early this monlh lo direct Ihe construction, which will Ix- entirely on the interior. The same firm will renovate isil Locust Walk, the former Delia House, as the F. Craig Swceton Alumni Center. "We bid the two projects together to get the best prl Facilities Development Diredoi Iiius Hewryk said yesterday. The current Alumni Cental Is bous ed in Eisenlohr. and is scheduled lo move lo its new quarters in April "( onstruclion will he going 00 around K ontinutd on page >j Andr»a Castro Stephen Pollan (seated) and PCB Chairman Mark f.reen

2 I'M.I 2 TODAY A VOYAGE OUT Penn s Women s Literary Magazine, is accepting submissions m We women s center, first floor. Houston Hall Please include SASE Deadline December 15 ibackgammon CLUB meets every Thursday at 8 D m in te 20m floor lounge HRN Come play some Backgammon Tournament this Sun day Call 222X76 for more into COME PUT your 2 cents in' Penn Women* Alliance meeting Thurs in Houston Hall Wpmens Center at 8 p m COMMITTEE FOR Disabled Meeting 7pm. Thursday. NoverrrDer 19 Room 308 Houston Han lac ceasiblei Ail concerned people are welcomed COMP LIT AND the G'adua'e School of Education present RodneySangster(Indianai Meaning as Perception Language and Read ty ' 830 pm Graduate Education Building Room D. 9/10 DONT BE A Turkey Give blood Hi Rise East -?0O700 - Donate and have a chance to win two tree passes to Wainul Street Cinema UNDERGRADUATE SOCIOLOGY Society will sponsor a lecture ' STK Decades of American Sociology by Or E Digby Baltzell today. November 19 at 3 pm in 236 Houston Hall All welcome' Campus Events S REAGAN TRYING to deceive the American people 1 Discussion at the Liberal Party meeting Beniamn Franklin Room in Houston Hall. 9 pm PENN SOCIALIST Zionist Union is meeting Thurs, Nov p m. at Hillei Call Davei > lor into PENN WARGAMERS will meet tonight in 327 Towne Building. 612 pm Board wargamev Dungeons and Dragons, and other simulations will be played PENN COALITION FOR Divestment presents Generations of Resistance.' a documentary on S Africa from the turn of the century to Soweta Thurs, Nov p m. HRS rooftop lounge. THE CHRISTIAN Science Organu-a tion holds weekly inspirational meetings every Thursday at 5 46 p m m the Chapel Third Floor at the Christian Association Come, VOLUNTEER lor equal lustrce Find out about the Coalition ol Concern ed Legal Professionals, tonight at 7 p m in me Law School lounge All ' > ' ' OFFICIAL INTERNSHIPS AVAILABLE Seniors Accounting internship over semester break. International Paper Company Graduate and undergraduate students Guggenooim Museum More mlo. Career Placement Houston Hall With LINCOIN STATE UNIVERSITY Gospel C HOIK Chtymy STATI UNIVERSITY Gospil ChoiR r will > REUNION PfciU., PA and THE UNIVERSITY of PENNSYIVANIA Gospsl C limit Saturday, November 21st 7:30 p.m. St. Joseph's Baptist Church 40th & Sansom Sts. Come and be refreshed! '«RECRUITERS Thursday Nov 19 Boston University Law School Coro Foundation, (fellowships in public affairs) Sign up sheets m Career Placement RECRUITERS FRIDAY NOV 20 Boston University School of Management Sign up m Career Placement. Houston Hall ENVIRONMENTAL internships available with The Student Con servation Association and with The Center lor Environmental Education Contact Career Planning and Place menl Houston Hali'or more mlo TOMORROW" ECUMENICAL EUCHARIST An informal gathering around the cornmu mon of bread and wine Campus community welcome Chapel ol Reconciliation Christian Associa tion. 36th and Locust 12:10-12:40 pm LUNCH AND LEARN with a different teacher each day of the week 1 Friday discuss major issues in this week's Corah Portion with Sheila Weinberg No background necessary Bnng or buy lunch Hillei. 202 So 36th UNDERGRADUATE Arts Management Club presents Noble Smith, former director of development and public relations at the PMA F A Happy hour Fnday 3pm. Bishop White Room : iiy SAC ngxnnxxuxxxxxxxixxxxxti '.rig B0 B0 J? : : n e> *. ~ *KD* Szechvan Cantonese Mandarin Authentic Chinese Cuisine In The Heart Of Chinatown. Special Homemide Dinners fetluring: "Set/en Start Around The Moon 3:30 PM 2 /**% TO 4:30 AM AD V"V, -*' 1008 RACE ST W». «*?, * «r f* * liiininimmixi: PENN STUDENTS- SEE THE WORLD'S MOST UNIQUE CABARET ACT. Penn students get it Cheaper! $2 discount or! 2 price student! rush Bernard Bragg, llll ll\ll\ I'lWsM \ V\l \S MIDDLE EAST AFTER SADAT - a speech by Yohanan Ramati, Pnme Minister Begin s Foreign Policy Advisor Logan Hall 17 tpm. Fnday. November 20 Sponsored by l RUSA PENN CHRISTIAN Fellowship meets Friday at 7 X. 2nd floor CA Student-run fellowship invites all who are interested for singing, prayer, discussions, worship UNDERGRADUATE History Sociely presents Dr Jack Reece and Dr Walter Ltcht. Friday Nov 20 at 4 30 in the History Dept lounge (2nd floor College H<*II> YOCHANAN RAMATI - Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee of (he Likud Block of Israels Knesset will speak on Fnday. Nov 20, Logan '' U' " WEEKEND AANA SELF HELP group for anorex cs, bulemics and (amity and friends Saturday November am p.m. Child Guidance Clinic Level A Conference Room Speaker to follow For further info call SENIORS' High Noon Smash Sat Nov 21sl at Blanche Levy Ter race (near Peace sight Followed by Senor Strut at Penn Danmouth game THANKSGIVING Food Drive Bring canned and dry goods to the Newman Center 3720 Chestnut, by Sunday Nov 22 WALSH'S TAVERN on 43rd St. Between Walnut and Locust Streets. BA MM»I WMM a an»f'iimy arm*. Hut MM AJMU itnt rrm 3 Pm u f fm DnMi rtommm* rmtt ««,i, IvtM Been A Part or University City Since lliur.clus. November I*, I*'**I News In Brief Reagan Asks European Arms Fullback Vs \SHlNCiTON - Slaking nut his claim as a man of peace. President Reagan laid before (he world yesterday a four-slop plan for removing nuclear weapons and pulling back troops in Europe,' challenging ihc- Soviel Union to "share our commitment" to arms reduction "With SOMCI agreemcnl. wc could together substantially reduce the dread (hreat of nuclear war which hangs o\er (he people of Europe." the President said 'This, like (he Flril footlttp»" (he moon, would be a gianl step lor mankind." Reagan offered to cancel U.S. dcploymenl of medium-range nuclear missiles in Europe if the Soviets would dismantle the 600 missiles thev now (( (intinued from page II " 'Stable' in today's society means 'financially stable.' Good credit has become analogous to good character." "A gas station card is an excellent place 10 siart." (he credit experl said. "because (he sums are small, and (he company is willing 10 risk (he loan on someone who has not yet established credit." Some department stores, he added, arc also lenient. Another way to establish credit is wilh a charge card or a credit card. I'ollan clarified die difference between the two terms: a charge card, such as American Express, Carte Blanche, and Diners Club, is Shabbos Schedule mm Friday 5 30 Servii es (with singing and explanation) f> 00 Dlnnei (Jusl come lot dinner if you'd like) 9:00 Fabrengen (a Chassldl gel together) Saturday 12:30 Lunch 2:00 Tins Week's Torah portion 3:00 Talmud Both courses open to a // regard/ess of background Come for any part of a ny meal or class. Lubavitch House 4032 Spruce St a? 9P rrt 2 fl' Tl have (rained on European largcts. He called, loo. lor slashes in conventional force] and new efforts to scale down (he nuclear weaponry Ihc superpoweraim at one another. He also Hked tie* etions IO guarantee nuclear war will never erupl lluough "uncertainly or miscalculation." But Moscow quickly rejected the President's initiative as propaganda designed to cloak an American a(- lempl to gain military superiorily "thiough the back doot." While rail used IhOM words, another Soviel news agency, Novotti, said Kremlin acceptance would "actually mean the Soviet Union's unilateral disarmament." Reagan's speech to the National Credit Rating Shortcuts geared toward the frequent traveler and involves an annual fee in exchange for special services The credit card, including Master- Card and Visa, is the more widelyaccepted card. Although neiiher card may be ohtained without a "financially Stable" status, Ihc signature of a co-applicani - someone wilh established credit - can gain the applicant a (rial period, i'ollan said. Upon reliable paymenl of monthly lulls for a period of time, the applicant ma) establish credit, Several credit agencies, such as American l xpress, offer programs thai make it easier for siiidents to establish credit. "Bj showing promise of a job of $10,000 or more.'" I'ollan explained, "a college senior can obtain his own Press ( lub was designed to smooth relations with America's allies in I urope and to counter the growing peace tnovemenl abroad. It was beamed live via satellite to European stations and (he Inlernalional Communicaiion Agency estimated that by evening it would be seen by 200 million people around the world. Deputy White House press secretary Larry Speakes said the President was "extremely pleased by the initial reaction," 10 his proposals, especially from Europe. Republicans and Democrats alike on Capitol Hill praised Reagan's proposals. Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker, said they "will have a profound effect on foreign policy." charge card." I'ollan also offered another, more nable alternative. "A consumer bank loan is a greal credit standing once it is paid back," he said. 'The way to go about getting one is selecting a bank that is looking for you. Consider a bank that advertises in your school paper, or one where you have had a stable SCCOUnl for a period of time." Students responded favorably to I'ollan's lecture. Wharton senior Edith Oraen called Pollan's ideas "extreniels useful," adding, "I would never have ihought of making a deal wilh the bank." Before the forum, I'C'B Director Mark Green said he thought students "realh base no idea what it lakes to establish credit." WE DELIVER! 7 DAYS A WEEK-2 PM TO 12 MIDNIGHT ROYAL PIZZA 42nd AND HAI.NMORE "FOR THOSE WHO PREFER THE BEST!" STEAKS - HOAGIES - SALADS - GRINDERS OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK AM TO 12 MIDNIGHT DELIVERY OK IMCK-UP DON'T BE A TURKEY GIVE BLOOD HI RISE EAST Thurs.. Nov. 19 2:00-7:00 -Donate and you have a chance to win 2-FREE PASSES to WALNUT MALL CINEMA co sponsored by Circle K Free Tay Sachs testing funded by SAC IS Drexel Players Present John dare's Obie hard Winning Pby HOUSE OF BLUE LEAVES Thursday, November 19th at 7:30 PM Friday and Saturday, November 20th and 21st at 8:00 PM MANDELL THEATRE 33rd and Chestnut Sts. for Reservations and Information Dial 895 ARTS General Admission '5 00 Students and Senior Citizens <3.50 MOO Off With Penn IP. WORLD THE HAWK by John Dosinger directed by Daniel Freudenberger A new ploy with sign language, words and music. The Irui'rotionv one) achievements of (he hearing impaired ore uniquely ond dramatically expressed in this new ploy starring the noted deal octor ond mime Oernard Drogg November Annenbarg School Thejlro Evening Matinee ' I Tickets Fn 4 Sontoi '. -. annenberg center CHARGE-BY-PHONE TICKETS: (215) UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 3680 Walnut St Philadelphia PA «ith 1^J c** <*is)z?z s0 Feet looking for real comfort deserve to find Birkenstocks. Kwipriniing in a BirkcmKxk The Natural Shoe Store 220 S. 40th St. Philadelphia. PA EV

3 «(iminuetl Irani page I) alto critical ol Ihe Council panel for cdntidcrini Faculty members in ihe same light as other University employee* when discussing benefits. "1 am violently opposed lo having our benefits mixed up with ihe others." Management Professor William Gombcrg said. "I don'l ihink thai just because we gel the benefit, that everyone in the University from the janilor lo Ihe president should get the same benefit." And Statistics Professor Ezra Krendcl quipped, "We're not noied for our administrators and secretaries, we're noted for our I acuity." Faculty Salary Resolution In response to ihe question of University Council involvement, tiombcrg proposed that a separate Senate committee look into the benefits question. But before action s.is taken on Gomberg S measure. I conomic* Professor Irving Kravis put forth an amendment calling for faculty members lo remove themselves from Ihe Council committee. kravis said he hoped such a move would diminish Council's influence in faculty affairs. "This is an illustration of the disadvantage of having the affairs of the faculty treated...in a committee thai transcends the faculty itself." he said. Eisenlohr Hall- a unlinutil from page I) them, and we'll complete the work o(ice they've moved out," Hirsch said. The president and his wife are scheduled lo move into their new home afler renovations are completed in mid-august, he added. "The major interior modifications will be to put in addilional bathrooms," Hirsch said. Some construction is planned for each floor of the three-story, while-columned mansion, which the University has owned since On ihe first floor, what is now a storage room in the southeast corner of ihe building will be converted into the home's main kitchen. "We're going back to a kilchen. the way it was some time ago." Hewryk said. Partitions will be removed from what arc now Alumni Center offices to open space for the presidential living room. In addition, iherc will be a "rehabilitation, cleaning-up and repainting" of the building, he said. Second floor renovations will include sealing a door lo what will become the master bedroom, which whi ihen be entered through a less conspicuous bathroom passageway. This renovation "will give them a little more prjvacy," Hewryk said. Two other second floor offices thai w3l be convened to bedrooms, along wsh five third-floor bedrooms, will accommodate the first family's guests. Other additions to the building will be the creation of a den for ihe president and the installation of central air conditioning. "We worked mainly with Mrs. Hackney] and ihe architect" in shaping specific plans for the renovation, Hirsch said. Furnishing the new home will also be a collaborative effort between the University and the Hackneys. "We're working on it as a learn," Hirsch said, adding that much of Ihe furniture will come from the Hackneys' current lownhouse and their stored furniture, while addilional pieces may be moved from other University buildings. Other offices housed in Eisenlohr are the Urban Ethnography Center, which has already been moved lo a new home in ihe basement of Bennett Hall, and the University Counseling Service, which is scheduled lo move lo renovated quarters on the second floor of Locust Walk in December. Though Edward Jordan, the newlyarrived executive vice president, is slated to oversee Operational Services in his new role, Hirsch said he is unsure which office will be responsible for the Eisenlohr construction in the transition months. "Right now I'm assisting in helping [Jordan) get acquainted with the University," he said. "I'm sure well be discussing how he would like the organization of Operational Services to be in the future." ATTENTION Juniors. Seniors, drad Students I'.mlil \ our (red it rhrough \ ISA \nd or Master Card (luar.ink'cd "li.mk Action" - Applications arc available to 1,000 I diversity of Penn Students through CSA on a lirsi come, first serve basis only! You must CALM. NOW, io receive your approved application TODAY! They Will Go Fast! I-X CSA Marketing. Inc. rat 38th^^j Spruce Tropicana Orange Juice 89C Reg Imported Ham $2.79/lb Reg s St. VEEKLY PECIALS Short Walk- Big Savings Pepsi RJ - 6 Pock Bottles $1.99 Reg Offer Good Th ru St inday November 22 mi OMI». IMNNSM\\M\N rhunda). November 19, PIKI I'M,I «But other faculty members attacked Kravis' proposal. Material) Science Professor Charles McMahon aid, "It's heavy handed, but it's also sort of a torpedo aimed at University, Council." while Finance Department Chairman Jean Crockett said, "I would be very embarrassed to be put in ihe X>M lion of a faculty member saving I nvai not interested in the benefits of other members of the community " kravis responded that other groups should also have such committees, "to which faculty members (would) not have access," and again criticized Council, saying "they choose issues thai are often nol central lo the University in importance." Kravis' amendment failed, but Ihe Gomberg measure carried. Gomberg said after the meeting, "I didn't want it to be anti-council." In other business, Ihe Senate payed tribute to Law School Professor Alexander Frcy, who died over the sum mer. Law Professor John Honnold said Prey, who joined ihe law faculty in 1932 and became the Senate's first chairman 20 years later, had supported civil liberties "at a time when only repression was popular." Photos For Applications Passports Resumes While You Wail Service (II Needed) On Campus At SHAPIR STUDIOS 3907 Walnut Street BA *< > tmnttt fmtmh four Plays hf Simuel Beckett *./ film with Butter Helton November 19 I.M November rtt t f.» HinU MM Ttmhr. Imnttrf Ct**t Mrk 'il* President Sheldon Hackney discuss ed recent threats against DuBoli i ol lege House residents and other inilimihi.il- III liis report. "That son of physical intimidation is something we cannot tolerate Oil campus, and I'm atadthe! niversit) community reacted io spontaneously and ttronsl) to that." he said. He added that rcccnl incidents of sexual harassment and anti-semitism, along with the OuBoil affair, indicated "a more general problem of human relations on campus, [onc we will not be able to solve in the short term even if we are able to solve ihe problem ol physical harassment." Hackney alia announced thai heexpects the search for a vice president for development to be complete by c ruisunas, and said he was "verj trai ried" that cuts in the Commonwealth budget could have a negative effect on the University Provost Thomas Lhrlich reported that he was looking into three areas: academic contacts between faculty and students, correcting a decline in English literacy among students, and casing barriers between liberal arts and professional education. CURRY COTTAGE Serves best Vegetarian Dishes Open 7 Days For Lunch and Dinner 4708 Baltimore Ave Free Coffee at Caft Jeudi on Thursday Nov. I9ih with Opening Night Ticket Stab PAT'S PIZZA RESTAURANT 4500 WALNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA, PA. EV OPEN MONDAY THURSDAY 7 00 A.M PM FRIDAY A SATURDAY 7:00 A.M MIDNITE CLOSED SUNDAY' Breakfast Lunch-Dinner II You Buy 3 PIZZAS You Get One FREE 'DINING ROOM- EAT IN OR TAKE OUT WE DELIVER CALL EV The Tradition oj In HIT Search in Music ( til (IJU'II s.,,,,,1 \luut Beethoven Sinmlii III \ Wa/IW, '/' /"/ rhomas de Hartmann tn \i Plant! SiiHitltt, a/i fi. \li)/.ll I 12 i<a>inlnm\ mi 'Tmnkli Twinklr IMlh S"/oi" Elan si> mil pianist ( illi.nl II.ill Hi \ li M.IVI i I llllcip.' Mm il ^ arrow \w - S.lllll si.tv. \'<>V( IUIM I 21. H pin I I.IVIIHHII I i maids., Win kini; S.K nh ii film '«/",/on th, tnirl f, i.n/f.rill I* xhint'ii fnluwhig tin i"imii Vdmissii in s"» I i, ki'ts.ix.iil.ihlc at tin IIIHI h Pick a Winner in Israel nun, nil, II III.IIIIIII, all >s I I 'Jii' 1 '- a» A great qreat opportunity to get acquainted wilh KidDut* while learning Ihe Hebrew language Earn from 6 to 8 college credits at Haifa University Several other university-related programs available Contact 64M40Q FOB EUEZER NA0T AZT r JEWISH Vi AND CENTERS 401 SOUTH BROAO ITRfIT M-JiMLPm. PA, m*f DEPARTMENT of MUSIC University Choir WILLIAM PARBERRY, conductor BACH Cantata no. 50 "Nun ist das Heil und die Kraft" MOZART Vesperae Solennes motets by BYRD and POULENC Friday, November 20, :30 PM Tabernacle Church 3700 Chestnut Street free Partially funded by S.A.C. How to recognize the real taste of beer at 17,000 feet Oive Tliat Student a Blue Ribbon! Pobst Brewing Compony Milwaukee Wisconsin and other cities

4 I ' '.' -.' PA<.E4 (Elie J0atlu pptiitsgluairiatt The Newspaper of the Uttfvefsity oj Pennsylvania Ml I ( IfoRI/ZO. tain H..M \1SS,,.IK ROM HI I SHEPARD, N I Hum // i/\/ SONG, / i/i -. EIIIIOH III V \LMAN, Pin i «.«inn EDIIOH THOMAS I IANOVER. SMI.M\N\<4«H l/v/v/ s KORNFELD, CHI IMI M\N«,I«//OH MiPC,I SSI I H. M S I Ml* l.fm^t.. - IICll.1141 'i i».m... IU UMIJ.- \tnv ' ' «Ntm%iM*rjnll I Ihetw-vpjp*' V.01I1.1 pjfn... lit ly. I'niiM 1... i..p..tsw*sisi.*>!-' ihnnqmndnai HtoMriphu» Over 70 Attend.OHmr-v"** < «** "" '*'' **wmmm Forum Moves in- * am*»- '" ". I \DRl II KIRI/M l\. I -. I S( OTT HELLER. M I urn RH II H \HI\ol I B Mtvu.il Ohm.in- I hurmi.it. November 19, l**n 1 /,'!</(/ A'/ HOI I (IlilC /. I DIIOKIAI (.IVIKSIW V/W \/,( A l( A/ V, SHIN To Define Racist Attitudes». me iiii goag lot* w... -,! *M.. i*.. gajaa^ba* «"*." a*.aaaaa>..-.»*» (.<.**.<.,i- > ' B*.-tea ~*oi r>*.i» '-Mini.%» simtla i «"J -ml irm,,....4" «! X.**! m*m»,... aa^bt< jr*ym«'- **»-> rajaj -- '.r» ratm \JCJW -w -**. B..., * **«<,< a.»w.w «*if*"lc" '" P«*"«^..^mjH^ - i*.****» * mm '< an»<.. t at*> hi, - *-> m-li < «canto'»*i-.< «<* ««( "-' cufctj -kni «** ' M t> -*> n^a* -n» «> ri Ml - '»» ««f "»*J awtsissli.(p-i!» i>«"" ' '""M» * buw '*«.. I INIIM K(>» WEBER. Ci! IHIIIK A 1 -l\/>/ ISV/( ///. P K.KM-ln I-1.I1..H ADRIEWI SI IH,I II l( K A.miKIIMM.GaWIMNM'W // \ I Sll IA7. PmilMI hnsmlv.. II'IIHOIHII I \LLERAS,.U111S1K111L i%wmi'.>... i\ ' ' :.' ' m.i.*im tfc..^,* raligla»«b > ^c<# «t~ J mm P«H *«N s* *m >» *»««H»fc», r ' '-»' On Bigotry and Slogans To the Editor: Re: Letter published from Steve llurw II/ and Michael Lahey I am appalled that you believe the. o o a ( - use of the word "nigger" was negligence on my pan. Perhaps you didn't know that "nigger" was the word being used to alienate blacks on this campus I stand with them and therefore I am nigger. 1 am not interested in "socially acceptable word" but in socially acceptable behavior I he bigotry on this campus, and in this country, is possible because most of us have happily accepted slogans as solutions. Someday we will all realize that the problem is not the words we use, but the feelings behind them When that day comes, we will have lo develop a new vocabulary lo express our unity. Until then, the fight will continue as ea.b looks into her'hts own feelings, trying to grow to the realization that bigotry must be cured bs everyone's individual steps to maturity. LESLIE R.POCH06 Former Registrar Letters The Dailv Pennsylvaman welcomes comment from the University community in the form of columns and letters to the editor. Material may be on any topic of national, University, or personal interest Material appearing on the editorial page in Ihe form of signed columns, letters and cartoons represent the opinions of the authors and do not necessarily, reflect the views of ihe Board of Managers of The Doll) Pennsylvanian. Letters must be typed double-spaced and contain Ihe author's name, phone number, and University affiliation. All material must be signed; names will beheld upon request. Send all material to: Bob Wojlowicz. Editorial Chairman, The Daily Penn sylvaman Walnut Slreet, Philadelphia. PA BLOOM COUNTY/Berke Breathed 0 ueuo 6AK»H' PICKING rwrbothex Nt UP /MMO7IN0 COTTER Hfceflr rwe SCHOOL HOMEGROWN/Rob Weber The Neighborhood I he sign welcoming me lo Spruce Hill is hardly impressive. I' sags slightly to ihe right and is fading around its rectangular edges. The green spruce tree at its heart fades easil) into the background of the University Pinball sign at 40th and Spruce Streets. Must people don't notice it, and those who do don't think about II It sou were to ask many of the 4,000 students who choose to live off campus each year, the odds are only a few could tell you that the neighborhood they live in is called Spruce Hill. Part of the problem, they tell me, is that they don't make as big a deal over neighborhoods in other places in the country as sve Philadelphians do. Most of us grow up in a neighborhood, have a name for it; probably even a nickname. My neighborhood in the Northeast is called Oxford Circle. Now, since I live between 40th and 46th llratt, and Market and Woodland Street. I live in Spruce Hill. Over one third of Spruce Hill's population spends its days in class at the University. The rest are primarily homeowners and young professionals who either can't afford to live in Center City, or just plain like the area. So, while these two groups exist in the same physical setting, there are in actuality two neighborhoods - onw of students and the other of homeowners/professionals \.i neighborhood in the eighties, Spruce Hill can't afford this dichotomy. It is faced with a number of veryserious problems - crime, litter, accomodating one of the world's largest populations of Indochinese boat people. Keeping students and long term residents from going at each other's necks only makes these tasks harder. Students will at times point to the crime problem as inherent to the neighborhood. They will scream about how "trashy" West Philly is, with run-down homes and slumlords. The residents retort. The trash, they say is from (he students who often hurl their waste in plastic bags which are torn to shreds long before trash day. The crime, they add, is encouraged by naive, wealthy students who are easy targets lor "imported" (from other neighborhoods) criminals. Parking is impossible during the school year, and noise often drives them cra/\ Unfortunately the two groups rarely meet to work out these problems, for the students there is a lack of time and interest; and the full-time residents apparently are not all that interested in student input anyway. I IK- homeowners in the area have formed an organization to work out community problems the Spruce Hill Com munil) Association - which for all intents and purposes could be called the Spruce Hill homeowners and professional association. Even though the neighborhood is close to 40 percent students, less than ten percent of the members are students. I hose tew student- who base even heard of the association offer a shrug and an "I don't have time to join" when asked about it. However, much of the blame must be thrust on the organization which has made no real attempt in the past couple of years to recruit students. The group failed to canvass the students blocks - from 40th to 42nd - during a membership drive last year and has rarely advertised events in the campus media. There are signs, and the lime is ripe, however, for cooperation - and it's not coming a minute too soon. I his Saturday, a series of community workshops on crime will be held in Houston Hall. Neighborhood crime preventton schemes such as Joe O'Malley's Uniserisly City crime Letters to the Editor lothe Editor: The forum on racism written about in Monday's DP is indicative of the illogical rantings and ravings found constantly in the pages of the DP. Associate Student Life Director Jacqueline Wade told her audience that all whites arc racists because they receive benefits from living in a white society, but only some blacks are racists because only some blacks hate whites. Not only is such a sweeping generalization ridiculous, but it is illogical. If all whites are racists because they live in a white world, then of course all blacks must hate whites because blacks are apparently oppressed. It's generalities like these, constantly found in the pages of the DP. which make me believe that the real racial problems in our society will never DC tackled. Anything that ever goes wrong for the black University com munity is always described as due to institutional racism. Yet, in certain /)/' articles, one can find rational explana- The University: Not a Racist Institution tions for black problems which have nothing to do with racism. Lor example, last year the /)/' w rote a series of articles about the lack of black faculty members. The mood of the articles was that this terrible situation was just another example of the administrations racism and insensitivity. However, there were a few articles that stated that very few blacks today arc seeking doctorates. Instead, many blacks enter fields where they feel they can make a lot of money. The DP could have drawn the obvious conclusion that there aren't many black professors because most blacks are not interested in teaching, but instead the DP cried "racism." Ihe lack of minority - SpCCiflcall) black - enrollment at the Universlt) is also another area where unproven generalizations arc made. Last year, articles appeared castigating the University for its lack of minority representation, once again staling that this problem was due to racism. Yet. An Embarassment to the U. To the Editor: The University community has been subjected to too much intellectual foolishness and moral posturing on the issue of "racism" this semester. This seems to have culminated in ihe performance of our associate director of student life at the "Racism Awareness Workshop" last Saturday. According to Monday's Daily Pennsylvaman, Miss Wade told her audience that "all whites are racist" because "they benefit from a lifestyle based on a concept of while supremacy and black inferiority, and because of the inherent benefit from being in this society." Perhaps to lessen the sting of this vulgar charge of moral inferiority - for surely racism is a moral wrong - Miss Wade apparently hastened to reassure whites that "she forgave the white participants for their racism." How kind - if somewhat patronizing. c - -^ 0OP5. G0TTH RUN KflM/KAZ 5 / n i ^H (jafjii v fw -a* have seen no response by any University functionary to Miss Wade's statements, which after all were made at an official or quasi-official University function. There is often much to be said for embarassed silence (if one can give the administration the benefit of assuming embarassment), and certainly Miss Wade is entitled to her opinions. But if a University officer were to make the ludicrous assertion that "all blacks are slavish" because they were enslaved by whites, and because the effects of slavery may linger still, one assumes that a correction, or at least a dissociation of the University from the views expressed, would have been quickly forthcoming. Is it not patronizing to allow such pernicious idiocy to go unchallenged, just because it comes from those who present themselves as foes of racism? Is not such silence damaging to the honesty - intellectual and moral - that Miss Wade endorsed, and to which a University ought to aspire? \MI i i \M BRISTOL Professor, Political Science Quotation of the Day "We're not noted for our administrators and secretaries, we're noted for our faculty. " -Statistics Professor Eire Krrndrl there were other articles in the />/' discussing the inferiority of primary and secondary education for black children. Once again, the DP could have drawn the obvious conclusion that the low number of black studentat Penn was due to the fact that mam blacks receive a poor high school education, and therefore cannot meet Penn's standards. Last year's "campaign" was directed against the administration. The impression I got from the DP was that the University was run by the K.K.K This year's "campaign" is now directed against the student body. I haven't seen a day yet where at least one front page article did not deal with some sort of racism, and the opinions expressed are unanimous: the white student body is racist. Jacqueline Wade goes so far as to say all whites arc racists. Contrary to popular opinion, all whites are not racists. Personally, I believe that the vast majority of Penn students are not racist at all. The campaign against the student body reached an apex with the rea< tion to the DuBios bomb threats. Of course these threats are disgusting, but they do not mean that the University is racist. After all. no one even knows ii the caller was a student. And yet the response of the DP. the UA and even the administration was to claim that the University has a racial problem. I simply cannot understand how anyone watch will be discussed h> community members and students Mave Morrison, director of the recently formed Office of Off-Campus I Iving, is helping to bring this event to students as a waj ol Increasing Involvement with the community, The Spruce Hill organization is also looking at ways lo boostei student participation, through possible membership activities and cultural events which would interest student* I Ins believe that they can offer certain benefits to student' - primarilv when it comes to dealing with dubioqs landlords ihcs wouid also like to work with students on the worsening trash problem with their Universlt) Cits Clean program. Student input in the neighborhood - from helping the needy lo cleaning up to walking against crime - is impor tant, and tin- meeting ol the minds here will take a lol al work. The Spruce Hill Community Association still bears a"n elitist image in the minds ol SOroe Students, who in turn afc viewed as ruffians In some residents. It "ill take strong ac lions from the lop at the University to increase student awareness and concern loi the area, and President Hackney should address this issue in the future. Ihe Off-Campus I fling Office should continue to be a major lactor in this el' ton..is should the i niversit) Council i ommunity Relations Committee. Awareness of Spi use Hill could also be increased - in Intro to Penn and on the pages ol tin. newspaper, and inolhei areas ol the University, Hut this will mean both students and community members sitiing down for good long talks. Or al least a lew beers at \\ alsh's u> start. A 1.,/. Webti is cli) editor ui The Daily Pennsylvania^ Homegrownappean biwetkl) on r/i/s page. can make Mich hast) conclustof). Isn't n lust possible that the threatwere made by one crazy fool? I think it is time to step back and reflect on what has gone on during trie last few years, lirst of all. I think everyone should realize that, contrars to popular opinion. Penn docs not have a racial problem. There might be,i tew racists on campus, but that is all. I don't even think the staff members ol the /'/'even know what racism really is Co see a movie in Brooklyn and hear the audience shout "nigger", at an) black actor on the screen, and theh you will know how to recognize racism In tm two years at Penn, I have met man) people, and I've yet to DISCI ' racist, so I really don't know what thjt DP is screaming at, Secondly, 1 think people should start thinking about some positive aspects of our Universl ty. Andrew Kir tzinan was wrong when he wrote that the University breeds in sensitivity. As far as I'm concerned, the people at Penn are good, decent people, and that includes our new president. Hopefully, after some positive reflection, we can then return lo the problem of blacks in the Universitv and in society, and propose some real solutions instead of scheduling another forum on racism. STEVEN EISMAN College "84

5 l( nni'niit'tt /rt/rn paee 11 1CTOII main students who vsjnt us in address tile writing problem," he said. 'The l niversii) m-eds 10 find ways 10 reach people iflei ihe irishman year,"martin said "Instead ol hoping Cot 'iit'iii :.> come to tit, we will go oui and reach them." In addition to the English Depart incut's expositor) writing courses, the current mechanism] foi teaching 'writing to non-english majors are the freshman seminars and the Writing ( enter, which have foi the most part limited then impact to treshmen. Ihe English Department plans to Haunch the planning tor the new pro- gram next semester. I ucid said the step i- to have English Depart jneni graduate students enroll in undergraduate comses in other depart- ments to gathei Information, and then J»ork with consultants to determine Jtie best method lor leaching writing outside ot the department, New Writing Program- "We want to get an idea of the wilting demands other departments make on their students." Martin ex plained. During the summer. I ucid said, participants in the program, from other departments as well as English, will go through a training session, and the program will begin in the tall semester. Both Lucid and Martin said they hope to have teaching assistants from other departments participating in the actual teaching of writing in their courses I ucid said the English Department presented a proposal for the program, including a request for the necessary Illl l>\ll\ HI WNM \ VMXN lhurml;i». Notcmbcl PA'.K 5 funds, to the Provost"! Office earliei this semester. "We need somethin ia the ordei ol 000 to set up the inquiry," he said. expwniof lh.it the mem) will be used 10 pa) loi consultants and lor the graduate students who will enroll in the undergraduate courses next semester. I ucid said he wis optimistic that enough moncs will be appropriated 10 initiate the program. He added that long-term plans for the program include designing writing courses in othet departments, and having I com nnttec of lop-lcscl professors overseeing the program, lending it their support and prestige. Radio /hack THE GOLD STANDARD 1107 S. 47th STREE I PHILADELPHIA PENNSYLVANIA Open: ft to III /MM Tuesday ihrmtgh Saturday Sunday.< '» '' /»" I'riee ITiagl / "'- /">'" W "' t uilii < ard: \uue Xlmcisphere: Olil l,i\lnoiif<l Despite Ihe menu which changes ever) week. Ihe meal, fruit and vegetables are of uniformly high t iialil> and I have never gone wrong ordering something thai 'sounded good*. II is one of ihe hesi restaurants in the city. Prices Good Thru Monday At New Store Only 5-CELL FLASHLIGHT David Rosseii Wharton Journal September 4, 1980 I I I THRU US OOV I HCtNSfO AGl N( DRIVE CARS TO FLORIDA -. MOST CITIES US A PNONr NOVk '.. If READINGS I I. 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Food Till 12:00 AM Present This Ad MARYQOLO THEATRE preients ***** CABARET Nov & NOV Dlnn«r/Th»tlr»:Frl. & Sat.. Thurs. Nov Nov. 13 r 14 and :30 Dinner: 7:30. Show:9:00 Tlckata $4.00 Tlckata $12.50 At St. Mary's Parish Hall 3916 Locust Walk (behind the hi-rises) For further Information and raaarvatlona CALL ij- iional J-.ckui i MATHEMATICS and COMPUTER PROGRAMMING Cati (6og) 66'/-1441 hi axxanqtmtnti CHHISLER Associates. Inc Mathematics Consultants Taking the Dr Peter J Chnsler MCAT? PO Box 2048 Haddonlield. NJ USA Multiprep will hold a wine and cheese party, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, December 2nd and 3rd, 8:00 PM to 9:30 PM, on Campus! Come meet our staff and other students from area colleges. auk Complementary home-study and test questions, with a brief lecture on test-taking skills, will be given to those who attend. Take advantage of this great opportunity to discover how you can start to prepare now for this Spring's MCAT! Location: 40th Street Mall (above Smokey Joe's), second floor. Mon-Wed 8 AM-2 AM Vhurs.24 Hrs Fri.-24 Hrs Sat.-24 Hrs Sun.- 8 AM-2 AM SPRUCE ST. Dietrich Funding- t( outbuild from i>iine D he said. "There was an obscure Gel man loan that was going to be made possible at a 10 percent interest. Thai WU tabled and we went back for new numbers. Every time you get into this thing it starts 10 slip. The Dietrich Hall ffaii is bothersome on the surface." "It you can't believe the numbers people are feeding you what can you do?" Ncff asked Eckman. "Is someone painting the tape?" Eckman responded [hat there had been "great pressure" to get the job started. "There were great pronti-cs for ihe schedule of funds we're not sure the Wharton School can generate," he said. "Now, ii doesn't look realistic that it's forthcoming." According 10 one source close to the Dietrich planning: "Nobody in a responsible and informed position in the administration had any reason to believe Carroll could raise that much money on ihe basis of his record. And they had all been adequately warned." Former Vice President for Budget and Finance Jon Strauss, contacted in California lasl night, said he agreed with ihe contention. He added that the administration and the Trustees knew the cash-flow would be negative from the beginning, and that the project was not fully funded at that lime. He also said yesterday's news wai "not a great surprise." Slrauss added that Carroll had not concealed anything from the Trustee! at ihe time. 'The decision was made 10 proceed on the basis of a good knowledge of ihe funds that had already been raised and what wai needed to be raised," Slrauss said. He added the Trustee* Knew the project rcpresemed an "extraordinarily ambitious goal" and a big risk. SlniUSt said the Jen-ion logo ahead was made because o! ihe high priority 01 the project. He did not explain how the Trustees beliesed ihe expected negative cash How would be relieved. Hut the source familiar with the situation said Dietrich was pushed through by Carroll, whom he said did not fully consider ihe consequences. "This will eventually come out 01 University funds," he said. "It was inevitable. It was buill Into the situation. Carroll (imply wanted a monument, and no one was strong enough to withstand his will." 1 he lource, who requested anonymity, said Carroll had obtained the backing of powerful Trustees, thereby ensuring the project's future. "It was simple political capitulation to.1 sirong dean with ties to a very poweriui Trustee," he said. 1.irroll. reached last night al his home, refused any comment on the matter. A negative cash-flow indicates thai the sources 01 expected income either have no) materialized 01 base not paid On lime. In ibis case,.11 least according to Slrauss, bolh have happened. In the event thai the condition continues, the 1 niversfty would have to pay ihe construction bills lor Dietrich. Officials fear ihe University would have 10 bor row to pay for such a shortfall, and _ thus encounter sharp interest charges.. In other business, the Board ap- ". proved ihe renovation of Eiscnlohr ; Hall as the presidential residence. "We > now have bolh the money and the 1 bids," Miller said. "And fortunately., they match." ERA Supporters Visit- I( OUtUUUd front page I) the election of Reagan, people realize lhat equal rights are not scenic " "Kcagan has given credibility to all our claims," she added. "He is showing us lhat we need a constitutional amendment as a foundation for all our rights." Penn Women's Center Assistant Director Deborah Levinson. who coordinated the women's campus visit. LSAT MAT GRE GMAT MCAT DAT agreed lhat college support for ihe I ERA is "crucial." "College women are preparing foj careers which they may not be able to reach without the ERA." she said. And regarding ihe ratification fight!' Dans-Anthony-son said, "If people sij! back and are complacent and let sol meonc else take care of it, it is not gos ing to gel done." EH MASTER TEST TAXING TECHNIQUES DEVELOP VERBAL, MATH A LOGIC SKILLS IMPROVE BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS LEARN SPEED READING STUDY SKILLS Mor» Thmn 10,000 S'udvn'a Sine* 1944 COLLEGER ^ftnni. SKILLS CENTER lvt"u ffiutactg RESUMES ^f i^ ^^ A V" «^ 'RecornrnenctctJ 'or Quo/ ^ THE GOLDEN DRAGON 11:00 AM PM MON.-THURS. TIL 1:00 AM FRI.. 1:00 PM - 3:00 AM SAT. & te 1OO PM - lo:o0 PM SUN. PHILADELPHIA'S FINEST IN SZECHUAN AND MANDARIN CUISINE SPRUCE STREET Opening Today ahty" FOR THE FINEST IN TYPESETTING & PRINTING WALNUT STREET (Nexi (. B R "si Prmtinij Done on Promises INQUIRE ABOUT OUR COMPLETE CATERING SERVICES HOUSTON HALL RECORD SHOP in the basement of Houston Hall Grand Opening Sale Thurs., Fri., Sat. All single LPs $5.99 or less M-F 10-6 Sat. 12-4?a

7 'White Hawk'- ((onlinued from page li M the deal, r.11 her than»iih creating.,11 irtiilic work. Espedall) in the 'list scene, characters ask queslioni usi 10 John and Richard can talk about "making the hearing people notice US." I hough an important poini, the author need not have beat the audience ova the head with it. This lack of integrity becomes more troublesome when the characters enact their original cabaret show for the hearing and the deal. Because the audience is invited to become the audience of the cabaret, the play-wiihin-a-play loses its identity as a significant event in the nar- ratives Conflicts and difficulties among ihe three partners are also an important part of ihc play's development, but Basinger has not clearly depicted these strains. Hence, ihe audience is unprepared lor the intensity of Act II's confrontation scene. liccausc ihe play focuses on in- terpersonal communication, the technical effects are de-emphasi/ed in lavor of the acting. Lighting, lostumes and sets are simple and appropriate. I rusimmont, in the part of Richard, stands out. His handsome, bearded face and voice combine to show anger and concern even as he llftfl expressively. The actor portrays a man torn between loyalty to his Iriend and Ins willingness to work with the hearing I n/simmons' physical grace shines torth in the energetic cabaret scene. He swaggers and undulates in the COmedic dance numbers, such as "I Hale Those Oood old Days." Bragg, who is deaf, is not as consistent.is i Itzsimmons, He too is ex- cellent in the cabaret show (even more remarkable because he cannot hear the music), but his stage movement is sometimes overly stilt When the play calls for mime, however, Bragg is remarkable. In the mime piece that ends the show, the former pupil of Marcel Marceau tells the allegorical story of the white hawk's murder. In quick succession he goes from a child to a rifleman to,i haw k Bragg'S eyebrows alone help establish the characters and his bent arms become the hawk's broken wings. The While Hawk is flawed but raises some interesting and provocative issues. The treatment ol the deaf is something that the hearing rarely contemplate. In addition to ihe Story, the isolation of the deaf is conveyed to the hearing audience by having, at limes, only signing on slage. The While Hunk will be playing at the Annenbcig School Theater through Sunday. IMI I. Ml \ I'rNNsil \ WUN Ihur-day. V»rmhrr II. I <*M I PMif. 7 Beckett cast and crew I'm sure you'll do Sam proud 1 BREAK A LEG EVERYONE!! Margie AN INVITATION TO BUSINESS, COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING SENIORS ICM is an executive search (irm. retained by major corporations to recruit key personnel We recommend attractive candidates who are graduating from local colleges and universities to our corporate clients. We invite you to send us your resume which should include your grade point and areas of job interest. Then, we will review your background and contact you. Also, we encourage you to call us if you have any questions about how to enter the job market. There are no fees involved, since we are compensated by the companies we represent. ICM CONSULTANTS. INC. DAVIS ROAD P.O. BOX 725 VALLEY FORGE, PA (215) Safe space.. for agreeing with others and for conflict University Lutheran 37th & Chestnut "SPECIAL" Houston Hall Candy Shop OPEN TILL 11 PM Vi Roast Chicken Dinner 3.25 Roast Beef Dinner Veal Parmesian - Spaghetti $3.15 MANY MANY MORE -SPARE RIBS FRIED SEAFOOD HOAGIES IHEESTEAKS REUBENS SALADS DELI-RESTAURANT 39th & SANSOM ST. "WEEKEND SPECIAL" FRESHMEN! TAKE A FRIEND TO 'TROY'S and get $1 off second dinner "The Middle East After Sadat" A speech by Mr. Yohanan Ramati, the Foreign Relations Advisor to Prime Minister Menachem Begin. Friday, November 20. Logan Hall 17, Sponsored By International Relations Undergraduate Student Assoc, International Relations Graduate Association, and the Penn Israel Alliance. 1:00 PM Chocolate Covered Pretzels $3.99 lb. (reg. $5.00/lb.. sold in lbs. only) Thursday and Friday November 19th and ZOth PENH IS A SECOND RATE SCHOOL......Academics, Sports, Social Life. Agree or Disagree?» Submit your original essays, stories, poems, or one-liners to the YEARBOOK box in the Office of Student Life, 1st floor Houston Hall. Classified Ads Place your classifieds at the D.P. office 4015 Walnut Street, 2nd floor. Cost: 15$ per word, per day Deadline: 3 pm. two days before publication. AVAILABLE EFFICIENCIES or 3 bedroom apartments Modern, 'bright New public transportation Welaenthil Properties Spruce ; Street, ATTRACTIVE, unfurnished 4 room i apt 2nd floor, gas heat, very secure Near Umv.rsity Immediately.available S28S/month SA frier 7 p.m. - CAMPOS OH Center City Efficiency '.*> live Bedrooms Can furnish Rnode , SINE 1 48TH 2 bedrooms, spacious.. hdwd firs, mod kit. tile bath, Ige - clceeta, sep dnrm, AC Immed. avail IS375 Also avail Jan I. 1 bedroom. 2S0 STOLKER S CO RENOVATED 1&2 Bdrm. 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HOUSEMATE WANTED Single room In 4 bedroom house Jan.- May Near campus SnS/month Reply Quickly NEAR CAMPUS. 2 bedroom town house Total renovation ust completed DrW. wrd. bnck patio asopius January occupancy ONE BEDROOM apt Very clean, well lighted, partially lumiahed with rugs and fireplace No utilities $225 monthly After 5 pm ON CAMPUS rooms and apartments tor rent Ijr spring semester Call anytime RENT - 1 BEDROOM apt - 42nd & Chester Available December SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM apt In U.C Victorian, new kit/bath, D/w attic/ study, Irv rm wfplano Can be used as 3rd bdrm Secure 400 OOrmo OPEN HOUSE Sunday, Nov 22nd. Two bedroom townhouse under renovation State Street (between 3Bth & 40th sts i S Favorable finaclng available Call EV tor Information. PINE AND 40TH efficiencies 1 and 2 bedroom. $190 a month and up Available now Yentis SPACIOUS Victorian apartment, to share. Six rooms furnished, pnvate bedroom. $240/mo. includes heat, cell th and Walnut 40TH a PINE Furnished and unfurnished efficiencies $175 to $200 Heel S hot water included , m ma CHCVETTE 1S80-4 spd. radials, roofrack, 9000ml. $4,500 or offer GENESIS TO - I have tour good seats for November 26 Spectrum show lor sale at cost Doug 1682 ntm RADIAL TIRES need two 14 inch, good condition Alan SPEAKERS - Boss New in original carton $400/ pair Call IS 1988 VOLVO Model '«QOod condition $ Call after 8 p m PAID RESEARCH participation Male undergraduate or graduate stu dent volunteers between the ages ol 18 and 28 are needed to participate in a two-session research study deal irtg with physiological reactions to verbal stimuli at the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital <49th and Market Streets), as part of the research program of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School The first experimental session lasts 2Vt hours, with a token reimbursement of $7.50, the bulk ol which will be reimbursed at the end of the second session, the second experimental session takes 5Vi hours and reim burses $18.50 Analysis of the research data requires that born of the sessions be completed Please call Mrs Auxler st between 90O12OO or Monday through Friday, for further Informs tion and appointment times tor each of the two experimental sessions. If desired, a rids can be arranged from a central point on campus DISHWASHER NEEDED: 10 meal* week. Compansstlon; work 7'^hrsJ. wk. Call HELP1II Pan rims clean-up man needed - good pay OVERSEAS JOBS - Summer-year round Europe, S. Amer. Asia All fields $600-$1200 monthly Sightseeing Free info Write UC Box 52 PA 5 Corona Del Mar. CA PARKING ATTENDANTS: C-C'S largest seeks mature part-time help Lie req hrs flexible, evening shin (4-121 plus day work available Call , rr-i,' n UC GUITAR STUDIO, professional instruction in classical and modern guitar GREENISH-GRAY prescription glasses, tost Thursday near Van Pelt Ubrary Call LOST HRN VICINITY: 9/11 slgnev wedding ring Pieese return, any -enumeration acceptable It has enormous personal value Call no questions asked LOST: M Van Pelt Ubrary 111*1 eyeglasses. Please return to library circulation desk or call x5206 SEEKING HONEST, sincere. Intelligent gentleman, profession.; or successful educated business man. 37 to a young 49. with traditional values, lor an attractive, sophlstlcaled young lady, early 30s. 5'5\ size 12. college graduate, physically sound, with highly desirable inner qualities and varied interests. Write giving honest Information about yourself to Rsbbi Ben lamln, Box *BB, Dally Pennsytvanlan. 0EAR K.W. Here s to my cheerleader Happy Birthday (soon) Love lik INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS PATIENTS II you have mono, or have been diagnosed within ihe lest two weeks, you are urgently needed lor a research program Please call Ms. Roman, American Diagnostics Company lor more intor mati on AUTO GLASS: Foreign & Domestic. mobile glass unit, guaranteed workmanship Call Harry Belseigel at Tn-Slate Auto Glass Co T.VJSTEREO REPAIR - All work guaranteed Reasonable prices. Call R 4 C Electronics HtOH RISE NORTH 2 bedroom dou We for rent Cell PENN SKI CLUB announces Its 3rd annual Sugarloaf. Maine trip. Jan 2 & Mi days nit. 5 nights lux siopeside cendos Round-tnp bus, parties, X country available Call Jeennie Enc; Jett SKIERS: SKI Utah December 31 January 7 lor $495 Price includes air fare, lodging, lift tickets, breakfasts, and more For more mlormation. call Dave ZJHSE ATTENTION: PRESTIGE Typing Se< vice Theses. Dissertations, Manuscripts. Foreign Languages. Medical Resumes, Dictaphone, etc On Campus Representative daily & weekends AAA KIRK TYPING Service is now conveniently located in the basement of Houston Hall Term papers, theses, discount typesetting ol resumes, word processing, com pu ten zed cover letters?7?1h1 GAIL S PROFESSIONAL TYPING Service. 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8 nil i>\m i-i \\-M\ \\I\N Ihursda). November 19, I9gI Two Suspensions Came Out Of Inquiry Gridders to Adjust 'D' In Light of Shake Up Hv HIII ROMI All ol a snjjcii a loi li happening lo the iv'tiii football team. And it Isn't all that good. I specially to the defense, Port) five points»orc >men up to Harvard, :,! Delaware, and another 38 versus Princeton In addition, a rash.>i Injuries lias nun that unit. finally, in- paai Sunday, tour players on the team were removed trom said team rot violating certain rules and behav- Ing HI «a\s "unbecoming to Pennsylvania football players." Three of those players - Bob Bailey, Tom Sgro, and John Sylva - played defense fne upshot of all in-' will Pennsylvania have ll defenders left by the end ol the icason? What is the effect of all these developments as the team prepares foi Dartmouth Saturday. lie last home game of the year? "Depth is a problem," admitted coach Jerry Hctndt, "hut the drop-off MI talent won't be." In Othei uoids. the first stringers fill be leady to go. as will the second team. There are simply not as man) people available to play after that. I lie depth chart is depleted. "Now we "ill he working with some who may be haven't had as much attention so tar this year." said Herndt. "I here will he no effect on IIC plan, and honestly It's suiprimiic how well the second string.iocs once they become first string." I he people who will have to pick Shaun Teevens the Pennsylvania defense will have a mi I he team is faced with Ine task ol lacing up the slack seem capable. Jim Miller played extensively at Harvard and will take Bob Bailcv'- position on the defensive line. John Morganthaler will see a lot of time at linebacker for two reasons first, co-captain Dan I'rendergast is still suffering from a hip pointer, and his status won't be known until possibly l-riday or even game time Saturday,. Second. Svlva who had been starting at linebacker won't be playing. "Morganthaler last week had one of the best games at linebacker all season." said Berndt. "What we lack in experience, we might gain in "rookie' enthusiasm." The short term problem then for the next two weeks is depth or better yet numbers I he long term problems Michael Spans mhi-r ill change* i» Its starting line up this "sat urdav line In siispensjniis.in,i injuries. l.irliikmilll. whulisiillhasashiii.il the league illle. for the seal befall a while IgO for the defense, lens Dow ling bit the dust lor the season with a neck problem. Mike Christiani hurt a knee. Most of the defensive ha.ks have bruises and pain all over their bodies, Christian! had an orthogram performed on his left knee yesterday and is out lor the season He will heback next year as he has eligibilit) re mauling. How are things from his perspective on the sideline? "I o-o or no losses," said Christiani about the defensive injuries and the Nuinlav night decision, "the) still have to put) better, "Ihe defense was not really hurt by losing these guvs, the defense is just hurt period." The football team has been silent on the subject of Bcrndt's Sunday night decision Christiani did offer this, however: "Coach Berndt brought in a new idea, a new era, and n seems like this action is just anothei pan ol it Many new things base come to the program this year. and tin- is just another." Berndt on Bcrndt's decision to cut the four plavcrs: "I'd like to think that there will he no negative effects In fact, we hope it will bring us.loser together, I talked to each of the players individually. Needless lo -av the) were stunned, but they were also apologetic, Hut they understood it was something that had to be done " Brother Ready to Receive Ivy League Title B> RRi AN HARRIS It'll he an a vers cold day in July before they forget the name of Buddy Teevens up in Hanover. New Hampshire. Hack in 1978, the year the Big Green captured its last Ivv League championship, leevens enjoyed perhaps the klnesl season that a Dartmouth quarlet bact has evet had. In addition lo leading the league in neails ever) passing category, he also ran lot,>\ei TOOyrdt averaging over ten yards a pop, "Budd) was IS fine a leader as we've ever had at quarterback here," said Joe Yukica, now in his fourth year as head coach of Dartmouth ITirough it all, Shaun Iecsens. a member ot the Dartmouth Ireshman football team, sal in the.lands and swelled with pride as he soaked in the accomplishments of his older brother. "Just seeing how special the whole season was for Budd) «as a great inspiration to me," said Shaun, now a senior on the Dartmouth squad and the team's leading pass receiver (32 catches, 462 yards). Las) Saturday, alter the Big Green had up-ended Brown, the news which shook the Ivy League was cause toi much celebration throughout the forests and v.dlevs of New Hampshire: Princeton had upset Yale, that night. Shaun received a call Irom Buddy, now-.in a-.istant coach at Boston University. "Buddy tell that winning the title was just a great Quaker Oats llll MANSON» Will >, He who plavs logethei slavs together, and soccei team stars J.B, IMtM) and kevin kiiuievv have lollowedlh.it ruletoa tec I he pan -lashed I hell wav lo s snis on the Philadelphia SOCCCI "-even Ml League learn, voted hv league coaches. Ihen males clinched a lie toi the league title ss it h Philadelphia I extile as well. ll v\ < ORON \ It's doubtful thai too mam Mexican migrant workers will he there, but hundreds ot seniors should make then wav lo franklin I icld Ihis Salurda) tor the annual hall nine Senior Strut, at which lime ihcv II gel Inn ied in and howls from the.lowd. st»\ Ol s \M No. the.ai won't be parked, bul Blanche I ev v will be I'ai ked, a- -en KM - eailict before the game foi the nexl Vnior Smash, at noon on III an. he I cw Park Shoi glasses arenl necessary, but expect the does to howl ami voices loroat a I lei a COUple Ol still drink- IIII HOSION SIR \Nt,i i R kny ol those old r-xhirts getting light around the nc.k ' Don'i go shopping! If you've bought season basketball tickets, -kulk down to the Palestra ticket office.u ' 10 Saturday, pick up a free shin, and -up pon your team especiall) in those gruesome contests against Harvard Nylon -io, kin.'- aie optional ( IIXKIIs WHITMAN II he had Kills joined the I nivei-ilv ot Texas' baskelball Club, he could have shot hoops uisiead ot. well von know. \ll,i lunatics who love inch lowers and anyone else is invited to join the Penn Basketball t luh rhere'll be a meeting at Gimbel Gym at B M)tonight Gel vour sliootine eve le.ulv "So Ya Wanna Be A Swami" Closes At Five This Afternoon I here is no ivav lo overpl.iv the Importance ol this simple ta.i i odav I. ihe lasi dav toi applications toi "So Ya Wanna Be \ Swami." Yes, we know u's as it someone said that sour last chance tor manhood (or womanhood) was today But that's really what u's all aboui Either sou have what II lakes to he a Swami or vou remain contented with raiding elementary school playgrounds tor dates. lo deal with the Specifics toi a moment, all entries should sav. in 2s words oi less, whv vou should have the supreme, ultimate, Galactic, c lose io Ciodliness, really big honor ol being a Swami. then bring youi reason down io the DP offices located at 4ti s Walnut street bv 5:00 toda) YOU can linn in a paper late and -llll gel avvav with it. You can take extra long with VOIII girlfriend and she might love it. You could even not return from Thanksgiving Break until alier C hristmas and no one might nonce But KNlav IS the da) sour Nwanu's picks must he in Ihe game- vou are to predict are Dartmouth at Pennsylvania, Ma: sard at Yale, < olunibia at Brown, and Cornell at Princeton. He sine to include voui picks toi these lour games with vour enlry. Don'i delav Ihis is one chance 10 tell your mother you've done something productive this semester You can't tell her about the drinking, you can't tell liei about the D grades, and sou ean't tell her about the diseases I hi- really is sour last resort. s,ou.ould be mentioned in the same breath as people such as Meredith Baxter Birnev, Nan.v Wil.nn. lohnnv Miller, Pink) lee. and \hhic Holt man, who all can now put />/' Swami on their resumes, experience for him." he remarked. "He called to tell me how much he wanted me to have that experience also." That "experience" may be just two da) away for the younger Teevens. Should Dartmouth delcat the Pennsylvania Quakers this Saturday, then the Big Green would own at least a share of the league crown. "It's kind ol interesting," said Teevens, in respect lo Dartmouth's progress throughout the 1981 campaign. "We got off to a bad slarl bul then we started playing well. When we went lo Yale (both were undefeated in league play at the lime) we knew ii was our big shot So when we lost, n was pretty disappointing. We just had to try and win our remaining games and hope lhal someone helped us out. And last week, we got our big break. Princeton beat Yale." Ices ens was sidelined during his entire sophomore season with a separated shoulder. So when he reported to camp his junior year, he apparent!) had Ins work cut out for him. Not only did he have the lask of rebounding from an injury, bul he was being converted from defensive back to Hanker. "Making that change wasn't loo difficult because I was a receiver in high school (Dccrfield Academy)," explained the Pembroke, Massachusetts native. "I jusl had to Icatn how lo read defenses more quick- ly." Teevens also had the advantage of studying under Dave Shula, a three time All Ivy receiver al Dartmouth who is now m Ins insi seaeffl with ihe Baltimore Colts. si a sophomore, Shula was Buddy's favorite target a- he hauled in 49 passes Dave Shula really helped me lot." he said. "On I inl.iv nights when we were on the road, we'd go into Ins room with a projector and nisi spend hours watching films " "Dave Shula was the finest example of intensity on a lootball held as any individual that I have ever been around," Yukica said "Shaun exemplifies lhal quality of intensity in many ways. "Like Buddy, he is a fine individual, verv com petitive and an extremely hard worker. His intensity always remains the same, on both the practice field and the playing field. He has just one tempo - agressive and tough." Win or lose Saturday. Shaun Icevens will have little time to rest come Sunday morning. As captain ol Ihe 19SI X2 Dartmouth hockey team, he must put on ihe skates and start training for ihe upcoming season Nexl winter, if he's not in law school, he hopes to be playing hockey in Europe. "A bunch ol guys from Dartmouth are playing in German) and there might be an opening for me there." he cxplancd. Drug Probe By Coaches Termed a "Witch Hunt" CopyrightI9B1 the Da ' Hv MM Met R \«kl N I wo ol ihe lour plaveis suspended trom the Pennsylvania lootball learn Sunda) nighl were vielmis ol what one leant member called a "one da) witch hunt" b) ihe coaching stall Ihe foul players were defensive tackle Hob H.tilcv. linebacker lohn sviv.i. linebacker loir. Sgro, and offensive tackle Man Hembrough. I he IOUI were suspended foi allcgcdl) violating team rules pro hibiting drug use Bailc) and Hem brough, according lo a mcmbci ol the le.iin who was on the trip, were smoking marijuana in then hold loom in Massachusetts last Iriday. ihe nighi beiore the Quakers' game w II h llai v aid "Two ol ihcin weie practically caught. Ihcv weren't discreet at all." ihe >lavei, adding that the man iii.ina could be smelled in the hotel hallwav "Ihcv weren't caughl vviih IOIIIIS 111 i hen hands When the vouches confronted them, ihe) broke dow II and confessed Ihe oihei two players latei suspended, ^viv.,.nu' Sgro, "had ab solutel) nothing to do with It." the player, who asked 10 remain unidenidied. added. Pennsylvania lost to Harvard the following day. 4s Nciihci Italic), noi Hembrough participated in the game I he coaching stall spent Sunduy, afiei 'he Quaker* had returned to campus, contacting plaveis ream members were visiied al then homes, Called. 01 a-ked lo come down to the lootball office 111 Wcigluman Hall Once lliere. the plaveis were qucs Honed abotll ill lie use on ihe Icani, i hi le.iin menibci -aid "Ihe coaches were surprised alict ihe) caught these two cuss. I lies couldn't understand how it had been gome,m without iheni knowing about it." he added "ihe coaches freaked Ihcv iii-t weni mils on Sun dav. ll via- like a one dav witch hunt "There was a loi ot pressure," ihe piavei continued. "Ihcv weie keeping a hsi and Svlva.i\w\ Sgro's name kepi.online up. When ihe couches asked ihem, I hey were vetv honest ll even MIV,va- as honest as those two... Ihe suspensions ol all lotu players were announced al the regulai team meeting Sunday evening. Head coach lerrj Berndt refused to comment on the mat let when -on laclcd lasl night "I've said hoin ihe beginning that Us an in team thine. Berndt -aid "I will not comment an) furlhct on II." Berndt. who is in his first sear a- ihe head coach at Pennsylvania, said Monday thai ihe (out were suspend ed toi "breaking team regulations and discipline unbecoming a I'eiin sylv.uiia football playet ihe entire team ha- been ordered b) ihe coaching stafl not to -peak about ihe incident to ihe pi ess ihe lout suspended plaveis could noi be icached toi comment, Sgro was quoted I he Mark Turco it i!in in iixin />r, lincil I HIIIIIII'lll I'hiliiilcl/'hi.i lih/iiiici on fucsdu) a- savnic. ii wasn't a single modem It's hi on all veai I' wasn't known lo ihe plavei- until recently < oach Berndt fell he had io take the action lot the good ot ihe leant In addition lo Svlva and Sgro. ihe unidentified playci -aid. the names oi oihei players were " a h-i ol drug IISCIS on ihe leant, compiled bv ih. coaches»w Sunday "There weie -even io In oihei name- on the list." Ilie pl.uci said, "and it's causing -hilt- in Ihe dcr'li "Shilis in ihe depth chit translates into who i- on the first team, second lean), el. in -lion. which players play in a ante and which don i "If- turned everyone against each Oilier." the plavei -aid ol the coaches' actions "You don'i know who ihe h.ll- idling ihem things \\ i all icspc.i th. new.oa,ll... Inn I teh ih.v handled ibis in a hush manner." he added "I hev handled a extremely pooli Ihe team ha- two games remain in.' Saturday,II home.i.'.nii-i Dan mouth and thanksgiving Dav at Richmond IVuii-v Kama - i 7; ihe le.iin ha- lo-t -even straight -.iiioi winning its onenci ovci ( orncll (It Ihe loin plavei- who wei. suspended, ihrcc weie regulars on ihe defensive mm viva, a junior, wits the second leading lacklet on ihe icani. Bailey, the only scniot an the four, was ihe eighth leadin tack let Sgro was hod lot the icani lead in tumbles Hembrough i sophomore, ha- played litlle ihis with the offensive unit. Itcrndi slated on Monday that ihe future oi the ihrcc undergraduate plaveis had not been determined \\ mentioned lo ihe ihrcc underclassmen thai ihcv could iso-sihlv be reinstated during the oil cason," Berndt -aid. "lhcy still haveto prove to us that ihcv aie vvonhv oi playing Pennsylvania football New Recruits Coming on Strong for Cagers liv BOH svi'tiltl Mi i ast Mav. basketball coach Hob Weinhauei waved good bye io jusl one Red and Blue eager. That being his captain Kenny Hall. But the (lass ol 'ss bring! with it a whole host ol eager freshmen teady lo step in and pick up the slack. Among the brightest prospects so tar in practice has been 6-1 point guard Karl Kacine Out ol St, lohn'l Ptep in Washington. DC.. Racine was named (o the All-Metro I eaguc I irst Icam and an All C alholic Prep All-Amertcan. He averaged I? ppg and 7 assists, "He's been doing an excellent job offensively adjusting lo the total system," said W'einhauer, "especiall) at the point gaurd position. He's also eliminated turnovers and gained confidence." "At first things came slowly." admitted Racine. "We (the freshmen) were learning and competing at the same time. Bul I've been adapting. You have to pass more in college. In high school I was expected to shoot, but now I'm surrounded by quality players and I have to get them the hall," Pressing Kacine for game time al the point will be 5-11 Anthony Arnolie from Brother Marl in High School in New Orleans. Arnohe wai Second Team All-Louisiana with 16 points and eight asslts a game. "Anthony has been a very pleasant suprisc." W'einhauer said. "He is much smaller, but he is very intelligent. He's got a knack for getting the ball where it should be." "I feel much more comfortable now that I understand exactly what Coach wants," said Arnolie. "Ihe real difficulties come in being able to do all the litlle things well." The third in the troika that, in Wcinhauer's mind, "have progressed noticeably better than expected" is 6 3 Kevin Warren. This All-State performer out of Marcos DeNi/a High School in Tempe. Arizona, averaged Ireshman Rick Maloiu-y (with halh anil a l,.i-ki ih.ill prngram Ihis sear. 25 ppg last year. And il is he who has probably ihe toughest job of all the newcomers, lhal of learning not one. but two. positions "He has to learn the small forward and the guard position," explained Weihnauer. "Therefore, he has naturally been learning a little bit slower than the others. But he's a strong kid and he shoots very well. I believe he will eventually be much better at guard." "This fall has been a big adjustment for me not jusl basketball wise. bul academic wise, social wise, and even weather wise." said Warren. "Philadelphia has a much faster pace than what I'm used to. But the whole transaction has been very smooth. "I've caught on with basketball at Lisa Siltxrman unrulier ol oilier I'ennsv Iv jiu.i nkrulls should make signilicunl contributions In Ihe a steady rale. The perimeter offense is very different from what I played in high school, and learning the swing position is also different, but I really enjoy the switch." Three other freshmen have also shown marked improvements over the past week or two. Among them is 6-6 Rick Maloney, First Team All- Southern California from New berry Park High in Newberry Park. California; also. 6-6 Jim Wolf, an All-Stale player from Kohler High in Kohler. Wisconsin; and finally. 6-2 Scott Mascioli, First Team All- Pennsylvania from Wyoming Valley West in Kingston. "Maloney. Wolf, and Mascioli all made progress last week." said W'einhauer. "W'c expect all of them to be able to contribute during the year." Of course, none of these freshmen will see starting action early on in the season what with double digits in returning troops. And Ihis abundance of returnees has made things even tougher for the rookies, "Freshmen always have problems early." said assistant coach Tom Schneider, "but this yeat with all the returning players we arc not able to wait around for them to develop. This throws them into a much tougher situation besides learning a new system. But these freshmen are all bright and they're all from good high school programs."

9 INSIDE Clinton Street Transformed Page 3 STREET Vol. XIII No. 23 Now. 19, 1981 Interviews with: Lynne Carter Page 8 and Barbara Cook Page 10 Philadelphia Orchestra Strikes a New Note

10 Get It Shaped Up For The Holidays Remember Just Shake It and Let It Fall NATURALLY into place The Precision Cut Shampoo Blow Dry Cover Photo By Louis Hood Philadelphia Orchestra Congradulalion? iii (ill the Humans (>n the cover: The Philadelphia Orchestra may have been labelled the 'Solid told Cadillac' but in these inflationary limes, many people see il only as a gas-guzzler. Wilh an energetic, young Ruiui do Mull at the helm, however, the orchestra may be looting ahead toward its finest years. Page 6. UNISEX HAIRCUTTING STUDIO Open Monday thru Saturday 2012 Walnut St No Appointment Necessary To all those who went lo Koslon: Thanks for showing me what road trip was like - if it werent for the honor of il. (hough. I'd just as soon have skipped the shower. A. POWELTON PIZZA We Deliver to ALL Penn Residences! (5 pin - 1 am $5 min.) Full Line of: Hoagies- Steaks - Stromboli - soda For Quick Delivery Call th & Powelton Call Alnvk-s To Talk About KITH THREE 214 WALNUT STREET PHILADELPHIA (215) Clinton Street is one of the oldest streets in the country, and the Philadelphia (Nde Town Historical Society would like lo renovate il and close il lo traffic. Bui there is plenty of resislence among many of the residents, who fear that what they have already may be lost forever. Read about the controversy on page 3. On page 8. meet a man who dresses in women's clothing for a (lucrative) living,. He's female impressionist I.ynne t.'urter. and he's about to embark on something new playing a serious role as a transvestite. Barbara ( mil may just have one of the greatest singing voices ever, but she says that it doesn't nii'i-n anything without feeling. On page 10. find out haw she keeps that lovin' feeling despite physical and personal setbacks. Photos Courtesy of The Philadelphia Orchestra Howard Gensler Aphrodite Valleras Editors Elaine Song Contributing Editor David Henkoff Music Marsha Pik Theater OHK wl Swiss Entry Acddcftiy Awards The IM.Y. Times says- More than a discovery... It's a revelation!'' A film by Markus Imhoof The Boat Is Full A revelation of a time... A place.. A people. I 4S I4S S4S /4S 9 4S "BEAUTIFUL! v-xeffl Cm * Nv Trfrirs "MAGNIFICENT PERFORMANCES, SENSITIVELY DIRECTED!" Sain**) Ore* GwvMtl I Of»t 2O0. 4O0. «ro0. ftoo. IOOO "A SEXY SOPHISTICATED COMEDY" I... II H \1F.», 2:00. 4:45. 7:30. 10:10^ Il TE. 2p. / LIMITED TO SEATING STUDENT DISCOUNTS MMLABLE David Gladstone Photo Editor Susan Schuval Photo Associate Gopyiqhi the Daily Pennsylvan«an/34tti Street Magazine No part thereof may be reproduced m any form m whole or in part without the express written consent ot the editors 34th Street Magazine is published by The Daily Pennsylvanian every Thursday at Philadelphia. Pa during the fall and spring semesters, eicepl during exammation and vacation periods One issue published in the summer The Board ol Managers ol The Daily Pennsytvanien has sole authority over and lull responsibility lor the content ot the magazine No other parties are in any way responsible lor the content ot the magazine, and all inquiries concerning that content should be directed to the Board ol Managers Subscriptions lo The Daily Pennsylvanian may be ordered at a rate ol S28 per year Othces located at 401% Walnut Street. Philadelphia. Pa Editorial phones?is?416s8s Business phones 21S?

11 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, Thv proposed Elcwnlh Street Bdlew<i> into Clinton Street David Gladstone On A Street Of Dreams By Margot Cohen David Stewarl whipped out Webster's diclionary and for three full minutes recited the lengthy definition of the word "dream.* "Ah. here we go," Stewart said, coming to the conclusion of the list. "Anything extremely beautiful, fine, or pleasant. oy, gladness, music." Leaning back with a smug expression, he snapped the book shut. "One thing we don't do is use words idly." Stewart is the Executive Director of the Philadelphia Old Town Historical Society. located on Clinton Street, and the historical renovation of Clinton Street is the "dream'' which has become his obsession. The plan for the two block-long street, which lies between Spruce and Pine and 9th and 1 1th Streets, is a complicated one. The Historical Society wishes to close off the street to traffic, removing sidewalks and parking spaces to make way for ornate gardens. At 9th and 11th. 23-foot high gates would be constructed in the Greek Revival style as pedestrian entrances, and wrought-iron gates will stand on either side of 10th. In addition, the plan calls for the placement of gaslights, fountains, pieces of sculpture, an amphitheatre, and the renovation of Louis I. Kahn Park. It is the First time in America thai a purely residential street may be closed to traffic to preserve an historical atmosphere. "It will be like stepping back in time," Stewart s;i\s. his eyes flashing in anticipation.the street will be restored to,i romantic version of the way it was from 1836 to 1850." The dream is currently far from becoming a reality. The whole projei l is estimated to cost a whopping $14 million; four million for con struction. and $10 million for maintenance and management. The Executive Director says he has not yet begun to "push," but so far has raised only three quarters 0l a million dollars through private foundations. Stewart's desk is cluttered with books like The Art of Winning Government Grants. The Foundation Directory, and Publicity AndHoM ToGel It. The first step, however, is convincing Clinton Street's diverse group of property owners that the street is meant to be an historical oasis. The Historical Society staff has staged numerous meetings, but so far some of the residents remain unconvinced. Clashes over the plans have caused passions to flare on this sedate little street. Some neighbors say the project has knit them closer together, yet opponents of the plan claim the Clinton Street proposal has created walls of hostility between people who used to live peaceably side by side. The elaborate gates at either end of the street. which strike the Philadelphia Historical Commission as "ahislorical" because they never existed on the block before, are a source of conflict. "It makes the street seem elitist." Douglas Fischer, a resident strongly opposed to the project, argues. "The gates set people apart from the neighborhood. It says 'look here, we are the upper class of Philadelphia.' " Our new name for (the gate on 9th is the 'Berlin Wall'" renter Marilyn Class, a fierce critic of the Historical Society, says. "It's an aesthetic abomination - it's going to overpower the street and make it dark. Every mugger in the c it) "f Philadelphia is going to IK; renting out space behind it "Our biggest obstacle is educating people as to what the entrances represent." Stewart counters. The gates are forbidding, but they are not meant to forbid. They are meant to keep the negative environment out. and keep the emotional and aesthetic environment in." He emphasizes that the gates would not deter passersby from entering the street; they would act as an invitation to experience the historical enclave. Neighbors are also concerned about the ramifications of closing off the street in traffic. Many of them park on the street, and are uneasj over the prospects of finding another parking sp.ii e in tight Center City. As the plan now stands, ambulances, fire trucks, sanitation trucks and moving vans will have access to the street. Tenth street will still be open as a cross-street, so residents will be able to back ni and out through it. But some, especially the elderly residents, are worried that they will not be able to unload their groceries in front of their homes, or be able to take taxis to then doorstep when it rains. "Everybod) has hack exits on either Cypi I Pine." scoffs resident Pat Cavanaugh. dismissing these concerns, while pointing out that she is not personally affected since she fives on the corner. "The biggest fear which has been voiced by most people is the reassessment of the houses." If the $14 million project is completed, property values on Clinton Street will probably rise This may mean higher taxes on those perfei il\ preserved. 19th century Greek revival rowhouses the residents are so proud of. "We're looking forward to retirement on a lixedini nine.',in elder!) resident who asked not t" be identified, said. "We just wouldn't be able to afford higher taxes." The chances of any elderly person being injured by high taxes in their lifetime are minimal." Temple University Law prolessor and protect advisor Olan Lowery reassures. "It will be years before any negative impact will be felt. Taxes don't rise until sales take place, and that takes a long time." To quash the project, only one propert) ownet would have to object. City Council must approve the plan, and due to the inherent difficulties of closing Off a street, would be unlikely to do so unless it had full community support Though Stewart expects Clinton Street to be finished in April of the Planning Commission is not so optimistic. "Once the bill gets to the City Council. It's Bt least a six month process, and it could take one and a half to two years." Center City Area I' 1 ' 1 " ner Hadley King says with assurance. The dosing probably won't have much impact on traffic, King adds, but the Kates I other facets of construction will ailed the sewers, telephone lines, gas. sanitation, and other citj services. The Streets Department notifies every city agency "I the possible closing, and prepares an exhaustive report on the impact of the project for Council But the plan has yet to reach these concrete stages; Stewart is still lobbying in the commum- «nnliiiiirtl mi pat* 4)

12 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, 1981 Clinton St. (C imliniird frum page.0 ty, making compromises, holding preliminary conversations, trying to muster support for the ambitious endeavor. In his enthusiasm for the project, he occasionally tends to overstate the amount of encouragement he has received from others. Nevetheless, he keeps plugging, convinced that his cause is an honorable one. "I have a sense of inner history and I want to share that with other people," Stewart confides, wearing a belt that looks like an antique door knocker. "It's totally empirical, not something that I've read. In fact, I've never read a single history book about Philadelphia - I find them stultifying, totally boring." "But I think I may have lived on this street 200 years ago," he adds, professing a belief in reincarnation. Stewart says he has struck up a correspondence with Jacqueline Onassis. who has expressed interest in Clinton Street because her relatives are originally from the neighborhood. The Executive Director hopes that (ackie O. will travel to Philadelphia to cut the ceremonial red ribbon, but the glamorous jet-setter doesn't make commitments more than six months in advance. Some of the residents are afraid thai the project will turn them into celebrities, fearing that "gawkers" will overrun the street. "I'm not sure I would want to live on an exciting street like that," Redevelopment Authority Project Manager j.e. Mitinger declares. "I wouldn't want to be on the stage all the time." Residents do not wan: Clinton Street to turn into another Elfreth's alley, a small block near the Delaware River which is the oldest street in Philadelphia. Clinton Street is the only area other than Elfreth's Alley which has been designated a National Historic District, and Elfreth's alley is inundated with tourists who clamor for tours of the private homes. "I don't think that will happen on Clinton Street," claims Architecture Professor Alvin Holm, a member of the Board for the project. 'Elfreth's alley is so tiny and so cute - you really are on display there. Clinton Street will operate on a broad, grand, hospitable scale." "It will be a marvelous place to live," Cavanaugh exults. "The landscaping will be beautiful. And if it starts here, I think it will spread, and the surrounding area will improve." "It's like dropping a pebble into a pool, and having it make concentric rings," Stewart agrees. "We hope to motivate Pine Street and 10th Street to realize that they can be part of the community development. We want to be the catalyst in improving the quality of life." He smiles wistfully, cocking his head like a little boy who is about to give his mother a Christmas present. "We want people to go away feeling thai they've experienced a dream." THE TIMELESS WISDOM OF TWO MILLENNIA BY THAT LOVABLE GERIATRIC WONDER 2fe 2000 G VbarO\d G Man By Me/ Brooks and Carl Reiner Trite Not Trendy Homnna By Michael Tremblay Walnut Street Theatre, Walnut Sts By Rich Campbell 9 & Every immortal word ot the recorded 2000 YEAR OLD MAN legend is preserved tor Eternity and whatever happens after lhal THE 2000 YEAR OLD MAN. translormed from records which have sold 1 million copies since the lirst album was released in 1963 to an illustrated book, is the result of a perfectly meshed partnership that began at a Holly wood party when Mel Brooks and Carl Reiner were recent alumni of Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows'' That partnership continues today after each has earned his individual claim to superstardom. In THE 2000 YEAR OLD MAN readers will learn the authors amazing secrets for long life like slow growth ("I breastfed for 200 years") and a natural organic diet ("Clouds Stars Rocks We ate big things" I Best of all. readers will enpy the timeless wis dom of two millennia On the deep heartbreak of fatherhood, for example I have over children not one comes to visit me" And the shortcut to happiness Listen to your mother and your father Listen to your grand mother and grandfather Listen to an aunt and uncle Listen to a smart niece Listen to a good looking cousin And mainly listen to your heart And listen to your watch And listen to your fountain pen Listen to your inkwell Here is that classic of comedy THE 2000 YEAR OLD MAN May he live-and keep us laughing tor the next 2000 years More wit and wisdom from these classic interviews: On fear: Reiner What was the means ot transporta tion then' Brooks Mostly fear you would see an am mal that would growl you would go two miles in a minute Fear would be the main propulsion Michael Tremblay should have called Western Union instead of writing Hosanna. Few plays ever contain the amount of confusion and contrived theatrical devices present in a single act in this play. Unfortunately, it's the only memorable quality of the piece. Hosanna. with no plot to speak of. is the story of two homosexuals, Hosanna and THEATRE" Rocky, who discuss their loirs in life aftei an embarrassed Hosanna runs away from,i Halloween party. It is a character play, with the characters not only unbelievable, but also developed to a level of stereotype rarely soon today. Hosanna, played by female impersonator l.ynne Carter, is an aging Iransvestite in Greenwich Village whose life hiis liri one meaningless. He (she?) spends the lirst act trying to remove his Cleopatra dress and Ihe second (in a new dress) fantasizing about being Elizabeth Taylor playing Cleopatra. Rocky, Hosanna's lover, represents the other extreme of the gay stereotype - a formerly handsome, bearded, macho biker dressed in I.evi's and leather. He has a passionate hatred for inanimate objects, and spends his time talking about how 1( nnhnnt'tl on page N)

13 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, 1981 'Tattoo' Gets The Needle linn il.' Taltoo fades away tonight sew you won't be able to see it unless hurry to the Duchess. Needles to say, it will still be available for viewing in Hollywood. And how will you get lo Hollywood '! Zee plane.' Zee plane I Tattoo Starring Bruce Dern and Maud Adams Directed by Bob Brooks By Paula Rice Tattoo, a provocative new film by Boh Brooks, is the story of the desire of a man (Bruce Dern. as the owner of a tattoo parlor) to possess a woman (Maud Adams) and to indelibly mark her as Ins own. The film, a somewhat sensationalized version of ohn Fowles' The Collector, tries to derive its erotic effect from the notion that every great love leaves its mark. I nlortunately, the mark that Tattoo leavos is boredom. Dern is Karl Kinsky, a tormented loner and voyeur, and Adams is Maddy. a beautiful fashion model. In the opening scene. Kinsky is an American serviceman stationed in apan where he discovers the ancient classical art of body tattooing, and soon becomes mesmerized by the designs that completely cover the bodies of the Japanese cultists. His obsession with the tattoo later materializes with his need to show Maddy, a sign of his affection. Kinsky wants to punl\ Maddy's liberal sexual attitudes and transform her into bis ideal woman, so he steals her away to an isolated Dern and Adams kiss and ntuke-up (lots of mtike-up) beachhouse where she awakens to find her body becoming a canvas for his fantasies. The film's most redeeming quality is Maud Adams, whose most notable prior screen appearance was in the )ames Bond film The Man With the Golden (km. Adams' beauty sparks the film's tension and sensuality and her performance im- gresses. Bruce Dern, unfortunately, has slipped back into his typecast character of a redneck, psychopathic sicko after his seemingly triumphant escape from this role incoming Home. Although it is rich with overt and subtle symbolism. Tattoo comes up limp despite its promise ol torrid eroticism and suspense. No Class Private Lassons Starring Sylvia Kristel and Eric Brown Directed by At the Regency By Peter Canello* Private Lessons is a fun movie to screen at midnight on a Saturday with your arm round your date and,i six pack at your feet. A vacuous comedy about a pubescent boy trying to make it with bis voluptuous housekeeper. I'rivute l-essons is redeemed only by its own innocense. But the pint [which was probably dream ed up by a pubescent boy] certainly doesn't help Beautiful Nicole is hired by wealthy Mr. Philmore in take care ol Ins apple pie ol.i son, Philly. Nicole, howevei is corrupted by Lester, the dastardly homosexual chauffer, into seducing the innocent Philly while Ins dad is on a two-week business trip, and pretending to sutler.* heart seizure during orgasm The sweetly prostrate Phill) then opens his dad's safe to Lester In keep his dad Ironi learning about his offense «tiiillmieil mi pugl ''I 'Pursuit' Is Futile D.B. Cooper has unfortunately disappeared from the Midtown Theatre. If you want lo see it, you'll have to pursue it on your own. The Purauit of D.B. Cooper Starring Robert Duvall and Treat Williams Directed by Roger Spottiswoode By Milton Lewin Say, looking for a good, old-fashioned, family-fun movie, with wild chase scenes and great scenery? Well, if you find one, be sure to let mo know so I don't have to keep wasting my FILM time with feckless failures like The Pursuit of D.B. Cooper. Actually, to be perfectly fair, it can not be called a failure unless one knows what it was attempting to be. If the target audience was the yearold age group (or considering some of this year's freshman class I've seen), then the film is a success. It panders lo (indeed, requires) an audience not concerned with plot continuity, character development, or. in general, believability. (Heavy on that last one). The movie is based on a true story of a man pseudonamed D.B. Cooper (Treat Williams) who parachuted out of a plane with $200,000 in stolen money, never to be seen again. In reality, however, only the first five minutes of the film are based on the truth, for once he jumps, it is purely the writer's creativity (so called) which propels the events, since what the real Cooper did after jumping is still a complete mystery. What we have, then, is one man's attempted variations on the so-tired-it's-probablydead theme of bad-guy chasing anti-hero good-guy. The chaser here is exsargent Bill Gruen (Robert Duvall) who works for the insurance company that involuntarily contributed the $200,000 to Cooper. By a coincedence (this film lives, breathes, and excretes coincedences) he was Cooper's sarge in 'Nam, therefore each knows the others methods. So one would inticipate great mental gymnastics by each, as they try to outwit the other. But one would then prove loo intelligent for this film by making such an anticipation, since the relationship is stressed initially (it was, in fact, how Gruen figured out who Cooper really was) then completely abandoned for the duration of the film. This is just one example of the inevitable confusion which results when any measure of cerebrial effort is expended by the audience. Some excellent comic relief, though, is provided by Paul Gleason as a soldier who fought with Cooper under Gruen. He, too. figured out who Cooper really was. and joined the chase for the loot. He definitely is the bright spot of the movie, for he can talk his way into, or out of, anything. Watching him in action is thouroughly entertaining, in fact, almost as enjoyable as watching our next cast member. Kathryn Harrold. She is Cooper's oftabandoned, but always beautiful, wife, whose li iiiiiiniwit mi /uivc '0 Jaded Ivory Quartet Starring Maggie Smith and Alan Bates Directed by James Ivory Opens tomorrow at the Olde City By Betsy Williams In his latest film, Quartet, adapted from the ean Rhys novel. British director lames Ivory leads us through Hemingway's Parisian haunts of the 1920's; the cafes and jazz bars of Montparnasse. Ivory presents a much less bounteous "moveable feast" than does Hemingway; one which does not satisfy either the poor artist or the bored, wealthy expatriate. Lois and H.. Heidler (Maggie Smith and Alan Bates) are two of the latter who befriend a beautiful and penniless Maria Zelli (Isabelle Adjani), taking her into their home when her husband is hauled off to jail for complicity in a shady art deal. The film is full of potential, most of which is dispelled by the sickly turns of plot and the pallid performances of these usually brillant actors. We soon discover that the Heidlers are seeking s.ulistic excitement under the auspices of charily and Maria is one of the prisoner/playthings lo 0) cupy their "spare room." Her duties include being H.J.'s mistress and modeling for Lois' dilettante pastime, afternoon portraiture. Ivory masterfully equates the emptiness of both worlds by dissolving shnls of dark, smoky jazz dens where the wealthy play, to the dank, unlit prison cell where Stefan wails for Maria's weekly visit. Maggie Smith is languid in her role as a woman who, outwardly tolerating her husband's transgressions, is seething internally. Alan Bates is equally disappointing, delivering most of his lines in a lifeless monotone. Isabelle Adjani elicits no sympathy for Maria because she displays no emotion despite her increasingly futile and desperate siuation. lames Ivory has married an interesting subject to a potentially explosive cast, but Quartet, unhappily, is a union that lacks harmony, not to mention fireworks.

14 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, 1981 Orchestrating A New Beginning By Bob Lalasz 11 was and Philadelphia had decided that it needed an orchestra. For a city to have an orchestra around the turn of the century was always a grand symbol of its cultural and civic progressiveness and often a focal point for any competition it would have with other metropolises. Boston. New York. Chicago, St. Louis, and even the smallish Cincinnati had founded and nurtured large music ensembles, and the City of Brotherly Love found itself uncomfortably behind the times. But a group of prominent Philadelphia society and business leaders struck out to alter that. They brought together three amateur musical societies to beget a top-flight orchestra for the city, selecting musicians from the Philadelphia Musicial Fund Society Orchestra and area theaters. Because both orchestras and orchestral music were by tradition strongly Germanic:, the group tapped Fritz Scheel, German-born and himself the son and grandson of conductors, to be the infant orchestra's leader at the podium. Scheel and the new ensemble made music, as they say, for the first time on the night of November in the Academy of Music at Broad and Locust Streets. Thus the Philadelphia Orchestra was born. Although Scheel and his successor, Carl Pohlig. sounded competitiveness as a primary note for the Orchestra from the beginning, they undoubtedly never dreamed of what fruit their labors would eventually bear. Some 60 years, two legends, and thousands of concerts later, the Philadelphia Orchestra was considered by all to be a member of the "Big Six," which included the orchestras of Boston. Chicago, Berlin, San Francisco, and the New York Philharmonic. Some thought it the premier music-maker of the entire world, and famed New York music critic Paul Henry Lang had even gone so far as to label the Orchestra a "solid Gold Cadillac." The Cadillac was a fitting epithet - in the 1960's. The Philadelphia Orchestra was envied by orchestras everywhere as the epitome of musical and financial stability. The sound it produced was entirely its own: smooth, silky, and undulating, resplendent with lush strings. It took no chances with the music it played, but sped down the middle of the popular 19th century musical road of Beethoven. Mozart, and Brahms with nary a swerve. Its budget was large and comfortable, balanced with little effort at the beginning of every fiscal year; its subscription concerts were sold out. Record contract! with both CBS and RCA insured recording time and exposure when other American orchestras were scrambling to cut less vinyl at rising costs. The Orchestra's music director and conductor, Eugene Ormandy, had been leading it for 25 years and had developed it into a musical acme. The Philadelphia Orchestra, its board of directors, and its managers were seated on solid ground in the 1960s, and things had never been bettor. But things change, and for the Orchestra they changed dramatically. The elite and luxurious gas-guzzler metaphor that had symbolized the Orchestra for the 60's also revealed how far behind the times it would fall in the lean, inflationplagued, streamlined 70's. The players in the Orchestra struck for - and won - a 52-week contract, more money, and a larger voice in decisionmaking that had until that time been the prized possession of a dictatorial, Main I.ine-based board of directors. Skyrocketing costs and slackening ticket sales forced the Orchestra to examine both its budgetary process and its public image. And catcalls arose from all critical fronts at the Orchestra's seeming refusal to play baroque and 20th century classics, which require less players than the full orchestra, and at its total ignorance of American classical music. "It was unable to move." Daniel Webster, music critic for the Philadelphio Inquirer, said recently. The Orchestra had slipped - certainly not in quality of playing the music it chose - but in its conception of how a modern orchestra should be run and how it should be visualized, both from the inside and the outside. And the Orchestra began to realize that it had slipped. Never since the! tempestuous 1930's. when the fiery genius Leopold Stokowski left the musical directorship of the Orchestra in a huff (and was replaced by Ormandyl, had the Orchestra undergone such close scrutiny and evaluation. Now. the managers, board, and players of the Orchestra arct realizing that the institution which some have called the world's greatest orchestra is at a signpost, an intersection of sorts, and the decision to choose one road or another may very well be the decision that determines excellence or demise. KM.I.iKid Muli is one of the people crucial to that decision-making process - and he is wellsuited for the role. Named in 1979 to succeed Eugene Ormandy as only the fifth music director and conductor in the Orchestra's 81-year history. Muti, 40. has been characterized by critics and colleagues alike as a coiled spring of musicianship, a man who holds passionate views of the music: he conducts and who relentlessly demands perfection from both his own podium technique and from the musicians he conducts. The principal conductor of the London Philharmonia and Florence's operatic Teatro Communale as well as the Philadelphia, Muti, according to Webster, is a member of an inner circle of the very best international orchestra conductors. "He is still considered a prodigy," Webster remarked. But this Neapolitan with the intense visage and jet-black hair has not been reluctant in his second year as the Orchestra's music director to goad, to push and prod, and to challenge the players (indeed, the entire organization) to stretch and to grow. He is, above all, a visionary, and he relishes the thought of leading an orchestra in the transition from antediluvian to modern. "I sense movement." Muti told the Inquirer recently,

15 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, before leaving for Italy to fulfill operatic com mitments and to London for recordings Uui most of the movement baa been made by Miili himself - and all of il has been in the form ut ripples and subtle shifts in current, instead of sweeping, eight-loot high wave's. In his recent four-week staj in the city before hopping on a plane out ol the Country, Mutl made quiet changes In the workings ol the Orchestra. For example, he opened die final rehersals. which were traditionally closed, to serious college music students from the Philadelphia area without any strings attached. Muh said recently that he found iheir present e allrat livt and refreshing, "I may not do this for every program." he told the Inquirer, "but these are the people who should be hearing the way we work.. this is an Important idea to me." A small gesture, to lie sort', but, according In Webster, it is indicative of the kind of motions that Ntuti is making and will Continue lo make. "Mutl is pushing lor more concerts here in Philadelphia], and the open rehersals is another way of reaching out to the area," Webster said. He also explained that Muti is planning to drop the Orchestra's local touring in such lot alums.is Wilmington and Baltimore. Muti has also dared to tamper with the "Philadelphia Sound," the distinctive aural impres sion Ormandy achieved through 44 years by empnasizing the weight of the strings, without i hanging the music ilsell "What is it?" Muti queried after asked to comment recently on the Philadelphia Sound. "It's just publicity, isn't it?" Hut Muti's immediate concerns are transcended bj his announced long-range plans for the Orchestra's future. Among Muti's stated intentions: The building of a new theater on South Broad Street directly across from the Academy of Music, as well as renovation of the Academy ilsell and the Shubert Theater. According to sources close to Muti, the maestro envisions the three as forming a Center Cltj music "t enter" This music center holding an international music festival in Philadelphia, attracting the world's best composers ami c onductors. The Orchestra's Increased participation In chamber music conceits, concert opera, musu competitions sponsored by the Orchestra, and a lestm luring ol the subscription formats to attract more diverse audiences, including university students. Muti is also pushing his Orchestra to musical limits it rarely touched with Ormandy at the helm. Besides scheduling long ami strenuous works lor this year and last such as Haydn's "Seven Last Words" ami University professor George Crumb's "Star Child," he asked the Orchestra before his departure to play during bis absence as hard as they had in his presence Although Orchestra musicians are appreciative ol Muti's drive, the) are feeling the enervating affects of prolonged c oncentration. One cellist observed that the difference between playing for Muti after playing for Ormandy is that "with Muti. we can hold our hows right.' a direct reference lo the change in sound. But a violinist remarked that what Muli was demanding was "possible, but it's also very tiring." Yet another playor said that "wo want to do it, but this insistence on perfection is putting a lot of pressure on us that we never bail before." But pressuring is a part of Muti's character, and although he is spending a reduced amount of time with the Orchestra tlue to his commitments in London and Italy, he has not lost any of the visions he came with two years ago. He holds on to his dreams, and is intent on moving the Philadelphia so that its song can reach the people he wants it to reach. But the heights which Muti has set for the Philadelphia Orchestra are only as attainable as the Orchestra's buying power. Orchestra Conductor Riccardo Muli; Above Right: Conductor Laureate Eugene Ormandy And making sure tli.it happens is Sevmour Rosen's job. Rosen, who was named executive director of the Philadelphia Orchestra Assot la lion's board ol directors In the fall of had little comment for.nth Street, saving be "couldn't be bothered." But he told the Philadelphia Inquirer recently that he "wouldn't have come here" if he did not have the ability to change things Kosen has i hanged things, tightening up in chestra management antl utilizing television ami radio opportunities to further the Orchestra's sterling reputation. "We have a television contract, we have a ratlin contract, we are sold out in Philadelphia, we are sold out in New York, we are sold out in Washington." Rosen said before departing lor this weeks Orchestra appearances in New York "It's obvious that we've sharpened up the way we've sold ourselves to the public. I think the public is developing a new conception of us." Three major portions of that new conception stem directly from the Orchestra's commitment to increased television, radio, and record exposure. The Orchestra has always in recent memory been heard on syndicated radio; it was only last year that a $1 million grant from the Atlantic-Richlielci Company (AKCO) given to the Orchestra and to WHYY-TV in Philadelphia enabled it to be Been in a television series. The Orchestra hail appeared on television prior to last year, but in isolated programs such as the one featuring its trip lo China in 107:i. Rosen, who engineered the contract, came to the Orchestra from Pittsburgh It was there that he was instrumental in arranging the Andre Previn antl Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra telecasts of the early 70's. He stressed that television is "an integral part of the Orchestra's plans." Rosen also toltl the Inquirer recently that the Orchestra will be takinr advantage of more foreign tours to promote itself and to garner more funds. Other staff members expressed displeasure with the way in which the Orchestra had mismanaged its previous foreign tours, and stressed the need to change things for the Orchestra's 1982 European tour. "We can sell out the houses in Europe," one staff member remarked. "We should be asking for a percentage of the gross ticket sales instead of acceping flat minimum rates." As Daniel Webster once wrote, "The Orchestra's reputation abroad is like that of a rather precious court orchestra ol the IH.II century, a ewel, but Isolated and guarded lor its own aristocrat!! con stiluenc v " But Muli anil Kosen embody the MM spirit ol the Philadelphia Orchestra: dedicated lo eve alienee, almost ruthless in Ms pursuit ol il. antl given lo sweeping change 10 make the music ami the message inure Bl t essible to everyone, nol USl the Mam Line crowd. It is not only an egalitarian HIIII v. il is a lin.ini lallv sound OIM Muti's DOW slogan is "Philadelphia lor Hie Philadetphians": but by the lime the Orchestra is completely transformed from a relit: to a flexible institution, it could lie everybody's orchestra.

16 8 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, 1981 Lynne Carter: A Real Ladies' Man By John Marshall "I am not a Iransveslite," says Lynne Carter, relaxing barefoot in his hotel room. "You don't see any women's clothes laying around here. I've never lived that way. They are in my dressing room, I put 'em on, I do my THEATRE act, I wash my face, I go home - that's it." Carter has mode his living as a female impressionist, playing to packed nightclubs and concert halls across the country, delighting audiences with his imitations of Phyllis Diller. Pearl Bailey, Marlene Dietrich, and other famous ladies. But his first dramatic role, that of Hosanna in Michel Tremblay's play of the same name, is exactly what Carter is not - a Iransveslite. "I had trouble trying to capture the thinking process that would go along with Hosanna." Carter admits. "It was hard at the beginning." Playing a man who dresses as a woman to mask his doubts about his sexuality and self-worth has been no easy task for Carter, and he says he was persuaded to take the part at the insistence of producers and directors he knew in New York. "I wanted to do something serious, but didn't know if I could do something this heavy. They said, 'If you can conquer this, you're on.' I listened to them, and here I am at Walnut Streot Theatre 5." It is the site not only of the play's Philadelphia debut and the current production's debut, but of Carter's legitimate stage debut as well. "You always have to try to Open new avenues of crea- tion," he says, adding, "I've done everything else. The only thing I haven't done is the legit." What he has done vaudeville, radio, TV, movies, and concert halls - has comprised a long and illustrious career, albeit an atypical one. Carter declines to say how he became interested in performing imitations of female stars because "that's such a long story." He is presently working on a book which will provide the details, but basically, says Carter, "I stumbled on it by accident." One reason he has stayed with it over the years has been its economic profitability, he says. "I found out that a lot of the comics that were around doing lames Cagney and Jimmy Stewart were looking for a job, but the way I was working, doing female characters. I always worked steady." Alter a two-year stint in Bette Davis Eyes The Watcher In the Woods Starring Lynn-Holly Johnson and Bette Davis Directed by By Howard Sharman After the death of Walt Disney, films from the magic kingdom lost their ma c and FILM fell into a pattern ot mediocrity epitomized by such forgettable films as Escape From Witch Moun- tain and The Boatniks. Now Uisney Studios is attempting to re-establish itself in the industry by making films with appeal for all ages while avoiding the deadly "G" rating. The new productions began with The Black Hole, a childish rip-off of 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea, and have included Condorman and. with Paramount. Popeye and Dragonslayer. Newest of the new Disney films is the supernatural thriller The Watcher in the Woods, which has finally gone into general release after having been withdrawn Quality Books at Quantity Prices HOUSE OF OUR OWN BOOKS 3920 Spruce St.. Tues.-Sat pm FrminiM d Soi ialim Tnlrs-Sn ornl Flooi Sleep In Them Contact Lenses Farsighted Nearsighted Astigmatism Continuous Wear *> ^v 10% Discount with student ID Dr. L. Schwartz Dr. I.Zeitlin 3935 Chestnut St Eye Exams-Fashion Eyewear-Optical Repairs from its New York premiere engagement over a year ago. The film has since had an additional one million dollars pumped into it. in order to re-shoot a supposedly confusing ending. They should have saved their money. Watcher is no better than any other film the studio has made in the past decade, and. like the others it will rapidly close and be forgotten. Watcher tells the story of what happens to the present day look-alike of a girl who mysteriously disappeared 30 years ago, when the "double" moves into the missing girl's home. This stock plot, despite the studio's attempt to clarify it, Is hopelessly muddled, and the simplistic finale leaves many loose ends. In fact, one never even finds out who "The Watcher" is. The acting is just about as hopeless as the plot, and even Bette Davis' portrayal of an ominous old recluse can't help the film, since she must combat the overwhelming blandness of Lynn-Holly lohnson as the girl, and Carroll Baker as her mother. If Disney is looking to build up their fortunes with fare like this, they've obviously been looking in the wrong place. The Watcher in the Woods is a misadventure in boredom for anyone over twelve, and just another nail in Walt's coffin. A WM aa^avw ^g* the Navy during World War II, Carter returned to his native Cleveland, Ohio to decide on a career. It seemed to be determined at an amateur contest, in which he won first prize for an impression of the then-emerging Hildegarde. Building his act around imitations, he addded the likes of Marlene Dietrich, Hermione Cingold. Ethel Merman, Tallulah Bankhead, and other famous females to his repertoire. "I always did them funny," notes Carter. "And I never once thought I was a woman." The subjects of his satire were impressed with his impressions. Pearl Bailey sent him arrangements of her songs, and Josephine Baker sent him gowns. "They all have great senses of humor and can laugh with others at themselves," says Carter. Comedy has served him well, but at the moment he's "gonna break that goddamn sign", or lampost, or mirror. His only other concerns seem to be getting laid and getting away from Hosanna. At only one point in the play, during Hosanna's twenty minute monologue, does any real emotional quality and development of character seem apparent. Here too. however, Carter's performance is almost obscured by the repetitive quality of the script. Instead of writing a character play about two people learning about themselves and their relationship, Tremblay. has chosen to write a statement about appearances and their importance. It is asking a,1 ^k Carter is playing an extremely serious role. "It might be very hard for some people to take," he says. "But it's 1981, these things exist, and we can't look the other way and say they don't." The show will play major cities across the country before arriving in Now York, where it has been performed twice in the orginal French- Canadian dialect in which it was written. When he is finished with the show. Carter expects to continue with his impressions act. (loss intensely due to a heart problem) but also hopes to play other serious roles. Is there a limited future for a man who plays women? "Yeah, but that's not the point." exclaims Carter. "I'm an actor! It doesn't matter what I'm playing. Hosunnu shows that I can do theater, regardless of what 1 wear. Whether it be in women's clothes or men's clothes, an actor is an actor." Hosanna' «onllnntd from />«<r it great deal of any audience member, straight or gay. to identify with the stereotypes he presents. It appears that Tremblay is familiar with the devices of making a statement, but cannot put them together in a coherent form. He does make an interesting comment on sex roles and their reversal, but the topic is not developed. Both lead performances are adequate, considering the material they have to work with. Carter's Hosanna would make a much better woman than a man. as women are his forte. Hosanna is a play which leaves the audience bored, unamused. and certainly not enlightened, if they don't leave first.

17 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, 1981 Pursuit Williams and Horrald make splosh in film thai didn't ( onlinueil from page St character seems to change every few minutes. With all respect for this sylph, it seems as though she used her scenes in this film to try out her different acting emotions and skills, probahly in preparation for an upcoming real role in a real movie. Finally, one must acknowledge the scenery Utilized here. There are some really gorgeous scenes lilmed in Wyoming, including a somewhatentertaining white water chase. But the real beauty of this movie's footage is the panoramic and always captivating Arizona desert. The surroundings of the final chase segment, as well as various other scenes, serve to remind the viewer once again of this awesome spectacle of Nature's grandeur. Williams and Duvall each play their parts as well as they can. Williams' role at least allows him irreveranl fun, while Duvall is plainly wasting Ins talents with this juvinelly simplistic part. The entire film, in fact, is either a half-decent madefor-tv movie, or Walt Disney meets the 70"s. In either case, unless your little brother (Penn class of 1989 or later) is visiting, save your parents hard-earned money for some quality entertainment. Happy Thanksgiving & Merry Christmas soon sale Nov. 19 through Nov Z& SWEATER DRESSES (by Plain Jane for Esprit) 20 % off GENESIS boatneck furblend sweaters were $28.95 NOW $19.95 BIG BARGAIN! JT /^X ALL blouses 10 An xx in the women's dept. 5 O.UU 01 ALL pants or jeans Unft m in the women's dept. f D uu 0TT - IITTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTXE 'COUPON- every pair of nickels Shoes (COUPON> for women Urban Outfitters In The Warehouse, 4040 Locust St , Mon.-Sat , Sun Selected Outerwear $ off <MQ QQ Q ff (COUPON) 'Lessons' l< imiinunl Imm page Si Private lessons bares a striking resemblance to those kiddie mysteries that Disney used to grind out in the early 70s. The only difference is ih.it the Kurt Russell character is a horny little kid. the <M Klwm character is an offensive Iii iss, and the ulie Andrews character wears ruffled panties and strips on demand The movie's gee-whiz.ittitude IOWHKIS sex is refreshingly real, especially in a film year [Body Unit, The Postman Always Rings Twice, Endless Love] which has cleansed the original sin in a sea of panting, sweating and drooling. As Nicole, Sylvia (Emmanuelle) Krystel emotes In her best Brigitte BardotBlke Sommer sex kitten pun lhe at i ant that sounds like French but isn't), ;iml ban's bet beautifully formed boobies often enough to keep bet Budience aw 'ike. Her unendowed o stat s, Howard I leaseman and Bt Ii Brown, should be so lm k\ Hesseman, who has.n traded a large l.msbip from his role on TV's WKHP in (.Hir iiiniii. should ha\ a known bettei than to sign on ;is Lestei. BIguabl) one ol the least redeemable pints in i 111«-11i.i liistni v llniwn grins bis bashful grim and gulps his aw-shucks gulps as well as can be expected Private Lessons is so sun pie. so unruffled, and so light headed that it's almost fun. Add a little booze to help lorget the inane script, and Private Lessons becomes,i hilarious party movie. when good-natured Mr. Philmore comes home to save the day, and we are ask ed (in the best I)isne\ tradition) to believe that no one has to be responsible for all the shenanigans, you might actually smile. With the batch of films that have opened in the past week, that alone would be worth the admission pru a

18 10 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, 1981 Stewart's Cool World Al Stewart Live/Indian Summer Arista A2L 8607 In order for a live album to be successful, an artist must take advantage of the energy created in the non-studio environment. This energy takes the form of audience Inters! tion. extended songs, and spontaneous musical performances. Live shows allow an artist to define songs without the constraints of the recording studio, reflecting a freer, more energetic environment. Al Stewart, however, never realizes he's left the recording studio on Live/- MUSIC Indian Summer. Stewart become! like many of the characters in his songs: unable to recognize - lei alone deal effectively with - Ins surroundings. Stewart's problems begin with side one, which contains five songs actually recorded in the studio. The production is in the lush vein Stewart learned on earlier albums from Alan Parsons. The songs, however, miss the pop sensibility of earlier hits. Lyrically, Stewart eschews his usual preference for historical topics, but continues to use exotic settings. Overall, side one is a bland blur. The trend continues, unfortunately, on the three "live" sides. From the opening bars of "Running Man" to the closing sax of "Year of the Cat," Stewart and his t T ' Z==M... n ^V M ew ** BHBV band regurgitate the studio version of each song, although the drums reverberate more loudly and the sax sounds more impassioned. These effects, however, are due more to concert hall acoustics than to changed musical styles. The only exception is "Nostradamus". which Stewart splits into two parts by inserting a new song, "The World Goes to Riyadh." in the middle. Musically, this song fits nicely, but lyrically does not add more meaning to "Nostradamus." Stewart underscores the studio sound by fading each song as it ends. This annoying technique effectively destroys what little illusion of a live performance exists. It also removes Stewart's usual introductory comments explaining the cryptic meanings of his songs. Stewart has omitted some of his minor hit songs, which makes this album an incomplete statement of his past. Overall, the album does not seem to serve any purpose except to generate profits for Stewart and Arista Records. Regardless of the culprit, someone should have realized that the tight record-buying economy does not allow for such albums. - David Albuno WQHS Reviewer Look for a WQHS record review ovary weak in 34th Street, and listen to tha 34th Srraaf mualc show ovary Sunday night on WQHS. V K fl kw,\l.stewart blinded by fame ^." I i Karla OoVlto Is this a COOL WORLD or what? Epic On her premiere album. Is this ci COOL WORLD...or iv/ial? Karla DeVito - who toured with Meat Loaf and followed Linda Ronstadt in Pirates of Penzance - sounds like a fusion of Hlondie and The Beach Boys, with her Speotoresque wallof-sound vocals beautifully accentuating the album'a driving new wave rhythms. With a crop of fine studio musicians and superb production by Bill Mouse, DeVito tackles a wide range of material (digging up her grass roots for "Midnight Confessions" and giving new credence to "Almost Saturday Night") while retaining her own evolving identity By Margot Cohen Both the cover versions anil the original compositions In the 1950s and '60s. a are interpreted with a style blond, slim ingenue wowed that is gleefully forceful and Philadelphians in preraucous, yet teasingly coy Broadway try-out runs of and demure. Here is the type shows like "The Music of girl a guy would be hupp> Man" and "She Loves Me." to bring home to his Barbara Cook will try to parents...although he'd be knock them off their feet happier when his parents again on December 2. when went to bed. she appears at the Academy None of the 12 songs on of Music. the album (12 - count 'em) "I think of myself as as an are fillers (creative black emotional instrument." Cook space) and there are a few says, as her recorded voice real possibilities for hit warbles in the background. singles. Prime cuts are "Hoy "Most open.i singers bore me Talk." "1 Can't Stand To to death - they have dazzl- Reminisce." "Bloody Bess," ing technique, but I'm Randy Newman's " ust A always left wanting to know Smile." a sweeping rendition how they feel about things." of )im Steinman's "Heaven The powerful song stylist Can Wait." and the title chooses her repertoire track. meticulously, requiring each Is this a HOT DEBUT...or song to have a strong impact what? on her audience. Sometimes, - Howard Censler a song will just strike her and Qrag Lake her pianist and musical Greg Lake director, Wally Harper, as Chrysalis having that special "something"; but more often. Exorbitant touring costs Cook scrutinizes the song to may have resulted in the see if it lives up to her standemise of Emerson, Lake & dards. Palmer in but at least "The first thing 1 look for is one member is determined the words." she says. not to take the break-up lying "Sometimes I hear a song down. Greg Lake, also a with a seductive melody, but founding member of the then I realize that 1 don't original King Crimson, has believe what it says." now released his first solo "Sometimes it is a good LP, which presents a variety song," Harper interjects, "hut of selections ranging from it has been written before." lyrical ballads to classic "Yes,'' Cook intuitively rock'n'roll. agrees, smiling fondly at the Although not every tune man who has collaborated on the album is a musical with her for eight years. success, all are performed by "Unless we find a new way a very talented group of of doing it. a new slant, it musicians. Lake provides jusl seems foolish to do it." vocals and rhythm guitar She grows animated when playing; behind him are she talks about Lena Home, bassist Tristam Margetts, an artist who seems to share guitarist Gary Moore (Thin many of Cook's criteria for a Lizzy), keyboardist Tommy good performance. Eyre (Gerry Rafferty) and "Lena Home has iist wiped me out lately." the (( ontinurd on page lit David Gladstone Barbara Cook singer says. "It's her desire to communicate, her willingness to let you in now that's so exciting. Every element of performing she does so fully the humor, the movement.'' Her own movement on stage is ;i prime area for improvement, Cook admits. She is no longer the young, flexible actress who flung herself around the stage for Broadway showstoppers. She fell victim to hypoglycemia after playing load roles in a number of shows, but has now managed to keep her weight under control. If she sui I Beds in moving more during her act. Cook says, it will help her convey that emotion she has worked so hard to concentrate in her voice. And judging by the reviews, her voice is quite a marvel. Critics have had no qualms in breaking out the superlatives for Cook. Something of a cult figure, she has a hard core of unfailingly appreciative fans who help make each concert successful. "You fall in love with her. and you can see her a million times, publicity agent Harry Freedman says. "I keep B tape of her in my car. I have her records at home. I think there are a lot of people like me." Her promoters are hoping that she will be received.is warmly in Philadelphia as she has been in New York. San Francisco, Los Angeles, and the other cities she has hit. Cook tends to plaj small i luhs,is,i matter of choice. "Singing as I do, it asks a lot of the audience. It means participation, and a willingness to change. You can't really do that in casinos. In a cabaret people really come to hear the music not to do business or pick up women."

19 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, RED ZONE RECORDS MUSIC drummer Ted McKenna (Kory Callagher). On two SCIIK lions, "Someone" and "Let One LOW. You Once." Clarence Clemons (Bruce Springsteen's K Street Band). Mike (.ilcs (King Crimson). ml Snuffy Walden make guest appearanees. As a member of Kmerson. Lake & Palmer. Lake was noted for his touching i).ill.ids and profound lyrics. but both lyrically and melodically his ballads on the new album are but poor imitations of such classic songs as "Cest l-i Vie" and "Lend Your Love to Me Tonight." Interestingly enough, all of the songs on which Lake COlUhoHtM with Tony Benyon and Tommy Kyre - "Retribution Drive." "l.ong Goodbye" and "The Lie" - contain superior lyrics to those composed solely by l-ake Bob Dylan contributes his talents as << writer to the repetitive and pointless "Love You Too Much." which bears a remarkable resemblance to an obscure Beatles' song from 1964 entitled "You Can't Do That. "Retribution Drive." on the other hand, manages to do justice to the style it imitates, that of Alan Parsons' "Damned If I Do". "For Those Who Dare" is perhaps Ifca album's (iin-sl si'li'i turn. Backed by a powerful arrangement and provocative lyrics, l-ake brings the album to its climax. on this, the final song, demonstrating fully his tremendous vocal abilities. Most of the selections on Creg Lake succeed musically, and for this reason alone. this may be one like you'd like to take a dip in. - Neal Hlaher Jo«o Gilb-rto Brasil Warner BSK 3613 Tired of R&B. New Wave. Soul. Disco. Country * Western. Classical, and just Happy Thanksgiving & Merry Christmas soon sale Nov. 19 through Nov 25* Selected Outerwear $10.00 off V dli milllllllfllllllllllllllllhi KE Flannel & Corduroy men's I (our own make) (shirts) ^T2.00 oft i Selected plaid, houndstooth, checked and assorted western woven shirts $4.00 off 'or men ALL Sportcoats&n^^$> j $20.00 CORDUROY, WOOL PLAID, HERRINGBONE and NAVY BLAZERS. OFF for men Pinwale corduroy & twill fjj\.... Bugle Boy Pants-R f$ off! (COUTON> Urban Outfitters In The Warehouse, 4040 Locust SL , Mon.-SaL 10-10, Sun CCOUFON:.IIMHII everything ate? l>" you yearn to hear romantic t..«t it, American folk SOUKS with laal of gentle strumming strings, flutes, pi.urn solos, and an ixxasion.il trumpet? If so. you'll love the Brazilian artist oao Cilberto's new album Hrusil The songs, which total six. arc all in Portugese. This is the kind of melodious magic that instantly uplifts and transplants you to your favorite spot in the South Pacific. Carribean. or wherever else you like to float off to. But don't get * In idea that this is a horing album. The songs change in tempo from gentle ballads to slightly spicy, characteristically Latin American numbers with a touch of jazz. Whether you are inclined to listen to this sort of stuff or not. it is definitely the music you'll want to hear on your honeymoon. While the disc is a short one - 28 minutes - you should enjoy every second of it. Hurry and purchase a copy. II will definitely seduce you. and possibly your date. Alan Lewis HAKKI HI CLAYTON. HAYWARD K (.KADM Y formrrly ot LTlTLEFtAT NATALIE COLE JON HENDRIX JERRY JEFF WALK Elf THE AS ROBERT HAZARD & THE HEROES FOUR TOPS MARY TRAVERS ERIC ANDERSON BOW WOW WOW DAVID DYI S MK FLASH BACK SflMdcv lkr>«~*<r- > -SatamUv Nile livr" FATHtH GUIDO SARDUCCI -LIVE" via SATELLITE IS FT SCREEN MEAT LOAF DO WOP PT. 1 PERSUASIONS 14 KT. SOUL KARON BIHARI J.ir' i 1 r. m -LJVIN DOLLS" V am b» Jl IVrf * mm h. '.. MX s *fc *

20 1 2 34th STREET MAGAZINE, November 19, 1981 FILM MMCI OP THI CITT * * A real Treat (Regency. 16lh & Chestnut ) THI PRINCH LIEUTEN ARTS WOMAN * * Ga nnler Piniet whose Hashing script lets Streep act Meryiy (Rittenhouse. 19th & Walnut. 567^)320) TRIM coxnuiom * a * * No mass appeal, but solid dramaturgy tor the discriminating panshoner (Sam's Place. '8th s Chestnut ) Also sneaking into Sam's Place s HAIDERS Of TNI LOST ARK QALLIPOLI * ** This lilm trom down under goes over (Mark I. 18th & Market ) r ARTHUR * * Bach again tor another nip at the ticket well imidtown Chestnut & Broad ) AH AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LON- DON *» *» Hair raising comedy m this lycanthropic thriller about a Penn student spending a semester abroad IWalnut Mall 3925 Walnut St ) AU PIRI * French taare about fatherly love (The RiU. 214 Walnut St ) HALLOWEEN II * * Hick (Director Rosenthal) or treat A bloody good sequel (Samenc Chestnut St ) TIME BANDIT! «The big hit in town with Sean Connery a stand-out (Olde City. 2nd and Sansom ) HEARTLAND *. Western union unfortunately telegraphs plot and emotions (RiU III. 214 Walnut St ) Also at the RiU TIM (OAT IS FULL a highly acclaime Swiss Mm CARBON CORY w THI HOWLING (Midi own) WATCHER IH THI WOODS See review leric's Place. 15th & Chestnut ) *******»#********************* Freddie's j Restaurant & Pizza Shrimp Scampi Fctluone Eggplant Parmigiaric* Veal Picanii Antipasto Piz/a Mane icotti Sf.'te Store Purchased Liquor Permitted INFLATION-FIGHTING PRICES! Open for Lunch &. Dinner Tuesday Saturday Friday &. Saturday til midnight ~7REE DFSSFRT with this coupon Mm Purchase S5_ s _ 2 1st &. Chestnut Streets LO If you're an above-average student, a Masters in Journalism, a Masters in Communications, or a PhD in Communications could be waiting for you at Temple University. <_ Wc have above-average faculty members in our School of Communications and Theater. They are outstanding not only for their excellent academic backgrounds, but also for their varied professional experience. At Temple, we think an above-average faculty deserves above-average students. If you believe you could qualify for one of the graduate programs, we'd like to hear from you. WSJTE: Iran's Office: School of Communications and Theater Temple I rm.-n.ih Philadelphia. PA or call Ornise l.annon at 2IS N PRIVATE LISSONS See review (Regency) QUARTET See review (OIC* City) STM CRAZY The /any adventures ol Julia Child and Graham Kerr alter they're arrested tor ciuooing fetuses to death while making an omelette Our critic panned it (Milton's Place Paradise Lost, don't understand) SCHLOCK FILM FESTIVAL ONLY WHIN I LAUQM V. * w RICH AND FAMOUS) v. {Duke 1605 Chestnut ) RAT OR Oil w BLIND RAOI Could you pass such an obvious Dargarn up? Two horrible films lor the price ot one. courtesy of (The one and only Goldman. 15th & Chestnut ) STRIRIS w RICHARD RRTOR IN CONCERT Not really sc oi * li*"'. but anything that plays at I*P iioidman automatically qualifies IWhere else ''I FRIDAY THI 11th RARTS 1 A t (Ducheae, IMS CtMatnut, SS3- SS1) RIRIRTORY FLOATING WUOI w BALLAD OR ORM (thru nun DISCREET CHARM OP THI BOUROIOail w DIARY OF A CHAMBERMAID (.1/22 111*4) IWalnut Mall Walnut ) Lite show- KINTUCKV FRIID MOVIE or FILLMORE ' THI ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW THEATRE AN IVININO OP ICKITT:ROCKABVB,NOT I, PLAY, COM! AND OO, and FILM Prince Thaatar 1SSO Walnut St., f 4S-STS1 Intuitons presents tour Beckett plays including the Philadelphia premeire ot Rockaby Plus a special bonus a silent him with Buster Keaton Tontght. Friday and Saturday OIMINI Annenbera Center 3SS0 Walnut St. 243-STB1 Philadelphia Drama Guild presents this heartwarming comedy set in the South of our fair city To December 6 Mil Ml nil MR. KMirBIK siusn '. - llfcjmcmtah -.! uwisinn. iiwiikiii : $2.oo I Friday. Nov PM JFine Arts' B-1 34th & Walnut THE WHITI HAWK Annanborg Cantar 36«0 Walnut St. f 4S-STS1 World premiere ol a new play using sign language along with words and music to tell the story of a deaf actor's struggle to make if m the art world Til November 22 BETWEEN THI COVIRS Maik and WH) Club 310 S. Oulnce WA1-422B The Wiggers do it up in the traditional atmosphere Deer, and lots ot Penn Pride HOSANNA Studio 3 Walnut Street Thaatar tth and Walnut ST4-3SS0 An unfortunately stereotyped and in suiting look at the lives ot two homosex uals See review lor more To December 13 ANNII Shub.rt Thaatar ISO S. Broad It. T3S-47SS Little Orphan Annie and the whole gang come airve on stage You're never too old Till January 3 INT Society Hill Fl.yhou.. SOT S. Sth Street WA Story ot prsecution of homosexuals in Hitler's Germany Be prepared to squirm Till November 21 THI WOOLQATHIRIR The Wllma Near Thaatar 2030 Saneem St. 9S This truck driver meets candy counter girl saga is just a bit too synthetic Til November 21 SHEAR MADNESS Burgsndy Thaatar, Bellavue Stratford Bread and Walnut Straata 73S- SS04 This comedy whodunit broke all records in Boston It also hails the opening ol a new theater in Philly's most famous hotel Hilarious Open-ended run MUSIC TDM PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA Eduardo Mata conducts the Orchestra m a program leaturmg Stravinsky s "Pulcinella." Orbon's Tres Versiones Smlonicas and Respighi's Feste Romane at the Academy of Music. 2 PM PM 11/21. 8 PM. 11/24 SOUTHSIOI JOHNNY A THI ASBURV JUKI! New Jersey s number 2 rock act will be dorng one show at the Brandywme Club 9 PM. 11/19 BARRIRI. CLAYTON, HAYWARD, ORABNIY Former Little Feat members will be per forming two show at the Ripley With a catchy law firm like name like this they can't miss 8 30 & 11 PM 11/19 MOODY BLUES Not the St Louis hockey team.. lough loss Legendary an rockers win be bringing their album lour to the Spec trum. 8 PM. 11/18 & 11/20 SONNY ROLLINS Not Tree s brother Legendary (another legendary ">) ja/? sax player will be doing two shows at the Biiou & PM. 11'O MISSION OF BURMA Boston based pop/new wavers will he playing at the tfar) East Side Club, to an audience that s been fit to be Thai'd 11/- 21 OOOO'e Trendy girl group is coming to Irvine lor one show 8 PM BRUCECOCKBURN (Seriajsly Pronounced Cobumi This guy will produce folk rock at the Bi ou that should singe ycur extremities. 8 & PM. 11/24 THI AS Not Billy Maitin's team if you re strand ed m Phiiiy for Thanksgiving (egads*) you might want to check out these popular local talents at the Ripley 9 PM FOUR TOPS Not to De contused with then Hiiiei counterparts The Four Dreideis It you're lucky enough to be stuck in Phrlty for Thanksgiving you must check out these Motown legends at the Ripley & PM Don t Noah why but these art schiockers will be packing the Spectrum three limes aitnougn 34th Street predicts a quick Exodus 8 PM. 11/25 n/26 & IV 27 BLACK SABBATHIALVIH LEE Philadelphia's Fall Heavy Metal Festival continues with the legendary NOISE makers Black Sabbath Former Ten Years Alter lead guitarist Aivin Lee will be doing the warm up honors at the Spectrum 8 PM 12/4 OREO LAKE Not one ot the five great lakes Former King Crimson and Emerson. Lake & Palmer guitarist will be bringing his album tour to the Tower. 8 PM 1214 NATHAN MILSTBIN The Philadelphia All Star Forum presents this possibly renowned violinist in a pro gram featuring Pergoiesi Bach. Brahms. Paganini. Liszt, and TchaAovsky at the Academy. 3 PM. 12/6 AC/DC Socket to you 1 Heavy metal and NOISE will reach new heights on this "Highway To Hell. 8 PM 12/7 & 12/8 Coming December 10 The firet ever 34th Strati Holiday Film Supplement PRE HOLIDAY SALE 10% OFF EVERYTHING Headquarters lor 7EBRAKIHKO, & STREET BICYCLE SHOP 630 South 4th St., Phlla.,

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