Pioneers How Chinese immigrants broke new ground in Police. The. Top of the lake. Hungry for more. Good sports OCTOBER 2017.

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1 OCTOBER 2017 The Pioneers How Chinese immigrants broke new ground in Police Hungry for more Meal allowances for shift workers Good sports 2017 Winter Games Top of the lake New Taupo Holiday Homes

2 Contents We remember Represent! 6 Hard out how Chinese officers made the grade 10 Witness to policing history 4 Travel and study: Generous fellowships offered to Police staff 5 Burnout: Police researcher reveals the high cost of hassles in the workplace Sports boost: Association increases 5 sponsorship to Police Sport Cover story: Chinese immigrants who 6 blazed a trail to join NZ Police Iam Keen 9 Witness to change: Dave Harvey s year Police career 13 Flashback: Humble reminder of officer s sacrifice Fun and games: Police Winter Games in Rotorua Cradle to grave: Police Welfare Fund benefits and grants H&S champions wanted: How you can help your workgroup Most Wanted: Two cracking crime reads reviewed by our new columnist Hungry? Here are your shift work meal allowance entitlements Plaza summer specials: Holiday discounts at two Wellington hotels Sport: Sports Diary; Winter Games; ski and snowboard champs Regulars 17. Ask Your Aunty 20. Brain Teaser 20. Keen on Beer 21. Keen on Wine 24. Holiday Home Hot Spot: Taupo 25. Letters 27. Memorial Wall 27. Contacts Police News is the magazine of the New Zealand Police Association, originally the New Zealand Police Journal, first published in Printed by City Print Communications, Wellington. Opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Association. Those wishing not to receive a personal copy of Police News should contact the editor to be removed from the distribution list. October 2017 ISSN Published by the New Zealand Police Association P.O. Box 12344, 57 Willis St Wellington 6144 Phone: (04) Fax: (04) Editor: Ellen Brook Website: Facebook: nzpoliceassociation NZPA Police News must not be reproduced in part or as a whole without the formal consent of the copyright holder the New Zealand Police Association. 2 OCTOBER 2017

3 NEWS AND VIEWS Top of the lake 24 from the President Shift work meal allowances Winter Games I am one of those shameful Aucklanders who failed to show up for my local Association meetings until now! Letters 25 COVER: Originally from China, Alfred Zhou, now a detective at Glen Innes, joined Police in Read his story, P6. Photo: ELLEN BROOK In late August, I had the pleasure of attending the Police Sport Winter Games, sponsored by the Association, in Rotorua. It was a great occasion with more 600 competitors taking part in a variety of sports. Congratulations to Police Sport and a big thanks to the Rotorua District Council for its generous support. The games highlighted how important healthy lifestyles are for our members. This month, your Association representatives and national office staff will attend the annual conference in Wellington. The theme is Resilience Matters. Resilience is not about telling people to harden up and get on with the job; it is about adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy and significant sources of stress. The conference will hear from respected speakers on this topic, and other health-related messages, as we explore how to better support the mental and physical wellbeing of members. The keynote speaker will be Tom Mulholland, a well-known emergency and expedition doctor, author, TV and radio host and founder of the Healthy Thinking Institute. Dr Tom, as he is known, truly walks the talk, combining family, a full-on career and many outdoor activities. He is going to guide us through how we can live to 100 while staying out of the emergency department. In this month s Police News, Police employee Nikki Geeson talks about the correlation between overwork, not enough staff and the chronic condition of burnout in high-risk occupations such as policing. Her academic work underscores the story of veteran police officer Dave Harvey, also in this issue, who tells Police News that thanks to the Police trauma policy he was able to take time out to recover from post-traumatic stress and stay in policing, rather than quitting years before he was ready. At the conference, and in conjunction with Police, we will be launching a mental health wellbeing app that provides practical tools for dealing with stress. This brings me back to the importance of sport in promoting personal wellbeing, along with the camaraderie and fun of competition. In recognition of that, the Association is pleased to announce a doubling of its sponsorship to Police Sport, which will now exceed $100,000, continuing the Association s commitment to its vision: to be the trusted guardian of the police family. We look forward to working even closer with Police Sport to promote this important aspect of our members health, and we will share with you the knowledge we gain from this year s conference. Chris Cahill OCTOBER

4 The Buzz HOW MANY DOG YEARS IS THAT? Veteran dog handler Sergeant Al Campbell, who now works as a detector dog instructor at the Dog Training Centre, was presented with his 42-year clasp during last month s Police Dog Championships held at the centre in Trentham, Upper Hutt. Al joined Police in 1975 and has spent almost his entire career working with police dogs. PUHIA TE MITI-PAI I NGA WA KATOA. During Maori Langauge Week, Commissioner Mike Bush suggested Police staff might like to use the Maori version of Always blow on the pie. Police nominations sought for fellowships A charitable organisation has set up a generous and exciting new fellowship programme that will allow members of Police to travel and study overseas, and it is seeking nominations this month. The Woolf Fisher Police Fellowship programme was launched last month and aims to recognise and reward excellence and dedication among Police staff. Woolf Fisher Trust chairman Sir Noel Robinson said the fellowships aimed to recognise people who commit themselves to New Zealand. The trust wanted the hard work of Police staff, which often occurred outside of the spotlight, to be acknowledged. Speaking at the launch of the programme, he told Police: It might be someone who has been sitting behind a computer for 2 1/2 years, or it might a constable in a little town who goes above and beyond the call of duty. Nominations, which close on October 15, must come from within Police for the 15 annual awards and are available for staff up to and including the rank of inspector and Police employee equivalents. There is no minimum level of service required, but nominees are expected to have shown a sustained level of commitment to Police. Staff must be nominated without their knowledge, so there s an element of surprise when the fellowships are announced. Nominations will go through the Police Honours and Awards Committee, which will provide a shortlist for the trust to make the final selections for the fully funded programme of study or observation within a policing-related environment in another country. The successful nominees will be asked to submit a study/travel proposal to the trust. Ten of the fellowships will be for six weeks and five will be for eight weeks, with partners included. Up to 40 per cent of the travel period will be for study or observation and the rest of the time can be used at the fellows discretion. The trust has been offering such fellowships in the education sector since 1961 and this is the first time it has extended them to another profession. Sir Woolf Fisher a founder of Fisher & Paykel was a New Zealand businessman and philanthropist. IT S NOT REALLY HURTING ANYONE. Warkworth resident Leigh Sheehan defends his cardboard cut-out cop Policeman Pete, who patrols an infamous stretch of local highway to encourage drivers to slow down. The Corflute copper has been on duty for two years. Never mind that he s a British bobby, Leigh says it works. stuff.co.nz 2018 WALL PLANNER Do you need a 2018 Police Association wall planner for your team or station? Our popular A2 wall planners note useful dates such as Police pay days, Holiday Home ballot periods, daylight saving and school holidays, Police Remembrance Day and regional anniversaries. The planners, which are intended for work groups, will be sent to your local Association committee secretaries in November for distribution. Requests for planners should be directed to your committee secretary. NEW Z E A L A N D P O L I C E I AT A S S O C Mo I O N POLICE ASSOCIATION New Year s Day 1 Tu Th New Year Holiday 2 We Fr New Year Holiday 3 Th Fr Sa Su Mo Tu Sa We Su Th Mo Fr Tu Th Fr Sa Su Su Daylight Saving Ends (clock back 1 hour from 2am) Mo Easter Monday Tu We JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL Mo Waitangi Day 6 Sa We Su Th Fr Sa Su Mo Tu Tu We HOLIDAY HOME BALLOT WEEK 4 BEGINS We Th Fr St Valentine s Day Th Fr Sa Su Th Mo Fr Taranaki Tu HOLIDAY HOME ART DECO BALLOT BEGINS 4 OCTOBER 2017

5 NEWS AND VIEWS From overwork to burnout Police survey rates work hassles on a par with traumatic events. Organisational hassles, such as too much work and staff shortages, can be a greater source of stress on Police staff than traumatic events, according to the results of a recent study. As part of a master s thesis on police wellbeing, Police employee Nikki Geeson, who works in Mobility, surveyed 600 police officers from Waikato, Eastern and Tasman districts. The focus of her research was the impact of traumatic events and organisational hassles on psychological distress and burnout, and the moderating role of social support. The strongest finding in the study was the association between hassles and burnout, she said. Burnout is a chronic condition which occurs in response to job demands, and it is also associated with high-risk occupations. Exhaustion and cynicism are the two main components of burnout and the findings in Nikki s study indicated that participants were experiencing high levels of these. While hassles and traumatic events were both associated with psychological distress, the overall level of distress was moderate. More positively, Nikki said, most of those who took part in the study said they still retained a sense of personal accomplishment from their work. And those with higher levels of social support, either from supervisors, colleagues or family and friends, reported less distress and burnout. Nikki said the concept of burnout had not been widely studied in relation to police, even though it could have serious consequences for individuals and organisations, such as increased levels of depression and poor occupational safety behaviours. She said she was passionate about police health, safety and wellbeing and felt privileged that so many Police staff had chosen to share their experiences with her. Last month, with assistance from the Police Association, Nikki shared her findings with an international audience at the annual conference of the Society of Police and Criminal Psychology in San Diego, presenting a paper called Burnout: The Hidden Danger of Police Work. Presentations at the three-day conference covered a range of operational and wellbeing topics, such as making decisions related to the use of force, body cameras, leadership, diversity and emotional survival. There were common challenges among the countries represented at the conference, such as diversity recruiting, meeting training demands and implementing restorative justice practices, Nikki said. Police employee Nikki Geeson surveyed 600 police officers from Waikato, Eastern and Tasman districts. The concept of burnout had not been widely studied in relation to police, even though it could have serious consequences for individuals and organisations. Sports sponsorship boost As part of the Police Association s ongoing commitment to the health and wellbeing of members, it has decided to double its sponsorship of Police Sport, the organisation that co-ordinates and administers sports events throughout New Zealand and supports members travelling overseas. Last month, the Association s board of directors agreed to increase annual sponsorship for Police Sport from $50,000 to $100,000. Association President Chris Cahill said the increase was in line with the Association s vision statement of being the trusted guardian of the police family. It is consistent with our aim to improve the wellbeing of our members. Participating in sport is a key contributor to mental and physical health. It s not a hard cause to support. The Association knows its members love sports and that is reflected in Police Sport s high membership 5500, sworn and nonsworn making it the largest employeebased voluntary membership organisation in Australasia. Chris said the Association was keen to work even closer with Police Sport and it was also becoming clear that Association support, along with help from Police, was a key component in ensuring that events were able to be held. For example, he said, in just two years, the Police Winter Games had grown to include 700 competitors taking part in 11 events, which meant costs had increased significantly. Police Sport chairman Brett Shields said the agreement with the Association would be a significant boost, especially for the Winter Games. It means we can focus our energy on making sure everyone knows they can take part in the games. They are not just for elite athletes. We want to include everyone and continue building the camaraderie among members that these sporting events bring. As part of the agreement with Police Sport, the Association will retain naming rights for national Police Sport events, including for the annual Police Winter Games. OCTOBER

6 COVER STORY The pioneers How Chinese immigrants broke new ground for policing in New Zealand. By Ellen Brook Detective Nian Zhou (Alfred) now feels confident mixing with different cultures in a diverse community, which, he says, would not be the case in China. In the early and mid-2000s, a small group of Chinese immigrants were negotiating their way through Police College. Just about everything was difficult the language, the driving and swimming tests, and the cultural stumbling blocks but eventually they graduated to take their places in Police. Today, those officers are finding that what was once a barrier is now an asset. Their bilingual skills and cultural awareness are making them an invaluable part of Police, especially in Auckland with its large Chinese population and regular influxes of visitors from Asia. They were pioneers in policing for their communities and few people are more pleased with their progress than Auckland City District Asian liaison co-ordinator Jessica Phuang. In fact, if it had not been for her efforts, many of the Chinese recruits who aspired to be police officers might never have made it to the college. When she joined Police in 2003, there were only a handful of Chinese police, most of them hired in response to the surge in Chinese immigration to New Zealand in the mid-1990s. Police wanted its recruits to be more representative of that demographic, but it was struggling to get the numbers through the college. Pretty quickly, Jessica realised why. If you are a Chinese or other Asian person trying to get into Police, there are more challenges English and the PCT, for a start and there is a lack of confidence. Chinese people don t like to blow their own trumpet and, because of that, hardworking people can get left behind. I went to the recruiters and told them that one size doesn t fit all. Jessica decided to get proactive literally. With the help of a Police physical training instructor (PTI), she started a weekend running group for Chinese people wanting to get fit enough to apply for Police College. She began with about six in the group. Every weekend, we were out there. The PTI gave them tips on how to improve their fitness and I was the whipper, getting them motivated and boosting their confidence. There were more challenges than just fitness. Up to 60 per cent of the applicants were failing the recruitment literacy test. Jessica organised tutors and recalls even hosting English-speaking sessions at her home. In 2003, Police decided to scrap that part of the test for speakers of English as a second language and, a few years later, Chinese immigrant Eli Cao became the first Chinese person to top a wing at the college. Jessica s running group grew and started attracting other nationalities Koreans and Japanese and then there were up to 50 people taking part, providing support and motivation for each other. 6 OCTOBER 2017

7 Swimming is another challenge for people who haven t grown up in New Zealand, Jessica says. She tackled that one by organising monthly swimming evaluations with a PTI at the Tepid Baths in Auckland and telling the hopeful recruits: If you don t improve, I m going to scream at you! Jessica s tough love approach had the desired effect and, today, nearly 14 years later, her many proteges in Auckland and elsewhere regard her like a mother. Of course, getting through the recruitment process and the college were just the start of the journey for these Chinese officers. FRANK, SUNNY and ALFRED Detective Feng Tian, known as Frank, and Detective Dayong Sun, known as Sunny, both joined Police in There were only five other Asian officers that they knew of at the time, and the two men soon formed a bond of shared experiences. Both had immigrated to New Zealand as adults, seeking a better lifestyle. Frank arrived in March 2003, aged 31, with his wife and young son. Originally from a town in southwest China, he had been living in Thailand since 1997 completing a master s degree in business administration at the Asian Institute of Technology. He graduated in 1999 and worked as a training co-ordinator with the Asian Disaster Preparedness Centre before moving to Auckland. His first job there was collecting donations for the Westpac rescue helicopter and then he worked in a textile warehouse. Looking back on his career path into Police, Frank says he always liked the America TV cop show Hunter. I liked Rick Hunter and his beautiful partner, Sergeant Dee McCall, but I never thought I could be a police officer because, as an immigrant, I didn t really think it was an option. When the opportunity did arise, however, and thanks to his schooling with Jessica, including the swimming lessons, he grabbed it with both hands. Everything went well at the college, except for one area he failed the driving, stumbling over the commentary that accompanies the practical test. He was unable to graduate. At the passing out parade for his wing mates, Frank stood alone to one side, saluting throughout the ceremony. The following day, the college surprised him with a private ceremony for him and his family, attended by some of his wing mates. He was posted to Howick Police Station where he received extra driving training until he was able to fulfil the requirements of graduation. It was a difficult time for him and he felt crippled. Without that second chance, Frank says, he would have failed to become a police officer, and he s eternally grateful for the extra help and the faith put in him to fulfil his potential. Today, Frank is an investigator with the Financial Investigations Team in Counties Manukau. His experience was not unusual. Sunny, 48, had previously worked for a computer company and as a warehouse stockman in Auckland before he became interested in Police. Auckland City District Asian liaison co-ordinator Jessica Phuang: her many proteges regard her like a mother after she helped them through the recruitment process for Police College. Now he is an investigator with the Asset Recovery Unit in Auckland. The college was challenging, he says. The study was okay, but the driving part was hard because it was not in my background. I didn t have enough experience and there weren t enough hours to develop the skills, including the commentary. It was very stressful, but we got through with help from Police. Frank believes that the experiences of Chinese police officers such as themselves have helped change the perceptions of Police management about bringing people from different ethnic backgrounds into Police. Other Chinese people look at me and think, if he can join, then I can join. We are setting an example. Continued next page Jessica Phuang organised weekly fitness training sessions in Auckland to bring potential recruits up to speed. OCTOBER

8 COVER STORY But, he warns, it s not easy. You need to be brave, and have courage and guts. Detective Nian Zhou, known as Alfred, agrees. He arrived in New Zealand in 1999, aged 22, to complete a master s degree in computer science and was working as a computer programmer when he became aware of the Police campaign to recruit people from the Asian community. He, too, was encouraged by Jessica Phuang and made it to Police College in There were four Chinese boys there. We had to spend extra time learning English and practising our driving. I didn t learn to drive till I came to New Zealand. He was posted to Mt Wellington where he worked on beat duties, PST, then traffic and inquiry sections. In 2010, he joined CIB and qualified as a detective in Now 40, Alfred looks back on his career with satisfaction. I can see that I have made significant progress, especially becoming a detective. Today, he feels confident mixing with different cultures in a diverse community, which, he says, would not be the case in China. But, it wasn t always like that. When he first started, like many Asians, he says, he was shy and worried about his accent. I got some negative reactions from people, but I had to show courage and professionalism. In China, he says, police officers would never expect to be abused the way police are here. In China, the culture is to always be polite and respectful to your elders and to authority figures. Now, however, I know how to respond. All three officers say it took some time to decipher Kiwi slang and colloquialisms, and to work out the correct pronunciation for street names and suburbs. Alfred says it was obvious that some people lack trust in police, which can make it harder to work with them. I had to learn to break the ice and earn their trust. He recalls attending a family violence case where a Maori woman had been blinded by a blow to the face from her partner. As the officer in charge, I had to really connect with that woman to find out the true story. I visited her many times, and other family members, and I learnt about Maori cultural practices. We built a rapport and that helped get the evidence needed to get a good result for her. Alfred says he is still frequently asked to help out with people speaking Mandarin, for example, during evidential breath testing, explaining the procedure and a person s rights. An Asian Safety Patrol Group on the beat in Auckland. All the officers say it took some time to decipher Kiwi slang and colloquialisms, and to work out the correct pronunciation for street names and suburbs. If the language barrier is not taken into consideration, he says, it can lead to confusion. An Asian person may be slow to respond because of the language, and that can be interpreted wrongly, but it s more likely to be nervousness than an attitude issue. I can ease the situation by speaking a common language. Alfred notes that there is a perception in the Chinese community that New Zealand police don t do a good job. Part of the reason is the time it takes to solve some crime. We do our best. In China, he says, every big city has thousands of high-definition CCTV cameras and offenders can often be identified, located and arrested within a very short timeframe, and police s powers of detention are very different there. Here, the rules are not the same. Many Chinese people expect us to be like police in China, but there are differences. I think we police do an awesome job, actually. I love the job. All three officers admit that being an immigrant means giving up a lot, missing family and friends back home, struggling with fitting in, but, after forging their respective paths into Police, they all value their new lives here. Bridging the cultural divide is important and, while still retaining their heritage, they recognise that they are becoming more Kiwi. In our culture, says Frank, life is work focused. You go to work even if you are sick. It s well accepted and you d even be complimented for it. Here, work is more family focused. You are discouraged from coming to work if you are unwell, or a family member is sick and needs your help. The wellbeing of your family and yourself is more important. Jessica is well aware of the problems. It can be challenging for Kiwis to understand how we function collectively, she says. The ethos is, I don t own the community, it owns me. She remains committed to encouraging more Asians into police work. Most Asians here are still immigrants. They have good morals, are hard working and most have acquired high qualifications, so they deserve to have a good career such as policing. All they needed was specific support to help them succeed. After 2009, Jessica s running group morphed into the Asian Safety Patrol Group, which patrolled downtown Auckland on Friday and Saturday nights so people interested in joining Police could get experience talking to and helping the public. It has supported 100 ethnic applicants to become police officers. Wellington recently set up a safety patrol group and one is planned for a South Island city. In 2014, the administration for the groups was handed over to Community Patrols of New Zealand and the scheme has received volunteering and diversity awards. There s definitely a good reason for Jessica and her extended Asian family to blow their own trumpets now. 8 OCTOBER 2017

9 NEWS AND VIEWS This column is written by a frontline police officer. It does not represent the views or policies of the Police Association. MyPolice, your problem Having rolled out in April, all blingy and new, MyPolice is now lurking on your devices like an overfed slug. Timesheets have backed up, travel allowances are not getting paid, and jobs are taking forever to be advertised. Rosters are lagging behind actual movements. Are these still the teething issues we generously expect of a new system or is there a bigger problem? Here are a few of the issues. Forty thousand timesheets had not been processed in August, but supervisors diligently worked their way through them and this was down to 13,000 in September. Also, rumour is that the timesheets don t recognise breaches of the nine-hour rule, so if you have breached it, you need to send an to workforce management to manually adjust your timesheet something many staff may not be aware of. A self-approving system is certainly faster, but the requirement to manually enter small amounts of overtime creates a natural disincentive to do so. HR seems to be where some of the backlog lies, with either not enough trained staff to handle the new requirements, or perhaps not enough access granted to work in the application. For instance, it takes six weeks for a job to be advertised through the HR system of approvals. If you are deployed out of your district, be prepared to wait six weeks to get your allowance. Scheduling and organisational charts are out of date, and therefore unreliable, and only one supervisor can see their staff at any given time, which is a problem for dual supervisors. On the other hand, if you are overpaid for work or allowances, I hear that it takes only 48 hours for payroll to get in touch. At least some things are still reliably prompt. We know big IT rollouts are a nightmare, and the bosses will be hoping all these glitches can be fixed, but with our Commissioner rumoured to be suing PWC, maybe they re pretty grumpy about the whole thing too. Performance anxiety I m still enjoying the PHPF sessions, with their occasional complimentary morning teas, but I m wondering how supervisors are handling their leadership expectations. On the one hand, we re encouraged to work together, pool resources and have a unified goal (ie, being the safest country in the world) but PHPF also says we are to be process-driven and results-focused, and sets each district up in competition by sending out weekly comparison charts. At the local level, we have input into the strategic performance templates (SPTs), meaning we get to put some fancy words around who/what we re going to focus on to cut crime. If you hear an up-and-coming manager use the term cascading, fear not, they re basically talking about a trickledown effect for the goals. I think. The decision-making should be clear, but often it isn t. For instance, Waikato District has changed its patrolling policy in Western Waikato in response to a recent incident where shots were fired at police. All patrol cars are now to be double-crewed. However, the swiftness of the change has caused some angst among staff who have been re-rostered to meet the new requirements, and, with its lack of consultation, the move could be considered reactionary. If it s only rolled out in one area, does this mean it s a pilot project, and is there a bigger plan to protect all the frontline in Waikato? Please explain? Sometimes the decisions made at higher levels don t always do what I thought PHPF was supposed to, ie, consult and consider the views of all staff, including those of us further down the food chain. If it s all about role modelling, then do as I say, not as I do won t cut it. Rugby role models Speaking of brilliant performance and outstanding results, a big shoutout to our colleagues who were part of the winning team for the Women s Rugby World Cup. Go Black Ferns! Your professionalism and drive is a fine example to us all. Stay safe. Constable Iam Keen To update Iam Keen with information, Members a new discount for you Rugby League World Cup 2017 has been added to our discount programme. The Rugby League World Cup 2017 is hosted among New Zealand, Australia and Papua New Guinea and kicks off October 27 in Melbourne. The New Zealand team (The Kiwis) are playing three pool matches, a quarter-final and semi-final in New Zealand. Matches are being held in Auckland (Oct 28, Nov 25), Hamilton (Nov 4, Nov 11), Wellington (Nov 18) and Christchurch (Nov 4, Nov 18). Members receive a 15 % discount on tickets to all New Zealand matches in the Rugby League World Cup Hurry this offer is valid only until the final New Zealand match on November 25. Visit our website for details: sign in, then click on Member Discounts from the Products and Services menu. You need to be logged in to view the discounts. OCTOBER

10 NEWS AND VIEWS Witness to a new era of policing As Sergeant Dave Harvey recalls his long career in Police, it s a bit like looking in a mirror reflecting not only on the ups and downs of his working life, but also the growing pains of a nation. When Dave Harvey joined Police in 1970, aged 20, the country and the way it was policed were very different to what was to come, delineated quite clearly by the 1981 Springbok tour and an emerging culture of protest and violence. It changed police forever in the eyes of the public and signalled a new age of policing, Dave says. He had started his police life walking the beat in Dunedin no radio, no partner, only a baton and a greatcoat for the night shift, albeit with the sergeant driving past every half hour to check you were not slacking. You had to be quite ingenious just get a cup of tea from the local cake shop. Such were the concerns of young constables. Greater responsibilities lay ahead, however, when he started working in solecharge stations in Central Otago, where policing meant forming strong bonds with local communities and being available at any time. He moved north to his home town of Blenheim for 18 months and then to Christchurch in 1976 where he met his wife, Claire, who worked in banking. During that time, he was a uniform inquiry constable at New Brighton. In 1981, he says, a darker side of policing was becoming apparent as pro-tour and anti-tour factions began to clash. I never thought I would see the country divided how it was then. Many police officers were opposed to the tour, he says, but they had to do their jobs, being sent around the country to police anti-tour demonstrations. He arrested Trevor Richards, the leader of the Halt All Racist Tours group, for obstructing a carriageway at the Basin Reserve in Wellington. He was a nice man, Dave recalls. Meanwhile, many officers were getting hurt gouged in the eyes, broken fingers and suffering burns from fire fudge bombs (an incendiary mix of sugar and chemicals that can burn through clothing). All we had were our wooden batons. Dave says he was surprised how senior officers at the time appeared to struggle with making decisions in the field. They were overwhelmed by the protest and didn t have the tactical awareness we have today. It was a whole new world for New Zealand of violent protest activity. By 1983, he was a sergeant and he and Claire moved to Wellington, where he worked on section and team policing. The growing pains of the 1980s continued as the country grappled with the Homosexual Law Reform Bill and major industrial action by workers at the Marsden Point oil refinery. In 1986, Dave joined the diplomatic protection squad, looking after prime ministers David Lange, Mike Moore and Jim Dave knew that cops are exposed to shitty things, but he didn t really know how that could manifest itself until he found himself having difficulties in Bolger, Governor-General Sir Paul Reeves and other VIPs. In 1990, he escorted Prince Edward during a royal tour to open the Commonwealth Games in Auckland. He enjoyed the work, but it came to an end after the 1991 election and he and Claire moved back to Christchurch. There, as section sergeant at Christchurch Central, he was able to incorporate some of the strategies learnt in the policing operations of the previous decade. From 1993 to 2010, Dave was a rural sergeant in Hurunui and North Canterbury. It was a job he loved, but it came at a cost. There were a lot of tragedies suicides, drownings, car crashes and often they were people he knew. Dave knew that cops are exposed to shitty things, but he didn t really know how that could manifest itself until he found himself having difficulties in I couldn t concentrate. I was having awful dreams and would cry for no reason. I was having dark thoughts, becoming withdrawn and thinking why me? It became apparent that the old harden up approach wasn t working. In fact, Dave had post-traumatic stress and, thanks to the Police trauma policy, he was able to take a break. I took 10 weeks off. If I hadn t, I would have left Police in OCTOBER 2017

11 The 1981 Springbok tour protests were a turning point for policing in New Zealand, says Dave Harvey. Photo: FAIRFAX MEDIA/EVENING POST COLLECTION In Brief Coming out the other side of that made him a better cop more empathetic and aware of the trauma and risks that police are exposed to. They were skills he was able to put to good use from 2010 when he was shoulder-tapped by the district commander to become the district workplace assessor for Canterbury, coaching and mentoring probationary constables. By the time he retired last month, he had overseen training for 253 new officers. Earlier, in August 2007, Dave did an eightmonth deployment to the Solomon Islands where he was the professional standards investigator looking into complaints of misconduct against participating police forces from the Pacific. That challenging work was balanced by, along with other Kiwis, assisting the Solomon Island Rugby Union refereeing and coaching the national team. Dave has always been active. He s been a member of the Territorials since 1976, being promoted to corporal and then taking part in the punishing officer selection course, which he passed. In 2011, he suffered a knee injury after the February 22 earthquake. He was helping with the retrieval of bodies from the collapsed CTV building when he slipped on some concrete. His sore knee was not top of mind at the time, but later he realised it was a bit buggered. Following surgery, he was still able to do the PCT, but a further op on the knee in 2016 meant he couldn t pass the test. With retirement age looming, he decided the time was coming to devote more energy to his lifestyle block at Swannanoa where he and Claire run a few cattle, and to help his extended family on farms in Hurunui. Along with his workplace assessor role, Dave was also the Early Intervention lead for Canterbury a perfect fit for him. I m passionate about the rights of rural staff, some of whom I know are leaving because they are burnt out, not well looked after and working long hours with no safeguards in terms of trauma. As one who knows how wrong things can go, his advice is: Don t be afraid to ask for help if you feel you are not coping. Talk to someone, seek advice and always strive for a good work-life balance. As his own scales tip into retirement, he s more than ready. I m lucky, lucky to have support from Claire, and a passion for scuba diving, boating and travelling. ELLEN BROOK Dave in 1976 when he was posted to his home town of Blenheim. Insurer expands The AIA insurance company, which underwrites all Police Welfare Fund insurance products, has bought the insurance operations of CBA (Commercial Bank of Australia) for $3.8 million. The deal includes Sovereign Insurance, one of the largest life insurers in New Zealand. The new arrangements will take at least 12 months to become effective, but Police Welfare Fund manager Pete Hayes said there would be little, if any, effect on life insurances products and services provided to our members. That takes the biscuit A London Metropolitan police officer has been on restricted duties for more than a year after being accused of stealing biscuits from a colleague. Police Oracle reported last month that the officer was said to have handed out the biscuits to colleagues after finding an open packet on a desk at the end of a busy night shift. That led to an accusation of theft and he was put on light duties when the Professional Standards Department was called in to investigate. The length of time being taken has highlighted delays in internal investigations at the Met, although the outcome of the biscuit probe is expected soon. BOOK WINNERS The winners of last month s book giveaway, Fatal Mistake, by Karen M Davis (Simon & Shuster, pb) are ROZ CAMPBELL and MIKE CRAIG. Your books will be posted to you. OCTOBER

12 POLICE HOME LOAN PACKAGE NEWS The housing market Temporary dip or new normal? From flat out to flat-lining, there s no doubt the housing market has cooled down over the past few months. In the latest issue of ANZ Property Focus, our economists note that key indicators such as house price growth and sales volumes have fallen to their lowest levels for some years, while the number of days to sell is below the historical average. In other words, fewer homes are being sold, they re taking longer to sell and price growth has slowed considerably. House prices have fallen in Auckland in the past six months. New home lending is also down, mirroring the decline in the value of housing turnover. Is this trend likely to continue or is it just a blip on the radar for the housing market? There s still strong demand for houses immigration is still at near record levels and our economists expect it to remain strong for some time. Normal population growth and a deficit of new homes being built continue to prop up the demand side of the equation. Balanced against that are a range of issues, including affordability (on average, house prices are now six times annual incomes and more than nine times in Auckland), anxiety about potential increases in mortgage rates and the impact of LVR restrictions and bank lending policies on the availability home finance. Some election-related uncertainty may also have weighed in. Our economists expect these issues to keep the housing market subdued for some time yet, barring unforeseen events. In today s world, though, things can change rapidly. If you re involved in the industry, keeping up with the play is vital. You can check out expert insights and commentary on the latest developments in the housing market in ANZ Property Focus. Check out our website for the latest issue, or have it delivered to your inbox every month our economics team at to subscribe. To find out more about the ANZ Police Home Loan Package for Police Welfare Fund members, contact us on or visit your nearest branch. Lending criteria, terms, conditions and fees apply. This material is for information purposes only. Its content is intended to be of a general nature, does not take into account your financial situation or goals, and is not a personalised financial adviser service under the Financial Advisers Act It is recommended you seek advice from a financial adviser which takes into account your individual circumstances before you acquire a financial product. If you would like to speak to an ANZ Authorised Financial Adviser, please call Special offer Six months free home insurance Buying a new home or refinancing can be an expensive process. We aim to make it easier on Police Welfare Fund members pockets. Draw down a new Police Home Loan and be eligible for six months free home insurance through the Welfare Fund s Police Fire & General Insurance*. Members eligible for the free cover should contact our Member Services team on You will need a copy of your loan document from ANZ. For more information or to apply for the Police Home Loan Package visit *Police Fire & General Insurance will be subject to the standard underwriting terms and conditions and is provided through the Police Welfare Fund, not ANZ. Members are eligible for one period of six months free Police Fire & General Home Insurance premium only, per member, regardless of the term of Police Home Loan taken. Police Fire & General Insurance is underwritten by Lumley General Insurance (NZ) Limited. 12 OCTOBER 2017

13 FLASHBACK Humble reminder of officer s sacrifice If Sergeant William Cooper had not crossed paths with Stanley Graham in 1941, he may well have lived out the rest of his days peacefully, his name and achievements unknown to the rest of the world. And his Police Long Service and Good Conduct medal would be of little consequence to anyone other than his descendants. But fate put the West Coast police officer and three of his colleagues in the line of deadly fire when Graham, an angry and mentally unstable man, began a murderous quest at Kowhitirangi, near Hokitika, on October 8, He killed four police officers, an agricultural instructor and two home guardsmen who had been drawn into the fray, which led to a two-week manhunt that has become infamous in New Zealand s history. Up until that year, there had been only seven police officers slain on duty in New Zealand since William Cooper was the first to die that day. He was 44 and an experienced officer, having joined Police in 1919 at the age of 22 and served at stations throughout the South Island. He was said to have been good natured and good humoured, but a tough character, not to be messed with. Cooper received his Police medal some time before the events of October 8. No doubt it was safely stored at his home, snug in a small box, while its owner was trying to negotiate with Graham, who had been causing trouble in the neighbourhood, to give up his firearms. Graham was in the hallway of his farmhouse, armed with a Mauser. An account of what happened next appeared in Police News, October 2006: As Cooper reached out to take the rifle, Graham fired and the bullet smashed Cooper s right forearm and carried on into his ribs. Graham then shot and killed two other officers at the scene and fatally wounded another who died a few days later. Cooper was in a nightmare situation with his smashed arm and ribs, unable to get his pistol out of his right trouser pocket. His only option was to go for help He got halfway to the front gate when Graham shot him in the back. As he fell to his hands and knees, Graham shot him again with the bullet passing up through his body, this time finishing him. Three more people were to die before Graham, who evaded capture for 12 days, was finally shot and killed by a police bullet. In 2004, a memorial to the murdered men was unveiled at Kowhitirangi. In 2008, William Cooper s medal was put up for sale. There was some concern that this small, but important piece of New Zealand policing history might be lost to an overseas collection, so the Police Association stepped in to buy it. William Cooper s name and those of his slain colleagues were among those read out last month during the annual Police Remembrance Day service at the Police College on September 29. Sergeant William Cooper and his Police Long Service and Good Conduct medal, which has been donated to the Police Museum by the Police Association. The medal has since been kept at the Police Museum on long-term loan, along with other memorabilia from the event, but, due to legal issues of ownership and possible insurance risks, the museum now requires that such items either be returned to their owners or permanently donated. Last month, the Association s Board of Directors approved the latter option, with the understanding that the Association be acknowledged as the donor and that the memories of the tragedy at Kowhitirangi, 76 years ago this month, will be kept alive. OCTOBER

14 SPORT POLICE WINTER GAMES Fun and Winter Games Wellington hands the Challenge rugby cup to Canterbury. Canterbury rugby team Last month more than 630 police competitors converged on Rotorua to compete in the second Police Winter Games, sponsored by the Police Association and organised by Police Sport. Competition was fierce but friendly over nine events, including the Police Association Rugby Tournament Cup, claimed by Canterbury after winning three games against Wellington, Auckland and Bay of Plenty. The Counties Manukau men s team took out the Police Association football tournament and Auckland triumphed over Wellington in the women s division, with Kelly Martin and Dana Hill named players of the tournament for the men and women s divisions. CrossFit was a popular event, with Lisa Franz and Joshua Bremner winning the RX divisions. Rotorua s Redwood Forest was the venue for the mountain biking champs, with Alana Whiteman winning the women s event and Brendan Munster the men s. Team DT01 (made up of Trenton Hoeta, Mason Jenkins and Brendan Munster) completed the course in the best combined time. A new endurance, rogaine-style race through the forest was won by team Ren and Stimpy (Scott Pitkethley and Mark Farrell), 10 points ahead of Norfolk and Chance (David Massey and Mark Enright). Canterbury Black won the netball and Bay of Plenty Cavaliers won the volleyball, both held at the Energy Events Centre. More photos P22 Northland line-out. 14 OCTOBER 2017

15 Sarah Halvorson, winner of the 5.5km crosscountry race. Mountain biking line-up. Lisa Franz, RX female winner. From left, Brooke Lee, Courtney Graham, Rhys Connell, Brendan Munster (1st overall), Mason Jenkins, Andrew Wong Too, Vaughan Smith, Trenton Hoeta (2nd overall). Mountain biking competitors. OCTOBER

16 HEALTH & WELLBEING Welfare benefits and grants The Police Welfare Fund offers a variety of cradle-to-grave benefits and grants which members can take advantage of when times are bad, and when times are good. WELFARE BENEFITS To apply for any of these welfare benefits, you will need to fill out a Benefit Application Form and send it in to us by post or . Log on to our website, go to the Forms and Documents page, then select Welfare Benefits from the drop-down menu. Birth benefit Members who apply for a birth benefit after the birth of their child receive $50 and a Welfare Bear soft toy. The twins benefit is $200 and two Welfare Bears. The benefit for multiple births is on a case by case basis. You can apply for the Birth Benefit up until your child is 12 months old. Adoption benefit The Welfare Fund adoption benefit allows for up to $300 to help towards the legal costs of adopting a child. Hospital TV hire Police Welfare Fund can meet the costs of TV hire if you or any member of your immediate family is admitted to a public hospital. You will need to provide a receipt. Relationship counselling A benefit of $150 is available if you need relationship counselling. Partial cover for counselling through a registered psychiatrist is also available under Basic and Comprehensive Police Health Plan cover. You can claim for the welfare benefit or Police Health Plan cover, but not both. WELFARE GRANTS Contact your field officer or Association chairperson or secretary to apply for these grants or Benevolent benefits From time to time, members hit a bump in the road of life. That s when the Welfare Fund can assist. If you re seriously injured at work or facing financial or emotional hardship, you can apply for a benevolent benefit. For example, if a member has been traumatised and/or received medical attention after an assault on duty, the Welfare Fund can consider making a grant, which may include a combination of cash, petrol vouchers and a Police Welfare Fund Holiday Home accommodation voucher. ACC/Gallagher Bassett Where members have suffered an injury which has later been declined by ACC/ Gallagher Bassett, they can contact the Welfare Fund, which may refer the matter for independent legal advice, particularly if the Health Plan has had to cover the cost of treatment declined by ACC/Gallagher Bassett. View information about welfare benefits and grants on our website at https:// policeassn.org.nz/support/ membership/welfarebenefits-grants Welfare benefits in the past year 151 birth benefits 7 relationship counselling grants $25,000 worth of petrol voucher grants 375 nights of Holiday Home voucher grants 210 benevolent cash grants totalling $44,250 $735 adoption benefits 16 OCTOBER 2017

17 Represent! Your chance to be a health and safety champion. Do you care about the health and safety of your workmates? Do you want to ensure that everyone gets home safe and well at the end of their shift? Are you prepared to raise health and safety issues on behalf of your workmates and to ensure your workgroup has a voice? Are you prepared to work with Police and your district health and safety advisor to find the best solutions for managing health and safety risks? Can you commit to the role of a health and safety representative for at least three years in work time? If the answers are yes, you re in luck, because Police is seeking nominations for workgroup health and safety representatives who will be elected by their colleagues. You can nominate yourself or someone else (ask them first). Find out your workgroup (defined by your geographical location) and who your wellness and safety adviser is by visiting the Association website (policeassn.org.nz/products- services/employment-advice-/- advocacy/health-safety). Health and safety reps can represent only the workgroup they belong to and some areas will require more than one rep. Complete the onepage nomination form, available from our website (see link above) and it to your district wellness and safety adviser. (They will be sending out information that includes the nomination form. You can also send them an requesting the form.) The closing date for nominations is October 31, If there are more nominations than positions available for a workgroup, an election will be held through Outlook. The results will be adjudicated by the wellness and safety adviser, the area commander and a Police Association representative. For more information about the health and safety rep role, visit the Association s website, policeassn.org. nz/products-services/employmentadvice-/-advocacy/health-safety or speak to your area s wellness and safety adviser. ASK YOUR AUNTY... She s firm but fair Hi Aunty Help! I m owed money by Police and they aren t paying! I ve slogged my guts out and passed the Core Policing Knowledge (CPK) exam not bad for an old dog and, under Section of the Collective Employment Agreement, I m entitled to the examination grant, about $1400. I ve asked Police to pay up, but was told they won t until I m fully qualified. Are they trying to pull a swifty on me? Old Dog New Trick Dear Old Dog New Trick Congratulations on passing the CPK. The intention of the examination grant is that it is paid once a member qualifies at a certain rank. Before the current promotions framework, members were paid the grant after passing the CPK and there were no further requirements. Now, however, members get the grant only after they have met further requirements of the framework and qualified at a specific rank. What creates confusion is that the CPK exam happens at the start. A more accurate description of the payment would be a qualifying grant. Police will pay once you ve met all the requirements of the framework. I ll get on to our Industrial Advocate to make sure the CEA wording is updated to more accurately reflect the intent of the clause. Dear Aunty I recently attended a burglary and spoke to three female occupants. I gave them my Police mobile phone number so they could contact me if necessary. Since then, one of them has sent me a few texts, with the last one suggesting we go on a date. She s quite attractive too. What should I do? Tempted Dear Tempted While it obviously is tempting, the answer is no. There is a clear conflict of interest because you met her in your role as a police officer. She is a complainant and the victim of an offence. She might see you as a knight in shining armour, rather than an ordinary human being, so you should never mix your work and your personal life. Politely decline the invitation and let your sergeant know so any communications with her are clear and transparent. your questions for Aunty to OCTOBER

18 NOTEBOOK The Redeemers By Ace Atkins Published by Penguin Random House Reviewed by Angus McLean The Mississippi of Ace Atkins world is a rough country full of hard-core crims, God-fearing townsfolk and tough lawmen. In The Redeemers, the latest in the Quinn Colson series, a safe burglary goes horribly wrong and the repercussions spread across fictional Tibbehah County, with all sides of the law wanting the contents of that safe. Along with close to a million bucks in cash, the safe contained details of widespread corruption, which some very bad people are doing very bad things to keep hidden. Sheriff Colson is serving out his last few days in office after being voted out, but even without a badge, he finds himself neck deep in trouble. His sister Caddy is in and out of rehab, his stuntman father Jason is constantly on the lam, and Colson is trying to balance a new relationship with his childhood sweetheart. Throw in a bunch of redneck villains, a crooked cop and Quinn s best friend, the foul-mouthed deputy with a heart of gold, Lillie Virgil, and you ve got a rip-roaring tale of crime in the deep South that is reminiscent of the Burt Reynolds movies of the 1970s. Quinn is a classic tough-guy lawman; a battle-hardened army ranger born and raised in Tibbehah and with a strong moral compass, but not one that is always within the confines of the law he serves. This book is not for the faint-hearted. If you start it, make sure you set aside a good chunk of time, because you will not want to put it down. Atkins is a bit a legend himself in the crime-writing world. The journalist turned author has written 17 books, including the Quinn Colson novels, the first two of which were nominated for the Edgar Award for Best Novel. He is also the author of the New York Times bestselling novels in the continuation of Robert B Parker s Spenser series. Atkins lives in Oxford, Mississippi. Moriarty By Anthony Horowitz Published by Harper Reviewed by Angus McLean When evil Professor James Moriarty disappeared over the Reichenbach Falls in a deadly tussle with Sherlock Holmes, it left a void at the head of the international underworld. That void is filled by the ruthless Clarence Deveraux, a sadistic master criminal who is as adept at evading the law as he is at taking out his competition and executing genius criminal escapades. Beginning in a Swiss village just days after Holmes and Moriarty s fatal fall, Deveraux is pursued by Pinkerton detective Frederick Chase and Scotland Yard s Inspector Athelney Jones a man who styles himself on the Baker St legend. Full of foot chases, sleight of hand and twists you will never see coming, this is a Holmesian-type tale of Victorian London at its best. Brutal, devious criminals mix with egotistical, brilliant detectives in a captivating mystery that reads as if Conan Doyle himself had written it. Do not expect Holmes to appear, but everything else about the era is there. These are the days before cellphones, the internet or forensics; the days when detectives had to beat the shoe leather and look for clues, talk to people and constantly analyse everything they came across. Prolific author Horowitz had major success with his Sherlock Holmes tale The House of Silk in this 2015 follow-up, he proves worthy of the master himself. Angus McLean is the pen name of an Auckland police officer who also writes and publishes his own series of crime novels. His latest book, The Shadow Dancers, is available on Amazon, Kobo or ibooks. His website is writerangusmclean.com. Every second month, his book reviews will run in Police News. Don t be stranded by the roadside If your vehicle has Full Cover with Police Fire & General Insurance, we provide a professional roadside assistance service free of charge. Any time your car has a breakdown, a flat battery, a flat tyre, or maybe you run out of petrol, or lock the keys in the car, you can call Police Welfare Fund Roadside Assist Plus for help. The beauty of the 24-hour service is that cover is attached to the insured vehicle, not the driver, so it doesn t matter who is driving your car. If they have a problem, the driver can contact the service. This premium service includes a rental vehicle and/ or accommodation if your vehicle breaks down 100 kilometres or more from your home. These are benefits not generally provided by standard roadside support services. A full description of Police Welfare Fund Roadside Assist Plus services is on the Police Fire & General Insurance page of our website: Trailers, caravans and vehicles with third party insurance are excluded from cover. Getting cover is easy Insure your vehicle with Full Cover Police Fire & General Insurance and you re automatically covered. For a quote, see the Insurances sections at for more information. 18 OCTOBER 2017

19 NOTEBOOK Shift work meal allowances There has been some confusion over what shift workers are entitled to claim for meal allowances. Our industrial team outlines the rules. Who is entitled to a shift workers meal allowance? Under Section 4.5 of the Constabulary Collective Employment Agreement, a member is entitled to this allowance if, in addition to their rostered shift, they work more than one hour of continuous additional duty, excluding meal breaks. This continuous additional duty can be either immediately before the rostered shift or immediately after (but not split between the two). What is meant by a rostered shift? For the purposes of the shift workers meal allowance, a rostered shift is defined as one of the following three categories: 1. Any period of duty worked in accordance with an authorised roster; OR 2. Any rostered period of eight hours or more, two hours of which, excluding additional duty, are worked outside the hours 0800 to 1700; OR 3. Any other roster approved by the Commissioner. Members covered by the different categories Categories 1 and 3 cover all members working a roster cycle (any roster introduced by Police) who work additional duty of more than one hour after or before their normal rostered shift. This is regardless of whether the shift worked is an early, day, swing, late or night shift. Category 2 covers members who work Scale A hours of work day shifts from Monday to Friday but who may on occasion work a swing, late or night shift. Members in this category are eligible to claim shift workers meal allowance when they are rostered to work at least two hours outside 0800 to 1700 and they work more than one hour of additional duty. Additional duty must be authorised A member s supervisor must certify that the additional duty arose from qualifying shift work, that the member was required to work additional duty and why the additional duty was necessary. FAQ How do I claim the allowance in MyPolice? A claim for an allowance is treated as an exception under MyPolice. You need to go into your timesheet and record the shift workers meal allowance claim under wage type. I usually work Monday to Friday from 0800 to 1600, however, we have an operation on this week and I am rostered to work 1400 to Will I be entitled to the shift workers meal allowance if I work more than one hour of additional duty? Yes, your shifts would qualify under category 2 because at least two hours of your rostered shift fall outside the hours of 0800 to I usually work Monday to Friday from 0800 to Yesterday, however, I decided to start at 0700 to catch up on some paperwork. I still finished work at Am I entitled to the shift workers meal allowance? No. You work Scale A hours and, therefore, you would need to be rostered to work at least two hours outside the hours of 0800 to 1700 to be eligible. Also, any additional duty worked must be authorised by your supervisor, and justified as necessary, for you to be eligible for the allowance. Do I need to buy a meal during my duty to receive the shift workers meal allowance? No. Unlike the meal expenses for additional duty allowance, outlined in section of the Sworn Agreement, entitlement to the shift workers meal allowance is not dependent on a meal or refreshment being taken in the course of duty. Do I need to provide my supervisor with a receipt for the meal? No. There is no requirement for receipts to be provided. OCTOBER

20 NOTEBOOK BRAIN TEASER 1. How many wings does a honeybee have? 2. What colour moves first in draughts/ checkers? 3. Which word can follow king, hair and nine? 4. How long is 90 Mile Beach? 5. What was Anne Frank s older sister s name? 6. How long is the rest period between rounds of professional boxing? 7. Rakiura is the Maori name for which New Zealand island? 8. What colour is the cross on Switzerland s national flag? 9. In the human body, what does dermal relate to? 10. Which team did the Black Ferns defeat to win the 2017 Women s Rugby World Cup? Answers: 1. Four; 2. Black; 3. Pin; miles/88 kilometres; 5. Margot; seconds; 7. Stewart Island; 8. White; 9. Skin; 10. England. Och aye, laddie! The story forms over two distinct time periods. First, in 1853, a Presbyterian minister from remote southwest Scotland, the Reverend Norman McLeod, founded a settlement in Waipu, New Zealand, with a boatload of fellow Scots. Then, in 2003, brothers Clayton and Geoff Gwynne brought the old post office in Waipu, which housed the Pizza Barn business. To them, it was like finding an old car in need of restoration abandoned in a paddock, and they rebranded and restored the building as time and money allowed. Around they started a range of craft beer, becoming one of the first restaurants to step away from mainstream beverage offerings. They quickly became passionate about everything craft beer offered, and in 2012 pushed the go button on an on-site brewery, commissioned in October Paying homage to the original founder of Waipu, and to complete the story, they named the brand McLeod s. Under the stewardship of former Renaissance and 8-Wired brewer Jason Bathgate, McLeod s has gone from strength to strength and now offers seven core brews along with a variety of seasonal releases. HEATHEN ORDINARY BITTER 3.8% The pour is a light copper colour with a noticeable aroma of citrus; almost IPAesque. These hoppy notes are backed by the malty, hoppy flavours. The hops do not dominate, but lend the bitterness expected of a beer in this genre a good old Kiwi spin on a classic English bitter. Would I shout a mate one? At a low alcohol by volume (ABV) of 3.8 per cent, this is a very sessionable beer, so yes. More than one in fact, because this low ABV beer tastes a whole lot better than some of its much bigger cousins. PIONEER BROWN PORTER 5.2% dark black pour, reminiscent A of cola, complete with a brown creamy head. Subtle aromas of chocolate emanate, as do notes of coffee. Quite light (both in ABV and mouthfeel) as far as porters go, but not unpleasantly so. The medium body with nutty flavours puts this porter more on the dark brown ale side of the ledger than the stout side. Would I shout a mate one? If he was a mad stout/porter fan, he might be disappointed, but only because it s different from what he d expect. Forgetting about where it should fit, this beer tastes good, and satisfies my nondiscriminatory palate. RECOMMENDED Northland Summer Chili Pils with Kaitaia Fire 5.2%: A pilsner with a pale straw pour and a surprisingly lacy, foamy head. Maybe my glass was warm. As is the finish on this refreshingly dry and drinkable drop. Billycan Milk Stout 5.5%: Looks like a typical stout and smells like one chocolate, vanilla, coffee and tastes like a good stout should, with a big mouthfeel and mild, balanced bitterness. One to look out for. AVAILABILITY At the brewery McLeod s Pizza Barn, 2 Cove Rd, Waipu. Widely available at liquor outlets, selected cafes/bars, and supermarkets from Invercargill in the south to Taipa Bay in the north. Online: Some specialty online retailers. Web: mcleodsbrewery.co.nz Stu Hunter is a detective sergeant based in Auckland who enjoys brewing and sampling craft beers. 20 OCTOBER 2017

21 Under-$20 wine challenge The annual rugby championship among Argentina, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa finishes this month. If New Zealand s dominance in this year s Super Rugby competition is anything to go by, the All Blacks will be hard to beat. Wine production is something all four countries take great pride in as well. Sauvignon blanc from New Zealand, shiraz from Australia, pinotage from South Africa and malbec from Argentina are all benchmark wines, while each country produces great examples of other classic wine varieties as well. New Zealand continues to grow, from strength to strength, in the wine-production industry. Our reputation for world-class pinot noir is a good example. However, if this selection of under-$20 wines was a wine competition, for me it d be Argentina that just comes out on top. PONGRACZ NON-VINTAGE BRUT (SOUTH AFRICA) $16 78 points Excellent South Africa has built a longstanding reputation for its bubbly wines. This one oozes life and flavour with lively mousse, fine bead and yeastiness, along with green apple and biscuity notes. There s excellent balance and persistence here, with a lovely dry finish. You ll find this on the bottom shelf of Countdown s array of sparkling wines BROWN BROTHERS LEXIA (AUSTRALIA) $14 75 points Very Good The little-known grape variety muscat of Alexandria, grown in the Murray Valley in Victoria, is the core of this medium-sweet wine. There are nuances of musk, spice and tropical fruits on the nose and palate. While there s a reasonable splash of sugar remaining, it s light, crisp and fresh, and, being low in alcohol, makes an ideal daytime option. This goes out the door quickly when on special at Countdown SACRED HILL MARLBOROUGH PINOT NOIR (NEW ZEALAND) $17 77 points Excellent Red fruits and beetroot, tilled earth and some lead pencil show on the nose here. Those red fruits carry on to the palate, joined by woody oak and spice. It s a slow starter, but fattens up with time, building in texture, length and interest. For me, it s the silky finish that makes it stand out from the crowd in this pinot noir price range. Great bang for your buck TRIVENTO RESERVE MALBEC (ARGENTINA) $16 82 points Excellent Subtle liqueur fruits on the nose here. Flavour-wise, its intense dark fruits, fresh herbs and subtle earthiness work well together. Balance is the key with the acids, tannins and alcohol all working in sync. Its well-structured mouthfeel suggests you can store this away for a few years with confidence. Pair this with a big, juicy rib-eye steak and you won t be disappointed. Crowned Best Argentinean Malbec in the 2016 Decanter World Wine Awards. Summer Special at Plaza hotels Come to Wellington over the holiday period and take advantage of the great accommodation rates we have negotiated for our members. The West Plaza Hotel and the Bay Plaza Hotel have once again offered their Special Summer room rates to members of the New Zealand Police Association and Welfare Fund, from December 22, 2017, to January 31, West Plaza Hotel $105 per room, per night, queen room or twin share. Bay Plaza Hotel $95 per room, per night, queen room or twin share. Booking reference: Police Summer Special. You will need to show your Association membership card when checking in. All rates are GST inclusive. Conditions: All rooms requested are subject to availability. Reservations must be made before arrival. The advertised rate is not available outside the valid dates. For reservations contact: 110 Wakefield Street, Wellington Freephone: Phone: Oriental Parade, Wellington Freephone: Phone: OCTOBER

22 SPORT Sports Diary To contact Police Sport, Dave Gallagher at POLICE WINTER GAMES Women s football teams; winners Auckland (left) and Wellington NZPA Golf Championships When: November 5-7, 2017 Where: Pleasant Point Golf Club Contact: Mark Sewell, 2017 North Island Police Touch Tournament When: November 17, 2017 Where: Kaierau Rugby Club, Whanganui Contact: Karl Pascoe, 2017 NZPA South Island Police Touch Tournament When: November 26, 2017, 9.30am Where: Woodend RFC Contact: Tony Maw, or Note: Entry fee $200 per team, close November 5 Richard Purvis, 2nd place Mens RX NZPA Hockey Tournament When: March 1-2, 2018 Where: Nunweek Park, Christchurch Contact: Joshua Clauson, 2018 NZDF Inter-services Softball Tournament When: March 13-15, 2018 Where: Linton Army Camp, Palmerston North Contact: Joshua Clauson, Note: your softball CV including position, grade and teams by November 1, 2017, to (men) Brendon Smith, or (women) Jo Wigman, govt.nz 2018 Western Bay of Plenty Fishing Competition When: April 9-11, 2018 Where: Tauranga Sports Fishing Club, Sulphur Point, Tauranga Contact: Rob Everitt, Note: Briefing held on Sunday, April 8 Courtney Graham of New Plymouth. CrossFit competitors. Cross-country competitors post-race at Blue Lake. 22 OCTOBER 2017

23 SPORT Turoa turns it on The sun was out for the full two days of this year s Police Association Ski and Snowboard Championships at the Turoa ski field (August 28-29), providing ideal conditions for the 25 competitors. Day 1 started with a giant slalom event, which proved challenging due to a slightly glossy surface. Some old stalwarts came through to take out their various categories, and a couple of lads new to the event Karl Harrison and Andre Kavanagh posted very competitive times. Contestants were breaking out the sunblock again on Day 2 when a friendlier course was set up. Although it was only necessary to complete two runs to get a combined time for placings, competitors returned for extra runs just for the fun of it. This competition is ideal for anyone with an intermediate or above skiing or boarding ability. You don t have to have raced before and it s all about having fun and getting to know others from around the country. Overall winners Men s skiing Mark Farrell Women s skiing Kate Smith Men s boarding Garry Learmonth Women s boarding Lisa Hogan OCTOBER

24 NOTEBOOK Holiday home Hot Spot The heart of the North Island Situated on the edge of the country s largest lake, Taupo has spectacular scenery and geothermal areas that attract tourists all year round. It s also a hub for outdoor sports and events such as the Ironman in March, the Great Lake Half Marathon in August, the Taupo Road and Custom Club Snow Run in October and the Annual Great Lake Cycle Challenge in November. Other activities include soaking in the thermal pools, rafting, four-wheel driving, hunting and fishing, horse riding, golf, tramping and jet boating on the Huka River. Refurbishment of the Police Association s new Taupo lakefront units, Blueline Apartments, has recently been completed and they are now available for booking. There are seven units in the lakefront complex ($70 a night), two of which sleep up to eight people. Three sleep up to five people and the remaining two can accommodate three people. Each unit has a balcony with an outdoor table and chairs. Inside, they all have a TV, wifi, heat pump, pillows, blankets, shower, cook top, oven, microwave, fridge/freezer, dining table and chairs, couches, iron, ironing board and washer/ dryer. A port-a-cot and high chair are available from reception. For $40 extra per stay, linen, towels and cleaning will be provided. There are dates available at this holiday destination and others around the country. Visit or call us on Stayed at one of the new Police Association holiday apartments in Taupo last night. 10 out of 10. Well done, just brilliant. Thanks NZPA. from NZPA s Facebook page 24 OCTOBER 2017

25 LETTERS Letters to the editor must include the writer s full name, address and telephone number, and may be edited for purposes of clarity and space. or write to Editor, PO Box 12344, Wellington I love Auckland keep hearing how much better off I ll I be if I leave for the regions. My wife and I have looked seriously at New Plymouth and Whangarei, but no matter how much sense it makes financially, the cost of leaving friends and family behind seems to outweigh those benefits. I have generations of family history in Auckland and, aside from that, I genuinely love Auckland. It seems a shame there isn t a better solution. A metropolitan allowance doesn t have to be cold hard cash. Could we get creative? Maybe an extension of the contract with BP and hand out petrol vouchers? Unfortunately, I am one of those shameful Aucklanders who failed to show up for my local Association meetings until now! The last Police News issue challenged me to take the situation seriously. Many cities around the world have established a working system that provides fair pay to cops living in metropolitan cities. I have no doubt that, in each case, the local union/association had a big part to play in those negotiations. So, come on, fellow Jafas, fight the good fight and get along to your next Association meeting. Teachers, nurses, social workers and government employees are facing the same issue, so surely we can come up with something together? Considering I am blinded by the greatness of my own city, I am keen to hear points of view from around the regions on the topic. Would it be fair? Is it in line with our values? Or should Jafas just take a concrete milkshake? SCOTTIE SHERER Waitemata Waitemata appointments It was disappointing to see Waitemata District unfairly criticised in a letter, Something strange (Police News, September 2017), alleging that the district only fills vacancies from within. This is far from correct. In the past three or four months, of up to 12 Waitemata vacancies advertised nationally, at least six people have been appointed (or recommended) from outside the district, I am one of those shameful Aucklanders who failed to show up for my local Association meetings until now! including a general duties sergeant, a detective sergeant, a detective senior sergeant, two general duties inspectors and a detective inspector. So, in this time period alone, about 50 per cent of the district s advertised sworn vacancies have been filled by applicants from other districts. That is a healthy ratio. I am one of those recent outside appointments, and can advise you that Waitemata is an awesome place to work. There is a very strong will across leaders in the district to look after our people, including running a completely fair and transparent vacancy process in which people are appointed on merit. I invite aspiring leaders, at all levels, to apply for any advertised roles in Waitemata. You will be treated with respect, fairness and professionalism. ANDY KING District prevention manager Waitemata Misunderstanding diversity The letter True culture of Police (Police News, August 2017) seems to wilfully misunderstand the Police value of valuing diversity. Anyone with a passing interest in understanding Police values need only look at the Police website to understand that diversity is concerned with acknowledging that Police can better achieve its purpose if the organisation consists of a diverse group of people who ve had varied experiences and who bring their diverse perspectives to the job many views achieving one shared purpose. Historically, New Zealand Police was a homogenous organisation made up, overwhelmingly, of white men who were, not surprisingly, skilled at policing in a way that took account of the experiences of white men. They were not skilled, however, at identifying and considering how their policing might most effectively and ethically respond to the lives of women and people of other ethnicities, including Maori. This has had real effects on real people. Has the letter writer ever spoken to victims of domestic violence or sexual offences about their experiences with police? Or spent time reading about the dysfunctional police culture that Louise Nicholas so bravely shone a spotlight on? Or spoken to Pacific Islanders about their experiences with police as new immigrants and during the dawn raids? It s not enough to say I ll respect people who I consider have contributed sufficiently to earn my respect. Valuing diversity requires us to park our prejudices and egos at the door and accept that there are significant limitations to our individual knowledge and skills. If we are going to police our community effectively and ethically, we need to work with people who are different from us and who may present alternative solutions that we may not recognise as being better than ours, but which often will be. Identifying diversity as a core value sends a clear message that Police is committed to transforming our organisation to better serve the whole community, not just a privileged few, and to leaving behind dated attitudes that have not served our community well. The value of empathy also requires that we all try to move beyond our own experiences, to understand the experiences of others. It doesn t require that you celebrate the illegal behaviour of an offender, but if you at least attempt to imagine yourself in the shoes of the person you are dealing with victim, witness, offender or concerned citizen you are more likely to deal with them in a way that connects with that person while achieving your purpose. At the very least, you re less likely to damage the reputation of Police by not treating them in a thoughtless way that causes distress or offence. The letter writer needs to broaden his or her horizons or risk being left behind, a relic of the bad old days. SARAH McKENZIE Island Bay OCTOBER

26 LETTERS In the words of Kipling That was an interesting letter (Police News, September) headed Unless it s on your hip, you re unarmed. At my young age of 78, I still remember, 23-odd years ago, entering an address unarmed, on a covert warrant, with my senior sergeant, Mal Ward, and discovering a firearm, a.38 revolver. Later, Mal asked the OC, a senior commissioned officer detective, why we weren t advised about the firearm during the brief. The answer was, If I d told you that, you might not have done the job. Evidently these days, operational staff are perpetually between a rock and a hard place so eloquently put by Rudyard Kipling in his poem The Ballad of East and West: There is rock to the left, and rock to the right, and low lean thorn between/ And ye may hear a breech-bolt snick where never a man is seen. GARY LEWIS Lower Hutt PCT wall tap offends Last week I was lucky enough to complete my PCT in the time specified without injury or any issues. What disappointed me was watching a senior sergeant doing the test. When it came to the wall, he got to tap it and carry on (and probably got well under his time). I was mystified as to why this is allowed to be shown as a completed PCT. Considering there is a considerable amount of money paid out for passing the PCT, where is the integrity that is one of our core values? How many other officers get to tap out and get paid? Where is the trust and confidence of fellow officers when this is allowed? This officer is a Level 1 responder. What would happen if I, or a colleague, were injured going over a fence? Tapping the fence isn t going to cut it. If you can t complete the test, you should not get paid and put others at risk. NAME WITHHELD Industrial advocate Greg Fleming responds: Good work on your PCT pass. Regarding the wall touch, this was introduced several years ago by Police in response to injury/ safety concerns for older members. Any member, irrespective of rank, has the option of a wall-touch once they reach 50 years of age. Although it might be argued that this is inconsistent with the SWiFT response In last month s Police News, Iam Keen suggested there might be quality control issues with the SWiFT (specialised workforce integrated form transfer) process. We, the SWiFT team, read this with a degree of sadness, because it appears some staff may be confused, or misinformed, about SWiFT and the processes that support it. For a start, SWiFT and Winscribe are completely separate, have no overlap, and should not be confused with each other. The objectives of SWiFT are to improve quality, accuracy and expediency, enhancing the responsiveness of sworn officers to better serve the needs of stakeholders (victims and victim advisers), and to save operating costs. SWiFT was created in the Bay of Plenty District in 2013 by me (a constable) and Senior Sergeant Wayne Lambert to free up sworn staff to get out and do their job. It evolved with the help of many people, from commissioned officers to new graduates and Police employees. It was designed as a start to end product to allow BOP District to take the preparation of prosecution files away from sworn staff and have them done in time for court proceedings. Since its implementation in February 2013, it has proved successful. One limitation is that it does not interface with design of the PCT, it was a decision the Association supported from a practical perspective. A PCT pass is a pass; there is no extra reward for completing it faster than necessary and risking injury in the process. In terms of having the physical competencies for frontline duties, the key issue is that the PCT is only an indicator of a member s ability to perform his or her duties. A PCT failure does not automatically trigger the end of a member s career, even after a suitable remedial period. The Policing Act 2008 requires a separate assessment by the Commissioner that he or she is satisfied that the employee is incapable of performing competently his or her duties and any other duties that may reasonably be required of the employee from time to time. NIA (except copy/paste) or Mobility. Like all programmes, to be effective, processes need to be followed. Supervisors must ensure the SWiFT file is correct before it proceeds to a file management centre, or equivalent, for a charge entry and file creation that ultimately ends up with the Police Prosecution Service. On that issue, Iam Keen raised a valid point and, for the benefits of SWiFT to be realised, we too strongly urge supervisors to follow the advised process. SWiFT has been officially deemed an interim product by Police. It has been implemented by four districts and the Commercial Vehicle Safety Team. We hope that one day a product will deliver all SWiFT does and more. SWiFT, which will celebrate its fifth anniversary in February, was created and is managed in our own time, on a home computer, at a very reasonable cost to Police of zero dollars. The BOP District alone generates SWiFT files per month; ,000 a year. Te Puke CIB recently completed a file with 35 charges and 15 victims, including CSV1 letters ed to the court, preparation of the victim impact statement, charge wording, etc, in about two hours. We want to put officers in cars and on the road, just like you. IAN SADLER, WAYNE LAMBERT Bay of Plenty REUNIONS Former MOT Traffic Officer Reunion April 13-15, 2018, Invercargill. All former traffic officers from the Ministry of Transport and local authorities nationwide are invited. Contact Trevor Buchanan, com, for a registration form. South Auckland Police Reunion April 27-28, 2018, Papakura RSA. Registration fee $10; Friday night meet and greet $10; Saturday night dinner $45. Payment must be made by March 30, 2018, to South Auckland Police Reunion Account, (use your initials as reference or, if serving, your QID). 26 OCTOBER 2017

27 JB got there first As first president of the Police Association, Bill Murray, elected in 1936, holds a special place in the history of the organisation. An award in his name is given to individuals to recognise exceptional work done on behalf of the Association. This year, the Bill Murray Award was presented to retired police officer and Association stalwart Ron Richardson. It was another redoubtable member, retired police officer and historian Sherwood Young, who spotted an error in the Bill Murray notes that accompanied a feature on Ron in last month s Police News. Sherwood pointed out that although Murray had been a spokesman representing police delegates to Police Minister Peter Fraser in 1936, it had not been to seek permission to set up a police association, as reported. That task had already been undertaken by another Association legend, John Bruce (JB) Young, a few months earlier, in August of that year. Sherwood should know, of course, as he is Young s grandson and a police historian. He writes: In 1936, Chief Detective John Bruce Young was stationed at Dunedin. He led the deputation in August and after that initial meeting, returned to Dunedin. Wellingtonbased detective Bill Murray was elected as the first president as there was no way Young could do the job from Dunedin. Murray and Young were friends and had full confidence in each other. Bill Murray (top) and JB Young, the first and second presidents of the Association. When Young transferred to Wellington in 1938, Murray very quickly stood down after his two years in office and Young become the second president. Young had previously been a member of the first, short-lived Police Association, launched in Auckland in April 1913, and later served as Auckland secretary of the police branch of the Public Service Association. Under Association rules, he had to resign as president in April 1943 when he was promoted to sub-inspector. He became commissioner in Sherwood adds: It has been a matter of family pride to have been descendants of JB Young who was a member of the banned union in Auckland in 1913, who went on to lead the first delegation, who established Jack Meltzer [Association general secretary ] as such an important figure and went on to become the only former president to become commissioner. Huge expectations faced him with a new government in 1950, which put him through the 1951 industrial dispute and imposed [police minister] Fortune and [assistant commissioner] Compton on him, and these all combined to make him the only commissioner to die in office. He gave his all to the cause and got no time in retirement as a consequence. Really sad. I always honour him at Police Remembrance Day for his efforts. Not quite slain on duty, but you can make the inference. MURRAY, Alister James 30 Aug 17 Retired Dunedin DAVIES, Brian Ross 6 Sep 17 Retired Lower Hutt CLAGUE-CHRISTIAN, Fletcher 10 Sep 17 Retired Auckland NELSON, Anna 12 Sep 17 Spouse Dunedin HOLLEY, Noreen 12 Sep 17 Widow Temuka TAYLOR, Gail Noelle 14 Sep 17 Former partner Tauranga KINGDON-MASON, Robyn Dawn 15 Sep 17 Partner Auckland Contacts New Zealand Police Association Phone Freephone Police Health Plan For benefit information and claim forms, visit our website, Police Fire & General Insurance Online quotes and information see Insurances at or call or Claims Police Home Loans Police and Families Credit Union Freephone GSF information PSS information Field Officers Waitemata and Northland Districts Steve Hawkins Auckland City District Natalie Fraser Counties Manukau District Stewart Mills Waikato and BOP Districts Graeme McKay Eastern and Central Districts Kerry Ansell PNHQ, RNZPC and Wellington District Ron Lek Tasman and Canterbury Districts Catherine McEvedy Southern District Brian Ballantyne Vice-President Craig Tickelpenny Region Directors Region One Waitemata and Northland Districts Murray Fenton Region Two Auckland and Counties Manukau Districts Emiel Logan Region Three Waikato and Bay of Plenty Districts Scott Thompson Region Four Eastern and Central Districts Paul Ormerod Region Five PNHQ, RNZPC and Wellington District Pat Thomas Region Six Tasman and Canterbury Districts Mike McRandle Region Seven Southern District Mike Thomas Assaults on police The Police Association keeps track of assaults on police, injuries to members and firearms incidents. This helps us provide assistance and keep a record of these events. If you have been assaulted or injured while on duty, or involved in a firearms incident, notify your committee rep, who will the details to For urgent industrial and legal advice ring 0800 TEN NINE ( ) 24 hour/ seven days service OCTOBER

28 Got new goodies? Make sure they are insured More than 6000 members protect their home, vehicle, contents and pleasure craft with Police Fire & General Insurance. We offer: Great value cover and hassle-free sign-up. A free premium AA roadside assistance service with Full Cover vehicle insurance. No bank charges or administration fees for fortnightly payments. Discounts if you package your insurance together. Getting a quote or information is easy For a quote online, log in and visit the Insurances section of our website: or talk to our Member Services team , 8am-5.30pm, Monday to Friday.

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