MADISON.AREA TECHNICAL COLLEGE CATALOG

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2 MADSON.AREA ~ TECHNCAL COLLEGE CATALOG. POST :SECONDARY PROGRAMS For Further nformation, write: MATC Student Services 550 Anderson St. Madison, W 570 Or phone: (608} 6-MATC MATC reserves the right to make changes in the regulations and courses announced in this catalog without further notice.

3 -- --o o -.. -Conlents Table of Contents WhyMATC? Why MATC?- Why MATC? Philosophy and Mission ~ functions end Coals Accreditation Memberships Community nvolvement : Historic Mllcstones Student lnformouon- Polldes/Proccdures Admissions Scholastic Policies... lo Academic Probst ion ond Dlsmlssnl Fees and Residency..., General Policies of the College Student lnformatlon- Scrviccs/Aclivltlcs..., i Counseling Financial Aid...,......,,.,... Student Resources....., ,. 5 Student Activities , o 6 Clubs and Student Organi<alions Music...,..,.,...,,.,., ,... 0 Athletics li'ducalionnl Services... Types of Degrees Other Services, Apprenticeship Altcmnlivc Learning Program> of Study Agribusin.,;s Apprenticeship Business General Studies Grnphic Arts Health Occupulions Home Economics ndustrial Foods Murketing , Public Safely ,..., 9 Trade and ndustry Course Dcscrlpt!vns,.,,.,,.,.,.. o,,,.. 11 Numerical C9nrsc Guide..., ,. o, 107 Organizational Structure,,,,,.,,,,,, Fncilities-Madison and Area.....,., Governing Board ,.., Stnf( and Fnculty....,...,, , Alphabetlwl ndex l 9S PHLOSOPHY AND GOALS ACCREDTATON MEMSERSHPS COMMUNTY JNVOLVBMENT. '!:.,_ 1: -:

4 Why MATC? WhyMATC?-5 PHLOSOPHY AND MSSON Madison Area Technical College $ dedlcalt'<l to the policy that the most precious resources of the n~ lion reside in the many and varied abilities of its citizens. The college, therefore, endeavors to provide broad educallonal opportunities to all d tiens of the district. The primary function of the college is to give substance to the ideal o( equai educational op portunity for all citizens. Titus, a liberal admissions policy is an essential pmr1 of its operating philosophy. The mission of Madison Area Tt!ebnical College is to provide the following educational services: () Technical, vocational and semi professional programs designed to prepare students for employment upon.completion of such programs; () Continuing education deslsnec! to provide an expandfng opp.ort unity for vocational growth and development, with programs to upgrade and retrain employed persons according to long-term employ.ment opportunities and tteeds in ndustry, agriculture and business; () Transfer courses designed to provide lower division and prc-prof<ssional programs which prepare students for entry into tlie four-year institutions of their choice; () Gulclance and counseling services to assist both youth and adulls to fit themselves better into an ncreasingly complex technological society; 15) Cultural programs and services designed to enrich the life of the community and its citizoens. Function5 and GoB/s To carry out its philasopby, the college offers educational opportunities for all high school graduates in its service area. ts presence encouro.ges the enrollment of young people who might otherwise terminate their educations at the end o( high school. With its strongly individualized pproacb to education and personal guidance, the college gives these students the opportunity to d etermine their vocational DC' prpftsslonal objectives nnd to seek further edllcl\tion to gain their obj~ctives. To aid these 'tud nt~. the faculty works to: flj Help ~tudcnts understand themselves an<l those!ltooti thein and to unde.rstnnd.democ.ratic processes:.... () Prepare ~!udents to take part in the eco(\omlc life of the community;. () Develop students' aelf relianc:e by encouraging lhein to think critically in aolving problems; () Encourage students to tak.e part in some creative aclivlty and to appreciate the creativity of others (5! Help student~ develop sense of social r~spo n tlbility and: an increased understanding of the socioeconomk: problems cbnfronting our nation and the world; (6) Teach studetlts an awareness of!he.contrlbu Uons afforded by other deas, races and rellglons, Accl"ffdit.tlon Madison Area Technical College is accredited by (accreditation.uso includes the campuses at Fort Atkinwn,. Portage, Reedsburg and Watertown); Wisconsin Boand of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education North Central Association of Colleges and Schools National League for Nursing Wisconsin State Board of Nursing Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental A$sociation Am erican Association of Medical Assistants American Dietetic Association Council on Medical Education of!he.american Medical Association. American Occupatlonal Therapy Asso;;ialion ;. American S,oclety of Clinical Pathol9glsts American Society of Medical Technologists American Veterinilry Medkal As~ocfatlon National Shorthand Reporters AssOciation Wisconsin Department of Healtl'i and Social Services Barbering Division ' State of Wisconsin BdlK:ational Approvl!l Board )for tl\e education of veterans and war orphans) MembershiP. Madison Area Technical Colleg~ holds.mem,berships in: Adrninistrati~e Management Society American Association of Accountants American Association of Collegiate :Registrars and Admissions Officers American Association of COmmunity arid Juni9c Colleges. American Education Assoclatlo.n. American Tecllnlcal Education Association American Vocational AssOciation.. Association of Bducatlooal Com.mlinica!ions and Technology Association for Supervision and CUrriculum Development :Council o North Central Community 1unior Colleges. Ct>uncll on Hotel, Rc taurant and nstitutional Education Midwest College Art Conference National As.loclalion of Public School Adult Education National Council of Local Administrators of Vocational, Technical <lnd Adult Education.National League for Nursing Council of AssOciate Degree Programs, and Council of Practical Nursing Programs National Society for Study of Education North Central Asaociatlon of College.o and Schools Wisconsin Association of Collegiate Registmrs and Adml!!ions Offlccr Wisconsin Association of Schools and College Admwions Counselors Wisconsin Educational Media Association Wisconsin Vocotiona.l Assodation Wisconsin Education A~ lation Community lni'onemem-economlc DenJopment MATC's Planning a nd Bconomic ljevelopment offlee a&slsts n the delivery of instructional support services in the areas of research, planning and economic development, and submits projects to ob lain federal, slate and/or local funds to s upport district programs and services that will help individuals, communities and industries to improve productiv!ty by having access to a pool of skilled workers. The activities include: Res"l!rch to assess the needs of business, in dustry (employers) and the community for programs and services that District should provide; Working with 'comn\unities to enhance economic growih in the area; Asllisting employers by developing tailored train ing programs and services that are ''employer specific;" Providlnz assistance to local firms to help them solve their technical problems; Conducting surveys to re eiltch the changing n~eds of business and industry, and developing programs and servi.ccs to cope with tech nological changes; Providing boule skill programs and developing tailored basic sku! ndustry programs to help those already employed to improve job stability and up ward mobility. Community lnvolllement-outlwch SetVcel The primary focus of MATe's Outreach Services office is on adult continuing education beyond traditional cour5cs S&Ociated with formal clas!ll'oom C tlvltiea. By cooperating with indu try and buslness, public and private agencies, communi!)' groups and other institutions of learning, MATC is able to spon sor and develop a wide variety of institutes, seminars ond workshops. Objectives and goals reflect the desires and concerns bf the population served. Need assessments and other research activities are carried out periodically to determine new offerings and to eva l~o~ate on-going ones. The Outreach Services office se ks and welcomes cobtacts, requests, lnq'uirles and suggestions in lts effort to expand a nd become more effective in lts offerings in the adult continuing education area. A number of adult and continuing education offerings wiu be of fered as part o( the Weekend CoRege Program that will begin operation n the fall of The (ollowing are some eumples of programs of fered through the O~o~treach Services office: Tax Workshops Sltill Upgrading Workshops-use of modern data processing systems, auto mechanics, human relations, etc. (Available on job site or at MAT C) Business Management/Supervision workshops Development of Training Packages and Manuals Small Business Workshops-qllality control, statistical control, etc. Workshops for Properly Assesso" and Municipal Clerlu Workshops for Secretaries and Office Peraonnel Seminars for Owners and Managers of Apart ment Buildings Workshops of General Public nterest-home buying, home management, fitness, career planning, parenting, nutrition, etc. Hlslorlc M/leslones 191: School of ndustrial Education Opens. 1917: Becomes School of Vpcational Education. 197: Becomes School of Vocational and Adult Education. 1961: School ia aut~ to grant Associate in Applied Science degree. Becomes Madison Vocational, Technical sod Adult School. 1966: Sc.hool is autbotized to offer collegiate transfer courses. Acoepted as a candidale for. membership in the North Central Association of col legea and Schools. 1967: District enlarged to include apptoxltnately four counties-the Area, Vocational, Tecbni.:.l and.adult Education, District Jl!o : Becomes Madison Area Technlcal College. 1969: Madison Area Technical College ia accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. 197: Atlts meeting on July 0, 197, the North Central AS$0clatlon or Colleges and Schools voted to continue the accreditation of Mlldlson Area. Technical College for a period of ten years. 197: On November 5, 197, the v.oters or Area Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, :Qistrict No. approved a referendum in the arnount of $0 miuion to help finance construction of a new cam-. pus foc' Madi&On Area Technical College and satellite facilities in Fort Atkinson, Watertown, Reedsburg and Portage : Dedication of new facilities for MadlaOn Area. Technical College satellit e schools in Fort Atkinson and Watertown : Dedication of new f<!cililies for Madison Area Technical College satellite schools in Portage and Reedsburg.. 198Z: Approval of Madison Area Technical. College-Madison's spilt campus facilities plan!o in, clucle a Downtown Education Center, the Truax Airpark Site, and the Technical Center.. 198: Madison Area Technical CoUeg is reaccredited by the North Central Association of Col leges and School~ for a period of ten yean. 198: Ten years of legal controversy were ended when the Supreme Court, on March 7, 198, revemd an unfavorable decision from the Court of Appea.ls, freeing the district to proceed with the building of Madison Area Technical College facilllles. 1985: On January Z, 1985, bids were accepted for lhe building of facilities at Truax Airpark and renovation of the 11 North Carroll Street faculties. 1986: The first pha5e of the Truax facility s completed and classes begin. 1987: The Downtown Education Center, these cond phase of the Truax facility, and temodeling of the Technical Center will be completed.

5 Student nformation Policies and Procedures ADMSSONS ACADEMC PROBATON AND DSMSSAL FEES AND RESDENCY GENERAL POLCES OFTHECOLLEGE Student lnformation 7

6 8 Sludent nformation Student Jnformiltlon 9 l l ADMSSONS Requirements Madison Area Technical College is open to au adults and to all youths years of age and older wlw are capable of profiting from instruction. l'ost secondary programs are open to those who are high school graduates and to tl\ose who have passed high school equivalency tests (equivalency is interpreted to mean a passing score in au parts of the State of Wisconsin High School Equivalency Test or a passing result in the GED test. A photocopy of the GED certificate or W~n5ill High School Equivalency Test resulu is requir~d i.n these cases., 1111d to tho_se mature individuals who, through work e)(jlerience, can prove that they are capshle of.ma.sterlng the subject matter. For particular programs within the college, sdmis.sion requirement YBrf depending o.n aptit11de (or the curriculum, available student stations, and.a reasonable probability of acad'emic success.. A current application fcmn indicatesadmlssion testing. Specific exami'nations are required for cer tain programs, A student's application is evaluated on the basis.of a combination of high school and other tl'al!scripts, work experience, entrance examination results, and an interview il it is deemed necessary. t i$ possible fo.r.students to be C!)ncurrenlly. enrolled in high school and in classes offered by Madison Area Tech11ical Coll~ge. lo all cases, students must be years of age or over at the time classes start, and the student must have parent or guar(l.ian permission and consent Of the high school principal. Costs for.~ose attendillg in lieu.of high. school, undenh.e provisions of Section i\8, 1~ o(!he Wisc.onsin. statutes, are charged in ac.x,rdance with' the la\'i. Nouc~ 1o ApPlicants, Parvnta or Gu~rdlens Services,. 'financial aid andotlletl:lenefit~oflhe.. Wisconsin Board of VocatioJial, 1'echnicalali.d Ai\uli EDuca~io~ are provided OD :il non-discriminatoey ~is, 1is r~qqired by the, Civil Rights Ad of 196.'.Jndiviauals applying for.or receiving as~lstance. t)lrough t_bis agency Who believe that di5crlminatlon M lbl\-ground of race, cqlor or natioiilil origin is'lle lng-:practiced by-tile Wi5consin &~t~. Qf Vcx:ational, Technlca) pndadultbducat[on may file a :written complalnt wit~ tbe state ag~ltey, til.~ fei:lenit agency or -both,. ' - '.. ' Any ~itten ~ornplaint is.to be signed by.the cilmplainant, shall give in detail the time, place and pertinent facts ana circumstances of the alleged discrimination and shall be submitted to the State Director, Wisconsin Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, 10Price Place,' P.O.!lox 787, Madison, W The Atea Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No. is in full compliance with Tille V and V of the 196 Civil Rigl1ts Acts, Executive Order 1, Title X of the 197Z Education Amendments, Equal Pay Act, Age Discrimination in Employment AL:t, TlUe Yf! and Title Vlll-l'ublfc Health Service Act, Section 50-l97 Rehabilitation Act and Wisconsin Fair Employment Law. t is the policy of the district not to discri!llinate on the basis of a person's age, race, creed, color, handicap, marital siatus, sex, national origin, ance~t r y-, sexual orientation, arr.est record or conviction record in its educational programs, admissions, activities or employment policies. nquiries regarding compiiance with the above nsmed regulations may be directed to the Affirmative Action Officer, 550 Anderson Street, Madison, Wl570 fphone ) and to the Assistant Director, Student Service5 (phone 608/6-609!). AdmlssiQns Procertunts Applications for post-seco.ndary programs are a~cepted beginning t!te third Mooday in November for the follow.ing school year. Forms for this purpose may be obtained from local high school counselors or by writing the Admissions Administrator, 550 Anderson Street, Madison, W 570. Applicants currently ej>rojied in high school must have completed sbqemesters prior ta making application. Tileclosing date far advance application by m~i) for a fall semester is the last friday in July. After this date, new applicants may apply lo person for.programs where openings are available. Whenever possible; :the applicant should have-the h(gh school send witll the application a trausctipi of high school records: f currently cnroile~ in high s~ hool, the applicant Sbc;Juld also send a list:ing of. senior year courses and credits~ fa. gradu~te,--a com plete high sch!lot-itanscript should be-supplied as well as a ran script of any add.itlonal,education. These should be.sent by lhe institutlon a.\tended. Depending on piogram cjioice, the applicant is notified of a date for add.itional tests when ~oinpleted application and. transcript have.been received, Evaluation of application, transcript and lest results are made by the progr~m chaijperson, and the appli cant is notified of the status of his/her application. Those who do not qualify for the programs of their choice may consult with a cpunselor to consider alternatives. The accepted applicant is notified of detailed registration procedures prior to the start of the school year. n certain prc>grants, applications ate accepted for the second semester. A list of openings is available by the.mid term of the.first.semester. The closing dote for second-semester application& by mail is the third Friday in November. After this date, new applicants may apply in person. Health Forms and Physlc$1 Examination All students enrolled in post-secondary programs are required to complete a health information form which shajj be submi tl~d to the registrar prior to registration. n addition, Health Occup~tions students are re quired to have a physical examination and the results mailed to the registrar by their physicians prior to registration. Forms are provided. ( the results of the physical exntnination have not been 1 l l! l received by the registrar prior to registratiol], a student may be allowed lo register at the.~iscretlon of the aj?propriate dea>.. chairperson. Under no cit cumstances, however, are students assigned to the clinical area until this tequ_irement is met. Due to the nherent risk of exposure t9 harmful agents and the requirements of some affiliating agen cies, all Health Occupatioll Division students are re quired to show evidence of health insurance coverage prior to their assignments for clinic<!) ex pericnce. The limits of such coverage shall be at least as c;omprehensive as those of the student health 'insurance available through Mac!is~m Area Technical CoUege. Since Health Occupations individuals are subjected to varying degrees of physical demand and/or mental stress, and all students~ed to per form at " predetermined level of competency to be eligible for graduation, it is recommended that ap plicants who question their ability to meet these requirements consult with the appropriate program administrator. Barber students must' pas.s the physical re quirements set up by the Wisoonsitl State Bo<trd of Health. Admfsslons Tests Certain programs require testing and others. do not. A curredt application blan.k int\lcates testing requirements. Upon receipt by the college of an sp-. plication form and transcripts, notice of a test date is sent to the applicant for programs where special tests ate requued..., --- Students who wish their pre-admissions test r~lts interprete may consult. with a counselor. Additional intere. t and aptitude testing is available for students interested in developing educational and occupational plans. Foreign StudeiJts M":dison Area Technical College is approved for the a ttendance of!on im'migrant studellts under 'the lllu)gration and Nationality laws an d the issuance o~ l 0.forms. Non~immlgran t foreign stude:nts who wish to upply must: fl) Demonstrate a _level of proficiency in English to pursue the programs of their choice; () ~ave a!) MATC district r esident as a spon5or; () Stgn an MATC trainlngagreement:. (.) S)lbmit_ English-worded tra.nscripts; (5) Submit TOEFL or Mlcbigan Test scores; /6) To oblain an -0AB or -0MN visa, deposit 5,000 toward semester fees. All.visa students are accepted on academic probation. Tntnsferof Cred/15 Studen.ts transferring from other nstitutions may have lhe1r records evaluated ~y the division dean/chairperson to. receive permission to waive certain program requirem ents pro\rided tlie courses be ing transferred are equivalent in!ulture, and satisfactory grades were received.. At the discretion of the division dean/chairperson, students previously enrojjed at other institutions of higher learning who are no longer acceptable for academic reasons at such institutions, or students who were oo probation upon leaving such lnstltu lions, may be accepted on a strict probationary status for one semester. Such~tudents mwt achieve a grade poin't.average of.0 or better by the end of the semester in order to continue. College TrefJfller Students who are non-residents of Dislrict No. are not considered for ~nrollment ln the college transfer program.. Non-resident students currently enrolled in technical (associate degree! or Yocational (diploma) programs are not.allowed to transfer to the colleg~ transfer program. Students enrolled in college transfer-liheral arts are limited t.o acquiring 7 credits at the college for the following reasons; (1) 'l;'be Wisconsin State.Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education-has a policy which limits enrojqleot in liberal arts transfer programs to 5 percent of the total post-high school full-time equivalent enrollment; (Z) ;rhe board limits enrollments in such p rograms to residents of District No. ; () A maximum of 7Z credits are transferable to other iostihitions of higher learning. ReghJiretion. Regis.t_ration for classes.is conqucted after students have beed accepted into a progra,m by the dlvfsloo deanf~hairpei'"sll,q.. Reglstr.lt!on js on" scheduled basis by program and a)pbabetical name of s.tudents. Letters an: sent informing. students ah<iut.the specifics of registration.... Mail and n-person registration is conducted separately for part-time students enrolling in degr e lllld non-degree classes. These classes_ a"' listed in a timetal:ile and/or new pap rs. Social Seci t~ Number Social security numbers are used {Or identification of student records and.are kept in strict confidence. Failure to furnish this voluntary numbe~!nay delay processing.and hinder the maintenmce of files while a number is heing assigned. Access tq Student Records Madison Area Technical CoUege, 'to be in com. pliance with the Family l!ducalional Rights and Privacy-Act of 197(Buckley:Amendment), CODslder; the following to be directory information and may be released to anyone who requests: Name, address, telephone listing, date of birth, major field of study, participation in officially-recognized activities and sparta, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance 'Which includes credits enrolled in e_ach semester!, total credits completed toward ~ c!eg:-ee, dates of withdrawal from courses or programs, degrees and awards received, the most rece11t previous educatiol)al agen cy or institutlo.u attended. Students have the right to inform MATC that any or all of the above information should not be releas ed without their prior consent. Students who wish.to do this are to report to the registration office within 0 days from tl.me of enrollment to fill out the

7 lo Studenl lnformalion necessary form revoking any or all of the public in formation Usted. Revocation remains in effect until the student modifies it Jlncluding after the student has left the collegej. n accordance w'ith this Act, students have the right to inspect, review and challenge the contents of their educational records and to request corrections to inaccurate or misleading data contained.in their records, or to submit an explanatory statement for inclusion in their records if the outcome of ~ hearing is unsatisfactory. Student educational recocds are maintained and kept in the office of the registrar. All r<>quests to in spector review one's ('ducational records, and for obtaining copies thereof, should be made to the registrar. Records placed oit "hold'' for individual in debtedness to the e llege are not released until cleared of the obligation. No personally identifiable information from information records is disclosed by the college Without each student's prior wrillen con sent, except when prior written consent is not re quired by the Act. ' Study Load A full time student iu an associate degree program may take a maximum of eighteen credit hours. ln some programs in the vocational studies division, when the study is largely confined to the classroqm or laboratory. up fo twenty credit hours may be taken. A student who is carrying a twelve-hour credit load or is in classroom attendance twenty perio<!s per week is considered a full-time student. Outside Work A maximum of tv-~enty hours of outside work per week is suggested for thejull_.time student. This. maximum may be too many for $0me students. Wben a student's academic work declines because of outside work, t is suggested tbat the work load be reduced. Financial aid is available to help those students-who need it. Class Schedule Period l Time 7:0 8:0 a,m. 8:0-9:0 o,m. 9:0-JO:ZO o.m. l0:0 ll : :0-JZ:0 p.m. ll: SO- :ZO p.ill. 1:0- :0p.m. PenOa l:li 1' l - 'nnte: :0-:0 p.n!. :0-:0 p.m. :0-5:0 p.m..5:0-6:0 p.m.. 6:1!-'7:0 p.m. 7:0- ~:ZO p.m. 8:0-9::!0 p.m. SCHOLASTC POUCES Degntes, Diplomas and Graduation Under the provisions ofchapier 5{, Laws of 1961, the Wisconsin Board of Vocaifonal. Technical and Adul\'llducaliort authc'n:u:es local boards o( voca tional and adult education to grant vocational diplomas and associate degrees in tbe appropriate areas to students \vho ouccessfully complete one and two y~~rs of _pos~ high school technical level instruction. An associate degree is granted to students who successfully complete th«: two-yesr college trunsfer programs or the two year technical programs. Diplomas are issued to tudents who successfully complete one-year to two year vocational programs. Certificates may be issued to t110se who have corn plcted special courses of study. jsee types of degrees.) Diplomas or associate degrees are issued to students who complete the prescribed curriculum both in hours of attendance and in terms of achieve ment, participate in graduation exercises, have ob tained satisfactory achievement {"C" or.0 grade point average) in their major field subjects, have maintained an overall "C " or.0 grade point average and are recommended by t~e instructors within the deparlmen t and the dean/chairperson of the division. Certificates of completion are issued to students who attain a GP A of.0 or better in their major field subjects and have an overall GPA of less than.0. Certificates of attendance are issued to students who attain a GPA of less than.0 in their major ficid subjects. The overall GPA is of no significance for attendance certificates. Students who terminate their attendance for a semester or more are required to meet tbe re quirements of a program when they re-enroll. At least one half of the credit requirements necessary for obtaining a diploma or an.associate degree ih any program must be taken at the college. (See advanced standing and transfer of credit.) Scholastic residency mandates that the student be registered in and satisfactorily complete applicable program courses in the semester prior to completing the appropriate program requirements. To obtain an additional diplomo or degree, a student must acquire one-half or more of new, addi.tional credits in residency. No rnoreihan one half of previously-earned credits ~rom-a diploma or degree may be applied toward an additioool diploma or degree. (See ~ho!astic resid(mcy.j Associate deg(ees, diplomas and certificates are granted at the end of each semester and,summer school. Students who receive incompletes or have other deficiencies. to remove from their records ate granted their associate degrees, dlp)ol'!las or cer tificates at the end of the se!llester durillg which all obligations have been satisfied. Deans/chairpersons may excuse from participation in the graduation ceremony only those students who they consider have valid reasons such as illness, death in the familr, military commitment or other justifiable excuses. SchofasUc Residency At lea$! one-half of the credit requirements necessary for obtaining ~ diploma or an as~ociate degree in any pro gram must be taken at the college. (See advanced s!lll\d[ng and transfer of credits.) Scholastic residency mandates that the student be registered in ond satisfactorily complete applicable program courses in the semester in which he/she is completing the appropriate program requirements.!. Student lnfortnatlon ll Any exception to this mandate shall be approved in writing by the dean/chairperson <;Jf the area in which the program is offered aud approved by the registrar. To obtain an additional diploma or degree, a stu dent must acquire one half or more. of new, add tiona! credits i!l residency. No more. than one hal o previously-earned credits from a diploma or degree may be applied toward an additional diploma or degree. Graduatloil Specl l Setvice Awards.Graduting students demonstrating el(traordinacy service to fellow students and the college are nominated for the Special Service Award. Nominees must be recommended by at least two-faculty members. These nominees will have demonstrated leadership in student.government, cl!lbs, and/or par ticipated voluntarily in college sponsored educa tional or recreational activities. Nominees are sub mitted to the Awards Committee after approval of the division dean/chairperson. Selected students will be designated on the gr11duation program and will wear a gold cord at the graduation ceremony. A Special Service Certificate will be.received in the mail with the studeni's diploma. GtaduaUon Acatlemic Honor Awards Candidates or Graduation Academic Honor Awards must attain a program cumulative grade point average jcgpaj of. 75. Graduating students beco.me eligi\lle in two year programs by achieving a.75 CGPA after three semesters.. (,haduating students in one year prqgrams becom e eligible by achieving a.75 CGPA after one semester. Can didates are designated on the graduation program. and wear a white cord at.the graduation ceremony. Final determination and the awarding-of Graduation Academic Honor Award certiflcates include the graduates achleving a. 75 after program completion. Students r«eive their certificates in the mall with their diplomas. Academic Standards Student~ are e><11ecled to maintain a high level of scholarship. Gr des.are recorded at the end of each semester on a.pennanent transcript on the following basis: Grade A AB B )!C c 0 p Numerical or below Point&.6.5 ~ J Q 'l'he allowing letters that may be shown on grade reports have the following defmihons:!-ncomplete W-Withdrawal (Attended but withdrew, or transferred to another course section) X-Course still in- progress Au-Auditing Note: Mi&&ing a final examination wilhout11oti[ylnt the in!truccor and wilhout having a satisfactory excuse results ill an automatic "F ' on the exam. Auditing Course A student may audit -a course for no credit with the consent of the division dean/chairperson. Selec tion of audit must be made at tne time o registra lion. The same ee is charged as if for credit. A stu -.. ' '""' dent taking a ~ourse for audit may not change to credit, nor can a student change from a credlt course tq audit after classes begin without the wtillen pet mission of the dean/chairperson. The course is in diclited ns " Au" for audit on the tratucrlpt. An auditor must meet the attendance requirements and may participate in the classroom work and complete, assignments, but!flay not take examinaiions. Figi,Hing ~ Point Average Grade point averages are figurl!d on a 0 st~~le with credit points granted for " A.''.5 credit points for "AB,''.a credit points for "B,".5 credit points for ''BC," credit points for "C," ~ qeclit point fo~ "D," and 0 credit points for "F" an<;! ".'' f any course is repeated, the hi$her grade is recorded OJ! the p~rnuinent academic record, and the lower.grade is deleted. To figure your own GPA, divide the total grade points received for one semester by the number of credits taken that semester."for exa:inple: You.enroll ed for credits this semester and you get credit$ of " A," credits of " B," credits of " C," and credits of "D." Your total grade points re (X.) + (x) + (x1 + (xl) = il()totnl grade points. Your GPA for the semester is 0 divided by = :50. Stude11ts in all programs are required to maintain a current and cumulative grade average. of.0 (''C" average). fyour.grade average, current or cumulative, s less than.0, it is re~ommended that you make an appointment with your instructors, and if necessary, the program dean/chairperson to discwis your academic record. Achieving Jess than a.0 grade average at the-end of a semester may result in probationary action according to the Academic Probation and Dismissal Policy. tncompfetea A grade or lnollldp!ete is given i a student h~s done passing work, and because of illness o~ mai,or cause beyond the student's control, fails to complete the course requirements. ncomplet~s must be made up by the end of the. next semester or the grade automatically changes to an "F." n a continuing course, a student must remove an incomplete by thj: end of \he next nine weeks or automatically receive a failure and be withdrawn from the second semeater of the continuing course. n Health Occupations counts with a clinical oom -ponent, the student may be given. an incomplete if the deficiencies in clinical performance~ are such lhat the instructor believes they may be corrected in the sequential cour$e which has a clinical compo nent. When the identified deficiendes are corrected, the $tudent is given a grade for the course. f the deficiency in clinical performance s not corrected by the end of the eequeutial course.which has a clinical component, the incomplete becomes an "F." No studenl is allowed to graduate without the removal of au incompletes.

8 1-Student nformation Student lnformatlon-1 Wlthclrawels Non Btt~ndance does not constitute a cancellation of pre-registration. l.'or your <:onvenience, yqu may telephone yoijr cancellation prior to the beginning of the course. Official Withdrawals: A student withdrawing from school at any time is required to schedule a conference with the program deartlchairper~on or a counselor to complete Withdrawal and Course Change forms. Failure to do so tnay result in grades being recorded as failures. Official withdrawals are not granted during the scheduled semester final ex am period. (See refund policy for applicable refund payment due.j Withdrawing from a Couroe: A student, with a deanlchairperson's consent, may withdraw from a course with the withdrawal r~corded as follows: "Withdrawn, too SOQn 'to measure progress." Unless an adequate explanaiion is provided, a stu dent who is absent for consecijtive calendar days (not class meetings! after the last class period attend ed may he withdrawn from that class with a grade of "W.. " A student who is absent without an adequate explanation 5 percent or more of the total schedul ed dass periods may be withdrawn from that class. Re-admlssion after withdrawal is with the rnutual con5ent of the divi~ioii des':'/ chairperson and the ln$tructor. Clinical LAboratory or AffiliatWns A: student may be Withdrawn from the clinical component of a nursing course at any time there is a status Of failure to provide a "standard of care" as established by course QbjecUves, basic nursing competencies, affiliating agency agreements and the Rule of Conduct (Chapter NlO and Nl 11 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code, Rule Of Board of Nursiilg. Thiswlthdrawal may result in failure of the course and is reviewed by the program a sociate. chairperson. The same pdlicy applies to any other program withiil the Health Occupations Division which has a clinical component or!n any other department or division of the college requiring affiliations. Advanced Stflndlng A: student may be granted credit toward a diplotna ~ran associate degree by making application to the d(vj.siqn dean/chairperson for transferring applicable credits. from other institutions of higher learning (see transfer of credits). Students.Diiy alsq apply for e~q>edential advanced standing credit. Such credit may be for previous work experience, previous military education or ex perlence, and advanced high school ~curses comparable in contenfand level. At the discretion ()f the division dean/ch~rso n, the. ev~uation of such credit is by oral, writien or performance testing, or by. a C<Jmbination of tl!ese. A student may not request advanced standing by testout for <lly e Urse during the semester in which he or ahe has registered for that course without the permiaslon. of the division deanlchairperaon. The decision to grant advance!;! standing rests with the division dean/chairperson. Students currently enrolled in vocational diploma programs who wish to transfer to associate degree programs may request evaluation of their completed courses on the same basis as indicated above. Credit for Experiential Leeming Students may earn up to one half of the credits r~ quired for an associate degree through evaluation of their experiential learning. Credit may be given for learning occurdng outside the classroom which is firmly related to a particular program and academic procedure.. Giving credit for experiential learning refers especially to learning which occurs in work settings, communities or self-directive accomplishments emphasi,:ing performance over con cept. The office Qf the division deanlchairperson may be contacted for further information. Attendance Students who will not be in attendance for 'their first' class meetiilgs. must inform the appropriate dean/chairperson in writing, Extenuating circumslililces arising on the first day of class wliich. prevent attendance shall be made known to the divic sion office. Failure to comply may jeopardize (:Ontinued enrollment. Attendance is the responsibility of the individual student. n cases of absence, work must be made up by arrangement with the instructor. (Refer to withdrawals.} Missing a final ex9nlida tion without notifying the'instructor and without having a l;atisfactory excuse results in an automatic "1.'" on the examination. [Refer to academic standards.) Grac1e ReportS Grade.reports are is,sued within two weeks of the end of each semester. Unless otherwise requ.ested,' grade reports are m~iled directly to students. An additio!lnl stjident copy may be obtained from the divi sion dean/chairperson. Transcripts The student's record is confidential and is not released.from the college except by 'the signed re quest of the student. Each student is ent.itled tq three free transcripts. A charge of $1.00 is made for each additional transcript. Honor Roll Honor Rolllettera are sent to students and made public for those who are enrolled as fulj.fime students and who have completed a News lnfonnation Card. High honors are a.ssigned to those.fulltime students with a grade pqint average of.50 or better and honors to those with a grade point average of.0 through.9. ACADEMC PROBATON AND DSMSSAL Probation A student ls plnced on probation if less than a.0 grade point average is achieved, currently or cumulotivdy, at the end of a semester of enrollment. Dismissal A student on probation may be dismissed from a program if less than a.0 grade point average is achieved, currently or cumulatively, At the discre tion of the division deanlchairperson, a student may remain on probation if the dean/chairperson is cdnvinced that the student is capable of achieving a.0 cumulative gr~de p()int average at the end of the semester. Studel!ts Admitted on Probation A siudent admitted on probationary status may be dismissed from a program if less than a.0 grade point average is achieved at the end of the first semester of enrollment. Dismissed stud~nts may not enroll for the'!lext succeeding semester or the next schdol year depending on the program in which they were enrolled. n addition, the Health Occupations and Home Jlconomics ~ivisions have specific policies which apply to particular courses and programs. Copies of these policies are available from 'instructors and the division >lean/chairperson.upon request. Academic Appeals Committee Tne conditions upon w)1ich the student agtees to enroll in the instilutian and in the course/cours es of inst~uction arc; bas.ed ~n certain premises. Anion& these is academic teaming.. Academic learning im plies ihat the jnstrtlctor has something to impartknowledge, skill, value judgments, etc.-to the stu dent, and thst the instructor evaluates, in terms of a grade, whether' t,he student has achieved that which is expec!ed. The procedure below shall be followed in.sequence~!1} When a student sii~cerelythinks the fi11al grade he or sh~ has re~eiv~d ln.a c.ourse is inaccurate or unjustified, he or she sb.ould make an appointment with the instructor who issu~d the grade andexplain the reasons ior this belief. This process mut be in itiated within 15 days ofreceiving the grade. The in s.tructor and the student should moike every ef(orfto resolve the issue, for onl.y the instruclor can change the grade b.y submitting a grade change form to the registrar. Us e~pected that most, if not all, misunderstandings will be resolved at this.level. () However, if the student and the instructor are noi able to reach an agreement, the student may re quest, no later than t~n days alter meeting with the instructor, that be dean/chairperson of the par ticular divisiqn in which the instructor s employed nrr.nge a meeting with the instructor and the de~nlchairperson to attempt to resolve the issue. l'rior to the meeting, the student.shall place in writing a signed statement indicating the rensons for his or her belief and submit copies to the nstructor and to the dcanlchalrperson. 11 Should the issue still he unresolved, or should the decisii>n be adver$e to the student, the student may request in writing, no later ihan {lve days after the meeting with the instructor and the deanlchairperson, that the Assistant Director nstructional Services call a meeting of the Academic Appeals Committee. The Assistant DirectQr, nstructional Services shall chair the committee which shall be composed of himself, the Student Ser vices Coordinator, the dean/chairperson of the par ticular division, and four instructors from the same or a similar instructional field. The student will be dotified in writing of the time and place of this hear ing, at which time the.student may present his or her case. At this hearing, the instructor may also present his or her case. Mter hearing the cases of the student and the instructor, the Academic Ap peals Committee shall make a determination in the matter. The st.udent will be informed in writing of their decision. 1} Any party may have, at option, the right of an appeal from the decision of the Academic Appeals Committee. A hearing before the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and.adult Education, District No. shall be held at which time. the party will be allowed legal counsel if desired. Any party who desires to appea l the decision of the Academic Ap peals Committee must do so by petitioning the board in writ!ng no later than five days after the receip't of the decision of the Academic Appeal Co.mmittee. Mter the hearing has been held. by the. boord, the party shall b~ notified in.writiilg a:; to their decision. Appeal From Academic Actions snd Re-Admittance. Appeal from academic actions may be made.to the Academic Appeals Committee. f a student has bt:en dropped for academic reasons, re-admittance may be sought after a semester has elapsed. This application must be passed on by the Academic Appeals Committee. FEES AND RESDENCY Payment ol Fees All fees ere peyabie at the time of registratlon Or deferred upon approval and sigrring of a fee arrangement. Registration is not compleie until a!l fees are paid, "Hold" for ndebtedness Records and registration are withheld for student who fail to meet fiilancial obligations that are levied by recognized college offices, Advam:e Reservation Fee An advnnce reservation fee of $5.00 is due. within 15 days after notification of ac;;eplance. The receipt for thio fee is th;, student's assurance of a place n the program or a place on the.. waiting list for the program in which he or she has been accepted. lf a student does nat withdraw prior to classes commen cing, the advance reservation fee applies toward pro gram and materials fees. Prior to the semester of en try, $10.00 of the fee is refundable if the otudent

9 1-Studcnt nformation Student lnformotlon-15 notifies the college of cancellation in writing one month before cl11sses convene. f a student pays lhe advance reservation fee and program and materials fees and wlthdr1ws within one month prior to the beginning of classes, the advance reservation fee is non-refundable. Late ReglatntUon Fee New and continuing students in full-time postsecondary programs who fail to register arid pay their fees at the appoinied registratio!l time are charged an additional $5.00 late registration fee is not applicable toward any other fees or charges and is non-refundable. Textboolcs ttnd Clast Material$ Students purchase their own textbooks and class m;lterials as required. Graduation Fee At the time of registration, $15.00 graduation fee, plus tax, is. paid by each student if it is anticipated that the student will graduate a~ the end of the semester..! the student is dropped for academic, medica.! or other :reasons, or withdraws. of bi&lher own volition, this fee js refijnded upon request. Program and Materials Fees Program and materials fees are established annually by the Wisconsin!l<>ard of Vocational, Technical and.adult Educatipn according to Wisconsin state statutes. Transcript Fee Students are entitled to three free' transcripts. A charge of $J.OC.is made for each additional copy. Supplementel Fee A,supplemental fee of $1.5 per credit is chmged all students enrolling in post-high scllool courses at Madison Area Technical College. This fee is not refundable unless the college cancels the course or the student withdraws belore classes begin. Field Trfps The cost of field trips is paid at regis1ati6n time. Refunds are not.granted for non-participation in field trips unless the student officially withdraws prior to the field trip. Non-Resident Fee By act of the Wisconsin State Legislature /Chapter 9, Laws of 1965), a non-resident fee is authorized and charge<! for all students who are non-residents ofarea Vocational, Technical 81\d Adult Education, District No.. Non-resident rates ~r~ computed by the Wisconsin Board of Vocational, Technical ami Adult Bdt"illion in accordance with state statutes. The rates vary from year to year ao they are based on current instructional costs and expenditures... Students who are legal residents of Wisconsin, but who reside. in another Wisconsin vocational school. district, may have the non-resideni fee paid by that vocational school distiict provided that the student completes the requjred form ~nd the student'.s district asrees to pay, and provided that such local vocational district does not offer a similnr program of study. Forms for this purpose ore mailed at the time of attendance. All out-o f st~te students, all foreign students, and all non-resident stt~d ents w.ho do not have the proper form signed are responsible for paying their own non-resident fee. n all ca es, the individual sludent is responsible for proving his/her residency status; Fee Arrangements The Meo Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult.Education, District No. will allow students to dcler payment of semester fees upon completion of a "fee aitangemej)." A fee arrangement, a legally-binding noie, becomes official when signed by the student and a representative of the college. Students may sign a fee arrangem~nt only upon enrollment and payment of a minimum of $100.'00. Under e>ctenuating cir.c l.lmstances~ exceptions may ~granted by the controller or financial aid ad- ministrator. A $10.00 processing fee is charged for each fee arrangement. All student grades and/or transcripts will be placed on hoid until. the fee arrangem~mt is paid. f an individual is receiving food stamps, is on AFDC, county o r city welfare, financial aid, etc.~ and can produce documentation to this fact, an adjust, ment on the $ minimum deposit referred.fo above could be made. District No. would then use th"is documentation for reporting. " Services to the 1 Disadvantaged" to the state board... j Fee arrangements shall be. made due the bi5t day l of the week in which the student,' s first disburse - ~ ment of financial aid becomes availabl~ n each. ~ semestet unless the student has a valid reason for im a extension. Alt ~xtensions shall be due at least 0 calendar days prior to the end,of school.. J Failure to officially withd.taw frorri clas~es nr ~eing f officially withdrawn from a class by an inatructor 1 for non-attendance does not relieve the student's j obligafion for the fee arrangement 1 Additional fee arrangements shall not be permitted for studen~ who have _previo-us firil!"cial obli$afions. due the colle$e. BxceptiQns ntay be granted by the registrar or adn'li!siqns administrator if the student provides evidence that h~lshe will be te~elvi(lg finanei~l ald. Collectlon.of Fee Arntngemenrs Receivable (l) The grades and transcripts of eacb student who signs a fee arradgement shall be placed on hold until au fees are paid. () & ch student must pay-all previous debts to the district before being allowed to register or Sign a ne~ fee arrangement. This tequi.l'ement may be watve<l by the registrar or his designee. () Witl!in 60 days after the stan of the first or se c.ond semester of each school year, the buslneu offtce shall revlew all new fee arrangements to determine: ja) The portion of the unpaid balance that will be covered by financial aid.., : fb) Fot those students who areenrolled in school and have an unpaid fee arrangement, a letter shall be sent informing them of the amount due. (c) For those students who have an unpaid fee arrangement and have dropped from school! (1) The business o" i.ce shall review each student account to determine if a refuetd per board policy may be due. f so, the information shall be sent to the registrar for a.fimi! review and proces.sing; () f there s a balance due, the business office shall send 01 bluing to the student showing the i!ffiount due. H the amount due is unpaid withtn 0 days, a follow-up letter sball be sent. lf the amount due is unpaid within 60 days, the account shall be refened to a collection agent or the district's atiorney in secor dance with poucy number l OZ5. REFUND POLCY (For Program, Material and Non-Resident Tuition FeN} lf yqu plan to withdraw from a particular course, do so immediately. A single day can make il m~jor difference in the. amount of refund. Non-attendance does not constitute a cancellation of registration. E~ cept in' cases of Cilnce!lation or discontinuance of courses, or when the studen t is sponsored. tbe STU DENT M UST REQUBS.T THE REFUND Wl'fHN THE STPULATED TMB PEROD. The district may establish a charge of not more than $.00 per course to be c!educted from any refund to defray processing costs. Stop payment of a check does not cons~itute. a formal cancellation. For stop payments, there will be a returned check fee of SS.OO and the registrant will be held liable for the fee untll the date of official cancellation. Allow four weeks from the date of cancellation to receive.a full refund of payment. ) Refunds fo r oll courses regardless of length: (a) f the district cancels a course, the refund is 100 percent of all (program, materials and nonresident. tuition) fees paid.. (b) f the district discontinues or cancels a cou.rse. during the.80 percent refund period, the refund is 100 percent of all (program, materials and nonresident tuition! fees paid. After this period, or after consumable materials have been issued to studel)ts,. the refund is a proportionate amount of the above fees.paid, (c~ f the student m1kes application for a refund before the first class m eeting which the student s scheduled to attend, the refund is 100 percent of above fees paid.. (d) A student who drops from one course a.nd adds another during the first 1 calendar days of the term shau receive cr.edit for all awlicable program fees, materials fees, inter-district tuition and out,ofst~te t11lt10n for the course dropped-which must be applied to the course added: (l)lf the applicable progr~m fees, materials fees, inter-district tuition and out-of-state tuition for the course added exceed the fees fur the course dropped, tltc student will he assessed the additional amount; ()1 the appllcoble program fees, muterlals fees, inter-district tuition and out-of-state tuition for the course dropped exc<!<'d the fees lor the course lidded, refunds w(ll be' made pursuant to Wisconsin Administrative Code, A-V () For all coursc5 which arc scheduled to meet a semest~r or longer, the ~!Uld for 1111 such tour$es s: (aj 80 percent during the flrst! calendar days from the first instructional day or the term. "lbl 60 percent during the 15th through the 8th calendar days from the first instructional day of the term. (cl Zero percent after the 8th calendar day from the first instruclional day of the term. (} For all COjlrses which are scheduled to m eet less than an 18-week semester, the refund for each course s: Jal 80 percent if less than 11 percent of the total. potential hours. of nstruction.have been completed. Jb) 60 percent if 11 through 0 peti:eni of the total potential hours of instruction have been ~:ompleted. (cl Zero percerlt after more lhail 0 percent of the total potential hours of instruction hove bceo completed. rot.'f:elvfhc JJlt S(!!XlfDTO-'f.F.'': A S~!.ESTf.R Oft.J)~GU: REFUNDS. GENERAL POLCES OF THE COUEGE Weekly College Bulletin An all-college b.u)letin is di$tributed each Monday during the academic year. N~ces of meetings and other important communications to students are included in the bulletin. Any new policies that l\ffect student~ are publlshed in the b ulletin. ClaB*room Attendance and Visits n acca>rdance with the provisions of Wisconsin Statutes 8... and i 18.15, persons shall be sixteen years of age or older in order to enroll fn or attend any classes offered by' the A:tea Board of Voclltional, Technical and Adult EducaUon, District No.. Non-students, regardless.of age; shall be permitted lo visit classes offered by the district board with the consent of the instructor teaching lhe class to be visited or by obtaining a visitor's permit from the appropriate administrator. Consent and permission will be granted only for the purpose of becoming ~nowjedgeable about a course or oriented to the educational mission of the district. This _policy.!hall not.inhibit persons of any age from receiving services in the dental laboratories, the barber shop, or elsewhere if personal services ore being provided. n these instances, the person shall follow the established appointment practice or procedure. Further, students or non-students are prohibited

10 -Studcnt lnformation Student nformation-17 from.leaving a child under the age of sixteen years in district facilities unattended. This policy does not preclude allowing a child in class where the child contributes to th~ instructional process. Class Size The college reserves the right to discontinue any class which has au.attendance of less than ten. Student Code of Conduct MATC is a tax-supported institution which serves a large student body, many community groups and a large number.of visitors. t is important for the school and its students that the conduct of all students. be governed by a rea5onable sei of rules, and that the:ie rules be enforced. Accordingly, each student is expected to comply with the general stan dard set out below and to be familiar with all rules and regulations. The following principles and rules apply to all students of Madison Area Technical College: ll Students are expected to comply with all state statutes and.city ordina.nces. 1~1 At all times, students are expected tq conduct themselves in such a manner as not to interfere with the educational process at MATC. () Students. are expected to conduct themselves in such a manner as. not to endanger the safety or welfare of their fellow students. (1 Students mll5t comply with the following school rules and may be suspended or expelled, or be liable to legal procedures as may be appropriate, for the following offenses: (a Obstrudion.or disruption of the normal operations of the college or al:(ivities authorized by the college. lb) Physical or verbal abuse or detention of any person(sj on college property or at college activities when such endangers the health, safety or rights of such person(sj. ' (cl Theft or damage to property of the college or property of any visitor or member of the college community. (d) Unauthorized entry to or use of college pro perty Of facilities. 1 1 X,Jse, possession or distribution of narcotic or illeg~l Qfllg~, firearms, explosives, dangerous chemicals,.etc. on college-owned or.controlled pro perty or at.~ ollege sponsored activities. ffl.dishonesty!cheating, plagiarism, etc.) or knowingly furnishing false information to the college. )g) Ga!Jlbling.as defined by law, Any violation of an MATC rule or policy may serve as a basis for.;me of the following actions: As a first step, a violation will be reported io the district directoi or hi~; designee who will determine what, if any, disciplinary action is appropriate. The district director or his designee may temporarily suspend a student pending an investigation When the student's continued presence might ~ndanger the student or others. f the disvlct director or his designee deter mines that suspension or dismissal is appropriate, disciplinary action shah follow the Non Academic Probation or Dismissal Policy. Dismissal The district board has several policies under which a student may be dismissed from the.coilege: (1) Academic Dismissal: A student may be dismissed from a program for failure to achieve a.0 grade point average. (See academic probation and dismissal.) 11 Code of Conduct: Students failing to comply with the policies under the Student Code ofconduct may be suspended or dismissed in accordance with such polky. (See student code of conduct.) 1! Harassment: a student violates the policies defined under "Harassment," the student may.be suspended or dismissed.!see harassment policy. See also the procedures tot dismissal and suspension under non-academk probation and dismissal.) Dress Code Most students at MATC are preparing to.seek employmentin one or two years, Others will ask for recommendations relative to transferring to other institutions of higher learning. t is the policy of this school that students shall dress in a manner that would be appropriate. to the vocation for which they are preparing, and in any case, be neat in appearance. Both appearance and maturity of behavior are important factors Which will influence the facul ty members who are called upon to recommend a student for employment or for transfer. Non-Academic Probation or Dismissal 11) When th~ administration and/or board has. reasonable cause to believe that a student has pur, sued a course of conduct which should require suspension or dismisssal, the student is informed of the specific charges in writing by registered mail or personal delivery thereof. () The student is notified in writing of the time and place of a hearing, at which time the student may present the case if desired. The student is advis ed of the action taken.bjr.the administration. (1 The student may have, at option, the right to appeal action taken by the administration. A hearing before the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No. is held at which time the student is allowed legal counsel if desired. A stu dent who was suspended or dismissed by the ad ministration who desires to appeal the action must do so by petitioning the board in writing within five days of the date of suspension or dismissal. After the hearing has been held by the board, the student.is notified of their detision. (1 Pending action. of the charges, the status of a student should not be altered, or the right to be pre sent on the campus and to attend dasses suspended, except for reasons relating to his or her physical or emotional safety and well-being, or for reasons relating to the safety and well-being of students, faculty or college propertyc Parking On-<:atnpus parking is availabl ~ at all camp)ls sites, except ~he Downtown.llducational Center c.,_mpus at 11 North Carroll Street. The cost for parking is estoblished by the district board. nformation on parking is available at the time of registration. Polley for Worlc Study ol' Cllnfcal Afffllatlon Experlenr;es tor Pregnant Students A student enrolled in any program of the district which requires. a.clinical affiliation or work ex perience at Madison Area Technical College or any other school within the district or with another agen cy who becomes pregnant shall be permitted io par ticipate in such clinical affiliation or work ex pericnce with the following provisions which will govern the student's continuance of the program: (1) A medical doctor or certified nurse midwife shall certify the period of pregnancy. The division dean/chairperson andlor program administrator shall be informed. 1) The student shall present a monthly statement from her medical doctor or certified nurse midwife for each of the last three months of ~ncy in <licating whether or not she may continue in the program.. () The student's program may l)e terrni'nated after six months of pregnancy at the discreiion of her physician, the affiliating agency, and administrators of the college. (1 This decision shall be made jointly by the attending physic.ian or certified nurse midwife, the dean/chairperson of the Health Occupations Division, and/or the educational administrator of the program in consultation with the physician consultant to the college, When aecessary, and.the appropriate administrator from the affiliating agency. 15/ The return of the student to the program shall be determined by the medical doctor or certified nurse midwife and as the schedule for clinical experiences-permits. School Vsitors The board arid the staff welcome visitors to the college. f a visitor to the college conducts him/herself in such a way that would endanger the safety or welfare of students, staff or other visitors, or that would irtlerfere with the educational process, the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No. authorizes the district director and administrativ.e personnel or appropri.ate designees to:., (11 Give warning to persons who shall enter the building {or the purposes of soliciting, peddling or loitering l)y posting signs at all entrances which shall. state: " No person may enter these facilities for the purp.oses of soliciting, peddling, loitering or for ij. legal purposes." (1 Notify the police whenever they deem it necessary to safeguard the well-being of students, staff, other visitors and property of the district. (/ File a formal complaint and bring charges against such individuals. Student Due Process Procedure When a student sincerely believ~s he or she bas a valid complaint against any member of the sta ( (staff meaning any full- or part-time employee of the board), he or she should comply in sequence with tbc following procedure: () Wl!hin 15 days of the date the alleged incident took place, t~e student shall make an appoin\ment wi.th t."ls persqn and explain the nature o.f the com plaint and the reasons for!hi~ belief. The staff member involved and the student should make every effort to tesolve the issue. t is expected that most, if not all, misunc\erstandings will be resolved at this level. Students wliofeel in.tiq~idated by the staff member involved may proceed to Step, Com plaints involving the district.director which are not resqlved at the meeting level should be addressed to the Area Board of Vocational, Tec.hnical and.adult E<'[ucalion, Di~lrict No.,. (11 the student and the staff person are not able to reach a.satisfactory agreement, the student 1uay, no later than ten days after meeting with tl)e staff person, request that the supervisor of the staff per son arrange a meeting with the student, the staff person and the supervisor to attempt to resolve the issue. Th.e student shall place in writing the nature o( the.complaint and submit copies to the supervisor and the staff person prior tq the meeting. 1) Shoul.d the issue be unresolved at Step, or shol!ld the issue be adverse to tbe, student, the student may appeal in writing,.no late~ than flve days after the meeting with the supervisor and the staff, person, to one of the following administrators. Complaints concerning instruction should be ad-' dressed to the Assistant Director-nstructional Services. Complaints concerning student services should be addressed to the AssUiiant Director Student Services. Complaints concerning support staff should be addressed to the Personnel Officer. CompWnts concerning administrators or deans/chairpersons should be addressed to the District Director. The parlicular administrator will call a meeting ~( the student and the p'ersons involved to attempt to resolve the pro\)lem. 'rhe resolution andlot decision shall be conveyed in writing to the s~lldent (1 Should the issue still be unresolved aftefstep, or. should the decision be adverse to the student, the student may request in writing, no later than five days after receipt of thdetter from the particular ad ministrato~,. that the. particular administrator call a meeting of the Appeals Committee. The particular administrator will chair the committee which will consist of a total of sev en people: the administrator, three staff persons from the particular.area inv olved!chosen either by the president of the Teacher's Union, if it relates to in~tr\lction, the president of the Support Staff Union, if il relates to support staff, or by the district director, if it relates to student ser. vices, admmistra.tors or deans/chairpersons), the president of the Student Senate. and two other senators cl)osen by the president. The student will be notified i~ writing of!he time and place of this hearing at which time ihe student. may present his or her case. At this hearing, the staff person against whom!he complaint is being issued may illsq p resent his or her case. All have the right to be represented by legal counsel at!heir own ekpense unless otherwise provlded for by the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No..

11 18-Stuclent lnformotlon Mter hearing the ~tud.,nt.tn<~ the ~taff P<!f&on, the Appeals C~;~mmUtee shall make a detennina!ion in!he matter; The stud~ht and the staff person will b.. 1~furni~d _in,writing of the Appeals Committee deci SOn WJthm,en days. A copy o.! the decision shall be 1;ent to the district director.. js) Should the deci ion of the,\ppeals Committee be unsatisfactory 1v the student, the district director hils the option of either attempting to mediate the complaint or o a~epting the decision of the A weal Com~ittee: in either case, the district director shall so. n~tifi:' the student of hls decision in writing Wlthm f1ve days of receiving the decision of. the Appeals Committee. (61 The student has the rlght to appeal the decision of the Appeals Colllmittee and/or the district dlrector to the Area Board of Vocational, Tecbilical and. Adult Education, District No... A student who desires to appeal the decision must do so by petitioning t_lie_ board in ":'r_iting no l~ter than five days alter receipt af the decision. A heari.ng before the board shall be held at $1ich time as the board designates.' The. ~tudent shall be notified accordingly. After the bearmg has been held by the board, the student shall be notified in writing. within 0 days, as to their decision. Note: ln thi! p;ocedure, all.staff members i!lvolved shall keep. d re~ord of the times, dates and other penfnent (JJ!ts rolatmg to!he.liature of the corrferencr!s i~. which lliay were invoned. Harl~ent Ttie _d lstoc~ board, through jts commitment jo afftrmabve achon, will ensure that au employees and students work and study iii an environment free-of harassment. The district board w ill take au st~ps necessary t? prevent ~aras~ent from occ~rring. Such ~ t-~s mclude afflrmahv.ely raising the subjeqt, expre~1og stmng disapproval, informing employees and students of their rights to raise and how to raise. he. issue, and.de'velt')ping m<!!hods to sensitize au CQnceroed. Deflnitloos Harass~ent Slurs or other verbal or physical conduct 'di(ected to an individual constitute harassmen~ when this conduct:,.l~l H~s the pu_rpose or eff~ct o( creating ail inturu.datmg, hostile or offens ve '!"Orking or acadelllic envuorunent. (Z) Ha8 the pu'ri?o"':- ~r effect of unreasonably interfering Wilh ali indiv1dual'a work or academic performance. (]-Otherwise adversely affects an individual's employment or academic opi>ortunities.. Sexu~ Harass~'ent; Onw~lco~e sexual advanc~s;, requests for sexual favors, and other Verbal or phys1cal conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when:.... (J Submission. to such c:ondutt is miule either explicitly or mplicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or a~ ademic progress. (1 S~~missi.on to or rejec ti~n of ~uch conduct by an lildavidualis used as il basis for employment decl sions or academic progrcs, affecting such indiyiqual. (1 Such co_nduct has the purpose _or e'ffect of. substlmtially interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an ntimidating, hostile or offensive working or academic environment. R~lallfatwisment: Racial slurs and other verbal or physical conduct relating to an individual's race constitute racial harassment w hen this conduct: () Has the purpose or effect of creating an intim~dating, hostile or.. olfenslve working or academic environment. () H.!s the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic perfornwlce. (1 Otherwise adversely affects an individual's employment or academic opportunities. Any person who. believes that thq may b,ave been harassed may follow sither the in{otmal or formal procedure or ~oth without feat. of recrim.inati<;>n, 11nd ~hall ~ a~sured of a pr.ompt and confidential an.vestigabon. lnforltl Procedure There shall be a. Harassment Cormnittee wlilcb shall co~sist of.three faculty mem~s. appointed.by the p_resident of the Teacher's Union, one. ~tudent appomted by the Student Senate, one admini ttator appointed by the district director, ;~nd_i>ne support staff membe~ appointed by the president of the sur' port Staff Umon. The Harassment Committee shal ~ als~ reflect affirmative action iargeted.group.s..a chaafp<!rson will be selected by the committee. An up to-dale Jist of committee members may "be obtained from the director's office, the student senices office, and the student senate office. All members of the co.mmitt~e shall maintain confidentiality... The commiuee member($) -may help individuals who alleg.. to be harassed. Any person who believes that she/lie has been ~ictim ofharassmentiwiy consult with the commtttee memberjs) n6 later than the 0th calendar day following the one in which Uie alleged incident is known or should have been known by the complainant. The committee niember(s) will offer consultatlon, outline options, and ;oay draw,.upon other support and counsellng sernces to assist the.tomplainant. The committee ~.memberls) may make an effort to.resolve the "issue ~nfor~all~ and in th~ strictest privacy. Duiil\g the,. mvest gation, the allegations will be treated with sensitivity and f<!dfidentiality, and every effort will be made to avoad damage to the rep11tation of the acc~ed or ac~user:a w~itten record will be kept and filed wltb the afflrmalive action officer or personnel. officer until the time has elapsed for initiating the. formal procedure, and shall be made available if a formal complaint is flied. Formal Proc:edui:e Act:Ording. to reci;gnied due process procedures ~ the following steps shall be pursued Jn the event of a :J ~arasstnent eompl~t. These steps shall be invoked, m the order of their appearance in this written ' 1 policy, until all steps have been exhausted or until i! i the complaint has been resolved to the ~tisfaction of all parties concerned. Depending upon the nature of the harnssment complaint, in order to expedite the process, some steps may be eliminated if that.is the judgment of the district director or his/her designee. n order to be considered under due proeess procedures, written complaints must be made no )ater than the 0th calendar day following the one inwhich the alleged incident is known or should have been known by the complainant. For the purpose of mailing written complaints, the :allege's mailing address is: Madison Area Technical College, Area Vocational,.Technical d Adult l!ducation, District No., 550 Anderson Street, ' Madison, W1570. Complaints, and copies thereof, should be addressed to the attention of the appropriate personnel noted below in Step. Due Process Pro~edures Step J;.The compla_inant(s) shall confer with tb~appropriate administrative personnel 1see below) and make a writt~ complaint. () Any acts committed by facility which may constitnte harassment shall be reported _in writing to the Assistant Director nstructional Service. (l Any acts committed by suppori staff which may co!uititule. harassment shall be reported n writing _to th~ Pl'r~onnel Officer Any acts committed by administrative S)aff whicb may c.onstitute harassment shall be reported in wnting to the District ;lirector.. {1 Any acts COmmitted by students \vhich mayconstitute harassment shall be reported _in writing to the Assistant Director-Student Services. The signed complaint shall give ln detail the time, place, perth1ent facts and circumstances of tho:: alle"ged harassm~nt, and Shall be Cited with the Affir- : io"' "... Student lnformation-19 mative Action Officer or Personne'-Officer. A copy will be sent within seveq calendar days to the person against w hom ihe complaint is made. The appropriate administrative personnel listed above-shall, within 1 calendar days of receiving the complaint. 'nvestigate the complaint,.attempt to resolve the compll!.int, and prepare a written report of the Findings. One copy of the complaint, findings and recommendations shall be given to the alleged.harasser, one copy shall be sent to the.affirmative Action Officr.r ot Pet"sonnel Officer. and one copy shall be sent to the District Director. f the complaint is not resolv ed at this level, Step shall be invoked... Step : Within 1 calendar days alter Step 1 has been completed, the Affirmative Action Officer or rersonnel Officer shall investigate the complaint, atteinpt to re.soh e the problem, and'prepare a written. report o( his/her findings. A copy of this report shall be referred to the District.Director. Step : After attempting to resolve the complaint,. the District D irector shall nial<e a decision within 0 calendar days of receiving the report -of the Amrmative Action Officer or Personnel Officer. The. complainant and the person against whom the.com- plaint is made shall receive a copy of the decis_ion. Appeal Procedur~.... Appeals of the District' Director's decision shall l:>e referred to the Area Board of Vocational, Tec"hn!cal and Adult Education, District No.. Within.0. calendar days.of receiving.the app\!111, the area board shall concluct a hearing at \vhlch time_ all parties, shall have the ~ight tci-leg~l counsel.at their expense. f th" are board rend.efs-,a,~~cision which is.not satisfactory to the complainant, the complainant has the right to seekredress through external agencies.

12 r! Student nformation Services and Activities COUNSilLJNG 'NANCAL 1\U STUDENT RESOURCES S"'UDllNT AC1'1VTES CLUBS AND STUDENT ORGANZ/\TONS MUSC ATLE1'1CS Student nformation-1

13 Student nformation COUNSELNG CENTER Counseling Students and 'Prospective students are welcome to consult with counselors n the student services office about any academic or p ersonal problems. Since many students face diffic<ilt and often perplexmg decisions in their early college years, they should feel froe to make use of counseling S<!rv!ces. There are counselors to help with financial problems. housing, adult btgh school, student activities, testing, career counseling and employment. Counseling services include vocational guidance, c.ueer information, a.ssistilnce with academic and study problems, specialized testing and persooal counseling. Students who desire it a_re given ~he op portunity to work with a counselor m a con{jdenhal relatlonshlp in which they can explore their aspira trans, aptitudes, interests or any special problems they muy hnve... Programs and services of special interest to women are provided by a women's counselor in the student services offjce. ln addition, counselors will provide assistance to older returning adult learners and help them to deal wjth any anxieties they may have about the educational. experience. Students who are hllving academic "Standards of Progress" difficulties, ;lnd who need to discuss the effects ol such difficulties on their future fmanclal aid, inay also make counseli.tig appointments. Coiuuelors are also a.vrulable to assist students who may be withdr~wtn~ so they m_ay make plans for the~ future eilurotioo,. CllrHr Plannmg Resources Career plonntng ~s an important part of human development, ~rising out of our needs and values as well ~ our nbwtles and e~riences. The career planniilg reilouices ol studet1t services at MATC are desi~ to.malce you aware of variables; both within yourself and ~n the world around you, ~t must be de01lt with in developing a purposeful hfe pattern. Resources available are the Career Planning Pro gfl!lll (a gro~ p as$~s.sme~t and. career orient~t!on pro gram a11~iloble Jo mqulnng.adult student, h1gh schools and eominunlty groupsj, individual counsel 1ng, cllreer pianning groups, additional assessment!dstruments, compule ri~ed: career guidance pro grams, and a career resource library. The use of the computer-based guidiulce system offers a system~tic career development program designed to enhance normal <:areer development for students and other adults, Among the co~nents are values clarilication, work.skills, matching values and occupations, interests and strengths, occupa lional inform ation and el<pioring specific career plans. Evalueflon and Assessment Many kinds of instruments life available to assess student interests, abilities, aptitudes, personality traits and vnlues. The counselor and the student decide which evalubiion instruments ilre beneficinl. Aftorward tbe counselor explains the significance or results of the evaluation to the student. This information s kept confidential. WomiH 's Services A professional counselor is ~ssigned the respo~sibility of providing assistance and support serv1ces in m eeting the needs of women.. The college recognizes the need to p~ovtde a service system with emphosis on counselmg to amtst women in the areas of career exploration and developn1ent, economic parity, training and general informullon necessary to enler or re-enter the work force. Specie/ NHds. Counseling b available to students wbo.have academic, social, economic, cultural or other han dlcnps tbnt might prevent!hem from succeeding in educational programs. The college also has.special progrom~ aimed at providing opportutlitles for enrollment to women and minorities who are re entering school after an interruption in their ~duc;a lion, those who ure seeking career change, and displaced homemakers. Special needs services fo~ physically and mentally disabled students attendmg MATC ar" 01lso provided and coordinated b) a special needs counselor.., Any entering st udent who has a diagno$ed learn iug disability is encouraged to submit appropriate " t~t scores and evaluation measures to th~ special needs counselor. This information wilrhelp 1nstruc~ tors U'd counselors meet student. needs. Supportive services are provided to assist han dicapped students to overcome specific barriers and face the different challenges encountered during their attendance ot MA TC. Such services may in clud" coun&ellni;, career exploration, noletakiog, academic coaching and loanidg Of ~tte ~corder$, and calculators. Jnstnictorn Should'be contacted regarding 5pec!al provisi6f!s.l liat may be necessary for taking tests..' ' ;: ' Accessibility to physicaha~uiti~& and.ac.ac!e!p.ic, programs is stressed u]iart. of the. commitment.to meet special nee~ ~ r!l<juire;nenfs. E"!ery: effort is made to lnt~grale harldicapped stut\ents i.nto tb~ mainstrebm of vocati.onai education.programs... MATC s committed to the belief that t i~ the right ot all students to have an.eqw.i opportunity to ac q uire knowledge, gain soclal skills and develop per sonolly. A special " nformation Hapdjlpok for Students with Special Needs" has been prepared to acquaint people witb.gen~ral information about. educatlonal oppori:w)itiesfor MATC students with, handicaps. Copies are avallal?le upon request in the. office of the special needs counselor, and stud~tds should be fami!lar with ts contents. Th~ book. should be of great assistance to handicapped. students regarding the availability of certain services and the accessibility of campus areas. Parking guides and several noor plans for campus buildings arc,., provided. Heelth Services Health services are provided to :students to aid them in maintaining phys~l and emotional health. These services are stoffed by a registered nurse who maintains an office at the Trualt campus and by a coj\sulting physician who serves in an ad visory capacity. A variety of health edu cation programs for students s offered yearly as well as health screen ing, treatment and proper referral. Student ~rh nsurance Pltfn A student hedlth insurance plan covering accident and iuness is available at nominal cost to students in full-time pi'ograros. nformation and enrollment forms are available during registration and in tbe student services office. HQusfng Madison Area Technical College is.primarily a.. commuter college. The. new Truax Airpark. i:all!!lus is located near major highways and is._.aslly reached from most parts of the dlstdct. Parking. c9sts are modest and bus service n Madison is widely' availabie. Nevertheless, many students will move. to Madison either for co'nvenfenc~ or to experience a new d~~e of ndependence rom parental supervi sion, which may be an important step in their in dividual development. For these students, MATC provides a housing information service... Housing lists prepared eacb June and updated twtce during the summer ere rnailea on request eel ween june 1 and August 15. These lists. are. available g. in the student service$ olftce along with maps, cbn i sumer information and housing ronsultalion. Moldlson Area Technical College assiunes no rc~ponsibillty for inspection or condition of!he. premises or the terms of the leiisc.s offered. The Ctty of Madisoo enforces a minimum housing code, a fire sa!eiy code and an equal opportu_nities t~rdinance. Job Placement The placement office provides assistance in secur ing part-time and full tlme employme?t. Many,. students allending eollege need part hme wor.k m order to earn money to defray expenses. Assistance is offered to help students identify job opportunities and develop appropriate job application skills so. they may be successful in finding a job.,. Employers n the Madison area contact the college in their efforts to obtain qualified employees. The placement office w orks with (acuity m embers to facilitate communication between employers and students. Notices of job opportunities received from employers are kept on file in the placement office, posted on bulletin boards, sent to appropriate pro gram areas, and sent to graduates and alumni registered for placement assistance.. Graduates ore encou"ged to register with the placement office so they will be noti.fied of job open ings relatiqg to their chosen fields. Placement :. reports, which include salary ranges for graduates, :. are available n the placement office. 1 RNANCAL AD Student lnformatlon- A comprehensi te f111ancial a.id program is offered to provide assl1tance to students who would other wi.se be unable to llnance their educations. thus, the opportunity for education is extended to qualified men and women in financial need through loans, grants and work study employment. The financial "id program is adnimistered on the principle that financial assistance should be viewed only as supplementary to the efforts of the family. Therefore, in order to determine need an<! to make awards fairly, the parents of aid a.pplicants are re quired to complete a fiiuj)cial aid form. n'. the case of a student who is clearly self supporting m secor dance with federal guidelines, eligibility is based on the financial resources of the student and/or spouse. All flnanclal aid awards are based on the a ppllcant's financial need as determined QY the financial aid office... Application Ptoctdures. t rs recommended that i11coming freshm~n at~p lyfor financial aid by April 15 of the year preceding their en.rollment in school. Application forms and in structions are available from high-school counselors and principal$ or from the financial ald office. Conti nuing or transfer students. ~hould also apply for, assistance by April 15. Students who apply after this date will be considered for all types of aid, but some fund& may not be available. Students wl10 have received assistance previo~ l)l must reapply each year in order for the award to be renewed. Application forms and instructions are available from tbe financial aid office, : n ordet to be considered for fuiancial aid, the. following information must be on file in the./inan, cia! aid office:.. lll.pell Grant Student Aid Repor:t:.;rbis r~rt, is received by the applicant after the Wiscoosm.. Fuaancial Aid Form is completed by the student and processed by the College Schowship Service and the Pell Grants Program. The ~ppucant must submit a Student Ellgiblllty Rep 0 rt.to the financial aid of!lce. () Fin~ncial Need. An,a.lysis Report: Th.ls r~port is forwarded to the financial aid office after the Wisconsin FillOnclal Aid Form is completed by.the student and processed by the College. Scholarship Service.. (J Copy of the st"dent's/spouse's federal in come tax form : n tbe case of a dependent student, a copy of his or her patents' prior year federal t.ax form' is requited, in addition to the student's pnor year lll form. (J Completed copy of the MATC F'lnanclal Aid Student Data Fonn. (SJ l!vldence that the applicant is enrolled n an approved aasoclatc degr-ee, college trans[er 01' vocational diploma program: En(ollment in c urses that do not lead specifically to a d iploma or degree does not qualify for financial aid.

14 Student lnforrnatlon Types of Aid Wbc:onsln Higher Etlucatlon Grant WHEG): The amount of ~rant is calculated by the Wisconsin Higher Eclucatlonul Aids lloard ~nd is based on financial need. This grant becomes n part of the financial aid package developed b)' the financial aid office. Students must be Wisconsin residents and enrolled at least half.time. Native Amerlc;an Assistance Grant: Grants for ndian students are available through the WSConsin Higher Educational Aids Board and tho Buroau of ndian Affairs. The grant amount is based on financial need: Financial aid application procedures, as prevtously outlined, must be followed in detcrrnln ing financial need. n addition, a student must complete a separate ndian Scholarship application for the purpose of certification by the Bureau of ndian Affairs as to the degree of ndian blood. A student must l!e enrolled full-time to receive a Bureau of n dian Affair' Grant and half time {o receive a State ndian Assistance Grant. Pell Grant: This is n f~deral prqgram designed to provide ~rants to students based on financial need. A maximu.m ~ward is d~termlned abllu<~lly by fed~ral ~u1~elm75. Grant AVfatds become part of a student s fmanc1al aid package. To receive a 100 per cent award, the student must be enrolled in lz or more credits. To receive a 75 percent.award, the student must be enrolled in 9, 10 or 11 cr~hs. To receive 50 percent, th~ student must be enrolled in 6, 7 or 8 credit&. Work Study: Under provisions of the Higher Bducatlon Act, employment opportunities are available to students on the ba.ois of financial need. The amount they are eligible 10 receive becomes part of their financial aid award. Students must be enrolled at least half-time. Supplemental l!ducatlonat Opportunity Grant (SEOG): Gr~ta from federal funds, as provided. under the Highe~ Education Act, arc available to students on the basis of financiili need. The grant become~ part of the student's financial aid package. Students must be ~nrolled nt least half.time. T~~entlncentlve Gr11nt ll'p).: ThiS program is destgned.. to.slip,lllement the WHilG program and is targefed to serve. disadvantaged and/or minority s!ude'nts. Contact!he finoncial nid office for further informnt1on. Wise<insin 'G unranlj:cj Student Loan l'rogtain: A student who is enrolled at least half-time (6 credits o.r more) may be ai:ile to borrow dj1 io a maximum of SZ6Z6 per year. Terms and conditions of!}sl loans often change. Contact tbe financial aid office for current regulations -and procedures. Veteran's Bducatiot>nl Benefits- Fed eral: To quaufy for monthly educational benefits tbtough the U.S. Veterans Administration, a veteran must be enrolled n an approved associate degree or voca tiona! diploma program at least half tirne. Most programs of study at MATCare approved for veterans benefits by the Wisconsin Educational Approval Board. To be eligible for maximum benefits a veteran must be enrolled n a minimum of iz credits in an approved S!oclate degree program or at least Z hours per week in a vocational diploma program dominated by-shop practice. For some programs, Continued ellglbllity for aid is outlined under the where classroom and thcorctlcnl instruction is domi conditions of " Satisfactory Progress R"quirements." nant, only 18 hours per week muy be required for Formula for Grant Repayment: lull beneots. Sons, daughters, spouses and surviving spquses of AmUimt Dl Pl!ts Amounl of Gntnt AmoLUlt deceased veterans, totally and permanently disabled cf Grwnt robe Rdund<"<l Recci~cd 1\opoid by Student and veterans or MA as a result of military service may be eligible for VA monthly educational assistance. Approved Rulored to Slate: or t is the responsibility of tho student receiving C<W rl d..,llon Fedenl <\<tount veterans educational benefits to notify the MATC Office of Veterans Affairs of any chan~es n enroll Tim Umltatl for ~ ment status or withdrawal. Aclditionatly, all vctera.ns e on hlch D Student May and dependents must make satisfactory progress i.n Receive Financhtl Aid their programs of study. (See VA reporting.) Regulatiol)s further require that flnmcia! nid be Veteransllducatlonal Bcncfils-Wi~nsin : restricted to time increments. The muimum Students who were Wisconsin residents upon entry number of semesters for whx:h a student making iuto the military service and who served during the satisfactory progress each semestex shall receive Vietnam Bra, in Lebanon, or Grenada, may be eligi- financial aid is as follows: ble to receive each academic year an educati6n grant of up to $00 for a veteran wlth no dependents and $00 for a vet with dependents. These veterans must~ be emolled full time, and application must be made prl!lr to th~ end of the enrollment period for which they are applylng. Applications may be obtained from the MATC Office of Veterans Affairs. ll Veterans enrolled Jess than full tirne who entcr.ed. ~~. r MAXMUM BNROLLM:-l!l' SBMESTBRS PROGRAM STATUS FOR FUNDNG z~year fuii Tit11tt t + 5 / rim /~,, 7 H lf Time(6 S (0 the military servlce as residents of Wisconsin,. or, Yeor Fu11 1'lme(1 who have llved n Wisconsin ten contin!jous years, / TlrneJ9 11) and who &llrved during a qualifying wartime period,, Holf 1imet '>.81 may be eligible, upon satisfactory c~mpletion, for ' :. :... ; reimbursement of tuition, fees and textbook costs. Contact your County Veterans Service Officer for - Satisfactoty Progress Requirements additional ellgibllity criteria and application. Note: Government regulations" require that recipients.ol Application must be made within 60 days after the financial aid make satisfactory pr6gress in the procompletion date of each oourse.. ' grams for which they are en rolled. To maintain Unmarried widows, widowers and minor or H satisfactory progress, a student must maintain a dependent.children of deceased, qualified veterans, :1 grade point average of Z.O or better and earn at least enrolled less than full-time, may nhio be eligible for six credits each semester of their enrollment. this state reimbursement grant. ' failure t? meet sa.tisfa~tory pro_gress requirements MA TC Foundar.Jon wdl resuu tn financtal a.~d probationary status during The MATC Foundation, established in l97, 1- the next semester ohmrollment During the operates lor the P"""OSC of aiding stude"' and the l semester a st_udent is on flnancial aid probation, the ~ ; student mtl~t achieve satisfactory progress or lose c~lleg~. Funds are provided by the generous con-. 1 <>!igibility for any financial aid, including loans and tnbullons of al.umni, staff, retirees, business, in-. grants, for a perlocl of two semesters. dustry, foundations and friends. S.hort terrn loans, Students who completely withdraw from school, gra~ts.nnd ~cljolarships are available. ' or earn Jess than 1.0 grade point average for any Dlsburseme11t of Funds semester, wllllo~e thelr eliglblllty for financial aid. Grant and loan thecks require two to six weeks A student. who })ecojil_~ ineligible for financial aid for prdcessing, \lepcndlng on the source of the. can r~. estabhsh el!glbthly to apply?y s\tccessfully funds. Grant checks are disbursed once each me~tmg.standards of progress recjuirements fqr a semester, usually at the beginning of the term. pen~d. Of t~o se~es!ers of 7nroilment while not When aid s ready to be disbursed, students will. re.celvlng fl!lilncjai md. Dunbg these two semesters receive an authorization card by mai!.advising them of e~rollmcnt, Q student must ~arn a minimum of six to report to the business office to pick. up their cr~dtts each semester ;tnd obtain a semester gradecheckfs), To receive aid, students wiu be required to pomt avera~e of at least.0 each semester. produc.e : () Authomation Card; (( Current student EvsiUtion of SttlndM'ds of l'rogresll VJd J.D. card; (1 Current registration form. There will Appeals Ptoces$ be no exceptlons to this policy. Under no cir Lo 55 0 f 0 clal,., u b cum stances will financial aid checks be disbursed nan a,.. e gl llity may be appealed by after 8 student is considered w 'thdl'il. ~ the student. Such appeal must be placed in writing attendance or other rcaso 1 \\ n or non ;<oa submitted to the finoncfol aid supervisor within. ns. 0 calendar days from the time the student is Condlt(ons for Repayment of Grant Funrh' ' notified t_hat he. or she has lost fimnciaj aid eligibili.repayment of grant funds, ns a result of H ty A rev1ew Will be made, by the financial aid wtthdrawal, is related to the terms and conditions of ii supervisor, of the ndividual's situation to detennine the fe~ refuu~ policy. ~ctual repayment of grant jl continued eli~ibility. funds S applicable durmg th'e fees refund period. ~~ " Student nformation-5 A student may appeal the outcome ol this deter minatlon. Such appeal must be made in writing to the Standards o! Progress Review Committee within 0 calendar days from the time the decision wa.. made by.the financial aid supervisor. The Standards ol Progress Review Committee shall be appointed by the Assistant Director-Student Services. A decision on an appeal shall not conflict wlth siate or federal regulatloos. VA Repotting Studen.t veteram who fail to obtain a satisfactory grade pomtaverage of.0 or better upon completion of their nitial 5elllester of enrollment, or a cumulative satisfactory grade point average o{.0 upon completion of any given semester, arc placed on aeademi probation. Foliure to achieve a satisfac tory gride point aver ge of.0 or better for the subsequent probationary semester results in. the stu dent's name being repqtted to the Veterans Ad, ministration for unsatisfactory progress.. Tl1e reportlng of upsatl~factory progress results in the immediate suspension of t.he.ufec!ed' student's educational benefits pending adnih istrat.ive review by the V.A. STUDENT RESOURCES Bookstores Necessary books and supplies are sold to students and staff at a price which represents CQSt plus ap. proldmately 0 percent and freight This gives student. a discount and stiu covers the!osseo from unsold and defective materio.js. Because the bookstores are non-profit units, they cannot afford the risks of dealing in used books. Visa and Mastercard are accepted; checks are accepted only iu exjtct ~tmount of payment. The bookstores are ope!' from. 7:0a.m..to ;00 p.m. Monday through Friday. M111ketlng Club's Used Book Sale The Marketing Club'~ Used Book Sale is available to ail MATC studen t ~. The textbook collection time period occurs at tke end of each semester during the final e~am.'veek. The textbook resale time period oc C\!rs during the beginning of each semester.. All used books turned n for resale are sold by c6n stgnment. BoQks sbld are levied a 10 percent.service charge against 'their re!ale fee/ With the remainhig monies returned to each MATC S\ude nt by check. Unsold textbooks are rctume(l. to each student for resale the following semester or students are given the optim1 to resell books at non-textbook prices to a textbook wholesaler, All books or checks become the property of the Marketing Club wh~n unclaimed by a specific clo& ing date each semester. MA TC Chlld Cate Center. The MATC Child Care Center provides care for children of full or part tlme MATC students during the re&ular school year, The center serves children between the ages ol -Yi to alx years from 7:5 a.m.. to 5:00p.m. A parent advisory committee makes recommendqtlons to staff regarding center activities and policy. Fees are based on the going rate for child cur~ in the community. Parents may register by con tacbng the Home conornl.cs office. Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

15 6 Student Jnfonnation C111Cicer S.rrell The Cracker Barrell is a smad shop located within the college. is operated by fashion merchandising students and serves MATC students, staff, faculty and nearby residents. Store image is projected throughout-in the decor, customer ~ervice and merchandise available. Students design the decor each yea{, establish the image, create the promotional materials, and buy and $<illl the merchandise, whicll varies each season. A customer usually finds a, good selection of gift items, old-!sshloned csndy, greeting cards and note papers, bath products, leather items. and sweaters and tops for both men and women. This unique litue shop serves as a laboratory for fashion merchandising students <1nd provides the opportunity to try-out theories and facts learned in class. DenY~ Hygiene CUnlc The Dental Hygiene Clinic is a leaching institution where dental hygiene students p erform oral pr<i~ phyla~s Jc\~~ l)ing) and other dental services such as x-rays, study' models, topicalllu<iride treatments. and oral hygiene instruction. These services are available to all students of the college for a small fee. The service cannot be C?.DStrued as a complete dental and oral exam~ nation. The iot<!rpretation of x rays and the diagnosis of dental defects are not the purpose of this clinic, but the information obtained by the dental hygiene student is available if the patient's dentist equests. A dentist makes the proper nterpretation of any diagnostic material as required. by stale law. Food Service Students enroll~ in the;foq< Preparation Assistant and Restaurani-Hotel Cookery programs plan menus, compute prices, and prepare and serve food and bak.ery goods under the supervision of experienced nstructors. The cafeteria opens at 7:0a.m. for continental breakfast. Hot 'llreakfast items are prepared from 8:00!> 10:00 a.m. SQup, sandwiches and the salad b." are available at 10:0 a.m.. entrees and ~ide dishes from J.J:0 a.m. to.1:00 p.m. The snack bar offers typicnl fast food items beginning at 10:0 a.m. Gourmet luncheons ate s~rved in. the Gourmet Dining Room on Tui!Sdays imd Thursd~ys from 11 t0 n.m. lo 1:0 p.m. (ceservations are recommendedj. ; lniodmltlon 'Resource Centeta There ore six infonnation resource centers- at the TtuiiJ! 'Airpark campus, the Technical Center, MA'fC Fort Atkinson, MATC-Poitage, MATC Reed.!burg, MATC Watertown-to serve students and ste(f. The largest center, at tbe T ruax Airpark campus, seats 55 people and has 1.5 miles of shelving with a capacity for 100,000 volumes. Computer output microfiche catalogs n all information resource facilities provide students with access to tiues in all collections. nstructional Learning Center The Adult &sic Education Department offers all MATC student$ end the general public the oppor tun y to review, re-learn or improve on basic skills such as reading, math, wtiting. study skills and campus Center Offlce more. Learuing Centen are located throughout The Campus Center Office houses the student ac District. ' Uvitlcs staff and the following areas-tv lounge, OpekM Dlspenuty recreation oren, multl purposc room, m eeiing rooms, The Optometric Technician program offers an op student lounge, Student Senate office, PAC office, tical dispensary which is operated by optometric and clubs und organizations work area- are all part technician students under instructor supervision and i of the Campus Center. serves students,.taff and faculty. Free of charge, Student Activities Board these services performed by students include ad- 'F.te Area Board of Vocational, Te.chnical and justmenls and minor repair of eyewear Adult Bducotion, Dislricl No. established a Student For all M..TC students requiring prescription safe- Activities Boord consisting of four fa<:ulty or adty glasses, optometric technician students perform, f this service. students must obtain a wrillen copy of ministrators and our students-three o whom are their current prescriptions from their vision eleded al large. The objectives of the Student Ac-... _.,_, : , ~~i~::~;~:cf::~:, :,r;~:c:!~a;ra~:.e~~;f~~n titw~ob:~~~~~;~ ~~~~: :~the form~ recognil;on the cost of the safety glasses will be calculated accor of stu~en_t groups and/or cl~bs as offictal college d' l tb lab rder. 0 tical dispensary hours are ~ orgamzatwns whtch ~ba r~ m segregate~ fun~s. pos m~e~ ev!rr se~ester. p f {d) To formulate gmdehnes for adm1n1slenng un s. Vision Screenings. {) To examine annual applications arid review,'ap-,students in the Optometric Technician program ~ prove or deny, n whole or in part, the. bu<!ge(s of ac provide complete vision screenings to MATC if tivities groups judged to be eligible to share ft~nds. students, staff and faculty. Vision screening s take! () To make judgments on the allocation of funds place January through March each year. Screenings (rom segregated funds to those activities which are perfo<med by fourth semester students at no ' qualify according to established guidelines. charge. Some of the tests included in the screening ' 151 To report recomruend<!tion> to the Area Board are: Case history, lensometry (neutralization of cur- of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, rent $peclacl s), color perception, cover l.,t aond District No., through the District Director. near point of convergence (to detennioe eye align- (6) To administer alt segregated ful\ds tesponsibly. mentj, vi$11al acuity {this test is performed al both, 171 To recommend other areas to be covered by the far and near distances, with and without.current cor- segregated funds to the Area Boatd of Vocational, rectionj, keratometry (!letermines curvature of cor- 1 Technical and Adult Education, District No.. nea), tonometry!measures intraocular pressure-tl)ls ' Further nformation about thestud~ri t Mtivlties test is performed as a screening for glaucoma using a Board may be obtained from the Assistani t>irectot non-contact ton<imeterj, blood pressure, and visual Student Services. The Student Aalvities Board elec- field scrl!ening(lo lest limits of peripheral vision. tion takes place in November. Th~ v~~n ~reening is.used to determine whether. " Programs and Activities council 'PAC' an tndjvtdual may requtre further eye care from a v1- ~.. tc.,_ sion specialist. Vision screenings are avali<lble by ap Formerly called the Program Board, t_he 1' AC 15 _,. pointments only on certaio days-during limited ; group of volunt~er ~tudents who coordmate a varu~hours ; ty of student activlhes and programs for the MA.TC student body. With the help of staff members from ~ tl1e Office of Student Activities, the PAC s mis.sion is STUDENT ACTVTifS 'j to offer co curclcular and extra-c\tic!lary rograms Afte ~ students become oriented in t heir scholastic -~l at MATC to en~ance n stude~ t s recr~ational,. work,' they. will find their couege experiences are ~ cultural, ed'l~ahqnal and socj,alexpen ences.. made more meaningful and valuable by their active ~ PAC ':'embers g~ t ~e chan~e to develo~ ski.us partlcfp.ltlon 1n some social or co-curricular phase of s.uch as. Comrhurucallon, ~em!, self-confide~ee,, the college program. ~ llrne management, leaderslup aod qther areas o~ per- t is tjle goal of the college to provide the oppor sonal growth. ~em~rs can also streng!hen thetr tunity for each student to participate in activities class_r~om iearntn~ 111 t!e a.reas of. market~~ which relat~ to vocati~nal objectives.. S;lltisfy social ~~bhctty, accountmg, pubhc rel.auons, wnllng! and needs, prov1de recreational opportumbes, and en, h_er areu o study. Any MATC student w ho t.s courage cultural enrichment. registered and n attendance for at least o!le credtt tn The entire philosophy of the a clivi lies prograr(l. an MA TC post-h1gh school program may JOin.the CllD best be summed up in one word--nvolvement. PAC.... Students should be able to find an area which ap- ~ A n1embe_r can.choose lo JOm any of the followtng peals to them whether it be music, athletics, drama, P~C comm!llees.... student government, clubs, newsmagaz;ine or, Film Sencs-fealures var~s classtc ~J.ru, recent programming. ;, re!ease~, educatlon~.t short. f11c~, rock vtde~, Sa!ld Student acuvity monej> is funded through tbe Ac # wt;h Clnema, ohd free fbcks... tivities Bo&rd which is composed of staff, ad :! n Concert Cornm iltee-f~atures hve ~an!ls, vtdeo mini'strution and students. J: dances nnd special concerts m such ~us cal styles as reggae, rock, runk, country rock, swmg. R&.B, new '{ wave, cte..; Student lnfotmatjon-1 ' Lecture/Arts Series- plans educational speakers, workshops und seminars on a variety of topics such ru~ careers, stress management, politics, finance ond other int ere~l areas. Also coordll\lltes performing arts programs lu the areas of dance, theatre, mime, classical. music. elhtl!c music, and other cultural programs. ' Outdoor 'Rec/TraveJ Committee-coordinates severo! recre 0 tlonaulelsure-\ype trips (i.e., hiking, camping, can~lng, Oreal America}. Also plans group trips during winter andlot spring breaks to places such as Daytona Beach, Padre slands, the 'Caribbean or other possible locations. ' Special Events C<immittee-<:oordinates PAC recruitment and orientation w.ecks, the annual Winter Carnival Week, Spring Picnic, and other special interest programs. ' Variety Unlimited-features a variety of novelty artists such as hypnotists, magicians, come<).ians, jugglers, caricsturisl.'l, impressionists, etc. ' Children's Series- besides the annual.kids' Day, this series features a variety o family-otiented pro grams lor MATC students and t!ieir children.(i.e., puppet shows, family m.ovi~s. storytellers, Easter egg hunt). ' Soundstage-fea t ur~ various musical artists in o listenin~ atmosphere to highlight such style$ as folk, jarz, blues, contemporary, bluegrass, acappella. etc. 'Publicity Committee-coordinates marketing campaigns for PAC events, comes up with idea$ and designs iol' inllovauve pohlicil:y for commihee functions, assists the committees with creative promotional techniques. Most oflhese committees have_the oppo~olty O review tapes, albums, videos, al)(l promotional infor mation on the m u_ltltude of art_ists snd speakers. Members g~ the cl)ance to talk to agents/performers, sched\lle programs strategically throughout the school year, arrange for the p r<!grains {reserve fcllities, order refreshments, etc.j, publicize ~vents, help set-up and tear down before and alter eveots. The MATC Programs and Activities Council. welcomes stude.nts of all ages, ioterests and b~ckgrounds to be<;ome members. Student Senate,. The Student Senate is made up of elected repfesentatlves from all fult-tlme programs. Members of the Senate repr!!scnt approximately 15 students from their individual programs. The.Senate meels.twlce monthly to make decisions or recomm~ndations on college policy, school activities, educational advancement, improvements to the college; arid lobby ing for student rights <~nd needs. The Senate is 1 member of and auends conferences of tb~ Wisconsin Student Council of Technical Bducation and the Wisconsin Student Caucus. General elections to the.senate are held during the fourth week of the new school year. However, members inay lie added' as vacancies occur throughout the year. Senate officers are elected dur ing May of each year and serve a one-year term unless re-elected. ~~.

16 8 Student nformation ESTABLSHED STUDENT SENATE COMMrMEES MATC New Campus Committee Legislative Commit~ Student Grievance Committee P"rofessional Standards Committee Communications Committ~~ Publicity and Public Affniu Committee Stude)l!Employer Career Awareness Day Committee Student Activities Committee Alumni Association The MATC Alumni As$odation hu a membership of o"er 9,000 graduates, and the number keeps growing. Alumni provide ~11 excell~nt reso~rce _for students seeking jobs. Then flnancjal contnb,jttons to the MATC Foundation hav~ aasi ted many in dividuals in completing their -educations. Alumni receive regular communications from MATO, and their-feedback is solicited to ensure that curriculums.are.current and. appropriate for today's jobs and for the jobs of tomorrow. COllege NewsmagaZine-SLANT SLANT (Student Life and News Today) is the of ficial nev1smagnine of the college. This national prizewinning publication is created' and produced for and by MATC student~. l t~ editors, artists, Teporters, photographers and salespeople are either taking courses related to publishing or they are volunteers who want experience and the distinction of work with SLANT to appear on thelr resumes at grndua Uon time. SLANT publlsbes ~0 pages th~ first. Tuesday of eaci) new month during the schoo~ year and circulates a total of 10,000 <:<?Pies.. Staff members gei,!!)!:ether many tilj\es througbout the sci)ool year for potlucks, after-school relreshm~nts and pic.nics.... CLUBS AND ST.JPENT ORGANZATONS Association of Cl11ll Technlcilms Civil technol~gy graduates or stud~nts.ijt ~~ standing may belong to this club. ThJ$ ass{)cial!on se~ks to uiute civil technicians, promote interest and provide education in this field, as well-as to en courage citiienshlp ol)d leadership. ASsociation of Electronic Technicians Active members of this organlulion include first and second yeac students enrolled in the Blectronic Technology program. The purpose of the club s to promote the interests of.members in a professional manner. Thi$ )a ac~mplisl)ed 'hrough field trips, recreatio.nal activities, speakers ond job interviews. Up to-<late files are kept on prospective employers. Class reunions are also arranged tl:trougl\ help of t~e club. Msadatlon ol Welding Speclall ts The purposes of this organ~za tion- are to ~tewelding specialists, promote mterest, pro~1de educa tion in the field, and to promote citizensh1p and leadership. t also attempts to promote recognition to which this specialty is enhtled. B..K. This club derives lt.s nome from "BelleviJJg in Kids," l t is made up of students in the Child.ear.e Services program. The purposes ol tbe orgamzallon include promoting and praclici~s leadership in t~1e lield and promoting the profess1onal status of ch1ld care workers. Acllvilies nclude social events, field trips and community oervicc functions. ConnoiSseurs Club This organization consists of students in the first and second ye.ars ol the Restaurant-Hotel Cookery progr~m. Tbe Connoisseurs Cl~b is OJ":D" to ajly stu dent in the culinary arts. A DlJOr actmty of the club is catering school luncheons, meetings and special school related events, giving members oppmtunities to practice their skills outside the classroom. Data Processing Management Association (MATC Chapter) The MATC Chapter of OzlMA exists for the pur pos e o developing better understanding of the nature and funcl!ons of data processing by pro mating sound, ~eneral principles, improving technical methods, studying equipment and assisting members in solving their ndividual problems. Members also hope to foster, among students, a bet-' ter understanding of the vital business role of data ~ pcocessing, the proper relationship o~ it to manage ment, and the necessity for a profess1onal attlh,lde and approach to understanding and applying these principles, The organila.tion is fostered by the l~ter ~ ll8tional Data Processing Management Assocoatson. Dietetic Technician ClUb MATC's Dietetic Teehnician Club is represented by any fuu time or part lime student associated with -~ the Dieietic Teclmiclan program. The club strives to promofe career and professional development in the, field of dietetics and human nutrition. Additional ac! tivities include related field trips and confetences, p.ir.ticipatio.n in com~u.nily nutrition projects. qnd. the promollon of nutnhon awareness among 1ts 1 members in.the ch.ool and in the community. Members are strongly encouraged to )oin.,and foll.<?yo' their parent organization, the A:merican Dietetic '. Association ~ U Drama Club! The.Drama Club is open to all students at MATC. ~ ts purpose is to encourage self-development techni ques in acting and to participate in tb.eatrical ~ endeavors at MATC. Field trips to the Guthrie Theatre in Minneapolis and a spring trip to New York Theattc are planned annually. 1 Health Occupations StlldentB of AmMca liealth Occupations Students of America is a statewide organization with a local chapter at ~~ MATC. t is dedicated to refining student skills and to comtnunity service. t s open to all students 1 within the Health Occupalions Division. Students! conduct the hl annual Red Cross Bloodmobile Drive! at MATC. n \he spring, competitive health related 11 events are held statewide n the areas of medical ter lt ij ij.,.,.. ing, job appli<:atiom, CPR, first aid, medical aosisling. operating room technology, dental assisting! """- akm"'-~ nrediaol '"'""'' and nur$ing. National competitions "" held in the suuuner. Human SetVc Club MATC's Human.Service Club is an organization of students enrolled n the Human Service Associnte program. Weekly meetings are open to ad MATt st11dents a.nd f<~culty. Activities of the club nclude [undraising, food drives and preparation for the AJJ. nual Spring Conference of Human Service Educators: Club goals nclude ncreasing awareness of comniunity needs and addressing some of those needs. nterior Design/Home Fumllhlngs Club This. club is an organization consisting of stud~nt members, both pan-time U!d full time, whq are enrolled in the one yent"hom e Furnishings program and/or the two-year nterior Design program. Their activities indude providing enrichment tluougn guest speakers. and field trips. Social functions and community se:rvicea are also included. Junior American DentiJ Hygienists This organization is the student compon\!nt of tbe Nalional American Dental Hygienists Association. The activities of the association are primarily profes $ional in nature. As members, student& are.~ligible to participate in any of tbe local, state or national meetings of the ADHA, and students receive the ADHA's publication. Marlcetlng Club The Marketing Club s open to all.matc students, especiiilly to those in marketing,programs. The organization' s purposes include developing buslne~ relationships with 9istrict business pe"''le, encourdg ing employment contacts. The ll\jly club activities allow members to test their!earned classroom skills. The club is a very active student organization. belonging to the state and national Delta Epsilon Clti Division of DBCA. MATC Press (;lub The P.ress Club's purpo~~ s to brq6den anc;l, deepen. student ioiter~ s t ln journalism. Specifically, lhe club will inform members, through guest speakers, speaker exchanges, Held. trips and special imerviews, of changes, innovations, new theories and job markets n the journalism and publishing fields. t provides public service fo MA''C and the Madison oommunity and ill affiliated with Sigma Delta Chi journaliam fraternity. M.L. T. Electrotyles Membership in this club is currently made up of medical lab technician students. t was organized n ts prime objecllve!a io be further recogqi,.ed by MATC and to help raise (unda for student ac iivitles. The dub is a good way to bring all students together to get better acquainted with eaclt other and to inform them of luappenlngs n course pro gramrning that may be oflnterest. Student lnformatio.i-~ Muffl.Erhnlc Student OrganlaUon (MESO) MESO membersblp s available to any student in terested in minority student issues. (Minority is defmed as Hispanic, Black, Native American or Asian American.) Member~ of this organization are students enrolled at MATC or participants ih any program directed by MATC. Organizational objec tives.are: (1) Develop a vehicle for cultural exchange that will be beneficial for retention and recruitment of minority students; 11 Bllrolnatc generalizations based on stereotypical ottiludes by creating a better atmosphere within tb~ college; {1 Promote and en couraze minority student participation in MATC's Student Senate; () Promote add cultivate unity.among minority students; (5) Develop and support cultural activities by presenting different activities. Student Occlip.Uonal Thetapy Association This organization consists o{ students in any-. semesi"c!r of the Occupational Therapy Assistant pro gratn at MATC, The main purpo~es of th~.,<>rgani~ tion axe: ll} To promote leadership and Clhzenshlp among students; () To promote interest in and knowledge of occupational therapy on campus and in the community; () To improve and advance the education and qualifications. of occupational therapists; {1 To maintoin communication wjth other OT stu depts n th~ ta te and na!ipn; (5) To enhance understanding between technical aod baccalaureate occupational therapy students thrc;>ugh communication with students at the University of WisconSin; (61 To provide a forum for discus,sion among stu~ents and staff memb~rs ~oncerni!'g: educational goals, practlc~ and P;rDbletns w1thm th~ program; [7) T o engage n activities to further t~e dissemination of knowledge regarding the practice of occilpati01tal tberapy; and (81 To encourage ilnprove ment of the MATC Occupational Therapy- Department. Office Eduestion Auocletfon. OEA is a voluntary student organization supper ting office educa\lon occupaliol\s. The organization is designed to deve"lop leadership abilities and.in terests in the Arn~rlcan business system and com petency in offlce occupations. t is open to all MATC studepts, full al)d part-lime. Students who join become tnember~ of the Office Education Association on a national level lis well as on state and local levels. As part of the stale and national conferences, students are given the opportunity to compete in events related to their future chooen professions. The Torch Awanls program offers' recognition for service at the local, regional, state and national levels. The MATC Chapter of OBA is involved in community service, service to the school, fundrais ing. ;md social and professional activities. Optometric Technician Club This club consists of student members, full and part-time, enrolled in the Optometric Technician program. The purposes o{ the or,ganlzatlol\ are.to promote interest and knowledge of optometry on eampw lllld in the community, to improve and ad

17 0-Stlident Jnforrruition Student lnformatinn-1 vance education and q~talifications in optometry,. and to engage in activities to further the dissemina tion of knowledge regarding the practice a( optometry. Recreation AJsoclaUon Thls association was organized by students in both the Recreation Resource Operation and To~Lrist Recreation progralll8. Tbe "Rec" Qub plans, im plements and evaluates various special events and activities such as the annuall'au Picnic, the MATC' Billiards. Tournament, and a field trip to Mexico Ci ty, Funds raised by the Rec aub are' used by students to attend professional workshops and ~nferences b~ld by such agencies as tbe Wisconsin Parks and Recreation Association, Wisconsin Federa tion of Tourism, and Wisconsin Recreation n dus\ries. The Rec Club is open to any s\ulient at MATC.. SkiClub.. This dub org$~);es.-weekend and \veek long tilps, for its stu.dent members and local ski activities for all students', including ski films, ski nights and social events.1t also sponsors a slrl team through Midwest Collegiate Ski Association. Mnjor trips to j ackson Hole, Winter Park, Steamboat Springs, Big Sky and ndianhead bave. been organized by the club. Textiles and Clothing Services Club,.TWs club ronsists or student members, full and part iime, enrolled 'in the Clot bing and Textiles program,_ 'fhe purpose of tbe organiuti~n ~ to dev~op an iilf~ in. and respect for education m clot~&. aild textile occupation~. Members promote and mte_r jm~t the program within and oufside t~e college. t ts their.desire to provi!le 'educatio!lal programs to aluiimi as well as to employees involved in clothing and textile service$ in tbe,comrnunity'. Socjal functions and field trips'ore other activities pl.anned by the group. The Ventilatots. Tlit members of tliis club include oil respiratory t!lerap~ stud~ats currently enrolled ~' MATC:. Organized in 198, their p uwoses and goals m clude fuodraising. s'ctivities so that club members may at {end educational conventions and other 'activities deemed necessary by tbc club. Additional objectives inchtd~ nforming the public or the value of r~~iratozy therapy, providing communication,bet w~n first- and second-year stu<lenta, and helpmg to mariej~araing fun... WliC9n8in./ndc!sttiJMltchlnlat Club W1MC is composed of both first and second -year students. The club is organized wltlf tlie following purposes io mind: ( 1) Proniotlng citizenship, leader ship and responsibility; (( Recognhlng and striving to fulfill all college Jl!lllcles; (1 Promoting better relations between fu:>t and second-year students; [) Promoting group interest, recognition, and employ men! Qf graduates within the machinllt trade; (5) Keeping in. contact -yit~ alumni; (6! Keeping aware of comtaht changes 1n mdustry. ' Wisconsin Student Aasoclatlon of Animal rechnklens, This organization has been establl.shed for st~d.ents in tlie two-year associate degree An1mal Tecbmcan program, Association piupdses include increasing membei knowledge of ani~ tt<:hnology ~d veterinary medicine, encouraging respo nst~le citizens to engage io tbe humane care o( anunals,_ maintaining effective communication bet~e~n th_e Veterinary Advisory Council, college admm1slrahon, faculty, veterinarians and future technicians, ;md protecting the status of future technicians from tbose wbo have not attained a degree of proficiency in the area necessuy for thfs specialized. field of study. MUSiC The Music D~p~~tment offers a: variety of activities aitd courses to stu(lents at MATC. n addition, qualified.and -expeoenced performers may j~in the Madison Symphony Orchestra, Madison Civ1c Chorus, Madison Civic Opera or Madison Municipal Band- all by audition end pennission of tbe conductor. Non-credit classes are also avallatll~ in piano, voic.e, organ and guitar.. :., New.College Singers ' MATC's New College Singer hn"e appeared throughout the United States. The Singers' performing ensemble has been critically acclaimed as "em phatically contemporary" and "the most dramatic and sensational stage action to be &ten by -any choir of its kind," Tbe group form an integral part of the growing music program at MATC for it: (.1) Exposes students to' the incre'a&ln'gly populnr a:nd significant means of. musical ~pressioq in tl\e pop-rock-show medium; (Z Serves es go6cmill ambassador of song for MATC; and () Provideo i;>oth'fuh and social el< perience. Auditions-are held the 'first week of each semester. One college' transfer. credit is given. Jazz,EnH""ble. MATC' Jazz Ensemble has become one of the top jazz groups in the state. l'r9m the premierins of new, original jazz works,,lo their featured performance. with Maynard Fer$ltson and his band, the Jazz Ensemble has: drawn entnu'slastic supporl fr()(li Wisconsili'&jazz "freaks." Menibershlp is by aixitiori ani! provides the stucjent with one college credit lnstrumentel Erinmble MATC's lnstrumental Bnsemble-provides students wiill an oppbrtunity to rehearse and perform band and wind ensemble literature. The b\lnd has per. formed music from many of the fine5! wind c'om : ' posers and from populilr composers such as Scott Joplin. t i.s open to'all studentnnd provides one co~ge credit. ' Community Show Choir The Community Show Choir is a group dedicated to singing popular music. t is open to anyone in the Madison community as well as to any student at MATC. Music is selected from popular styles which include Broadway, Rock, Motion Pict~Lre, etc. Tbis group is open to everyone without an audition. ATHLETtCS ~{ATC athletic programs are designed so. that.al( iriterested men and women have tbe opportunity to participate in some athletic activity. intetcos.glete Atlllelica MATC is a member of the Wisconsin Technical College Conference [WTCC), the Wisconsin Junior CC>llege Athletic Assaciation (WJCAA), and the N~tional Junior College Athletic Assotlatlo.n JNJC.\.1\j., These groups are ttie g~ern i~g b~les wt11ch determine rules,,regulations and ehgiblhty standards for student athletes, The following spprts are offered. M en Women Baseball Basketball Basketbali Bowling, Bowling Ch~leadil!g.Cross Country. Cross,Country Golf Softball.. Tennis Tenliis.. Wrestling Volleybafl.~.. Tlie intramural and recreation programs are open to all MATC students, nformation on weekly events is found in the student bulletin. lntramura ls Recreation (Oprn Gym) Basketball Aerobic Dance Bowling Archery Softball (co-ed) Badminton Sportsdays Basketball Touch f'oolball Volleyball(co-ed) Racquetball Swimming Table Tennis Tennis Volleyball Weight Training Truax Athletic Ff!Ctlea. ndoor athletic f1cilities at Truax lnf:l!!de: gym nasium, swimnlilig pool, racquetball courts. and weight iralniog room. o utdoor 'facilities nclude baslcet'ball 'and volle.yball. C!l~S, softball and baseball diamonds,!end.i& co~ and soccer fields. The va.rio\ts facilities are open to. students and staff wb'en classes are notuuession. Lockers and '~~ers for ~nand "!'omen are available.

18 Educational Services Educational Services TYPES OF DEGREilS APPRENTCESHP Al:l'ERNATVE LEARNNG DVSON. j,

19 -Educatio'!-111 Services Educational Serricei 5 TYPfS OF DEGREES Associate n Applied Science Thh degree is designed to le<~d the student directly to employment in specific career. t is awarded upon successful completion of occupations) pro grams where technical courses emphasize "applied_ sciences" (those kills that apply directly to a certmn field) in the study of subject areas like computer technology, public safety, industrial production, business techniques, food services, agriculture. or health. n some nstances, particularly in health related fields, this degree is a prerequisite Jor tailing a liceming ellaminalion. Associate n Applied Arts This degree is designed to lead the student directly to employment in a specjfic cureer. t is awarded upon successful ~O.npletion of occupnti_c;mal pr,o: grams where tecl)mcal courses empha~tze creattve techniques and activities in the.st11dy of ~ubj~t areas like commercial art, photography. llltenor design ot occupational therapy. AssOciate n Arts/Asslx:late,ln Sc/eiJce Llbei'(A Studies Degrees. Bither ol tl!ese degrees is designed for students.,.,;ho wish a broad general education whi.ch, in rome instances, c;n) be beneficial when seekin~: employ ment. t is awarded upon successful completioo of program requirements and electives compris~g ~ semester credits. The AS!$0i:late in Science degree :S earned b)' students whose liberalstudies coursework erophas!zes mathematics and science. The ~elate in Arts degr~e is earned 'by ~tudents w~ose l!beril studies coursework emphas1zes the soctal SCJences and humanities. Vocational Diploma. Vocational diploma pr98f8js are deslgried to prepare students n the basic skills necessary for employment. After satisfac.tor.y completion of any of these programs, a less than ol)e year, one-year or two-year vocational diploma is grapted. OTHER ~RVCfS. College T18111fet. The collese transfer program provjcjes!'ourses comparable and corresponding to those generally re. qui red in the first two years of programs offered by four-year colleges and universities, thereby enablingthe student in this area to transfer toil four-year institution. Students who pursue a couege transfer pro.griim are advised to schedule co11rses that meet the re quiremen'ts of their chosen four-year colleges. They should contact the colleges or universities to which they intend to transfer for adviee on specific courses they should take for entering their major fields. Some of the courses in associate degree programs are accepted for transfer by certain institutions, but these courses vary from program to program and from accepting institution to nstitution. Courses that are applicable for college transfer should be discussed at the time of registration. Qualified students in associate degree technical programs, with consent of the dcon/chuirperson ol the par ticular division, may substitute courses from the col lege transfer program which satisfy techmelll pr<>gram requirements. Vocational-Technical Developmental This one-semester program is designed to s;;rve one of two functions for students: (1) To provtde classes which remove deficiencies in past training and therefore enable students to be eligible for the vocational or technical programs of their choices; or 11 To strengthen and refresh. aca:dem.ic competen des to ~ter ensure success tn vocattonal or technical studies. APPRENTicESHP Apprenticeship Law An. apprentice training program. is a legally constituted progrom of education set up under Wisconsin state law n such a way that the employer and the apprentice are fairly treated un~er ~ contrac tual agreement called an indenture varymg m length from two to six years. During this time, the appren tice \a assured of receiving well-rounded lraining in. his or her selected field, and the employer is assured of having a screened, tested and apt e!l'p'oyee. This is accomplished through the cooperative effort 9f the ~pprenticeship Division of the Department of n dustry, Labor and H uman Relation~ (DLHRJ_which.spervises the work of the apprentice. on the J?b to see that it meets the &tandards set for the parttcular trade, the employer who provideswo~k experi.ence for the apprentice, and the college whtch provtdes the instruction in trade technology and the related sciences. A combination of work on the job and related training in the school, each supplementing the other, forms the basis for close to an ideal learn ing ~itu atlon. This method of training is age-old and proven. To tie euglble for apprenticeship, a person mu.st be employed in the field ln which he or sne wishes to part[~ipate. Content of lndentute There are four major situations within an inden ture which govern: Jl) Term of training, which vades from two to six years. 11 Schooling and school attendance, which ranges from 88 to 576 hours. () Work processes through which the apprentice is to be rotated on the job. () Wages to be paid in step increases to the apprentice for the duration of his/her Jlpprenticeship. The terms of ndenture listed above are ac complished under the supervision o( DlL!iR's Apprenticahlp Division with the aid of joint labor and management apprenticeship committees. Joint ApprenUceshlp C~Jmmlttees j oint apprenticeship committees are made up of representatives of labor and management who serve in an advisory capacity to the college in connection with the planning of apprenticeship programs for both day and evening classes, R,ecommer!tiops ar~ made relative to curriculum content, equipment needs and other information necessary to keep the apprenticeship instruction and programs current with the needs of indu try. ApprenUceshlp Counseling Service Prospective applicants for apprenticeship may receive counseling relative to job opportunities, wa_ges, nature of work, and special aptitudes.re qu.red for the llpprenticeship trades by contacling the associate chairperson n MATC's Trade and n dustry Division. ApplicatiOn for Apprenticeship A vari~ty o~ procedu~e.s are followed. by the Joint Apprentlcesh p Commtttee representing the nu111erous crafts n the Madison area. The associate chairperson will furnish, upon request, infortnation relative to application procedures. Program Offerings MATC presently offers technical-related trahting for apprenticeships in the. following trades: CONSTRUCTON TRADES Bricklaying and Masonry Carpentry Cement Finishing Construction Electrician Glazing lronworklng Painting and Decorating Plastering Plumbing Sheet Metal Steamfittlng!construction) Steamfitting!service) Tile, Terazzo and Marble Finishing NDUSTRAL TRADES Electrician (ndustrial! Mllchinlst Millwright (maintenance mechanic) Motor Winder Sheet Metal (industrial! Tool and Die SERVCE TRADES Barbering Cosmetology The Ap.>renlicesbip Division also offers courses and programs in occupational and trade retraining or upgrading in such areas as: Building nspector Plumbing Code Review Cosmetology Update Public Water Supply First Aid and Safety Supervisory/Management Groundwater Wostewaler Treatment ~e lated evening courses for apprentices and Journeypersons The following are apprenticeship training pr<>grams which are not presently being offered, however, arrangements can be made depending on student interest: Auto Body Carpetlaying Cook/Chef ndustrial Pipefitting Lather Meat cutting Pattemmaking Truck Body Repair Truck and Diesel Mecharuc Welding NOTE: See full descrlp\lon of apprenticeship pro grams and course descriptions. ALTERNATVE LEARNNG DVSON This division, through flexible scheduung and non tradit.ional delivery sy~tems, is dedfclited to meeting the dtverse ne~ds of differen.t population. grou ps within the district. Adult S.slc. Education Department The MATC Adult Basic l!ducstion Department of. fe~ all stude.nts and the gen.eral public tbe oppor tumty to revjew, relearn or 1111prove basic academic skills such as re;tding, writing; study skills and: more. Learning Centers are located tbroug.'wut District. Academic Programs and ctasses The following is a descrlption of the variety of classes offered by the A~ult Basic Education ;lepart ment. Programs are dcsigned to provide individualit ed adult learning to roeet the Specific academic and learning needs o f students. Support lnst~lon and Peer Tutoring: Anyone enrolled in an occupational trl!inirig pro gram or a general studies cla.ss at MATC can receive individualized support instruction to improve the basic skills required to Sllccessfully complete class assignments. tcademic staff and peer tutors work on an individual basis with students. Supplemental ln stt;~ctlon s offered in all of the following' areas: Enghsh grammar and spelling skills, writing skills and basic compo5ition skills, basic and intermediate math skills, reading comprehension, speed reading. Adult Basic BducJ1tlon: ABE helps persons. develop their skills n basic mathematics, reading sod writing from grade levels 0 through high school. Classes are offered in the days and evenings, and in strucuon s geared to the needs of students on an in dividual basis. GED Preparation: nstruction is provided for in di~idll8ls who are preparing to take t)le GED (!Li&h school equivalency) exanu in the five testing areas-writing skills, social studies, science reading and mathematics. ' TV GED: Assistance s offered to students who prepare for GD exams via the GBO program televised on public television jchannel11. nstruc ton provide assistance through telephone con ferences and special help sessions.

20 6-Educatl!!!!!!.! Services Programs of Study 7 English as a Second Language (ESLJ: Par ticipants whose native l~nguage is not English can atten<l classes to acq~ire knowl~dge of American culture and to improve their English speaking, listening, writing and reading skills. nstructional staff work with students who are just beginning to learn English as well as students who have m.~jre ad vanced English skills. These classes are open to American citizens, permanent residents and refugees. Citizenship Classes: Classes are offered to prepare individuals to apply for United States citizenship and. to pass the oral exam. Pre-College Skills: These classes provide a chance for individuals to enhance their basic reading,.math, communication and study skills before enrolling in occupational programs or classes atmatc. Career Education and Job-Seeking Skills: Stniclured chisses, as well as individual assistance, are offered to help identify and make career choices and to develop skills to effectively seek employment. These skills include resume-writing, job appjic'ation completion, interviewing skills, and job-seeking strategies. Career identification is coordinated with materials fr 0 m the Wisconsin Career lnformation System. Pre'Techl!i<al'Skills. Center: 'l'he cenjer helps to prepare single. parents, 'homemaker$ a.nd displace!;!. homemakers for entry.into technical occupa!io11al programs with an emphasis on non-traditional programs. Pt09~Wn $eivlces. ln addition.to the academic programs sponsored by the Adult Basic Education Depart.ment, the following supportive services are offered to students: Basic Sll:jlla Testing: Assessment testing is of, fered in all basic_skills.areas including vocabulary, reading comprehension, math computational skills, math reasoning.skills, spellinjl and English. grammar. Spedaf:Ne~d Student Service9: Special needs stqd~nts, ~nyone with a leaniing prol:l)em or phys.ic.al h~rtdicap that would inhibiu.ileir academic success, can work with instructors and peer tutors to rec eive basic skills instruction or assistance in their program areas. JTPA Service.: A Vl!riety-of JTPA {Job T raining Partnership Actl programs provide basic skills train. ing, employability skills training, and other specializ ea services to eligil:lle indivicluals. Some JTPA funded killed training pr!)grams are available through the!)ccupational divisions and through stu de11t services. Support services such as transporiatioil reimbursemept, child care payments,. and other assistance may be available to.help individuals attend classes, Fees All basic skills and instructional support classes are offered free of charge and ate scheduled during the daytime and evening hours. Some of the displac ed homemaker workshops charge a nominal fee. Other Programs and Services Minority Recruitment and Support Servioes: To serve tile needs of minority communities in District -JAsians, Blacks, Hispanics and Native Americans!, this office provides recruitment, advise' ment, referrals and other supportive services. Staff works closely with students to help them enroll in and successfully complete any MATC occupational, continuing education, basic skills or other special programs. Rural Homemaker/Single Parent Service~: This project offers specialized workshops and career/educational counseling support for single parents. Workshops may include career planning, life skills and orientation to specific occupational areas. Telecommunications Department Telecommunications serves VTAE.. District and is housed, along with its major facilities, at tile MATC Tr:uax Airpark camp\ls. t provides instructional and non instructional services to the entire district. ts primary insiructional services include initiating and coordinating telecourses among all instructional divisions for off-campus students. Additionally, Telecommunications initiates, marketi; and provides teleconferencing services for both.on' and off. campus registrants. The non-instructional ar.ea includes proviqing television and distribution production and services for all general information and educational activities. The programs an<!. distribution are offered both on and off eampus through cable television and broad, cast channels. Additionally, Telecommunicatimis is responsible for developing a communication iriter, connect among the MATC and District campuses. Wee"end College Department This department plans to develop and promote the delivery of programs, workshops, seminars and credit courses in cooperation with participating divi sioils at the Downtown Campus site, AGRCULTURE-AGRiBUSNESS A~sociate Degree An.jrna;J Te<:hnido.n VocntloDD. Dlplom11 Agricullur~ Mechanics Cmp Production Dairy Herd M.llnagcmcnl Less Than One Year Diploma Agridcvclopmcnl Farrn 1'r~1ining Farm Trainirtg Sl)eep Productio_fl Hotlicull\lre Operating Agribusiness for ~esults 'ru:<ide:rmy APPRilmiCESHP PROGRAMS Bar~ng SrickJaying ond Mascnry Carpentry Cement Finishing Cosmelo)ogy Gla;lng Construction Electrician ndustrial ElcctticiD.n ron\vorking Machinist Milly, flg.bt rainhng and D«:otnting Plttstering PlunibiDg Sheet Mt:ht1 Stearnfitling Toollllld Die BUSNESS AssDtiate Degree Accounting.. Administrative: A~:si:!tant lnformution Proces.slr1g. Adrriinistrnth>C.: Assi!st;mt-8ecreloni;d Busln~s Mid-Management Coun "'nd Conference Reporting Data Pmcf!.!!sing Computer Operation.'! Datil PreCessing-Computer Programming FinoncC M(':dL~~ Office Mld-Man:.gement Medical Sc<:rctary Vocallonol Dlptoma Account Clerk ClerkTypl t Data En,try Oper~tions Legal Tranmipllonlst Medical Ttanscriptianisl Stenographer GENERAL STUDlllS Ass:odutc Degree Liberal Stu.dies A!sodale in Science Libeial Studies Associale in.arts Kumun Service:.A:ssod.atc: ~n Tilan Opl!"' Year DJpromP VocationoJ-Tedmicai "Developmental GRAPHC ARTS Au.oclatc Degree Commcrcla.l Art Photography Priptins und Publishing Visunl Comml.lnica.tions Vocothmal Dlploroo Printing Programs of Study HEALTH OCCUPATONS A8s.odate Degr-ee A$5m:iatc:: Dc:gn:-e: Nuulng Dental Hygif!nisl M"edic9ll..aboro1ory Technician OccupaticmJl 'The copy Optoriletric 'fechtlil::lan Radiographer Respiratory Thero:~py Voa~t:lonal Diploma Dental ASsistant Medical Assistant Operating ]\oom Asslstnnt Pr~ ctical Nursing ~ ss TWin One Year Diploma Nur ing Assi$111 HO\B ECONOMCS Ass(K:i-.te Degree Clothlng and Textiles Community Developmenlal Disabmues A6SPCiate Dietetic Tcchm(:i.illn nterior Design VO<atlonol Diploma Child. Care Services Le,s_Than One.Year Diploma Homemaker/Home Health Ajde NDUSTRAL FOODS Associate _.Degree ~.stau~at!t and. Hotel Cookery Vcxdtio.nal DiploD1 Food Preparation Assistant MA\KimNG Auoclale Degree H~pilal~ty Management lrisuttul.ce. Techtlici!ln Mark-eling Markeling Fashjpn Merchandising Re!ll Estate R~creation Resourc.e Operation Supervi'51JTY Management Tet:hnician Touri!lt ReCreation Associate Vocalion.al DlpJruna Fashiori ~e!riling Smail Bu.si.riess Operations PUDLC SAFETY Auoclalc Degree Fire Protcc:tion Tr:chniciiln Polic~ ScJence Less TJ:sn One YeW" Dip loma Emergency Medic:al Services Speci.alist TRADE AND!NDUSTRV A!lsodate Degree Architectural Tedu1lclan Automoli'lle Technician Electronic$ lndu.slrial Weldin& Technlc~an Mechanical Design TechnicJan Public Worke Technlclan Vocational Diploma Auto Body Aula Body Setvi.:ing Auio Mf"['hanics Aulomotive Servjcing a :~rbering. Diesel and Heavy Bquipment Mechanics Dr~fti':lg Architc~:turol Electroni~ Sesvidng Machine Tooling Technics Parts Speci~list Small Engine and Chll.!ii.'ii.:o Mechanics Wc!dhin Wood Technics

21 ~ ~ " -"',_,,... Agribusiness-9 Agribusiness Division '111c AgricultureJAgribusiness Division develops ~ntl conducts programs lo meet district and stale agriculturelagribusiness employer and employee needs. Progrilm graduates will have developed competencies for entry-level employment in the programs depicted below which are pres<!tly!)perating. Biotechnology Laboratory Technici,n and Laboratory Animal Technician programs arc in developmental stag s and may be offered in the near future. TAXDERMY CROP PRODUCTON AGRDEVELOPMENT

22 DMYMS'"'l 0-Agribuslness Agribusine!ls 1.FARM TRANNG-SllllBP PRODUCTON HORTCULTURE OPERATNG AGRBUSNESS FOR RESULTS AGRCULTURE-MECHANiCS AGRDEVELOPMENT Less Than One-Year Diploma The objective of the Agrideve!opment program is to provide farm famllits with intensive basic sk.ius which will prepare them for the Farm Training program. nstruction is planned over a two-year period, but individual enrollment is on an annual basis. This program is planned and conducted on a two-fold basis: Group nstruction consists of 5 hours yearly and is composed of lcctur<o, demonstrations, field trips and small group nstruction. Forty-five hours of on-farm instruction and technical assistance is provid ed for each student. These pr~-schedu!ed sessions assist the student in the adoption, application and assessment of the production and management skills taught in group instruction. Dairy, livestock and crop production, and management practices applicable to the family farm are taught. A special emphasis is on farm accounts, business.analysis and farm financial management. llnrollment for the program s open to any in dividual who is beyond high school age and is active ly engaged in or about to enter farming. This includ~s farm owners, oporators, renters, partners, farm managers and hired persons. Both men and women are encouraged to enroll. Enrollees should plan to attend regularly-scheduled group instruction =sions fhat allow lime for individual instruction oo thcir farms. Training in this program is on n year-round basis, and application may be mode ot any time. t is advised, however, that students enroll during the summer or <Oarly fall. Students who have completed the Agridevelopment program "~ll be granted advanced standing for the "Oper~ting the Farm Business" course when enrolling in the Farm Training program. Note: This progran> does not qua6fy for fedcr1 veterm benefits. Number Ol11r~ Noma Agridevetoprmnt-Jntro to P.1rm Tr.linin~ Cr~rJifs AGRCULTURE MECHANCS Two-Yur Diploma Mechanical equipment for modern farming is becoming more complex, precise and exp<onsive. l n divlduals can no longer repair and maintain all of their mochlnes. n many cases, a large amount of equipment and a thorough knowled&.e of testing de\ ices is necessary to correctly calibrate and adjust complex subassemblies and ~quipmen t. An agricultural mechanic sets up, diagnoses, repairs and adjusts all types of equipment used in productive farming. This two-year (four-semester) program is designed to provide intensive training in agricultural equipment mechanical skills. Through training in the classroom and shop laboratory, students will be.able to gain the sl<ills and knowledge necessary lil this career field. ncluded in the curriculum will be general studies courses and agricultural business management courses. Admission requirements for the Agriculture Mechanics program fouow those for the college. Students who select this program are advised to have the following qualifications: ( High school graduation or equivalency; (1 Mechanical aptuudes and some course ex perience n mathematics; () Desirable personal traits including initiative, dependability, reliability and a capacity for working with people. FRST YEAR First semestec Number CourC NCUtti Survey or Agricllltur-e M~h&nics Communltotlons l Applied AsrH:.hurul Moth 070.:us n11o1ge.:1nd Planting Machin!!s Chauis Uniu Second Semester llletd Service 07()- H11rvC!ing Machines 1.(X)() Eled rical S~ itcm& and Equipment z.j Rolot<d Wehling Rtlated Hydr~~ltts O'rtliu 7 6 ~ SECOND YEAR Pirst Semester 1-7 Engines Rcl tcd Machine: Shop Selene< Applicdl 80!1-5 Humn Rotations ~ 5«ond Seuteste:c d.l. n Po\,.urTrantmiuions Agricuh1.1ral hnt'lernen\ Business Ma.nn,gemCT\1 and Uonon\lcs 1~ Hydr"ulic Lab 001).()00 Bk:cti\'c: _1 s.ucsced Elocllvo: 'arm Equipment Repair DARY HERD MANAGEMENT

23 Z-Agrlbuslness ANMAL TECHNCAN Associate in Appl~ ScienCe Degree This program emphasizes the ma.stery of appropriate animal skills and lhe auam:"'ent o( technical as well as generallnform~tion nee~ to. perform cerlaln:dutie under tbe.d r~ct su!"!rv'-' o!l of a licensed veterinarian. Such dulle u:clude re~tra_mt oj.1nimajs, reception and recordkeepm.g, medu:.atlon, feeding ond maintaining proper sanitation. ~roficl<n cy n performing certaiillaboratory_tests ':"c1de~t to the diagnosis and proper care of an mals_ '.' also m cluded as well as the development of abthty for effec tive Coinmunication5 and il application to proper public relations.. Previous courses wlilch may be helpful m. program success include vocational agriculture. ph!""'"'. algeb r~. bookkeeping, accoullting an~ tyj>mg. AdmtS sioii require~uent s -include th~ follo':"mg:. ll High school graduation Q<"eqmvalency; 11 Courses in biologytvocational agriculture may substitute!, chemistry, algebra 1.0 GPA); 1\ GP/1..0 or abow ;. 11 SaHsfacjory $cores,on ACT, SA~ or CRT (per/ so!a!'inlerview may v.:aive!!'is req~tr~ent), firs!' v'i;al\ : F1ut Sttneater Numw eo~tt... N.,.. 8DW0' llnlmal B!olon 80t;-lll C'h<rnlslty 09! 11i Anlmat.l!u.lb&ndry Oe<l,potional Preporotion Jl9H05 Veterinary MC!iool Termlnol08l' ~ ~~tro to M~robloi. &Y Communication Skills Ch.,nislry ll.. OHS ra~osy of Ha.olah.R<all ll.nlcs cf AccounUn&.. : VCtcrinary' Office Pr!JC't:dutcs 091 t0 ~nlm.ll Rtstr.aint LaboroiO<)' Technique> 1.. ' lnlernshlp [8wks/0hrs) SECOND YP.,\K :Flr l Scm.. lcr ~) 5 Amcrlcan ll\slitudons Animo! UOM\Y ond Pby$\ology.. o9l ZG Velcrlnory Operating Room Techmqu~s Zoonosis ~ 1'echnlcol R<ponlns 09 JH EC<Jaomics Hospitnl Supply end M<dlcon!s ' Cllni<al and Ho$pito1 1'cchnlques O~L- 5 PubliC Relation Llbo,.tory Tcchnlqueo ll lnlro to Loboraloty Animal Sci<~>~ :,..f. crcdils L..! ' '.1 S.1 S CROP PRODUCTON one-year Diploma.... Th' nigram is designed to provtde mteoslve t~nin 1~ 5 ~forni skills in a crop production enterpn~. Jrough treirililg in the classroo':' Ja?nratory and '" octunl job s\tuallons, students gam sktus. and. knowledge necessary to perform ~rop production duties. The last eight weeks of thts pro".,ram nas an t nded labonitory where students are placed m oc :a~ jol? sltuatlons with agribusin~ or cro! farm 0 erations. Classroom group meeti11&s and tnst':'c_tor sf.pervislon arc included in this phose of the trainmg. first SEMESTER O<dits Numb~r Cormt Nr11e :t~~g. ~~~~l ~~~e~:od\lcllon f rtu Finlldallll n ~'<m<oll ; Cr<~p Machin~l)' Fundnmenlnls 1 S01-5ti Comi'n\lnicattons l Applied Agricultural Molk _l 09 0 Crops Rcocrd Man &"'"' "' SECOND SEMES'ri!R 09Z 11 M<!criols Homdllng 09 :i0 Oroln PrOi:lucricn f orf\!c Rnd Spcolol!y Crop rruducbon 09 0 Agricultu11l Peal Mo;n>~' 00 0 Asricu\,ur~ Mo.rk~tnS and Ke~rtls O:t 1J flarm Flnanclat Monagc111~nt Haman Relations Survey 80 1~7 Communic.1ious B<lcnded Lob SwksJ.1 DARY HERD MANAGEMENT One Year Dlplom This one-year vocational diploma program is d~signed to provide intensive training lor the management of large dairy herds. Through 'training n tbe classroom, laboratory and on the farm, studenu gain the skills and knowledge necessary to perform the dutie of a herd manager. Students are t~ssigned to fanos for ln-deplh training in such areas as feeding, herd health, milking procedure and equipmen!, records, breeding and herd malli!gerial skills. Communications skills, as required b y a herd manager, are a.lso stressed during instruction. Admission requirements for the Dally Herd Management program follow those for the college. Students who select tbio program are. advised to :have the following qualifications: {11 High scbool gradootion or equivalency with courses in vocational agriculture, animal husbmdrt, mathematics and biology: () BxPfrience with, interest in and capacity for working with dairy animals;. () Good physical and emotional health; 11 Desirable personal traits including initiative, dependability, rellablllty and.an understanding and love for dairy herd production, FlRS'l' SRMSST.ER Numbo Course NCUM D lry Bulin= Monq emem Milk Production 09t 0 Dairy Calli< ndustry D91.J5 Dairy Clllk Feeding Dairy Llbomory R tcnd<d Labor 1ory AJ>Plled Jncullwoll M lh OJ-56 Comm.ua.ication.s l SECOND S~MES'E 091.J0 Dairy C.rlle Muoge,_ Q91 0S D<Oiry Hou lng and Equipment 09 1 ~ Dairy Fcrdi"l and Monasemenl Dairy Loboratcxy j[ Ettended Llboratcry ' 75 Dairy Coole Breedin At1l!lcial hucmlnotloa llwkl6hr l BDL-57 Communlc.11lonsll 809 S6 ltumon Relations Survey Cndi1S z s..! lli..! Aplbutlneaa- FARM TRANNG Leu Than Ont-YN' Diploma Tbe objective of tht Farm Training program is to meet the needs of peraons who are btcoming established n the business of farming. ln'ltructioo s pl1111ned over a six-year period, but individual enroll ment is on an annual basis. This program is planned and conducted on a two-fold basis: Group lnalniction conducted at centers throughout the district and in dividual on-farm instruction. Group instruction oon sists of 5 hour a yearly and s com~ of lecture, demonstrations, fleld trips and smill group lnstruc Hon. Bach of the six courses n the program offers twelve hours of on-farm ~ruction for each student. These pre-scheduled sessions assist the student in the adoption, application and assessment of the production and management skub taught in group instruction. Enrollment ~o r this program 'is operi to any in. divldual who s beyond high school age and is active ly engaged in or about to enter fanning. This ini:ludes farm.owners,. operators, renters, partners, farm managers and hired persons. Both men.and w01rn:11 are encouraged to enroll. f\'lany farm couples attend d assea together. Enrollees should plan to attend regularly-scheduled group instruction sessions and allo\\ time for individual instructioo on!heir fatms. Since- tral.nlng in this program is ori a year rntind j)asis, application may be ruade at any tlme. t is ad vised, however, to enroll cfwlng the sumer or early fall... All new students entering Fann Training must be enrollejl in the course "Operating the Fai'!n Business" or demonstr~te that they have achiev;ed the course competencies. The five other coune.s aze sequenced as cletermllled by th~ district, utilizing~ advis!lry s:ommitteel5). To gi&cluate from t)usoprogram, a stud~!!!t must succellllfully complete the six required courses jlz a~tlitaj....." 'Note: Th1l pt'ogram does not qualify for federal veterans benefits: Number CoutW Nanu Credit' 090-8t Operatins tbe Fllltrl BualJ>ess Sollo Manllj!eplehl 090 8~ Crop 'Mrulagemeot 09(1-~8 Uye.tock Nutrition Uv~ck Mo!lll<men! Farm Record! and Busincs:s Analy h.l 1 ELBCTVBS: 090-'80 Agride.velopment~lntroduc:tlon to.fa~m Training Form Tn~lnlnB-,Tpdale!~ES: \nimlli.Nutrklon lnlerme<llolc 1\l,cbrn'._,by be req\lired (oc penuns who b.girfe ltsstr m;~.themeliell ob!ll!i.._

24 Agrib11Si.ness5 -Agribuslness FARM TRANNG-SHEEP PRODUCTON Less Than One-Ye~~ DJploma The objectlve..qo!('j ~ar;m Training-Sheep Produc tion program s to meet the needs of perso~~ who are becoming established in U1c boslness of nusmg sheep. nstruction is planned and. patterned _from th~ farm Training program over SU( year penod: hut ~ dividual enrollment s on an annual basis. Th1s pro gram is planned and con(!ucted on a two-~old basis: Group nstruction conducted at centers. \V thin the..district and individual on-farm lnstrucho~. Group LD structioo consists of 5 hours yearly and 15 composed of lecture, d.emonstrations. field trips and small group instruction. Each of the sil< courses offers twelve hours of on-farm instruction for each student. These pre-scheduled sessions assist!he student in the _adoption, applica,tion and assessment o the 11rodu~on and-management skills taught n group mstru~bon. Enrollment for this program -is open to any. m. dividll<ll who is beyond high school ~ge a~d 1s.achve Jy engaged ill or about to enter fanrung w1th a pro fitable sheep enterprise. This includes farm owne~s, operators, reqters, partjjer~, farm -managers and htred hel. Both.men and wqmen are encouraged to enroll. 1n:flvlduals must demonstraie that they per for~ all or part of the managerial respon;;ibilitie> involved_~ a productive sheep farm ope,..hol). The farm unrt 1tself must be engaged ln or have.tbe abili~y to reach ~ull.time profitable ~heep prodclion. Th1s pro~ram 1S not mellllt for persons wbo have only a fut!ll'e wterest m raising sheep. Enrollees Should plan to attend regularly scbeduled group instruf:tion sessi~ns and to allow time {o(.individuoj.in~truction oo thelf farms. Since lfsining in this prqgrarn is on a year rou~d basl5,.applicatio.n to enroll may be n:'ade at any ume. t is aqvised, however, to enroll dunng the ~ummer or early fall. All new students entering this PtOS~ must b~ enrolled in the course "Operating the rarm Business" or demonstrate.!hat they have acl)ieved the course competencies. ':(he' five other courses ~e seq~enced as determined by the district, utlli~g Jts advsory committee($(. To graduate from th1s p';'ogram, a stu dent must succ~ssfu lly complete t)le s1x required courses (1 credltsl. Note: This provcun does not q~fy for 'federal veteran' bcneljts... Numbtr 09Q.81 0~ () ~ G c'oun Nam~ Operolln& the fum Business jsheep,,oduellon) Soils Manogem,.t (She<p ~uctkml _ Crop M"""''e...,t JSh<ep PtoductiOnl Livestock Nulrltlon ~ecp Produelionl Livestock Monage~r~ent (Sheep '!Qdudlonf Parm Re<Or<ls en~ lluslne llnolyois JSh.. p Proclucllonl t~~. 090 S80 Agridevelopm<nt lntroduction to Farm Ttalnma form Trrrin!ng Upd>lo (Sheep Production) Crtdirs z z.l 1. HORT~LTUAE. These courses are o unique ca~r a~s umt at M\TC Modison it cooperation w1th Gate~ay. Technical nstitute jn J{enosha and the W sconsm U Miclligan Florists Association. Satis~ac~o~ co~etion of these courses will allow~ md v dual to enter employment in the f.eld of h~tculture at ~ trained l.cvel or to transfer to the H<:>r!tculturc Rctad pror,ram at Gateway Tcchnical lnst tute for com~le lion of an associate degree. This is enc~ursged w1th the addition of general studies courses m the program curriculum that may also be co?"p!eted at MATC. Such courses inchlde CommurucatlODS and, Economics, American nstitutions, Psychology of Human Relations, Accounting and others. ThlS.can be an easy way to start to~~ds an ~ ate degree in Horticulture while rernau~~g a res dent?{ the D~trlct area. However, th1s S not a req_mre~':"t as some students may wish to.terminate thetr trammg with what is offered at MATC. Number CoLtrse Name 001-tlT/ B"lc Hortlc1llturc fk>riculture OO lz Flower Shop Opcrotions Cr.!dils \ l OPBiA TNG AGRBUSNESS FOR AESUL TS A SerieS of Leu Than one-v... Prog~uta This program is designed for the owner, owner/manager, manager, dep.'lrtment manager, employer for a farm machinery dealership, and related business. The program will pl'()vide instruc tlon through classroom, small group and individualit ed instruction. The small _group and individualized in structlon will take place over a five-year period to provide assistance with the establishment of long ranse objectives, the establishment of an adequate fmancial reporting system, development of an organizational structure, and development of a marketing plan. The "Operating Agribusiness (or Results' ' program is a new approach a the complex problelll$ a&sociated with operating a farm equipment dealer ship. ts business orlented approach to management training w ill: (ll lmprovc management skills; () teach new concepts and techniques; () explore better ways of doing things; (1 offer a forum for discussing specific problems and seeking sound solutions; and!5) provide knowledge and practical problem-solving with the help of experienced managers from farm and power equlpn1ent dealerships. f you enroll in thls program, you m;~y already be employed as a manager with 811 agribusiness. This training mu strc~gtben your role as manager or department manager of an agribusiness. Skills developed will be in the implementation of management-by-objectives-the development of the ability to successfully manage and motivate employee, to prepare department budgets, to plan advertising, and to carry out lll$ks essential to.the management of an agribuoineas. You can anticipate employment in agribusiness in lmplenj.ent dealer ships, feed-5eed fertilizer dealerships, etc. in a management role.. PetSO!lal qualifications needed to be successful in elude a high degree of self:moflvation and en thusiasrn. You should be able to solve your own prqblems and possess the ability to direct other people. Operating Agribusiness for Results HUtttlMr Cowu Namr ll&ribuslne'" OpentHons Qot;..0 Management by Objeclivc:s- A Systcmq.tie Approac:h lo Operotlions Elm~c:nls of Rstbli.shing Mlnotge1nent by Objectives 006 U De.ole,blp Prolil Co!>tit>Js 006 :1 Profit Can1rol An:~l) si.s 006- Pl onin! lor Prolit.>bitity Developme.nt of the Marketing Pbn OePiershlp Advertising and Proruotioo 'oo6-s7 D<olclllhip!moge Developmrnl Employee Modvotion Declerrhip Pollq ood l'rocedures l:nmt.j l t t..! Operating at~ Agribusiness Servfce Department Number" Cour.u NtJmc Crt.dit~ OpcrotlnB 1 Service Department !1 Mooagement by Objectives The Service Monager Promotlns Sorvlcc. Crowlh l 006 ~8 Plrmnir)g Servit:e G~~wth 1 00&-69 Merch;ndblng he Service Dcparlment l The llg Meclulolc 006-&1 Hwrtao Side o! Service Mantsement 1 OOS.& Tec..bniquu of Sen-ice Mn~gement & Motjvallng the Serviceman Organitlng fdr Service Results.l 11 TAXDERMY Less TtJan One-Year Diploma This program is designed to provide intensive train ing in taxidermy skills. Througll training in tbe classroom and Jabonatory, students gain ~ s.llills and knowledge necessary in taxidermy, A very large percentage of the training consists of laborafory "bands-on" instruction WQ<king with actual animlll mountings. Students graduating fr<im tliis program are expected to be capable of working as taxickrmists. eitber n self-employment or as employees in other professional shops. Number Courw Name Basic T.. idermy 09S.0Z 'l'axidcnny Ft&b 095-~0 T.. idormy-bird Taxtdormy SJluJl Mammal 09S.ll8 Talldormy-Hcods Taxldormy Lirge Mammals T.. idermy O.cks 09tNl Fish rainlios Nov.eltics O'td~s 1 1! 1 z.l 9

25 _ ::-~~ i (. ~ Apprenticeship Programs T~ Apprl!ntkeship Division overs..,; training pro grams which involve a contractual agreement be tween employer and employee th.at m.ay last from two to six years. A combination of v.oork on the job and related training in the school, eacb supplement ing the other, (orms the basis for a close to deal learning situation. To be eligible for apprenticeship, o prospective student must be employed in the field )o which he or she wishes to partici.pate. BARBERNG BRCKLAYNG AND MASONRY CARPENTRY CEMENT FNSHNG COSMETOLOGY GLAZNG CONSTRUCTON ELECTRCAN NDUSTRAL ELECTRCAN RON WORKNG MACHNST MLLWRGHT PAN'J1NG AND DECORATNG PLAST!RNG PLUMBNG SH!ETMETAL STRAMFTTNG 'J'OOLANDDB Apprentlceship-7 ~ ~

26 8-Apprcnticcsh ip Apprenticesblp-9 APPRENTCESHP Offerings in the Apprenticc~hip Division may vary depending upon the n~ds of business and industry. Therefore, ott listed programs may not be offered each year. Contact the MATC Apprenticeship office to be 5ure the program described is available. BARBER lng As an apprentice in barbering, you nla)' participate in the following types of uctivities: The basic and advanced cutting and styling of hair, shaving, hair coloring, chemical waving, the conditioning of hair, hair relaxing and straightening. giving of facials, scalp setvices end shampooing, and other activities related to hair and skin care. You will also be taught the proper care of barbering and shop equipment, shop maintenance and sanllntion, plus the use of therapeutic lights. You will have training.in public relations and recordkeeping. There are basically two different types o( barbering apprenticeship programs. One type is for persons wllhout any previous. training and the other for persons with previous trairling. The people who do not have previous training wiu be required to attend hours of r~lated training. and those with previous training (graduates of approved barber schools) will be required to attend 88 hours of related training. n both cases, a 6-hour recordkeeping course is required. This course will be talten outside of the regular day-related training _program. Any person who has training in a related field, such as cosmetology, may be granted credit for lbat training. Number C~ t:j Name Cr11diu 50t-59. Teclo &.rblleg Tech!!arb Reg 'l'eclt!!arb Reg ll Tech liar\> Reg V 50t-598 T<:<:h llo>[b Reg V Tecb Borb Reg V 50t SSO 'l'e<:b Borl>Adv Tc:ch Barb Mv 501 5,8 r.ch Barb Ady ll ~ Tech Barb Adv iv -' '' BRCKLAYNG AND MASONRY Persons n this trade lay building materials such as brick, structural tile, concrete, cinder, glass, gypsum and terrj cotta block. They construct and/or repair wulls, partitions, arches, sewers and other structures sucb as fireplaces and chimneys. They also fasten brick, terra cotta ven~ r or other nalur l or manmade products to faces of a structure. They may weld metal purls to steel structural members. Persons in this trade will usually hll\'e to serve a four-year apprenticeship consisting of 60 hours of on-the-job and S<:hool training. The related classroom training wijj be 5 hours of day and evening classes. Nmr1ber Cmusc Name Tech Brick Scrh..._Tech Brick Scm ll 0 5t~ 'fech Brick Scm ll 0-51 Tech Brick Scm V 0 5t Toch Brick Scm V 08-5t5 Tech Brick Sem V BP lnt Bl\ Som 0-50 BP lnt BR Scm DP lnt BR Scm S DP tnt.br Sem o0r 50S SP tnt BR Som BP lnr BR Som 6 Otdits : CARPENTRY Persons n this trade will do form building for such items as floors, beama. joists, wnll columns, stairs, etc. They will also do rough framing, roof ftaming, stair fnming and scaffold building in both home and heavy construction They may complete outside flnishing by installing such Uems as cornices, outside wau trim, door, window and roof coverings. They. may also install inside finishins malesials such as doors,' windows and thei.r trim, baseboards, cabinets, wardrobes, flooring, ceiling materials and stain work. or they may apply e.xterior and interior hardware to doors, windows and cabinets. They may do miscellaneous repair work, set up 'vorlt for machinery and other equipment, and they may have. to weld. Numbtt Cour.w iwlmc Crooirs t0 59 J'ech Cafp Scm 1.5., TochClfllSefi, 1.5 t0 595 Tech Carp Sem ll 1.5 to-596 T!Cb Carp Scm V 1.5 t0.597 Tech O~tp Scm V ) Tech C1up Scm V BP lnt Carp Scm BP tnt Corp Scm.5 AC\ 57 BP Jnt C.1p Scm BP lnl Carp Scm.s ? tnt Carp Scm BP lnt Corp Sem 5.5 i to CEMENT FNSHNG As n cement mason, you m ay partidpate in the following types of job activities: Setting scrieds to line, tamping and roddlng concrete, floating and troweling masonry surfaces, using ~dges and joints, chipping concrete, patching concrete, rubbing and brushing concrete, csleblisbing grade lines and. heights, forming valleys and summits, setting expansion strips, setting curb and gutter scrieds, flnlshlng curbs, gutters, sidewalks, driveways, basement floors and wash panes, finishlng foundations, walls and ceillncs, laying out joints in special designs, laying rises and treads, asphalt and master installations, waterproofing, spreading and finishing all epoxy materials on floors and other surfaces, and safety in the relllted areas. Nt.m:bcr Cout#Namc C'rcdils 6 55 t Tech CP and Pla Scm t.5 6-SGZ Tech CP ond Pia Sem u Tech CF and Pta Scrn lll fi5 T""h CP ond Pia Sern lv ) Tech CP an d flo Scm Y Tech CP luld r io Scm V T<!<:h CF and i'l Bf SM Tech CP ond PL Bf SM ~.s. u;.sog Tech CP and 'PL BP SM.s 6-StO T.ch CP om! PL 5~ SM. s T ch CF and rl BP SM 5, Tech CP and PL Bf SM 6.5 COSMETOLOGY Co.!mdologlsts perform professional services for both men and women. ncluded in these services are skin care and correct application of cosmetic makeup, hairpiece and wig care and styling, scalp treatments, bain:utting and shaping. shampooing, permanent waving and hair straightening, basic waving, hair. styling including dressing and finishing, hair colonng. tinting and lightening, cosmetic arl (facial massage plus use of cosmetic preparations! and manicuring. Numb., Cour.st Name 'ech Co,met Rc 50 59t Tc:ch Cosme! Rea ff Tech Cosmel Reg ll 50,9 )'ech Cosmel Adv Tech Cosmd A~v 'l'eeh Cosmet Ad ll GLAZNG C>wdit A glazier ta]ces parlin the following types of job ac tivllles: Metal fabrication, hardware application, tube installalion, sash and joint installation, doer installation, installing facing materials, application of tape, putty, vinyl and neoprene, gaskets and doorlites, in stallalion of mirrors, shower doors, plaster, sealant and solar panels. M.mtbcr Coutu NtJttre Teth Gla<e Sen Tech Glaze S.mll Tech at... Scm ll 17 S58 Tech G lue S.m V Tech Glau Scm V 11!560 Teet> Glou Sem V BP lnt GLS m BP tnl GL Sem Z t7 50l Bf lnt GL Sem BP lnt GL Sem lip lnt GL Scm 5 t7-605 BP tnt GL S.m 5 Credits CONSTRUCTON ELECTRJCWJ Electricians Lay out, install and test electrical flli tures, install electrical wire. systems used to _provide beat, ligllt, power, air conditioning and refrigeration n homes, office buildings, factorie;, hospitals and schools. They also nstall conduit, greenfield and other rnoterials, and connect electrical machinery, equipment and controls. The electtician uses a wide variety of hand tools to perform various tasks. The journeyman electrician musl master?land the use of meters and specialized testing equipment, be adept at troubleshooting and understand the theory behind the transmission of electrical energy. Nwmbtr CouruNam er.jirs Tech Elect Scm i 1,591 T«:h Elb:t Scm 7 <1,59 Tech Elect Scm m 1 59 T!Cb Elect Sen> V 1 59 Toeh Bl<cl Sem V Tech Elect Scm V 1~596 Tech Eleci'S.m V t 597 Tech Blect Sem Vlll NDUSTRAL ELECTRCAN As an industrial electrician, these are the typ'es of job skills that you may encounter.in yqur training!because of the, varied types of employment in the electrical field, you may be required to gain additional skills that are'different from the types listeqj: Assist in inapectlons of motor bearings and other electrical equipment, repaic motors,,stllrters, pushbui ton~. switches, fuses and oti)er electri<;al equipment, assist 'in the nstallation of el~ctrica.l c:qulpment, in". stau conduit, pull wires, dismantle. clean and paint motors, be able to work with hand and jlower tools, cut holes, bend conduit and make minor connections, interpret and use prints and codes to take. measurements and install electrical equipment pro- perly, troubleshoot motors and other electrical equipment, recognize failures and repair if t is within your knowledge. Numbtr Cour11 Nme 1 5 Tech Et lnd Sem 1 S Tech BL loci Sem 1 5 T!Cb EL lnd S.m S.S5 Tech B~ lnd Scm 1 56 Tech BL lnd Smt Tech Bt tnd Scm 6 t~ Tech EL Joel Scm 7 Crtdils z

27 50-Apprenticeship RONWORKNG 1'_he types of ncth itics you may participate in while ~~~ ~ronwo rk er Dpprcnticc include assisting JOUtneypersons to unlo.1d, distribute and learn about various materials and the handling of tools and equip tnent, always employing goqc( safety practices. Other types of activities may include ocnamental work in eluding layout fabrication and erection, reinforcing layout, binding, cutting, placing and tieing; structural work including la}-out, fitting, connecting, hooking on, riveting and signaling; rigging, knots, cable and rope ~pliclng, cribbing, moving and setting up ~ach1nery, plus acetylene and electric welding, burn tng and cutting with proper handling of tanks and equipment. 1Vumbv C<ntrr.o NtJmc 7-56 Tech ron Sem 7 :56 Tech ron Sem 7 56 'tcc:h ron Setn Uf 7 SGS 'tech rron Scm rv Tech lrqn Sem V 7 5 Toch R BP Scn Tech R BP Sem Z l7 Si5 Tech R lip Sen, Owiils t 1 t MACHNST A o machinist apprentice, these are the types of job activities you may encounter during your trnining program: You may have to learn the operation of -equipm"!lt such as a drill press, milling machine, both horaontal and vertical, and automatic screw machines; set-up and opernte machir:le tools, and fit and a~mble parts to make or repair metru parts, mechomsms, tools or machines, applying your knowledge of mechanics, shop mathematics. metal properties, layout and machining procedures; nterpret speclflcnttons, blueprints, sketches, or make a drawin_:: or describe parts which may have to be ' machined; me~re, mark and seribe dimensions' and ~fere~ pouits t~ layout stock for machining; verify dudcnsons and al1gnments with qteasuring in struments such as micrometers, height guages and guage blocks; may operate mechanism or machine, observe opera.~ion, or test withinspection equipment to d.iagnose malfunction of machine or to test rei?o\lred machine; may perform f)am~cutting and arc or gas welding operations.... : Number Cour.st Name Crtdils 0 51 Machinist[ M~hi11bt1J 1.5 ().51 Machlnlsllll MachinlsiiV l.li ZO.SJ6 Mochlnlsl V Machlnt.l V 1.5 ().50 Machlnlsl ADV 0.s05 Mochlnlsl ADV -zo.508 Machinist Math.s Machinlll Molh Machinist Math ll Mochlnlll. Math V Machinist Dr V.s Jtbchinitot Br V.s MillWRGHT (Maintemmce Mechanic} These nrc the types of udivities you may encounter as a millwri~ht apprentite: You will be 11ble to repair and maintuin 111nchine~. machinery and mechanical equipment using hand tools, power tools, precision measuring and testing equipment; observe n-...:hanical devices in operation, and listening to their sounds, locale causes of trouble, be capable of analyzing the problem, and complete needed repairs; dismanllc devices to gain access to and remove dcfcclive P"rts using hoists, cranes, band tools and power tools; eompltte repairs nnd maintain operations in ac cordnnce with diagrams, sketches, operation manuals ond manufacturers spedfication.s; perform preventive maintenance procedures, adjust fun.ctional parts of devices and control nstruments using hand tools, levels, plumb bobs and straight edges; inspect used parts to determine changes in dimensipnal re quirements using rules, calipers, micrometers and other measuring instruments; lubrknte and service hydraulic and pneumatic devices; complete perfor mance tests on equipment; se{ up and operate power equipment to make replacement parts for small repour on machinery; start and maintain service schedules recommended by equipment manufacturers; wo rk with atld maintain electrical equipment; repair and maintain hand and power tools used in dally 9peraijons. Numl~tJ Ccwr Nome O<dits f, 050 rech Min Sem -55 Tech MiD Sem ZS.M. r..,h Mill S.tn ttl.;;56 Tech Min Scm V 558 'rech MU S<m v 560 Teth Min S<m V Z-56 Tech Mill Sem V ZJ-515 Tech MW'ar s.m t -~17 T«b MW BP S.m -58 Tech MW N EL S m.0-6z9 T«b MW N EL Sem -5 T<dl MW.H and P Sem ' l-5 ~ t.s t 1.5~ :;. t.s PAfNTNG AND DECORATNG Pni~ting, by its simplest definition, is the process of applymg any given material to various substrates for the purpose o! either protection, san'itaiion or decora lion. The substrntc may be wood, metal, masonry or composition and may be interior or exterior. The substrate mny vary from a small house to an enor mous ndustrial facility, structural bridges or bigh towe r~. As an apprentice, you may participate in the foljo:nmg ty~s of actiyjties: Wood finishing, prlnt r~d1~g, erection of ladders and scaffolding, spray paonhng, a?raslve and water floating, color mixing and match1ng: d ryw~ll taping, fmishing and texturing, ap~lyi ttg spec1_al coahng,s and special decorative finos~es, hangmg wallcoverings, health and safety practices, and management and communication skills. Ntnrber ~ OlU! $f No1u~ Tech 171nl Sen\ Ttd t rainl Se.m 11 Tech 171nl Sen1 ll r.ct, l'alnl Scm V Tte.t, l'&lnl Sem V Tech Paint Scm V OcJits z f '1 1 fi l Ji u PLASTERNG As a plastering apprentic.,, yoo can expect to take part in the following types of job a.ctlvities: The proper uses of tools and equipment; scratching and browning {all bases) including the preparation of walls and Cl!lllngs which are to fi!ceive tile using sand and lightweight plaster; lining, dotting and screeding of different surfaces which are to receive tile, applying thinwall. You may apply the following types of fmishes: Whltecoaling, sandfmi.sbing, acoustical plastering and stucco. There is also opecialty type work with texture fanishes, acoustical tile, plaster veneering, plaster coallngs, fireproofing and in sulating, exposed ~ate, waterproofing. bonding agents, application and artificial finishes. NllmNr Cc:~ur.u No~m Tech C1' and Pia Semi 6 55 Tech CF and Pia Scm 6-65 Tech CF and Pia Sem 11( 5 55 Tech CF and P Sem V T ch CF and Pta Sem V T ch CF ond Pia Som V Ttch CP end P, BP SM t Tech CF nd F:O BP SM Tee ~ CP ood PL BP SM ~ Toch CPand PL BP SM ' Tot!> CF and PL DP SM Tech C!' and PL B' SM 6 Cttdi1s S 1.5 (,$ PLUMBNG Plumbl!rs install plpes for water, gas, sewage and drainage systems. Tbey also install sanitary facilities such as lavatories, toilets, tubs, bathroom fixtures, showers, kitchen fixtures, drinking fountains and laundry equipment. Plumbers use a variety of skills to install pipe systems. Tbey use both hand and power tools ln their work to cut, bend and ibread pipes, and to make welded and soldered joints. Plumbers mus1 also run iests on their instauations to assure that the system s functioning properly and m eets the Plumbing Code. They are often called upon to clear pipe Jines and drains and to make repairs on faucets. valves and leaky pipes. Nt~rnbtr Couru Narrw T b Plumb Sem Z7-581 Toch Plum~ Sem 7 58 Tech Plum'o Sem ll 7 58 Tech Plum'o Se1n V 7 58 Tech Plum'o Scm V Tech Plumb Sem V BP l nl PLSem BP lnt PL Sem 7 51 BPint PLSem 7-51 BP lnt PL Sem 7-51 BP lnl PL Sem s BP lnl PL Sem 6 Ctedk t.s t.s Appt"entlceshlp-51 SHEET METAL A sheet metal apprentice does the following typei of jobs: Layout work encompassing blueprint reading. measuring and designiog of any type of project in a shop or on:the job which may include Sllcb work pro cesses as sbearmg, forming. welding, soldering. plus fabri<:ation and assembly; the fabrication and installa tion of architectural metal which-may include sud\ items as gutters, metal roofs, flashing, tin ducts, gravel stops and coping, the assembling Wd installing of heating and ventilating systems for human com fort; specialty-type work with stainless. steel and aluminum, the nstallation of locl!ers, fr.mllation Qf toilet partitlo1111, metal pan ceiling, metal do.'<:!cing.,' flow pipe work Wd plastic duct work. Y6u V. ii!,.rj so have to be able to weld. Number Co1rJ Narrte -571 Tech SM.Som 57 Tech SM Sem Tech SM Som ll :!-57 Tech SM Sem V Z 575 Tech SM S<m V 576 Tech SM Sem V 577 Tech SM Sem Vll Tech SM S.m V. 51 8P lnl SM Sem 1 5 BP At SM Sem Z 5 BP A SM S m -5 8P lnl SM Sem -55 BP tot SM Som 5 56 BP lnl SM S.m 6 57 BP tnl SM Som 7..S 58 BP lnt SM Sem 8 Crrditl 1~ l.s STfAMFTTNG Steamfitters {occa ion.ally called pipefitters) are craftsmen who assemble, install!ddrnaintain pipe.! to cany water, steam, compressed air, gasses and fluids needed for processing, manufacturing, heating or coollns.- The journeyman pipefitter must be able to adapt and repair pipe systems and install appliances, heating and refrigeration units and do all types of pipe welding. Pipefltters work wiih both high and low-pressure pipes, mostly in industrial and commer cia! buildings. They nlso install and repair residential heating and cooling equipment. They install ammonia-carrying pipelines in refrigeration plants, comple>c p ipe systems in oil refineries.and chemical and food proccsslng plants, and also install automatic sprinkler systems. They know how to prevent corro sion, clogging and breaking of pipelines, and how to test_ pipes for proper operation. H"mNr Couru Name Tech SP Scm ~5!1 Tech SF Se., Tech SP Sem ll Tot!> SP Sem V f och SP Sem V Tech SP Sem V Tech SF Scm V 5-50t Bp lnl SF Sem BP lnt SP Scm 5 50 BP lnt SF Sem 5 50 BP tnt 5f Sem BP n SP Sem 5 o1:1!506 BP n SP S.m BP lot SP Sem 7 Cttditl 1.5 ~ s

28 5-Apprenticeship TOOL AND DE This cours~ of instntction is designed to enable the apprentice to <tnalyze $pecifications and prints, develop specifications from general descriptions and malce d r<lwin~;s or sketches of tools or tool parts, to pla11 the sequences of operations to complete a product using the different tools, to be capable of operating both hand and power tools in any work process sud1 as drill presses, surface. grinders. layout presses and shapers. They will be able to measure, mark ond.scribe metal stock to layout work pieces for m<~chiniug and set up and operate the machining tools of their trade areas. They will be able to fit and assemble parts into asoemblies or mechanisms, veri ) dimensions and ajignment using measuring ln~ struments, and be able to hand treat tools or tool parts. Number Ctmr~ Name Credit..:~CJ-59 T~ch T nnd D Sem 'r.ech T and D Selil u l.5 ~9 5~6 'tech T «hd D Sem H Tech 1' and 0 Sem V 1.5 j9-598 T~ ch 1' and D Scm V 1.5 ~9-599 'rech T nnd 0 Sem V J Sin Malh T and D sem M~1lh T and 0 Scm s 9 ~51 Mnlh r ctnd 0 Sem rrr Mnlh T a.nd 0 Sem V.5 9 5U Mnlh. T and D St-m V Mn lh T and D Sem V~.5 Business Division The llusiness Division prepares individuals to work in a variety of areas in business 1 industry or govern ment. l'rom entry-level office positions to accounting, comp.uter and mid~managem~nt careers in business. medical and legal professions, the division provides well-rounded,.hands-on training: Business-5 ACCOUNT CLERK ACCOUNTNG COURT AND CONFERENCE REPORTiNG ADMNSTRATVE ASSSTANT SECRETARAL BUSNESS MJD MANAGilME~T MEDCAL OFFCE MD-MANAGEMENT ADMNSTRATVE ASSSTANT-NFORMATON PROCESSNG CLERK TYPST LEGAL TRANSCRPTONST

29 ~ Business Busine.Ss-55 PATA J,>ROCESSiNG-COMPUTBR P.ROGAAMMNG MEDCAL$~CRETARY MEDCAl.. TRANSCRPTONST FNAN:CB DATA ENTRY OPERATONS DATA PROCESSNG-COMPUTER OPERATONS ACCOUNT CLERK One-Y881 Diploma Accurate records and reports of all business activity are required by industry and governmental agencies. The Account Clerk prq;ra.m provides the necessary training to qualify graduates for beginning employment os an account clerk, payroll clerk, order clerk, material control clerk, ~ccounts receivable and accounts payable clerks. t1rst SEMESTER Num~r Couru Nartlt!Ol-1Z Sole Proprletonhip AL't'OUnling 10-0 Applied Bu>in.,, M01h l0 60 Uuslnt:S.\ Law 10-1 Maclline Colculil\ion Typewriting j1,!!, Co nlnlu nl~:a tions SECOND SEM~STER f'nrtner.shlpand Corpuralion Accol!ntln~:; 'oyroll Accaunting fncomt Tax 1'0 ' Princ\plcfi of Bu:~ineu 10 0 Mlcrocomputcra Z Communlc:ntions Human Rcltlc:ms Credits 15 Arl~ curccd ftandl11g ~l'wtt (or prcuiou~ traim"rrj or rtlaf.ed worn c pt.'f"itncr. Eftr:ll"t$ n fh«busl~tc.u o;-.,;sion rmf be.wb!!(t:.fed (or art)' rcqairrd hbje:t :.pun ~ U«:J.t(wll)l plwiffg ut1 adritvt:~ltt uamirk~rio n. S ACCOUNTNG Associate n Applied ~ Degree The Accounting program provides the educational background and training required for entry positions in private business and industry, governmental agencies and public accounting firms. Job experience and continuing education provide the necessary qualifica tions for ad' anced positions in the field ol accounting. F\ST YEAR f"ust Semester.Number Owlrs. Name Ocditl Accounting l Principle Math a ( Finance 10,' l Juctntss Ors:~nh:ation ~~tnd Management Communico~on Si<uts J P ychology of Hum<U Relotlons _! $e(om.j Semester 101'1 1 1\e<:ounling 11-Prlncipln 101! 1\ccououlng V T x on 10 0 Bu&lness Low Syotcms ond Procedures Principles cf Oato Proc:esling 'typowritlnl 1 on 106- Mlcro-Kcyboa:ding 809-JJ 1 Economics SECONDYt:i\R First Semcalcr 101-!Z1 " ccountlns Jll.Prob1enu 10-0 Butiness Low OR 101-J Accountlna V!-T:o ZS AccountlnJ V CMt 10- Principles ol Firnmct ooo-ooo Elocll"' S<cond S.me>tec l01 1 AllOOunling 1V-M..,.~erlal 10l-1 Auditing BusiD.,.. Slatlsllcs Comrounlc:at!on Skills! Elective Rec:ommc,nd.:d electlvc': 101 Accoun\iut V Cost Ateounlln~ VJ 1~x Cov-mmt:nlal Accounting 10 1 Buslnen Law 11 1) 11 () () :!..:! STENOGRAPHER

30 56-Business ADAfiNSTRA TVE ASSSTANT NFORMATON PROCESSNG Associate n Applied Science Degree The Administrative Assistant-nformation Prncess ing program provides the educational b;lckground.for employment in word processing centers as correspondence secretaries and for advancement into supervisory and m;jnagement"positions in these centers. Admission Requirement.: English Compos! lion, srade of "C," Typing or Microkeybo~rding. FJRS'J'YBAR first ~m6ter Numbu Cour«Name 10 \0Z Businw Math. J6.1QO 'l'ypew itidg ll. ll J~Eo~at\on Ptoe~slng Concfpt& Comm\lnicatlon Skills ~1 PsycholOgy of Human Relallons Hl9-.18 lnfotj:ds.tion Processing TeChniques Second Se~s~er..JDl U Ac:counUng -Applied foi-u)o. Business L.1w Typewriting m, V 1 -~06-18, n!onnatlon Processing Tcchnlq~s ~ :alphobetic FUing J{J6-1~ Subj~l. ~graphic and Numeric Pilint R01-15Z _CO.mrrt.uniciJ:ion Skill ~ 11.. SEcOND YEAR. Fir.~ s:c~ester. \~"0Q 'l'yj>ei<tiling V J()fi-. Machine Transcription.106 l50 Secreladol Procedures lnforfll&ti<>nproceasing Tcc/Uqa.. m ~nontics --Hi&-105 Recon:fe and JnfoTmation Management.. :.ooo-:000 'EleCtiv Se~~_ttd. sentea er;.:. : =. l!)~ _l Q~ - Survey Of Data PiOces,;-:ag 1Q6.185 Word Pscc~~ing Managemcnl Word Proceuing Almiation lntc:grif~ Office Techniques ~ T~hn ical Communicalions o'?9~0qo Ble~liVe Cr«ffls --- ~ ~ )7 - to6-l8- Prerequisile: lnformation Processing Tet"h:nlqucs! t06 18S- Prerequl&itc: ~nformall on Precessing TCchn~qu e!t- H _87-Prerequisite: Jnformslion Processing_ Teclmlques H llccoipmended Jilectlv""' ioz-1 Busine" Qrg..1niiaHon ancs Manilgemea.t i0 )8 Sytlemo and Procedur<s 1 0:! )~ MaN&emcl)t T~chn iques z 1 ~ z.l.19. z.l S ADMNSTRATVE ASSSTANT SECRETARAL. Associate n Applied Science Degrel! The Admini trctive Assistt!nt Secretaiial program is d~signed not only to" place graduates in excellent secretarial positions, but it is also designed to provide the experiences necessary lor students to ~ucce~ful ly attain the rating of Certified Professional Secretary (CPS). A number of Administrative Assistant Secretarllll students have passed this examination since the opportunity to write the exam was granted.to students in this program. Admission requirement: English Composition, grade of "C." f trsl'year fira S cmel~r Numbtr Cour5e Name u$iness Law Typ<Writlng fl,, m1 106 lll Shorthand ror S<crctartal Workshop 106 l0 Alphabetic FHing l0g l0 Subject~- Geogrnphk aud NUmeric FUing 801 l51 Communication Skill~ Government: Process omd 'Pr.xt.iL~5 second Semester l06-o!l Typewriting ttl. 111, V} l06 ll~ Shorthand ~us1ness. Mathem atic:& [ ) Acc:ountj~ 1-Applied.80l -l5 CommUnicaHO!l Skitls SEOONDYdAR Fir& Semester OO loo Typcw,mng {ll, V[ Shi>r1hand ll 10 1 Business Organi.:.;ttien aad Man;,cem~nt lps-10 Sp.f\'ey of D.!ita PtotesslngfCornputc.rS Secretarl l Procedures. l06-81 nformation P-ro!;essjng Ope~atl?ns Seoond Scmrsler 'l'ypewri)ing V Shorthand 1V 10 1 M na,emcnt Technique:; Socreta~ iol1ntem shlp ECQnomics Psychology of Human Relation~ Credit1 l 11 '., 'tl~ -18. : t Alph.lbetit: Filing (1st c:hvks or sem~.:sterl " Subjcct, Geographic nd Numeric Piling!nd 9wks of stme&fcr) ~ : ~:t 9.'.l. BUSNESS MD-MANAGEMENT Associate n Applied Science Degree To be accepled into company training p.rcgr!illls in middle man;~gemcn t, or for running and operating a business, the Business Mid-Management program provides a well-rounded study in fundamentl!ls of busit;tess organization, finance, managcmeni and related studies. This program provides the student with training necessary for.employment and advance ment on-the job in trtiddle management and auied occupations. FRST YEAR Fin l Seme:stet Numbf!r Co!U'Sid Nomt Ae<:Ountlng Priflciples 10-JO!; Math of Fin.1ru:e Cummu.nlc:Mion SkiLls ( Economl<s P_syc'hology of Hurrisn Rel<1t\ons Second Scm~:1ter ~c:countlu&.!pri nc ipl ~s.~ 0 0 nusincss law [OR 809~15 Amuican Jnstilulions 10 1 Management Techniques Principles of Data Processing ~5 'l'ypc'wr!ling OR 106- Micro Ke) boordlng ComuttJniciHon Skills SECOND YEAR foirst Senicstrr M.pna~ment Acc:ounlins 10- Principles of Finance t ~~:!~ ~~~::: ~~!~~~~: ;. 000-ooo Electi\le iii,f. : R f Sec end Semesle'l" A(countinl: V Co..'it l Buslnes:; SlaU~li cs 108 Systems and Procedures Appllc..-<1 Busi~s Tra.ining OOQ.OOO El~li ve Recommended El tclive5: Accounting VtFrnx Ae;:.\lunling Vli-Tax li 10- l Bu$inds Org~11iz Rt ion nnd Monugcmcnt toh61 Buslnes L w ll 10 1-Q Parliamentary Procedure Cr di/8.l t6,j 1~ ~ ".l. 15.z Business-57 CLERK T'fPST One Year Diploma.,, Completion of the Cle~k Typist program gives the student an understanding of the general business ac' tivities required bf all office employees for occupa tiona! competence; Students gain a mastery ofskills.essential for initial employment and a iho.rough knowledge of the subject matter. Typical beginning jobs are general office clerk, lile clerk, cashier, typist; clerk typist, receptionist, m achine transeriptionist;. statistical typist or word ptocessor. FRST SEMESTER, Number Course Nante ~ttbjn e Clllculation-Math 1()6.;100 'l'ypowritiqlll~!; llil Alphabdlc Fillng Subject, Coogropl# and Numeric Filing' 1(..80 Principles of n ormillion Process ins Communicatiorts r B09 5 HumAn.Rel~;~tjo.m; SECOND SBMBSTER 1ill-0 Rehtecl Accounting 10" 0 Microcomputers J 'J'ypewJiting (, ll, lv) Orfict: Proced~ros 106 Mach~ne Tn.nscription Jab s.rvey nf~rnail~p Processing Operations CommunicationsH Creilirs. ~ l 1 ~. 1.. ""' ~.." r.$ ElectivM n t/11 llusinn~ Divisialf may bs.&llb~l(tul~ {o_r any rtquired,. s~bjecl upon sue-ass{ lilly pausing em achlevemtnr examination... " Alphobeilc Filing!1st 9wks or semester) " Subject, Geographic snd Numeric Fili"lliJJ!!!.wh or semester)

31 58-Business COURT AND CONFERENCE REPORTNG Assoclete n /lpp/.ed Science Degree Court and conference reporters record the testimony, opinions, cml'ges, sent.~ces or other pro ceedings in a court of lav; and the proceedings of business and professional conventions. by.maonine shorthand. This work affords interesting mental ac tfvity and requires concentrotion, patience, poise, goqd vision ;~n<l ~acing and good g0peral health. Pro mplness and attention to detail are most desimble traits. t is a professlon in whi.<h many men and women have found personal satisfaction, stimulation of mind and monetary rewards. The program is ap proved br the National Shorthand Reporters.Associa lion. Admission requirements: Typing- SO wpm; English Comp<isiliOil-grade of "C.'' HRSTYEAR Fitst Semestet Number Couru Name 10 0 'Busim!Si Law 1 l Typewriting 11 or m ~lachine Shorthand'! 801-lSl CommunicaUon SJ:iU fsycholosrofhtun1n ~ela lioji.s Second, St;rne.sttr B siness Mat~ OJ\ , Accounting AppHed Typewriting m, V 106 1<1 Mochinc Short bond 'ranscription SOL-15 Commllrii.calion Skills lj Electiv~ SECOND YEAR First ~mester 106-1Z Court Oriontotoo 106 \5 Machine Shorthand ll Q6 i7 ~gallrechnloal Dlctatlori Medical. Terminology l 809-ill "Economics ~00~-r~$ American lnshtudobs Second Semester Cowl Reporting!'rocecJures 106 1~ M clri e.shortband V""" 06-t$ Legalrr~cbcical Dictation Testil'n9ny, Charge and Deposition 106-tSi Court R1..oporflng [nternship OOO.QOO Elective Credlrs :l a.1 17 z.1 17 s.j S RllCOMMJ!NDB!,l ELJ>CTVES: wz:.rs Parliamenta,y Pr<>eodure l 509;)81 Medical Terminology ll Z i06 8l Wmd Pra:es.sing Optrallons A11 B Wt.l!lt. summtl':'luor#lshop, ol rhe!jjd <J{ the.second smres!~r. fs a required port of litis prognam. Word proc&5siug technoto.r~ With hand~qri expcne11ce is (Overed. 'Gradua1\on from the prognun requires a ne1 typewritlng speed of 60wpm for five minutes and complelioo-of two SCn\estcrs of (Ollcge lyp~writing. focludcs ll\. ovcr'j'ic.w in rcporh~nelah!d C!!cl1no!ogy including computer-aided transc:rlptioq, word processing ond video apptiullono. G rojdunlio~1 from the pragrrun req\llrts the foilowing t?achine shorthund wrlting ~~ds: ~-vok:e-zz5wpm~ -\'olcc an~ J_ury chcrse- 00wam: lite r;~ry- 180"'1lm tall s -m1nutc takes w1th 95 percent accuracy). Jntemship ptaccmeul requir~s -n i~~hine $horthnd_ speed at lalnr'ncnt of.zaowarn. The \nlctshlp w1h oooslst of a mlmmum of (1 hours of.;(ctml wrltfng:. Ume under l111;' supc.rvbjo11 of a qualhicd n:portcr. DATA ENTRY OPERATONS One-Ye.r Diploina As society increases its dependence on com(>uter generated information, the de~and f~r skh~d data entry operators continues to me. Busmess f1rms seek graduates who are able to key data accurately and quickly ond who are ~ble t? ~dapt to a ya;tety of. types of equipment. ln addlbon t~ p~ovi<lm~ ~- tion, in general clerical areas,. S(>CCtahzed tramm~ OJ) currently-used hardware and s~{twarc s the objecbve of this program. Students enten~g th~ prog~am should have a good background m anthmetlc and keyboarding (typingf. possess good fi.nger_dexterity, vision and ooordination. Entry-level jobs mclude.data entry or keypunch operator, microcompute~ operator, data processing control clerk or.genernl clertcal worker. Opportunities for advancement exist for graduates with the right ski!ts and person~ l.ides. Ad mission requirement: One year of typewnlmg. F,RST SEMESTER Ni'mber Co11rss Name Related At<Xiuntlng Da!rl Enl<y l 10 0 Mittocoropulcrs l 10:1 Mach;ne c;atculotlon Motb 10&100 Typewriting 11 or ll Colllll\unie~~tlona l SECOND SEM~ST~i Data llntry Mlcrocomp>!Or Jl job Survey tos-80 Oatal'rocessinp, Concepts Type.,ritjag lit or V 10&10 Alphabetic ruins 105 1!). Subject, Geccnrphlc and Numeric Filing: 106-o6 Office Procedu<et Communicatio,ns Cmll!l z ~...?. S.5 1 l...?..5 ' Alpbab<\ic Filinz jht 9wk of aem.. tcrl ' Subject, Geognphlc and Numeric: filing jnd 9wks of semester) Btcdivu n the Businc-s.s Divi~lon may be subslttuttd /or any required s~&jec:l ilpo11 Sficcess{ufry passing 1n" al'jtiev.emrnt CKom(nation. DATA PROCESSNG-COMPUTER OPERATONS Associate in Applied Science Degree This two y~ p.:ogram of studies leads to a'n : associate degree designed to prepare students for highly-responsible posi'tions in computer center operations. The student speciali«es h~ a technical care of ccurses in comput~r systell'\ 6peration, computer programming. data entry systems, <lata control and computer op'ernting systems. The techrucal mafi!i.al is reinforced by. lin internship program of guided, on, the job experience in typical and represertta\ive com puler centers irt the community. Related C<i!llSes in business and general studies are further included for preparation for entry into a commej'cial enterprise. Admission requirement: Algebra-grade of "C.'' FRST YEAR ~ irst Semester Nui11bcr Cour!ie Name. W7#lll Progr01mmjng l~ Comp lcr.coo<:<pt>, 107 1:1 Data Pr<>C<o>ing Technique~ Communication SklUs t Psychology Qf HumBn Re.lalklns Second Semester 10Z J<t~ Businr:s:s Sta1istit Computl"r Op!raUons System> Anllly:.i.> and Design Progtanuni~ V Communicotion Skills t SECOND YEAR first Semester AccounHns l-applied Management Techniques Computer Opera lions 11 L07 18 Computer Operetlons lntc.rnsbip Elective Sc..:und Semester Accounti<lg ii Applled Compurcr Opcr llon..lnterll>llip! EconomieG AmcriC.ln ln.slilutions QOO.OOO Elective Rc.::cmrncndcd lcdi.vcs; 1()...0 Business Law [ 106-,11 Typewriting r 106-lijJ Mitro-Keyboarding.Cmlits '.1. ' /Vo.": Progrorrrml g {&sic Ammbler Lang agr:l,.qui= aptjrot fmali!.lj JS ZS ltottr of lab rll!"t c:och wc:e k irr addition ro l~t:! regular hou r~ fh~ clam mtet.s.,. '. ~ 1, s DATA PROCESSNG COMPUTER PROGRAMMNG Associate in.pplled Sclenc:e D.egf1Mt A data processing career provides an exciting chaueng~ to those who are technically prel'llred to handle )he increasingly complex areas of application in which computers and data processing eqilipm~nt oper~te. Students must possess a high level of. abstract and logical thinking abilities. The Data Processing program prepares for job entry in business and industry -as a junior programmer. t also applies toward the requirements for the Certificate in Data Proce!siog. Additional educatlon art \f. job experience lead' to work in systems analysis. Admission require ment: Algebta grade of "C.'' Flll&TY~AR First Semester Nuhtbl r Cl.Urse Namy 101-lll AC<:otlnling 1-Principles Prci;rammllig l" l Compliler Co~;epts Oato Ptoce'->ing Technique., Communication SkUls ( Se~ond Semester Accounting!!-Principle l07-l l1 Sys(cms AnalysfS e.nd ~sisn J Programming U SOl-l5 Con1municalion Skills [!09-15 American nstitutions SECOND YEAR F"iut Seme~te r 101'-!:0 Microcomputer Software 101-) Programming lll lll1 1Q Systems Analy,sis and Design Psycbol9gy of Homan Relations OD!J.QOO Elective Crdits l'l..1 Se:colid St:mestf!r 10'7-10 Opera~irig Systen~. Services and. Fcil ilie~ Ptognmming V ] O.ata Proce.uing Programmi.r.g lnlem.ship Technical Communications ' ~ Sc:onomia DOO.QOO Elective 19 Recommended. Electives~ BusineSS: St~lisllcs OZ t60 Business Law i07-)t Ptog<omm;nz Vl RPGn POgtamming V.CCS Nott: Programming!/Butte Antmftle-J: AlnguQS requ.irts _approx i"'otel~ 15 ZS hour. of/a~ tlmc toch week in addition a rh rcgolar hour5 rhe class mc~t8.

32 60-Busines~ Business-61 FNANCE Asso(:iate in ApPlied Science Degree Finance is a general term meaning the management af monetar.raffairs. Most specifically, we speak of public finance as the management of monetary affairs af government, of corporate finance as the manage ment of monetary affairs of 6orporate enterprise,_ and of personal finance as the management of monetary affairs of individuals and families. Graduates of this prograrn are employed in banks, fmance compani~..insurance agencies, savings and loan corporations, cred.it unions, and busli}ess and manufacturing organizations. TypiC..l duties incluqe: Approve loans and participate-on committees concerned wlth len ding and customer service; ti!view financial and operating statements, analy:t.(! credit data to estim~te degree of risk involved in lending.money; study economic trends; extract date from a~counts; inter view cu torners; investigate complaints; ~eri(y charges and correct ~rrors in accounts; compute interest and payments; interpret data concerning investments; and construct charts.a nd graphs regarding investments. FRST Yl;AR Fi"rst Semester Number Q')ur$C Name ACcounting (-Principle~ i Math ol l'nance FimmciaJ UurjluHonJ Communl<:ation Skills lll Ecooomics Seconc:,St::rru:st~r Atcountmc 11-Principles P~rS<inal fin nce OZ-0 Bvsines! Law }0-171 Credit Managomonl l05'10z Prin<iples of Da" Procc.,;nc 801~15 Comu1nniCti(ln Skuts 11 SECONO YEAR r.lrst SemeSte:r 101-llB Manilg~metit Actou~tlng 10~1 l7 Mo.uey 11nd Bankins 1"0-~6 Prlncip~es cf Fln111nce S09 151?sycholog)< of Human Relations eclive Seoond Se'mc!.tc:l' Bttsiness StaHAtica 100 1& Com~trdal Le-nding 10-1S Manngemcmt Tec=hniqu~ Bfl9.15J Anl~rkan lnstilulious 000-OD Ele<tive R~co~n<kd Elective':!Oi 1Z Acoountl"ng V-Taxi AccoUil(iog VU T Governmental J\ccO\nUus 10:!.-1 B\llOnen Law M rktting Teobniqoe 19-l llil l'ri1>ciplu of Rtt.! Estole Prloelples ol lnsunmce Crcdirs &. a :t z _ _ 18 i6..1 S LEGAL TRANSCRPTONST One Year DJplomB The legal tfanscriptionist must have a working knowledge of legal terminology, legal documents and procedu~ necessary in instituting and prosecuting a lawsuit in addition to the usual skills al)d Jaiowledge required of s.u word processors. Advancement possibiuties include legal secretary, legal assislant and Profes ional Legal Secretary fpls). Stu<lents are prepared for work in attorney offices, government of flees, and the legal departments of induslry. A supervised internship in a legal office is.an important. part of the training. One year of.typewriting is required as a prerequisite for this program. Admission require ment; 'J'ypewriting-5wpm. ftrsl' SoM!>Sl'ER Number CmlfJt 1\ratnt: JOZ ~60 'B>JshlcSS L:Jw 106-=19 Legal Transcription Applied TypcwrliinsiLeaall OR Applied 'l'ypcwii<ing! Legal Oifice Ptac<.-dtir.es i nformation rrocuslng Opera.tione Cammunicalion~ l Cri!diJ.&!) jlj S SECOND SEMESTE ~ Ul 1 Business L&w 11 1D5 1U Survey of Oilta Proc~sing llls-lzo l.cg l Transcriplion tj Applied TypewritlngiL<aol J1 OR flj \pplic:d Typcv.-ritlng n ( l.cgot Ollke J'roc: durc> ll 'l Job Sur\'ey/Lq;a! Tronscripdon lnlemshlp -5.SOl 5 Co~tuntmkal ious U.l!iS H MEDCAL OFFCE MD-MANAGEMENT Associate in Applied Sclimce Degree The health services profession, the second largest employer in the CO!ntry today, fmds!he ncreasing number of trained personnel required unavailable. Consequently, graduates of tbis program fill entry le\ el positions s~ch as aclministralive. as.si5!aut, assis tant bw;ine s officer, unit manager, admitting offtcer or assistant nursing home administrator. The possibility of future articulation is available if the individual de.< ires to pursue lhe bach.elor's degree and eventually advance to graduate studies. Students who enter this program should.be able to concentrate on details, to understand and apply instructions and. principles of a complex nature, to perform effectively.under ~Jl circumsiances as well as being f(iendly and understanding in dealings with patients and coworker. Graduates of this program must have management skills, an. understanding of pl!tient care needs and good business practices, and an ability to coordinate relationships with professional health per sonnel and community health and social agencies. These are learned n formal education programs combined with on the-job learning elg)eriences. FRST YEAR f.1rst Se.tn~lc.r Number Cour~ Namt. O..:!dils Ot-111 Acctn~ nt iog Prindples " Math or Finance a Cammun.iQtjoa SkillJ l &l9 lll.economics Psychology of Human Rclatlons Second Sem~tez Actolll'lting ll-principles 10-1 Moma.gemr:nt Tcchn\qQts 10-0 Business Law OR 1! American lnstilu:dans Micro'K )'boarding OR jz) Typewriting [.. (1 105 wz Principle of Data Proeeuing Conununlailion Skills SECONDYEA\ Fir$t Semester 10l ll8 Mi~llgcmtnl Accoui)Hng 10-1 H~alth Care Principle:s' D-liS lntro trj Htl!l!~th C&.te Sy:5tems 10:!.-19 Contempcrary lssucs!henltlt Care Medicol Tmninoton t EJ~::cl i~e Socand Sc:tndter Fin hcib) Abnosem.eot of Hulth C:lre OR 1) OH9 Governmental Accounting )1 10-t. Environme~l Hea.lth and Wety OZ 89 Medkal Ol!icc Mid Monas<rncnl Affil.,lion lt ~fedicol TermlnoloiiY llond Medltol Reconls" Elcotlve llecomm nded El<ctivCJ: Ar:rounlinJ Vll-'l'&x t 101-Z7 Acco pt!n& V Tu 10Z-i61 8\l.siness Law 11 ~ Principles ol Jnsurcnce 'Offered folf..,mcoter only, orccred "Spring &c:mc:.sler onry t6 " MEDCAL SECRETARY AssociBte n Applied Science Degree The Medical Secretary program prepares the secretary for work in the ouice of ~ doctor, clinic,. hospit:al or for employment wherever a knowledge of med.ical terminology and professional procedures and ethics is required. t also provides excdlen( prep.aration for secretarial positions in any.,business. The status of Certified Medirol Assistant-Administrative -can be acquired.upoo completion of the requi~ Job experience and written examinations. Adm"ission. re, quirernent:_ English Composition-grade o( "C." FliiST Yl!AR Firsl Semest~r Number Cottrse Na"m.e D6-1JJ Shorthond ) OR Shorthand ' OR Secrtlariol Workshop Applied Typowrtllng.l OR J06~1l Typew.riting p 5}0 10 Body Struc iur~ 509-liO Medical T rminol~gy Communication Sldlls 1 809~15 American. lnstintiom Second Semu.ter l0 l<t Business MrUhematic:s JOJ.J \ /u:counting 1 /lpphed 106-ll Sl\orthand OR Shorthand ll Applied Typewriting Ol;l ~wriiln& llledic.>l Tcrmiooi"8J' 11 1!01-15 Cornrnunicotion Sl<iU. l Crcdil:r jj ( (J. "..1.:18 z ! ll 18 SECOND YEAR.fi<>t Semester 10Z:.l M~ ge~en~ Tccbutque5 100-JZZ Applied Shorth.>n<( ~ J \pplied Word Proe<ssing.>09-llO MedicO!! ReCO(ds., 809:151. Psychoto gy ol H.umool Rclotlous QO).OOO Elecli e 19 Sccond ~meslcr lq.t;-u Appll ~ Shorthand ~0~- lso Sccrchuiut Ptoc:edUrc$ " Applied Typewrillng lll Medical Secretary nternship Economics _000.{)00 Elective 18 Recommended Elccli'Y:!S: WZ l60 B1.1sineu Law 1 105' 10 S fv<y of Data Plocosslng. lo;-10 /llpbobeticfing 101;-1.0 Subjecl, Geographic ond Nu~neric FilinG R.cord and lnlorml lion M~oemcbl Shortlumd p\kemtnt ckf9ndoq.t cu provlou5 shorthand experience... t{ lhe seudent has had no pre io\ls typewriliug. Typewriting J should be oken.

33 6-Business MEDCAL TRANSCRPTONST One Year Dlplom Medical transcription has been a valuable and necessary skill since the hinh of medicine. Successful completion of this program qualifies the student for entry-level employment as a medical transcriptionist wherever machine transcription of medical material is required-hospitals, clinics, doctors' offices, nursing homes, specialty laboratories, insuraooe companies. Records are dictated by!he physician and typed by the medical transcriptionist using typewriting and dictating equipment or sophisticated electronic equipment. The skills a medical transcriptionist requires encompass typewriting speed and accuracy, grammar and proofreading. A medical transcriptionist rn\!st also pos5e5s a knowledge of medical tenninology, anatomy, pathology and pharmacology. Admission requirement: Typewriti11& 5wpm. FRST SEMEST~R Number Cburse Na.m.e Cr~diJs Hl6-0 Rf"cord,. Management OR Z Atphabe1ic Filing" AND Subject, Geographic and Numeric Piling* fll Pl Medical Transcriptlon!0&-9.lppUed Typewrilini'Medica! OR () t Applied Typt:wrilins ~) Medical T-~:rminology Z SW-10 Bady Structu~ BOl-51 Communications _.?: 15 SECOND SEMESTER Related Accounting i06-q6 Dfli<:e Procerluros OR f) Secretarial Procedures llj lnrorma.tlon Processing Operations M cdidl '1'r.wscriplion f Mt:dical Transcriptionist lnler:nship u()r ~.1 10'5 195 Secretati:~l {ntern.ship (l 509- l BL Medica! T.erminciagy U z Communiciltions n Alphabetk_Filing llst 9wks of.semest~r) tp6-10-subjet:t, Geographic J:tnd Numeric Filing (nd 9wks of.!ieme.s~erl 10fi 69 - Medic::~l Trans.criptiooi5t nternship includes a -weck e.ffiliation inn m~diqll facllitj. STENOGRAPHER One-Yeer Diploma The Stenographer program is designed to provide a balanced general educati<jil ~nd to give the vocational training needed to meet the requirements of a stenographic career. Prerequisites include one year of shorthand and typing. Admission requirements: Shortnand-80Wpm: Typcwriting 5wpm. FtllST SEMESTER Nlm1blr Course Name Crt!dil~ ioz..60 Busine55 Law 10 1 Machine Calcul;~lion 1 10&-10 Alpr.abelic Fihns lgg-j0.subject, G~cg(ap.hic and Numeric,Filing 106--JOO Typewriting l1 or ll Shorthand ll SO.l-51 Communications l z J-hlm~tn Rdatjons SECOND SEMESTER Applied Busines~ M11.thr:matlcs 10- Prin~lp~s.of Builness 106-tOO Typewritiog ttl or V 106-m Shorthand m!06 06 O!fic:~ frm:e:dun:: Job Su,.ey &01-Sl Communjcatlons 11.s ~ ts.s t()g-l0~aiphabetic Filing \ht 9Y~ks of semester) ((-10-Subject. G t:ographi.: and"nutnt:tk Filing (nd 9Wkll of scrne.stt'!rj! fl tl ~., ll i.l t,i d fl jl tl H!t, h n J ji il i.i t! t., > ' ' it N.<. i.~..... l l' f.1 ll!! ll J General Education-6 LBERAL STUDES HUMAN SERVCE ASSOCATE Gener~ Education Division The General Sludi.es Division oversees the offering of all the general education courses that provide a broad educational experience for students beyond those particular courses which den! primarily with occupattonal skills. Jn addition, the division offers Liber~l Studies degrees for students who wi.fl be transferring to four ycar colleges or for those who simply desire to study a wide variety of subjects. The division also offers its Human Service Associate program which prepares indlvidut:~ls to work in hum.an servicc: agencies. VOCATONAL-TECHNCAL DEVELOPMENTAL

34 6 Gcneral Education General Educatlon-65 LBERAL STUDES DEGREES Associate n Science or Associate n Arts These programs are designe(\ for students who want a broad general background and who either j 11 intend to go on for further study for a baccalaureate degree or 11 for economic, social or academic reasons wish to combine liberal studies and electives from a vocational or technical program. When Option 1 is followed, the program covers a SPJn of instruc tion that generally satisfies the first two years' re quiremerits for various majors in four-year colleges and universities. f the student has no major field in mind, this program, introduces him/her to several areas of study and serves as a broad preparation for transfer. Option introduces students to various Ways of exam.._!ning and understanding the world around them and themselves in relation to that world. At the same time, it permits them to talce. com mercia!, technical, homemaking or industrial electives. Associate in.science Degree Minim1.1m Req1.1iremenrs EngU!ih ""d Speech 1. Thee~: crediis must be in En8!i&h r;<jl'oposition. 6 Credits Hlstary and Social Sd.ente.s ncludes at least Qne tour~e eacb: fi'onl ~Wo areils of Jaf5tory, soclology, psychojogy, cconom~s ami_g~>vernment. Credits Mathematics 111rnf.Natural Sc;len~ 0 nclud~!!: at least Oile'labora_tory- course eat:h from biolcglcal undphys'irolsciences. Jndude$ tl.t-l'!lisl college.idg~bra, lfumaniucs _._ 6 Jncl~es arl, music, fi:ln:t. Clt~l\la, phuos9[>hy, foreign Jsngu<~gt! and hterature at composition _b~yond the Ecgl~sh ~uirement. Healtb!Wellneliis _- _ -:_ ncludes phy::ik~l-l!dt~catiorr. _Two Credi_~_oi phy~cal-edtft:..ttio~ 1 lhe: maxim1,1m coun~d _toward earnj:ng tht'l' degree. _ Eil'lctivl'!s.... ; --: _... :.'. ncludes any c91lege tra_nsrer ~ursel} beyond the tnfrij;lum.-re-. quirement5 and cc.l!rses:ln a)ly "division offering ~ociaf~ d e.gree eoursu. ASsociate in Arl$ Degree Credits Minimllm Req"iremG'!ts BngQoh nd Speech.. 9 Three credits~ must be"jn E~gli ~ h -composition. History ilnd Social Scicnces 1.~ ~ dudes <:~t cost.one course e_l!!ch..ftoxi thr~ ~ rc as ofhbcocy, soc:iolqgy, psy~hology~ ecof!o~~ and government. M a ~:~;tem,_tl~ amt: Na~ural'Sdent~ 7 n_c:lud~s 9pe lab9n:~tt.r y c.o~rse hi ecj~ nce,. ncludes Lntennedi.ate 01lgebr~Jf'-8nly algebra an,~ $~a metry were laktm in high schcol. Hum"nJiJ~... g Tbree c~its.mus"t be in: lil~ t ilhirc. The temainder :i"n ttrt, niusic, film, drama,.l;'~hoscpby; lor~itn l.:mguage and ~i~~ta luc~ or com position beyimd thc: r~ulrc::d.~ngh:~ h. Heai"i~Yi~lbl~s... 1 [ttc:(u~~ PhT-~i'C!d educati9n. Two credits of physical education is the.. maximum CO.untcd taward ~arnlna: the degree. EJf!L:Uyes... ndudes=any college transfer cnurs~s beyond minhll.un\ re G1.1irements.and.c:curses in Dny divlsio:p) o!fcting "!Ssaciale degree CDUnie$, HUMAN SERVCE ASSOCATE Associate n Applied Arts Degree The Human Service Associate program trains people to provide informotion, support, care nd advocacy to others in a human service agency. Human services include housing and finuncial aid, mental health services, corrections, work with drug and alcohol abusers, services in neighborhood centero, and work with the elderly, disadvantaged, physically handicapped and developmentally disabled. Courses in.this program emphasi?.e the development of skifls in interviewing, fanning helping relationships with individuals and groups, recordkeeping, written and oral communications. A background in general education is included to assist students in undersian. ding the re[ationships between contemporary social institutions, pro)jlems, e<:onomics and human relations. n two semesters of field study in a local human service agency,. students have a chance to learn to function as a member of a human service team. Some of the aptitudes and interests that may be helpful to students in this field include emotional stability and m~turity, an appreciation of cultllral diversity and an interest in wortcing with people. FRST YEAR Fir.sl Semester Number CaurJc Namt Communication Skifls 50~105. lntro to Humu:a Services 51-tlo SdffGroup Dyn<~mics P~ychplogy af ~Uman Rdatioits Americti lnstilutions : ~ rien.talion tu lflims:n Servkes P<lpLl}alions Se nd.'se mester.80!-lsf.1'1!crnic:al Jteporllnj 809~10 Com.munity.Service Agencies Social Chaoge'Sk!lls. szo-1 Group Work SkHis 59~_1"_17.. lriterviewing/advising " Human tiev.:l~pment SECOND YEAR Firs' Semes(er 5.0 Hi7 Humilll Servit:fls Counseling SklJis SZCH5 ls:~ues.ln Ah:aha_, a.nd Drug Abuse ~0 19 Humll.tl: Servi~::e1 Agency E.xper[egcc l S0 1S8 Hutn.fln Services Expcrlcmce Co-nference Elective Second se.mestei' SOO lll Economics Hurn.tn Se.rvkl!'s Agency E!iperieuce J1 SZ0 18~ Hu~p. S!rvices Exp~:rlenc;:e Conrerelicc Elective ELECT[ES:. 50 1~5 Juvenile Procedures[ 56- Juvenile Procedures U Urb>.n and Rural c.,.,munillos Aging and Social Problems 05<11 ntro to De v~lopm e~tal Dh:~biU1ie.s.50- Cou:n~e:ling Akohclil:::s./Dru.g Ablisers AODA: Sped.t Populu!lons Youth AODA: Special Populotio n Wamen \0DA; Sp<cl l Populotl<>n Oldor Adults S0-l5 AODA: Spcdal Populption.:s-Elhn~e; MinQritles AODA: Speciol Populot\cns-Othor Minorities 50 1'06 AODA: Special Populallon Di,.bl d Cudilj..l ' s 1 VOCATONAL TECHNCAL. DEVELOPMENTAL Less Than One-Year Diploma This program is designed to serve one of two functions for students: 111 To provide classes which remove deficiencies in past training, and therefore, enable students to be eligible for the vocational or ~chnical programs of their choice; 11 To. strengthen and refresh acaqemic competen cies to better ensure success in vocational or technical studies. The Vocational-Technical Developmental program may be completed in one semester if the student enters at the beginning of either semester. ~ny course offered by the college may be "developmental" for a. given individual, but the college identijies s~veral courses which.are designed for g~eral upgrading of basic skills so that students may be eligi ble for vocational at!echnic;1l programs. These co~rses are: Number Cours-e Name Literature and Comp~ition SOHll Engllsh Fund;llllentals 801-JlZ. CoiDpO!Lilon FundamentOJ"s United States 1-listory 80 0 Math FWld menws 80-l06 Pto.College Algebra Pre-College Geometry S06. 0 Bisi~ ScienCe Basic Sr::ient:e Sc6-SS Pre-college Physics S06 J17 Pre College Cbemish) Reading: How To Study SOB-ltD.lntcrnl.E!diate Reading Advanced Voc<bu)ary S~ills. SCB-15 Reading and Vocabulary S~Uls Credil8

35 l. Graphic Arts-67 Graphic Arts Division The Gruphic Arts Division covers training in the communicution arts as represented by the progr.uns depicted below. The division is very well-equipped, and students will find that they are learning the use of the latesllechnicm equipment used in the private sector today. COMMERCAL ART 1:, f PRNTNG PRNTNG AND PUBLSHNG PHOTOGRAPHY i

36 Graphlc Arts Graphic Arts-69 COMMERCAL ART Associate n Applied Arts Degree This two-year program prepares students who are interested ir> a professional CDreer in a variety of ch~uenging areas. The major career opport\ulities are mustrator, graphic designer or artist. jobs are in advertising agencies, publishing companies, advertising ~dart departments within a company, art studios or S a freelanoe artist. Some of the aptitudes necessary for!!uccess include aesthetic appreciation and.creative imagin tion, a wulingness to complete tasks aq:ordlng to technical requiremehts and an ability to'work under pressure to meet deadlines..previous courses that may be helpful include art and typewriting or comput.er skuls. Students sh~d have good 'COlllD'land of th~ English language, having at ta;ned.a "8'~ Jn Engllsh courses..!jrst YER Fi.r~f5em eetu ~: ;...,. Nurnbef. COUrsoNcmt,C.:..., Orilwlng Fundarhehlals Letler.lna typosraphy ;01 '19 Design and Color QHEO Studio Technique.0 10 Typography Communloallon Sklllol Economic.t Second Semtster 0H08 'l'ypogrophlcol Design ' 0H 1 Canoontns Life.Drowiag. 01 Comptehcosivt: Reade:rina: '01-10 Oa;!n and 0>1or n S.odlo Technique> CommW11ea~on Sld!all SECOND YEAR firltsemutk lllwtnllon Ad lay""t 01-l1 Graphic l:>eatgn 1).170 Photo Government: Pccxest and Psa.ctlcts QQ(>{JOO Ele<tlv., ~d S.mestor ~H Uusu~ili>n.u :.ZQNi Gro'p}l!c Peslgn 11 ' '0H i>d. teyout J.. 0J 1 ~ Porlfo!io Prcpu tion 8Q! cl~l, P ychology of Hom no Relotlons.ooo,ooQ Blecllves.;'EricrwEs:. '01!1~ t:ommerdal CartopnlnJ 01 \5,Publication Des!an 01 Av.,ced Problemlllllustratloo A~ced P,roblezu/Grapblc De'tlp 0).19 Lil.or.,.~ng ll lliilpub Techniques ZOl-111 Pboio ' Ctt dj$.1 17 z z z.1 S z..± 17 z...! i7 :..' PHOTOGRAPHY Assochlleln Applied Arts Degree The Photography program is designed to equip Lhe graduate with a aolld foundation in technical and aesthetic photographic skills. Graduates may find jobs e assistants in commercial and portrait studios, as technicians n prolenional photo processing labs, as staff members n corporate or government photo departments, or as members of film or television production crews. Desirable aptitudes and interests in elude the ability to previsualire subject matter, to de!ieribe visuals in written scripts, to engage in effec live problem solving, and to work well under deadlines. Previous courses in art, photography, chemistry, algebra, physics, typewriting or computer.ski Us may be helpful. Students should be ~Cient in writing, bavlng attained o "8" in previous English cotir:ses.. FRS'r'YER Fjr.si.ScmestCr Numb"e( C\lwrse Name CT.dils ~0:105. Photo cqmposhlon ZOJ l01.siudlo Photo ZOJ.ZO Llshtmg Techniques ZOJ.9 Deslgn and Color t 80J.5L Communication Skills 809 lll Eeonomlcs z.a s Second Semester 0J.108 Studio Pllo<o n 1).11 Color Photo 0-17 Pbolojo~:m~!ism Audiovisual Techniques lSZ Cammualaotlon S<Uia 0 ] Gonmmenl: Ptoc:oss and J'roalces.1 17 SECOND YEAR F'u61Sem.- 0-UJ Ccrom fcda1 Photo l ] 0 1. Colotl'ho!G, 0:1-1 Potlroit PJ>olograpby 0- CJ)ematogra~hy Audlovioual eehnlqueoll roycliolosy of Humu Rotations. 17 Secood Sc:illester ' 0 1 Camme rcl~l Photo Pbo(o'Communlcatlon ZD 18S Poitlollo preparotioo Studio Photu ll Telev!slort ProducUon... ' Electlvu 'H 17 1S BLECTV!S: Pbolo nternship Disply, Design and Prod ction!j6.1q P.rodueUoo, PlanaJn& and Control.ZO is9 Air ll(uah Tochnlqoa PRJNTNG One-Year Dlplome The Printing program provides the student with the knowledge and skills required n tbe graphic arts in dustry. Training is provided in almost every p=ss that reproduces nformation on paper and other materials. FRST SEMESTER Nwm~' CouTs Name ZOJ..0L Grophlc Arts PbOiogrophy 0 9 Lithogropklc Prepmtlon 0 17 Printills CoaposUlon 0'05 l...~ut ond Design 80 i'l Malh<rA~C t! 0 71 lntro to Lithograph!< Press 501!!6 CDtllmunl<ation 5kllla SECOND SEMSSTBR i0 9 Lithographic Preporollon 0 7 Litloograpbic Pie,. Operation& zo.t lnstrurm:~tation tor Graphic Aria!Oft-07 llpi/llcd Physical Science 809 5& Humon Relalloria Survey Z0 06 O>py Preparation and fast P 'Knowledge of typewriter kerboord and typia& skju is highly de.sirable. o.ditl 1 ~ 15 z 1..! 15 PRNTNG ANO PUBLSHNG ANocllte n Applied~ o.gree The Printing and Publishing prosrarn is designed to provide the student with knowledge of the printing and publishing industry. t acquaints tbe student with printing processes and provides training n the. skills required to perform each process. Upon ~mpletion of the program, graduate$ may oblain em'ployment and r~eive aditional on-tbe-:job training i.n such areas.., production plalllling. estimating, sa~es;quali ty control, presll production and other spec;lalized work. FRST YEAR Pinl semester N;.mbtr Course Namt l)<pograpby 1 D 10Z LitbogropiiJc Tec)lnlques! Plt)'chology of Human Relallons Technlo:al'Scieou:e BOl -151 Communication Skill ntra to Prlntlria""d Publi.ohlng Second :Semll!!9ter Z0!05 Llthogn~phlc Techniques Lllbogrophle Prepar&ti"'! lpa&teup\ 0 1 Typosrophy Te<hnl<al Science 80H5 ComDtunlcatlon Sl<llls 11 SECOND YEAR First Stmeatet G"'phic Art& Pkoto&rapby Pr= Teehnclogy t 10H9J job O<lent llon Economics 0-lS hulnunenlfuoo for Gnphlc Arts Eloetiv~ Secood Semester 1).111 Graphic Arl$ Photosroophy ~0 11 Prus 'l'eeiu1ology W 151 &stlmatins Government: Prccets and Pr.\ctkes 0-19 job Orlet~totlon lntro to [;\dslri l Procedures 000:.000 Eloc::livc: ELECTVES: 0 1 Typog phy ll.l 0 11 Blnd~ry Z0 1 Production Ploa.ning Special Problems Otdit.J ~.J. 1 17,;, ' i ~ l f

37 70-Graphic Arts VSUAL COMMUNCATONS Associate n Applied Arts Degree The two-year program in Visual Communications pruvidcs training for the creation of visuaf pre enla tions. Stud ems acquire a working. kn<l\dedge of specialized graphic techniques ajid formats for various media, including slides,_ animt~tion, overhead transpare11cies, print and computer graphics. Planning, scriptwriting, storyboardillg, photography and audio recording culminate in video and audiovisual productions. Three-dime nsional displays are designed and created using plan drawings and scale models, Graduates can expect to find employment in audiovisual studios, television stations, and media departments in education, health tare, business and guvernrnent. Students should have a strong interest in 8rt, design and communicattons. HRS"l' YEAR Jkil S~:mestcr N11mber C()!n.5t Nnme 0G l0:5 Ccmrnu.nication Probl em~ 01~105 Dcawing Fundclnltmtuts Q1-1J9 De:sisn ;u\d Colm 01-HiD Sludio T~:chniqucs 0 l70 P.fmtog:raphy! SOL-151 Comrnunicalion ShjJls 0-l0 'l'ypogrepby Second Scm~stcr 06-J06 Communtcath;m Prc.Ql~u~ 1! {11-10 D~sign and"co1m J Sound P.roductlon Techniques Z06-ll7 Audiavis lai" rcchnigut:.'i [ 0-\71 Photo~mpJo)"lJ BO-15 Cqmrounkation Skills JournaHsro SECONO l'ka!l Firli-L Serne:sler.06-llO Di:>piay, Dc&ign and Produ~tlon tct<hz5 n!!ltuctlomd_ Media S} 5lemlii Q6 10 T-c:lc" isjon Prvduction Prod11c1ion Planning and Co;ntro1 809-~5\ -Psychology of Human Rdalion$ 809-l' P.C'anomic~ Second Semesier i:06 l18 Audiavisuai.1'~chniques [) 06" 10 PorlftJf(o l' r~pamtion Cinemalography S01 1Z5 Government; Pr{looss tmd Ptactkc.'i P..h::dive!i ~LE C"l' l VES : :06- l 0 Vjs unj C.ommulliciltions lntcrnship rntro to Cartooning PubHcalion De:.sign 0J 15fi.Aidmr~t. Tcchn:fq u e!s Advomr::cd McdHJ. Probh:ms Cr~Jil~ l7 5~ 1G l7 J ~ z i u l j OPTOMETRC TECHNCAN DENTAL ASSSTANT Health Occupations Division The.llealth Occupations Division offers eleven programs designed to prepare workers for various oc cupations in the health care system. AH programs are fully accredited by the. appropriate accreqiting agen C)', and graduates are eligible to take any licensure or certification examinations required lobe able to work h1 Wisconsin. Health Occupations-71 OCCUPAT!ONALTHERAPY ~ f' l DENTAL HYGENST ASSOCATE D;EGREil NURSNG

38 7-Healtb Occupations Health Occupatlons 7 MHDCA, ASSSTANT ASSOCATE DEGREE NURSNG Associate n Applied Science Degree This program is designed to prepare practitioners who are able to function with judgment and tecnnical competence in providing nursing core for patients of all age groups. Upon completion, the student is eligible to write the natiolli!l licensure examination for certification as a registered nurse. Career opportunities include staff nurse positions in hospitals, nursi11g homes and other communiiy.health agencies. A student must have obtained satisfactory achievement ("C" or.0 GPA( in ml!jor field subjects and support courses. A student must have a minimum.of a ''C" in theory and an "8" (satisfactory( in clinical practice to pass a course in the nursing area of instruction (510 courses(. A student who twice fails a cours~ or more than on~ course in he nursing area of instruction may be dropped from the program. Emphasis throughout the program will be in the area of self direction and the independent rol~. Aptit~des and in leresis that may be helpful include the nbility to work ~nder pressure, to be l!recise and exact, a willingness to follow prescribed procedures carefully with the realization!hal errors may have serious conse guences, an ability to react quickly in an emergency, and an interest in petiple and their welfare. Admis- sion requirements: {1( High school graduation or G.E.D., high school chemistry and a satisfactory score on the MATC chemistry test, or college chemistry ( credits) with a grade of "C" or better; () Satisfactory scores Oll the AC!' battery or on a com pjirable substitute. Alternative educational opportunities are offered for licensed practical nurses who desire an associate in applied science degree. Advanced standing ln rmrsing courses may be earned through written challenge examinations and a skills performance examination. This credit by examination pro<:ess may be attempted only once. AU nur~ing majors have the same.admission, progression and general educatiol\ requirements and achieve the same program objectives.- Additional admission requirements for the licensed practical nurse are: p) Be a. graduate of an approved practical nursing program; () Current licensure a~ an LPN. t is recognized that LPN students are diverse in their educational and work experiences. Therefore, LP.N's are encouraged to seek information early in Qrder to plan and prepare for their educational programs. Fli\ST YEAR First Se~nester Number Cour~ Name S06-01 Anatomy nnd Physiology ' Mir::tobioJogy lnlro to P ychology Nursing FQndllnten(ll~5 Second Semester 80~-Z08 Anatomy and Physiology n 809"- Dcvtlopmcnl.al Psycllolo8y Nursing Process L 18-9wX.J 511).11 Nu,.iog Process!B-9wkol Summer Semester 801-CU Bngli:;h CQmposi1i.on ltltro to s~cio1ogy" SECONDYBA\ fjrsi 5emt..~tct Sl0-01 Fundamc:nlEtls of Speech Nws~nt ProcesslU lb 9Wk:!ii} Nur>ing Procc.s JV f8-9w~>) oqq.qoq Elt:ctive S(!cond Semest~r st0-1 Nursing Process V j8-9wk~;j Nursing Process V \R 9wk.s) Nur:!Urig Ethic:s and T~nds Elective Cred/rs.. course:~ whkb maybe taken-prior!-o entedng the tu,uaijlg pmgram. NOTE: To recei:ve credit for AhatornyiPhySlology and M_icrcbiology. the~e caunl"s- rrttr!lit.hlive been t~en Within five.yf"ars prior l9 admission to the nur-5ing program. 5 ~ s :.. -~ ~1..,.. ~ MEDCAL LABORATORY TECHNCAN PRACTCAL NURSNG NURSNG ASSSTANT

39 7- Health Occupations Health OccupatJorls 75 DENTAL ASSSTANT OM-Yeer 0/p#oma 1'he Dental Assistant program is planned to give students an orientation to the duties of the dental assistant, from general dental o!lice work to the. technical phases of chairs ide assisting, laboratory techniques Uid radiography. Related instt'uction runs coocurrently with practical instruction throughout the program. Students me provided clinical ex perience in area dental offices beginning in the first semester. Some of the aptitudes that may be helpful in this progran1lnclude an ability to pay attention to details, to follow instructions <~nd establish procedures, to perform arithmetic computations rapidly and accurately, and to be able to work pndcr pressure ilnd handle emergency situations. Admission Requirements: ll One unit of science "C" or better; () Sa_tisfactory score on Otis Davis test. FJJ\S'[' SEMESTER N.tmbcr Courn Name S08 0B Dontnl Materiol> Penlul '!'hoary Dental An11tomy Ch lr<ld Thewy 0 ~.:lu Cholnlde Tec~nlquu ub<lratory 508 Rodlogrophy SOB ls Cllnlcoi.Aiflliotion Communlcalian Skills "J SECOND SEMEST!!R SOS-0 D<ntal Mot rl ls DeniAl Theory li SOB.JZO DentAl Prldice.Administ.ratioo SOB-. Choirsldc Theory 508 :15 Choii&file Tochnlques U.bor.tory Cllnital Alfillalions Dental Bmorgonde> ~ Communication Sl<lllsl! 50!1-56 Human <Llticns DENTAL HYGENST Credils..l \ l..! S A~Nm~~hdSdeoce~ The dental bygienist.ls member o the dentaf health team ami. if; prepared td help ilidlviduals main.taln oral heal!)! ~d prevent oraldiseases. Under the s~perylslon of a dl\ntlst the hygiemsl~pfic t s the mouth, removes s~ains and deposits from teeth, ap piles preventive agents, prepares clinical and diagnostic tests, completes ~ntal x-rays, and per forms many oilier services relat~d to mouth care. Dental hygieni$1s ~ounsel patients about preventive measu<es such as nutrition, oral hygiene and dental care. The specific educational t>bjective of the program s to help students dev~op skill and competen cy to function effectively $ dentz,l hygieni.sts under the supervlsion of a dentist in a dental office or cllnlc. Upon complelloo of this program of study and prior to employment, dental hygienist graduates are re quircd to successfully complete comprehensive writ ten and cllrilcal examinations given under the direc lion of the State Dentistry Examining Board, American Dental AS&OCiolion.Dental Hygiene Na tiona! Board, ond Central Regional Dental 'testing Service. Entrance Requirements: Graduation from an ~c credited tk!amdhry school with a college preparatory course or the recognized equivalent,g.b.d.) test. The applicunt will be expected to have betler than average gr.ldes. An ACT or comparable test is required. Students must have successfully completed the following at the high school level: ~ years or English; ye.1rs of lnbtltematics ( year of algebra, 1 year of geometry); 1 year of chemistry; 1 year of biology; years of foreign language 11 the applicant did not st,udy foreit:n language in high school, two ad ditional yeau of history and/or science, in any com bination, is acceptable.); - years of social science. The Dental Hygienist program is a highly intensive program. t ls suggested that stndents take some of the gener~l studies courses prior t.o starting the program or <;luring the summer between the flrst and se cond years of the program.. F\STYEAR Summer Semc~l~r Nurt~bor Cour&c NtHJte Anntamy nnd Physiology'' ooo.ooo Elective' FJmSemttMer Cho!ml&lry'. SOB los Penial Hnicne y Or l Anotomy and Pltysiology SOB-11 Tootb Morphology Hulolagy DeniAl Emtor~ndet S«ond Semester 806 %7 Microbiology 10 t0 Nutrltloo' ~ls RodioiOGY SOS-18 Dent.J Materials Oinic:al DentallfyglomcT>eory. 50&-\01 =!Jplcal Denio! Hygiene.L<bl SECONDYfiAR Sumlll\'r Semester.. 80!1-1 P ycholagy OOO.OQO Slectlvo'.' Cr diu 7 5..! i6 :1 1 First sem ~tei-, Hnallsh Q)mpo ition:l' 50S t5 rathotosv "... : PerlodonUC'!' ,. :!.'. ~ PeriiO.Ol/Ccmmuniiy.Hcnlth.., Cllnkol Dental HytP<ne Th~ry ll Clirikol Dcnl l Hygi""c Litb U ' j_. Second Semester Applied P y<hol"'l) ' SlO :ZOl Fundomentals al Speech' S.c:loloiY' 508 1~ Phurmocoi"'Y Clinical Dcntol Hygiene TltCO<)lll. l Cll lc l Denial HygiCllC Lob U.!, 'Course whlclt tn.y bo l ken prior to admission lo lhe prog<nm. Nolf: An tloo:ll" ""'1 be onyt~,...u!dit 09/lcgr trom(eroblc <OUnl o( tiro ullrknt'r cltoleo:. MEDCAL ASSSTANT One-Year Diploma The Medical Assistnnt program is d~igned to orient students to the duties of a physician's office employee, from general office procedures to the technical pba>l!s of examining room ilssi!ting and medical laboratory techniques. Related insti'uction runs concurrently with occu(llltioilal insltucuoo throughuut the prosrum. Occupational experie~ s provided through placement n a local o f!ceiclmtc during the last four weeks of the final semester. Aptilude.S and lntcresls that are helpful are a genuine in teres! in medicine and in helping people. A medical assistant is courteous, tactful, well-organied and able to worlt quickly and,ccurately under pressure, llexi ble and alile to adjust to diverse personalities, as well as to follow directions and adhere-to standards'. Ad mission Requirement: Satisfactory scores on the 011- Davis admissl.on test. mist SRM S:i'ER Number Cott;.,e Name. sw M ~dlcol Office Proollco ond p,.,.au,es t 509 SS Mtdlttl Loborntory.l't.oc:cduresl 50!1-50 Modi cal Tennlno!o;y l Budy StrtK"':ure and funcrlon Pusonai/VaaoUonll RelatiOnships t(j6.js6 Mcdkol Office Procedotu SOJ-5) Comrn\lnica1ions Medical Orne<t Bmus.,ciqJCFR Crtd/U..! 11 SECOND SEMESTER Medical. Olftee Pradict!s ond Praeedure> Modica! Ttrmlrlolo;y t Medi<ol laboratory Proced r~s n Heallb Conctpts l'crsonoi/vocltllonal Ret.lion!bips Communlcollono t Mc:dlaol Olfict Procec!llrts 809-~5 Human 1\elatlons s~m:y xtern>llip!6 MEDCAL LABORATORY TECHNCAN AssOclare n Applied Science Degree This program, approved by lhe National Ac crediting Agency fur C:llnlcal Laboratory Science.. prepare& pctsons for work in clinical medical laboratories under the supervision of medical techno)qglsts. The couue combines instruction in fundamental principles n selected phases of laboratory techniques os well as: clinical experienc~ ln medlcal!aborotorics. The medica! laboratory techni clan is troined to perform routine laboratory pro ccdures n microblology, blood banking, clinical chemistry, hematology, serology and u~ysis. Ap titudell end interests that may be helpful mclude an interest in scientific, technical and mathematical work, the ability to work under pressure, to fouow' directions CCUrateJy and preci,;ely and to tolerate close supervision. Admission Requirements: jl) High school graduation or Q.E.D. with ''C" or better average; 1)The following high school ~ourses with "C" or better grades-three years English, one year chemi&try, two years algebra, one year geometry; () ACT, SAT or CQJ test. Pll\STYeAR ~irsl Scll>Uier Numkr Com JC! Nr11Ut 51:100 lnt,o lo Medico! Lllborolcwy C:u= jcpk And ubora<ary Slllety) Genttel Chomlo<ry' 80H5l Ccmmulllcolion Sktllt l' Cllrllcal,lollcroocopy Mlcroblol08'(' SC:cond ~mqt r Communication Skinall' Hemntolagy S tll lll Clink Mlcrobloi"'Y /tjtolamy and Physic los)'' SUillli:SerSemet l~r Psycbolo5Y of Human l!etalions' 8D9 1Sl Ame.riean lflthtuliont PR. t\09 0!ntro lo Soela io!)y' SECOND Ye~R first Semcslcr. :51 1<l8 Gilnlcal lmmunotogv 51 i07!nsl,u'rnentotion CJii>leol Chtmblry SllltiLocol Government OR 8 -t 11 Economl«()(]Q.QOO Elective Second Scmest<T S<minor Practlcolft (!Swluj QO).<)OO Ste<tlve 5.1 T 5 5.!, T Coursaa which moy be Q.ktn pr)or to nt~ing tl\e prqsr.,m~ ~y be. take.n at l.he collcce u ansfcr level. Note: Allcoor.snb<l,inm""l wyh SS 10ust b< Yiltut in "'~"'"'ia/ <Vdu... s ' 5 (1 P NURSNG ASSSTANT Less Than One-Year. DiplOma - The Nursing Assistant 'prografl1..prepares students for job entry in hospilab, nursing ho~ or o,ther healt)1 agencies. The 180 hout course mc.lud,es class nstruction, demonstrqtions and labo.ratory ex. perlence. Class instruction and supervised practice in the hospjtal or nursing home are schedule.d concur. rently. The nursing assistant, under the Pirectlon and' supervision of a registered nurse, is pce(lared to per form selected tssks supportivt; to nursing practice.

40 -- 76-llealth Occupations Health Occupations-71 OCCUPATONAL THERAPY Assoclllte n Applied Arts Degree Occupational therapy is a health profession serving persqns whose everyday functioning is complicated by developmental disability, physical illness or inj~ry. emotional problems or aging changes. Occupational therapists use activities designed to: (l)lmprove the physical, sensory. cognitive, :KJcial and emotional skills ne~ed for dail:( activities; (~l offer alternative approaches and adaptive devices w)len such capacities are impaired or lost; aild () ultimately promote a healthy balance and maximum independence in each client's 5elf-care, work and leisure performance. The program prepares occupa tiona! therapy assistants who collaborate with occupational therapists. OT assistants are employed in community settings providing mental health, residen tial care and home health services as well as in hospitals and schools. Graduates also serve as activity directol'$ conducting health maintenance activity programs for th" eldedy in senior centers, daycare ce"ters and nursing homes. Admission Requirements: (11 High school graduate or G.E.Q. with above average grades: 1) The following high. school courses-one year biology, one year chemistry, threefour years English, two years mathematics, two years social studies; () ACT, SAT or CQ_T scholastic achievement test. FRS'!' YEAR Ftrsl Scmescer Mm1bl:r CollY«NliiM 80L l5l Com"'unicatlon Skills ] a og.tsr.psyc:holosy o( Hu.rmul Reletions B06-Ul7 Aoalomy Md PbysioiOflY P Sl<l lol Occ:upa_tional Therapy Orientation Self/Gr-oup Dynamh:s Minor M«<ia Secbnd Seme~ter Speech" Abnormal Psychology" so&-108 1\n.1tomy and Physiology ll' 5l U5 Llfcs.part ~velopment 51!\1 OT Process Minor Mcdio U Summer SemesleJ t.lcdiund Skilb American lnstilutions SECOND YEAR Fint Semeater Field Obm,allon Community Practice Physical Rchtbilllation Pracli<z 5t-15 Mental Reallb P<Jcti(C.5l-t0 Health Care Sy51erns Atuve Media Second Sem~tr 51-0 Menlalllealth Fieldwork Gi 5 PhyQcat _RehobilltiJ,on Ficldw<lrk 51-t75 01' Fieldwork Spcclolly Sl!n"'(nar/Pnu:Ucc and Management "!\lay be lok<n attbe!'d<ije lrlulffor level. Recommended prgstftm elccljve-may djoojc olher :-leciilfe course with con&c:nt of OT progro.m director ! ! Z OPERATNG ROOM ASSSTANT One-Yeer Dlplom The Operating Room Assistant program is desig11ed to prepare persons to functioo as members of a surgical team. l!mphasis is placed on specific functions in the operating room and other areas concern. ed with surgical asep~s. Throughout the course, lectures and demonstrations are supplemented by ex pericnces ljj central supply areas. recovery rooms, emergency care anq ambulatory services, and operating rooms of a~credited hospilals. ln additlon to the study of medical-surgical terminology, weights and measures, and moral and legal responsibilities, the student receives training in aseptic technique5, principles of operating room techniques, surgical procedures and related n~rsing activities. The student also learns not only the correct techniques for p<isltioning and transporting patients, but. accepted methods for observing, reporting and recording ~lected surgical data. _Approximately 1,000 hours are spent in theory, laboratory and clinical practice. Personal aptitudes thal may be helpful include an ability to learn and apply technical knowledge, an ability to work under close supervision and to follow p<esctib ed procedures carefully with _the realization that errors may have serious consequences. Admission Requirement: Satisfactory scores on the Otis-Davis test. FRST SEMESTER Num!Mr Cou~ Ngmi; 51~00 lnfro to the Operating Room Op<raling Room Th<ory/Ltlboralory t 5\. 17 F\mctlonA MicrobjDfosy Operating Room lt.s.sist:j.nt Anatomy 51Z:.0 Opc1atiag ltoom Assistant Conununit:fttions P6YCtK>.Ogy af Human Relation! OR SOQ-56 Human Relations SurveY SECOND SEMESTER 5 1-JZO Opera ling Room Theory ll Sl J. Operating Room l.a.b\lrillory U 51 1 Operatin& Room Assi.slnnl Anatomy )J Credir l 8 1!1!!l \- t..! S OPTOMETRC TECHNCAN (VSON CARE TECHNCAN} ASBOCillte n Applied Scle~ Degl8e -As a member of the vision clt(e team, the graduate technician works under the supervision or the optometrist anc) assists in providing quality visio11 care services to patients. nstruction emphasizes the multi ple and unique. duties rcqu.ired of an optometric techn'ician.in a well-managed optometric practice.. n addltion to techni.cal and cunical trl\ining, a gene{ai educatloll' background is provided to develop the ~tudent's ma~im11m capacity for functioning with lbe public. The technical training nclude~. anatomy and physiology of the e.ye, optical properties of ligl)t, 9p tornettic terminology, use o! optical instrnin.ents, determination of lens powers; frame s\)'ling and adjus.tments, assisting 'n contact lens p~edures ; vision training, vision screening and chilirsi~e assi.sllng. - Clinl.cal experience i.'1 an important part of the curriculum. Workers in this field should' enjoy wor)dng with children and adults, should enjoy c;>ffu::e respo~sibilities and contact with people, and should be. able to follow prescribed procedures. Admission-Re- : quiren\ents: () One year each of the following high school courses-algebra, bioi9gy and geometry; () Typing,0wpm; (1 ACT, SAT or C~T tests.. FlRSTY AR fint s-::mesler Nnm&tr CQUr~ Namt Optontctrii:s General ()ptk'! SOl l S Communlc~:ttton Sll'ms t 5~0 10 Bcdy Structure B09 1~ 1 Psychology of Human Rcillllons Second Semester Oculor Automy 51~10 Opbtlalm.iu 5 15 Optomatrics U Amcticon fnstilutions! DDt).flOO Blct:tive Summl!r Semco;.tcr (J(D-000 Elel.'!ive SECOND VEAl\ fir6l Semc&ter Sl5- Oplom<lric:o ll Public Spe king" 5!6~10 Conlnct Lt!tl5Ctl VisiOn 'J'rai n~ut &onomk>" ~ond Semester 5 1Z7 Optot~~clricsiV SJ.6.W Oploml!tric: Pr,oc(icc ManAgement 5 15 Pr~r:linitol 5 1!0 Clinica.J Bxpericn<:e MAy bel kcn the coii B ron>i r level. Mny also be oken prior lo ~arcing oplomctric courses. Crl!ditJ.1 \.1! ~ 1 PRACTCAL NURSNG One,Yeer Diploma The Practical Nursing program is planned to enable the student to acq'!ire the knowledge, understanding. skills lind attitudes necessary, to become a qualified, competent practical nurse. The pr.actical nurse, under the direction and supervision of a registered nuri;e and/or physicion,.is,prepared to """'!me responsibility for nursing in those.situations r~lali~e ly free of complexity and to a511ist the professtonal nurse e.ndlor physician in more complex. ntjrsjdg sltu.a.tions. The program includes!ectilrcs; demoniltra.lions an!! super vised praciic~ at approved afflliatii)g hospitals and. nursing homes within DiStrict.. The p.rogram bas the approv.al of the Wisconsin State.Board qf Nw-sing: qasses are.admiued twice each year, and students are admitted to the ~ison ba~ program the first semester and to the Fort Atkinson extension of the program the secono stm~st«;r.. AdmiJ!.ion Pr~re-. qui site: Satisfactory scores an the Otis-Davis test or comp{!llble substitute. FRST SBM8S'nR NumW: Coilrse Name S0- E~ntaiy N rslng llody StruoiUre Nurslns ~ Adult Ctowth and Develop~nf Ps 1 ~bology of ljumao Relation OR 809 5G Humoan Relation' Survey S6COD SEMBSTE~ ParootJC~lld Nursing Nur~ing lhe Ment>tly ll 510-!!7 Nur.!ins the Adull SUMMER SEMESTER l6wk l Nur.~ln g: the Adult rn and Ls w Crtifirs.11.l :!. 1

41 78 Health Occu'pntlons RADOGRAPHY Assocfate fn Appfled Science Degree '!'he radiographer is the producer of medical images for diagnosis of disease. The radiographer's dutie~ include: Positioning of pqtient to obtain proper projection; aligning SO\lrce!usually x rndiation); nwking exposure factor selections; processing of the image..!photographically and cleetronicaltyj; and storage and retrieval of images. Graduates of this program are eligible to take the entry-level certification examina tion JARRTJ and are employable in radiology and medical imaging departments in hospitals and clinics. Workers in tl>is field hould be able to follow instructions c arefully and work to prescribed standards, should be able to us~ good judsmcnt in following procedures and handliug problems. They should be interested in work of a techni~:a[ or scientific nature and should be willing and able to work under pressure in emergency situations. Admission Requirements: (1) Chemistrylphysics aucl one rear of high school olgebro;!) ACT, SAT or CQT tests. flrstyear Firsl Scmesltr NW1Jbfr CourSl! Numc 56~1 01 ln!ro to Rtu:tiolt'>gic r.~chnclqg)' 5 11 l R!'ldiographlc Prace:dur~ 81}6 :J0 Ana.lomy 8D5 l56 rhysjcs Secnnrl Scmcsler Radiographic Procet.lmt:s Ril.dlographic 'l'cchniqllt$ J Rild!olugl.: Science El ective Sumrner s~me~c! RediograpJ1ic Technlqul.!s ll 5Z6 1l Applied ClJilical SECOND YEA~ firsl Semestc( 56 15! St)cdnl Proccdute~ Ps.y~::holog}' of!-uman RcJ<J~ons.OR 8U9-l lntro to Psychology Communiciltinn Skills J OR EngUs}r Compo.i!lion l 56 1Z Applied Clinicalll Bilsi~ Campulcr MaCn 50:9"-0 M~dh:al 'rl!rmiuulo!l.r Secy.nd 5emeter CommunlcnLio11 Skills! OR 8 10 Z0 1 fundom ~11tn ls a{ Sp('e<:h American Jnslilu~i<Jn.s OR n lrc!o Soc\o~og y 809-&5 1\pplied Psy cboi<>&y Spe.c ior Procedures U 56-1 AppHed CJi rj.icnl JJ Summ l!r Seme~le r ti6 1 Applied.Clinkul (Y Q!J(HJOO Elcclivc.1 17 J.1 5 JS) 11 1) 1) z.1 JG P _! l RESPtRATORY THERAPY Associate n Applied Science Degree 'rhe Respir<tlory Therapy pi'ogrflm prepares individua~s to work under physician direction ill l\ hospitul setting. A therapist'< re~ponsibilities include delivery of medical gas thcmpy, i!dminislt<llion of in haled medicl!tion, manugement of pnticnts requiring nrtiflcinl ventilution and pulmonary diagnostic cl uluntions. Graduates of this program nrc eligible to lnkc national entry [e\ e! certification exams and ;.lrl\r.nnced pract!tioncr regislr> examinations. Pr.ldilioners in this field slw~ld be iible a interpret and follow pr~sc:ri bed sinndards mld use good judgmcjll, ptoblem-solving and comnllltlicntion skilis in itn pkmenting respirator)' cnrc plnns. They should be interested in nn occupation of n technicol and scientific nature and should be ubtc to work under pressure in emergency situations. Admission Requirements:(!) High school chemistry and two years ol high school math; 11 ACT, SAT or CQT placement tests. FJHST YEAR First S~mcslt:l N!mllx..-t Coun>! Nwm: 81Jfi Jlil Gencr1' C1~cmisl r y l11lro lo 1\e.!.piratory Thcr~py Technicot Scii!K!C! t106 :06 Anatomy ;:md Plly:oiolugy r BM l51 P~ycl'<!lcgy of Htm"JOl J\~lalians Sec<HK Semcsie( SOl 51 ConllhlHlkaliuu SkiU'>~ 515- UH Re:-;p-i"mtury Tl1crupy Fmtdtl1"11Cll([l/1i Patient C;,a.rc Pulnumary Phy iclt)&y ooo<rao Elective SunmJcr 5tme.s~cr ~Og l] DcYclopn1Cill'-ll P:oycholo.~ y Mi(:robi J\ogy SECONDY~AR Fir==! Scmc.~lcr Rc!ipirottcry Thcrnpy Pri;K:t thrrc:; RT Cllnkal Pnlcticc 1 5/5-1~~ Pharurilcufogy '.:~l11optiysiol(l_gy Sl~clive~ S~..-con rl Sr:Ucslcr Arrn:dcom ln-s!itutiumri' ~ R~spirat<Jt~ Th~ r ilpy J i r occ: d~lr'!s SlS- R.T ClinicJ.l Pmctic:~ [ SlO!O Speech" oon-ooo Hlcctivc' SLul1mtr Scmt:>~cr RT Clinicnl Prudi-:c 'May be lukcli OJLlhc colh.::gc. lr!1 l1 ~fcr lr.vcl. ~ 'Bl~ct ivc ( trcd[fs! may be lnf:c~~ ~ilher firs! or SCCClhd ~c rncs t e r. Cr(!rll/~ 5 ~ ~! CLOTHNG AND TEXTLES cl 1x 5. Jj. l 1-17 l ~ l d.1 ~ t!' lli -1 9 ~ DETETC TECHNCAN COMMUNTY DEVELOPMENTAL DSABLTES ASSOCATE Home Economics Division The six program offerings in the Home Economics Division are designed to prep"'e students for employment in a variety of h<;>me and hc lth-related fields. ln'feluor OESGN CHLD CARE SERVCES Home Economics-79 ' i,. l. l t'

42 .. - _ Home Economics Home Economics-81 ;. CHLD CARE SERVCES One Yeer Diploma The Child Care liervice5 program prepares students for work in daycare centers, famlly daycare homes, preschools, kindergartens and as nannies. Child care workers plan activitios to foster the cognitive social, emotional and physicaijrowth and developm~nt of children in 5afe and he thy environments. Student& have field placements in child care settings both semesters of the program. Aptitudes and interests that r(lily be helpful include a de lre to work with yowlg children, staff and parents, an ability to think and act independently- including in emergency situati.oos, and ao ability to communicate effectively both ~erhally and in "writing. FRST SB.a;.j' STER Numblr a.,,... Nomi Communia;llons Child Growth and Development lnlctactional SeiUn,: Working wtth Children Activity Planniot 07 0 Basic Care: Health, Safety and NulriUe,. S07 M) sp<d l Serviod lntro to Sarly ChildhoOd care and llducatloo Snpervisa!:d Student Pr.ctict~m 1/Serninar SECOND SEMSTER Applied Hwn.n R.elatloosiC>itd Care Services 07 0 Cbild Growtb ond l>evtlopznont 07 1oteractlooal Settioll' WoriOn& wlth Adults 07-JGt Supervi5cd &ud.,ll'racdcumll Pr.acticu.m Sc.m'nar! T!'><h\ng Stn~leglhiBarly Childhood Sening 07 ~Zl O"rfe'ntH~n lo Emplaym~~t J07 5Z Aotivlly PlooniD8. CrtditJ z z 11 J l CLOTHNG AND TEX71LES AsiOCMte n Applied Arts Degree The Clothing ancf Textiles progrnm prepare$ s1u<knts for work in the apparel11nd tenile field. Student' llnd employment demonstrating Uld inslruc tlng for sewing machine, pattern or notion com panies, in fabric stores, in dressmaking or alteration, in drapery workrooms, and in apparel -production. Principles of mid-management!n clothing-related businesses are emphasized. This progralll is also an excellent backgrounll for entrance into design schools and home economics vocational education at fouryeo.r collega Successful studenl5 enjo)! clothing con structioo and working with fabrics, can handle. outhority, diwlay leadership ability, enjoy WQrklng with people and are lble to meet deadlines. FRST YEAR Pitit Semroeter Number Course Name Cmi/tl 0H7J Textiles l o... aking Ptlnclplel l 0H85 Equipmr.nt.Dd DemonstrJM>o 0\-188 rattern Study and FkU a Commualcation Skills.l 17 Seeond Se:r..,t<r oreosm ir.s l'rinclplu Applied Apporol D<5!gn W.HSl l'sychology of Human Rc:l.tiont 01 l7l> Line, Col«.a.xl l>,.lgn in Poaric and Dr= SOH5 Ttdlniall Reportina s.le$r1'.aship 18 SECOND YEAR Pirst S~ter. 0H66 Applied Business ior H<>me Sewing lndils\riea ~::m ~~~~~;,Jce.,u... 0H66 Wor~rOOm Manogcm<nt ooo-ooo Electives ~ 15 Second s.n.e.lot 0 1~7 H~e ScwiDJ Businels Pr.tct.icum Am.ctican lostitutlons 01-0 Oc<:opotiooal Resutch/A.. ysis Con.asrmer Re:501.11'CeS"1d fn(pono(ion 01-8 Allerotlon: 1\.. dy to Weor Blective ;.. 'i7 ELECTVES; JOJ.l76 Decorallve Te><tll<..Cra(ts 10-OS Appl\<d Accountln& tij.loti Sni.n Bualot" ~'>~<Nlll ncnt v,..o} Mtrdwldb!ns :Experiment. w~b Pob<ic 0-10 Sewlf Car tbe "'"""' COMMUNTY DEVELOPMENTAL DSABLTES A$SOCAT Associate n Applt.d Science o.gree The Community Developmental Disabilities Associate program prepares students to work. in a :variety of community.5ettlngs with persons who htive developmental disabilities. Graduate~ of the program may hold staff _positions n group homea, apartment llving arrangemenis, foster care home~. community based work sites, vocational centers or in special education programs. Aptitudes that may be helpful include the ability to establish and maintain effective interpersonal relaliohshlps nd an ability to thinlc and act independently. Successful students are.mallll'e and emotionally stable, and they are advocates for persons with developmental disabiliti6. FMT YBAR Pirsc Semester Number Owrs.r Name Cr dit 0S llz fntro to Oeyelopmenral Dl,obilitiea lntro..to Beh vior Ma.nag~mr:nt 809 tzs Govemmet1l: Procas 1t1d PracUc:t$ ' 001 )51 Communic Uon Sldlls l Oft ( En g1bb Composition.! Psychology of Humon RciAtton OR tl ll>tto to S Second Semc>ler 05-1\5 Di~lopmtDtal DiYbilit\es Jl 0S J Beh.ivior Management J1 51.f.J 10 Setf/G:roup Oyn.amics 05- Assessment and Prog.ram Ph1nning S09-i7 Huma.n Development _.. s CommtinlcaliiJn'SkltlsiD.D...! 17 SECO'iO \'JlAR flrm Stmes.tt::~ 05 1\7 C..mmunity living Skl\ls Field StudyiDe...,opmen\01 OC...blllli<:s 05-t D Seminar UOovdopment.J Di>ebilities ~ C..mmuaicatiao Sllilloll 011 1) 801-tm J;ngli<h Composition Technir:>l 1\epnrt WriiJr>s OR !1 Teehnir:Di l\cpnrtlng ll SOS lzl Home Heahh Manoaemtnt Elective J!. 17 Se~nc\ Semester 05 1 jiolllc: Manogemc:nt 05-1 field Shldy/O..elopmen11l Oisabillllcsll 05-1 Semln!ll JJO...,opm<nlel OU.biUti Counseljng Tc.cbniqu.es poo.ooo Elective.l ELECTVS: 0S 9 Vooatlcmai.Servl<:es Sup,:rvlslanll>evelopooental Disabilill.. 0 Hlo Consumer Re!CUtC"t!S and nformation DETETC TECHNC1AN Assoclat& n Applied Science Degree The Dietetic Technician program prepares student to work in nutritional care as part of the health care team. Roles of the die!elic technician nclude palient nutrition coun eling, Qiding patients in menu ~elec llon, modifying patient menus, tea~hing nutrition education in the commlli'llty, mailltainlng quality food standards and working in coordination with. food service managers and nursing se rvice~ to imple ment patient meal service. Successful students use arithroelic well in performing clerical tasks, can plan..lind direct otheu in routlne activities, communicate ideas verbally and in writing, follow procedures mid adhere ta standards, are emotionally stable an>! able to handle emergencies, and ore willing to keep abreast of new \echniquos nd methods. Admission Requirement: "C" in high school chemistry.. ~l.rst YEAR FJl'6t Semester Numbtr COU1Si1! Nawu: lntro to OicteticoiHeolth Care Field Pood Sci<nec/O.T S.Sic Nutrllion 0 t Medlt:al T munoloi) \n N \rltionot Can 0-1 Principl s <> J!io.Orpnlc Cbemislry 8()! 1.51 Camm~ication Skills l Cr<dirs J ~ 18 Serond Semeii cr 0-t 1 Basic Nuultl.on U 0 1to Sup~:VW:d Field Kxperienee!Nutritionel Care 0 18 Food Syitems Manoatment 0-1!>(1 Physiology lor Dietetics 809-LSG "&ing and iti' Sqdal P~olllcms OO<J-00 EJcct.ivc: _1 17 SECOND YEAR Pint S~nute t JOJ- 11 N.,uition EduQtlo:t l 0J 0 OietTt.enpy l 0-1~ 5upervi5ed Field l»per!tnccin utrllian.al Care Communic.'ltlon Skills 809 t51 Psychology o! llum n RelAiions An>etl~ lnstltullcns Second Se"mester ;0-11 Nultition Edue«d-on U 0-19 B.mployment Orientation \nd 'J\esei.lrch 0 11 Diet Thera~y- t 0 1 Nutrition PtiK:ticum OOt).OOO Elect_ivc BLBC'l'lVP.S: 'food Service Man ~meoi/htalth!are Facilities 0:1 119 Appll<d Cllnh:aJ Care.]_ 18.l 1

43 ~ 8-Home Economics HOMEMAKER/HOME HEALTH ADE Less Than One-Year Diploma The Homemaker/Home Health Aide program prepares graduates to provide services to elderly, disabled or other individuuls needing temporary or full-time hun1e care. Aides assist with menu planning, marketing, meal preparation and light housekeeping, as well as providing for physical. mental, emotional and/or social health care needs uuder appr<lpriate supervision. Successful students are mature and emotionally stable, are able to think and act independently, and l1ave a sincere liking for elderly ami disabled individuals. They alsc have the ability to establish and maintain effective interpersonal relationships. l'/liptih~ Course NQm~ 5l0-S l':'ursins A!i.l>istant Home Assislilnt Hnine H\:ttlth Home Health TrJ.J.~Jtion Crcrlit.~ 1.1 NTEROR DESGN Associale in Applied Arts Degree The nterior Design program prepares students for entry-le\ el sales and dcsi~n positions in residential and commercia] design with a11 etnplwsis on posi!ions in the bome furnishings industry. Graduates are employed by interior design studios, space planning firms, office derilership.s, insur~nce comp~nies r furmture stores, paintrng and de<.:or<lting centers, floarmg stores, building centers, kitchen and bath design hnns, and by manufacturers as sales representatives. A growing number of experienced graduates are selfemployed ln their own mlenor design businesses. Successful interior designers are creative and visuajiy sensitive md1viduals who enjoy workmg with people and the materials and elements of intenor design. They are well-organized and decisive w th the ability to follow through on olllasks, and ilre effective salesoriented communicators. FRST YEAR Fin1t Sem~s~~r Nmubtor Cm~rsc Nllme 0 15! lntrq to Juler-ior Dc:ii~~l 0--OZ ~ undumcntols o( b~sr~n 0 1 \5 Ba~lc On~ fling 0 1.n Applied Malhemo1Hcs & Comrnunit:Jiicn Skills S P:r.ydmlogy o( Humnn H.cfatio1\s ndustrial Foods Division The ndustrial Foods Division trains individuals in all aspects of food prepuration and service, from sllortordcr cooking to mid-manogement careers in.the hospitality industry. ndustrial Foods-8 Second Semester :ro<t-101 lnt~rior O!!sign i 0 11 Renderill!: 0~ lj History or llrchhccture ond lntt!rlor!!) Sot-t5Z Commullicflthm.Ski[fs 'rc:.:tiles Wind~\'1 1'rcatmenl:i SECOND YEAR First Scm!;Sicr.0.f. Hl:l Cntcrlor!Jcsign U 0-1 l_b Histor.y uf Atc:hitedur~ and lntcriijrs ll Slllc:malhship Amcric~:~n nstltullom Commercial [otcrlots lil!![(ive Second Semester 0 11 App!i"<!d nlcri<jr Dc~ign. 0-JZ6 nterior De5lgn )1}1Cfl:.51!ip ~0-l.0 Busin~ s Practlccs for_lnh. rior Design S09 1r Econnmi:cs (XJO OOO m~ ~ Livc El,EC'l'tVES: 0 J9 ncuphul:>tcry 0-15 i.d, Sp~cinl Topics 0-!56 Open Oaice Sysh:ns Lig~tin g r v i... ; FOOD PREPARATON ASSSTANT

44 8-lndu strlal Foods Morkcling-85 FOOD PREPARATON ASSSTANT One-Yea~ Diploma T~e Food Preparation Assistant program is designed to help students develop skills to pun;ue a career in food preparation within restaurants, hotels and in ~titutioru;. Food preparation assistants are employed m the areas of prepnration, short order, broiler, salad, pantry or baker's helper. Successful students can assimilate information and instruction clearly, tatl learn and apply the principles and techniques involved in cooking and baking. have a keen intere 1 in food preparation and cooking, are willing to assume responsibility for quality of work, and are willing to work under the pressure of mealtime schedules. firs!' SJ!MESTE!t Number Cour.u N1Jm1 5!6 07 lntro to food S.rvlce l"troductory Foods R0 7S Malhemollc, Coaununico'1tlon Skill& 1 61~ \6 lnlermedlutc Ji'ood Prep1tr1Jtlon ~oad Scrv\ce SerUt11.tlou ~ SECOND SEMESTER Practkwn ' 0-5 Menu Phinning Dnd Nutrition ~fs~ ~~~rc~:~~:~: Theory 0-18 Decor:~.th e food job Relotion Crecfils l 9 WCovcr1 entrcet, sap1d.j. c ttri.ng, short order, b.utefy, start"room. c~ret e:rie 5et lce _! RESTAURANT AND HOTEL COOKERY Msoclate n Applied Science Degree The Restuurnnt and Hotel Cookery program is designed to lit the needs of personnel who desire to pursue cnrecr5 wilhin the hospitality field in midmanagement positions in the food preparation and set\ lcc arells. Pasilions include assistant mnt1ager duties, coordinating food prcp<~ ration with footl service, supervising personnel, mtd in some cuse<, supervising n complete food unit. Successful students are able to SUpo!rvise and direct others in job perf or mance, cnn communicate information and instructions dearly, cnn lenrn nnd upply principles and techniques ensll)' Swdcnfs shauld have a keen interest in food prcparution and cookin!l and enjoy CMperimenting to develop tlew fond combinations and recipes. Tl1ey l ould be lutercslcd in work which involves the nllalnment of high sttmdurds and be will ing to accept responsibility for quality of work. Admission Requirements: (l) High school graduation or G.E.O,; (1 "C" or bcllcr in high school English al\d mnthemalics. FRST YEAR First Se:m~stc r Numfx:r Coc.ru Mmr Food Preporotlun t..h Ccmmunlcallon Skill t llvo &lated MaU><:n1olllc::l Meut SciCJL"t Food Scien<:c111<0t'f and l.ob Food Scienca Th«><r od Lllb ll.uery St:oond S<mesier 51 -lz Food l'rt poration Lob! COmmunia llan SklllJ l'lycbuldjy oc Human KcL1!ions ~11-1~1 f ood ood kver>a< 1'\ordoo lng Applied Ao:ounttnc SECONDYEAJt First Semester 51 ~-10 lntro to Gourmet Food Pre part~ lion Food S<rvlcelnS)Ju!lon> Food Costs and Percent &" J!cooomlcs Sl l-9 Pood Monag ment SH-10 CulinAry Lonsvagc Second Semut~r 10-1 Bu lne,. Organl,.tlon Food SeiVico Layout and Equipment BOQ-15 AmeriCDn nstitution ~:; :;~ ~;,~~~~!7, nd O.coratlvo Foods Job O rient:nlon Oil0l oo Rl ed tve Cr«lirs 6 _! 15 ~..! 17 ~ ~ 17 l iw.. Jll:, c~ r-. ~ -;:-. RBALESTATB '!'it>,r'!.t.' ~ Marketing Division Th~ Marketing Division, through its nine program of (ermgs, prepares students for dynamic and diversified careers invo~ving g~ and services. As the concept?f co~umensm gams.strength, marketing is being tdentified as the most 111lportant function of business today. - HOSPTALTY MANAGEMENT MARKETNG

45 "- -~' """ 8 1ndustrla1 Foods FOOD PREPARATON ASSSTANT One-Year Diploma The Food Preparation Assistant program is designed to help students develop skills to putue a career iu food p reparation within restllurants, hotels and iuslitutlons. Food preparation assistants are employed in the areas ol preparation, short order, broiler, salad, pantry or baker's helper. Successful students can assimilate information and instructions clearly, can learn and apply the principles and techniques involved in cooking and baking. have a keen interest in food preparation and cooking, are willing to assume responsib!lity for quality of work, and are willing to work under the pressure of mealtime schedules. Ft!ST SB\ESTER N~~mb«r Cuuru flame 51S 07 lnt"' to Food Scnlcc SHJ ntroductory Food Mathcma\1<& Communication Skills f SS- ll"'termedlate Food P~P~'\tion 5l6-J8 t'ood Service Silnitction SECOND SBMJl.STBR SJ8 J7 Pra ~tkum J 0 5 Menu P'annlnc and N11trltlon food Pt"Jl r>flon Th<Or)l Human J\datloll' Oecor111ive FDOd Job R latiooo Crtdils f 1 l ' Covers entrees,.ulads, ceterlng, short otdu, b~k6"f. stonrromn, careterla service. 1 z 1..l RESTAURANT AND HOTEL COOKERY As$0Ciate n Applied Science Degree The Restaursnt and HO!el Cookery program is designed lo lit the needs of personnel who de.ire to pursue coreer> within the hospitality field in mid man~gemen t polilions in the food prcparalion and scvice areaa. Positit>nS include assist~n t manager duties, coordlnnling food preparation with food service, supervising pcnonncl, and in some cases, supervising a complete food unit. Successful luden1s are able to 6Upervise and direct others in job perf or mance, am communicate in!orm.~tion and instructions cleady, can learn and apply principles and techniques easily. Students ~hould huvc a keen in terest in food preparation ond cooking und enjoy experimenting to develop new food combinatkllls and recipes. They should be interested in work which. in volves the attainment of high standards and be willing.to nccept responsibility for qualily of work. Ad mission Requirements: (1 1 Hl&Jl school graduation or G.E.D.; 11 "C" or better in high school English and mathematics. FRST YEAR first ~Oictler NrmrbQr Count Namt.51 l -1D9 Food Prtplr.tli()rt Lllb Coftlmunlc>tlon Skills l 0 JOJ Rt-!.:tt6.1 MathtllNUlcs 5l l -ll7 Meal Science Pocd Selonc<' Thc!Oty 1nd U.b Food Sci< nee Theory nd lob f 51 t-106 ll!k 'Y Ctcdits 6 1 J 1..l 18 ft il REAL ESTATE Marketing Division '11~.Marketing Division, through its nine program of lenngs. prepares $\udcnts for dynamic and diversified careers involving g?ods and services. As the concept?f co?~umensm gams sttength, ulilrketing is being 1denhf>ed as the most important ftmction of bu.siness today. HOSPJTAUTY MANAGEMENT l. 1:,.. ' Sccan.d Se..~~ter 511-liZ Food PreporaUon U.b Communi.. tloa SkUll 809-LSl PS}"thology o! Hum~ Rtl&ticms Food and llevor:js Pwd,asinJ 10 l-11 Applit!d Aceounun1 SFCONO YEAX Pir&l Semc$let' 511-JQ.( (1\tro lo Courmat Food rrcparation 5ll ll8 Food S"vltc lnodtutlon St l'oocl C01tc and Percont~~& l()g lll Bconomic' Food Mntlagement Stl-10 Cullrlory Langu s Se('Oild Seon1ester OH Bu lne,. Orsanlzolloo Food ~tvl<c La )'Out and Equipment Arnertc:on (nslitutiaru ~::::~~ ~~-~~~~:f, ond l><conotl>< fo.xls 51 J 19 Job Oricntotloo Bfocllve.1 17 J.1 \1 " J.1 18 i!. f! Mi\llKETNG

46 86-Marketing Marketing 87 SUPERVSORS MANAGEMENT. TECHNCAN NSURANCE SERVCES FASHON RETALNG One-Year Diploma Fashion Retailing is a program designed for persons who pish to enter department stores, chain stores or specialty stores in any phase of fashion mercha!ldising. Class studies stress an understanding of fashion products, salesmanship and a knowledge of fashion marketing principles and procedures. Supervised work c~perience.is required i n Jne second semester. Field trips, gu~st lectures.and ndividual projeds enrich Class studies and enable students to explore career possibilities. A wide range of employment op portunities is available to graduates. FST SSM ESTER NlmiiPu Crn~ No~ Survey Of Pa!;hion Priru:iples J0 06 M erch~m d ise Displny Qrientul\nn Seminar Appllcd BushJt.'i.:; M)J1 cm~llcs Cnn1munh:liHons l JO J. 0 }'UJ)clnJ)11.'Uiafs" of Sa!CSJnnn:Jhip RU(}-5:! HuJn61l R~hl ~ion:s SllCOND SEMES'!n 10~5.Pa.shkm in Uo~nt$ CU~. Relail Operation and Promotion l0 n r i dt.. E~p\..'fiem.-..! Q.jZ7 1'..;.xtil~s. an tl Non Tex:liles lor. Rct~ill11g 801 Cornmuf'tication~ l Pund011ncnt.:~h of Markelina Eh:clive Credit~ 15 J,1-1 7 HOSPTALTY MANAGEMENT (Hotei Motel).. Asso~Jate in Applied Science Degree The hospitality industry is one of Wisconsin's most impor.tant employers, represenllng over seven per cent of the state's jobs in hotels, motels, restauran.ts and ba!'ll. The outlook for growth is optimj,tic based on the increasing popularity of eating and dining away from home, an anlicipaled greater emphasis on early reiirement. and leisure time for traveling, and the continuing demilnd for business and convention lodging. Although a variety of interesting jobs is available in t b.e fi.td, tbe expectatio!l for greaiest growth in job~ is at the management level. ~ twoyear program provides background for advancement in the field, especially for those interested in service to people away from home.. The course of study in eludes management theory and practice, with ~P' plication to hospitality i sues and success(ul work ex perience in lhe field. l'rstye/11\ First Sc,.T'tCSlcr Nuh1ber Cnlll h'~ Name 10-l01 C".J'Cef Orientation 801~151 Commuutcation Skills..809.!51 Psycl1olugy c Human RcialiO\i R:cL1tcd Businl!!liS M~ t}lcnulflt~ Prin ci ple~ of M!'trkctinc 109-l8 lntro to Hospllality Mit n t~sej)t=nt. S CCU11d Ser11C~t:r 1_09 1 \v)l,ur.ml M~ace:rn ent 801-rs. Cocnmunic:Jlion SkiJls U 101-lO.S Appfled 1\=untiog 10 1~ Pril'\cipies or S(dcsn,ans.bip Fralll Orlice MantJRernent li-10il r'oo~ l;dencc SECOND YBAR Fir~t Seme.sttr 109~ 1 Be~cn~e Mcrc hstu.l i51n g ~ SOS-lSJ Amerktn ln&tihiuons 109- Hotel and RC$tauraol Law Ho~f ur.d R~OJ u.rant Sales Promoti HoSFitnlity fntcrmhip 0 10 Food Scienoe ll Second Semester 809-ll) Econumlc:s Rcsl.:l\lrunt Scrvict.! 1\.'lmlagcment Occupational R e!~01rch HO>pit.1lil)' ln1cr ship t lecllv"" Crdlls l.1 ~ 18 z l ~ l Ji ls,. ~ SUGG\S''liO E~UCTV ES: Prlnclplc.s of lnsunmce 10-1 Rtlcil Mnnagcmcnt SupcrVbory Housr::kccping rypewr!iing.

47 88-Markeling Marketing-89 NSURANCE SERVCES Aaodate n Applied Science Degree The nsurance. Services program is designed to meet the entry-level educatio!u!l needs of me& segments of the insurance industry. Training blends general educational development and required insurance technical skills. The program is intended to umbrella a large segment of entry-level qualifications found n life and casualty job manpower requirements. FRST YEAR FNil Semc:ater Nurnbcl- Covr~ Nome Career Orientation lll 109 Principltsofln umnce OL-LOS Applied Accounlln~ 80l Ul Commuplcation Skills lol-loj Related Business Mathrmatics Pr;nclplc ol Morkellng Second.Scmcsle< 0-i. Pcopcorty lnsu, ance Casually (n&uranoe '8LD-101 Fundamoi)t lslif Speech P ycholosl' o( Human Relotions Prlnclplts of SaJesm1n1hlp lllecllve SECOND YEA!t FirJt Semester 10 1 Und trwrulns Personal Lines 10 0 S.lc.o Manog<m<nl 10 0 Butioess Law U blkty Adjust;ul American Jnstltuttons Suond Setncs.~tr 10ot l0 Lift and Hullh lnsur1ncc EcuDOm!cs Co1n:c.r- Plano'ng and Ocvclopmenl 10 1~ Principles ol Underwriting Property. Adju.,ing SUGGESTED ELECTVES: r rlnclples of Adv~rUsing 10-llO [.<aderslt;p CredltMa1~1~nt ~g:: i~~ ~1:r:~;:rn~~~~~'tnar Creditl 1 s...! 17...! t7...! MARKETNG Associate n Applied ScienCe Degree. Marketing offers many career pursuits for qualified men and women with initlotive and trained abilities.. Marketing abounds with opportunities in the relilil, wholesale, manufactudng and related marketing fields. Study involves a broad, dynamic and diversilled area involving goods and services, with many opportunities for specialiulion and growth. ll to day's economy. the consumer is the center of tbe business universe. Acceptance of this consumer concept s having broad implications in economic think ing. As this concept gains gr.,ater acceptance, marketing is being identified as the most important function in buslne55 and is becoming more critical n the survival o( non-profit nstitutions. FRST YEAR Firat Scm<:ster Ntm1bur Course Nmne J0 JO Rebtl!d Bu&lncss Malhcmlltks Communication Skills 10~ 1 0 l'rlnclpl<s of M.arkctlns 10 10J Cureer OrlenLntioo SC9-15J Psycholu~y of Human Rda1ions Principles of Salesm n.shlp Second Semester AJll>licd A:ooounU s 80l-15t Communicution Skills n L Credh Man11a~mcn t OH0 Morl<etillB Re-.earch Lcadcrsh;p SECD'D Y6AR P1rst Stme~cr Prlnciplos o Advertllin 8()1J l5 Americn JnstltuUoos W-111 Bcon0011cri M01chacdioe PlAnning...U Conltol 10 1 Rcl il MPO&~t,..ent Elective Second Semester 10% 0 Bu&lneso Luw 1 lu+-17. Career Pltnn.ing omd Development 1()..0 &lu Mana~JTM,':Cll lntern:a!ontl Mttrkellng elective SUCOESTKD ELECTVES' SmAL 8uiness Manur:emenl 10 i\dvcrti.slnc and 'Public Relntions Cornpuigns A'n:ountina ll Prio.dph!s Plold Tnioing Scm milt Prinr.lplcsof lnsurath:c Consumer Bch.wior Cndlrs.1 J l 6 J.l 17 _j_ l6 MARKETNG-FASHON MERCHANDSNG Assoct.te ll Applied Science Degree Tbe basis for a ~re.er n fashiort merchandisirlg ia a!ou!ld grasp of the practkal aspects of b\15iness. The program includes courses in retailing, sales, merchandising. advertising, textiles, business law, fashion promotion, marketing and communications. Students organize a small store each sem6ter and shop markets for merchandise. The creative approach to merchandising and knowledge of fa5blon trends is reinforced by visits to one or more of the markets_ during the year-chicago, New York, Dallas or Min, neapolis. The department also offers a ooe year visiting student program with Fashion nstitute of Technology for MATC merchandising students. The program requires cooperative work experience to be gained during the second year. For merchandising students, a full-time, supervised position in retail or a ciosely related area is L'quired. FRST Y!AR First Semester Number Co11rU! Nufri Communicatfon Skills t Pritl<lpl<sof Modacllng to.h Principlea of Poshlon Morkotlng Rel:ltr:d Buslnc.\S Methem tlcs Tcxlllea Second Semeder PsycholOf!Y of H m>n!wotlons 10-1CU Priodpla o! SatesmMUhip 8tO.O Pund m<ntalsol Speech Viwal Metcbtndlsln& Ble:nents of Fashion to>.ooo lectin SliCONO Y!AR rors Semester SmaiJ Store Operation F1>hlon lnl<:rnshir 10!1 Fashion Proouotion l0 1ZA Retail Management SupoMiiolon S.cond Semester 809-1~ Covctnmcnt: Proc:c&s and. Pradict.' Fashion nternship U 10-1 ltetall Merchon<llslng Economics \100.(]00 Blectin: SJGG!STBO SLECTVl!S: MenS ~nr Reioning 10" AdvcrtlsJns Bnd Public Relatloo~ Ctunpnigns Mcrchandl,. Planning and Control OZ 0 Bwlncs Low May bl! taken cilher rd or th ~mester. crtdits J :!.1 ii.l S..1 REAL ESTATE Anocl te n Applied Science DegJee There are numerous career opportunities in.. residmtial, commercial and industrial J'Cl estate for trained men and women, offering a tremendouj amount of variety and challenge. One may become:a broker. appraiser, property lluultger or mortgage. lender. Real estate imludes th~ planning and develop. ing of office buildings, ndustrial complexes, farms, planned reaeational developments, p11bl i~ lane! acquisitions. showing cl!llters and the complex f~<:ld of. mortgage lendlng and finanj:. Tbis.programexpiorl;lS the basics of the real estate mar!tet,. pro!>"dy rights.. owner! hip, constr!lctioo, financing and brpk<;rage u they relate to the Amerlc:rul consumer. nstrnctl9nlll areas may include current information and equip ment technology. Students may be exposed to fleld practices through guest speakers on a vari~ty of con temporary subjects.. FRST Y!AR FiT~l Semester Number Courso Nam~ 10 toz Principles of Morkcli!!i Prlnciples ol Sole mouuhlp & Economics Commun\cotion Skills )()..101 Cerec:r Odent1tion Princlpl.., of Real Estate Second Se<noster 10 0 Buolnw Low! Relotcd Busin... J(aibematiC'S Property Me~m~nl and Development ll0-101 Pundomcnt>ls of Speech 19-ta. Real :iolale Flnonc: Elective S>CONOYEAR Fir5t Semester 101-OS Applied Acc6untlng ltetl Esta.,Approl.. ll!w-15 1 Psycl!OloSl' ol Human ll latious J!l-18Z Rcol Eshle Lsw t0 l.5 Principles of Advertising. Second Semestt:r Rei11 Estotc lnve.slment 10-t7Z Coreor Plannlog nnd DeVelopment F.undamenlols of Building Construction Amerkan lrutitutlons Elect!~ ~ -.Crcd.il; s.1 s.1 -l SUGGESTED Et.ECTV S: P.rlndptea o!? ta Proccssin& l l Principles o{ lnaurance J0J.J71 Credit Mona~enac.n t Real Eslote Apprallal n Leadership 10 A.dvcrlisin; and PubUc Relations Crunpaigns Mu.l stl<ct Credit Managemonl or Real K!Jote Approisalll from olectlve S<hcdulo.

48 90-Mark~lng ~ ~ Marketing 9l RECREATON RESOURCE OPERATON ASSOCATE.... Assocl te in Applied Science Degree The. Recr~ation Resoutce Operation Associate pro gram S destgned to develop resource opetation com peteocies n the techl)ical, problem-solvillg, human relations and ltfe ~ills that are needed for entry-level ~ployment in public, private and semi-private agen CieS. T be program develops an operator's.ability to plan, maintain, develop, Operate and protect natural and J?an-':nade.resou-rces, areas, facilities and equip~ ment. Tramed entry:level operators Work :as center diretf6ts, 1>601 directors, camp directors, facility at telidan!s, equipll\ent manage~ : building and grounds supel'vtsors, park resource assstants and naturalist!issistalits: FRST\'E;\R FirstSe:m~ter Numb8r Couu, Nam~ 801 ~ 151 Communication Skills r S09 J5 Psychology of Human Relnho:lS Leadeishlp ' ntru to Leisure.Se r vice~ l'o~np.retretulon and Lels~re in Modern So~iet~ Elective Sc«<nd Semester $01~ 15 Technical Reporting (09-)07 Recreation Safety JOQ.J06 Pro&tunming ~nd Public Rdatiuns 1~ 1 5 Principle$ of... d, crtising J09-L t5 Recreat.Kmal R"esou r~e-ma.nillgcmcnt R.ecre:uion nternship. SECOND YEAR Flrst Semester American ll':stitution.s!09~~ 50 Ml~~tn{ oc Leisure Facilities Principles ol Mark.UnJ Opera lion and Maintcna.nct: of Leisure.R~auTce.o; l0 JOJ ReJ.tted BusineS$ Matltematir:s t09-t0 Field 5,1rvey S.::cond Sem-:st~r Bcooomics R~crcation Seminar.109-HO Pr b(esslonlll lss Jntcrpretlng the l:ell:.ur~ Environmcnl ~0 0 Bus!ucl$. tow l Elective SUCOESTED BLECTlVBS: Commercial Touritt Hl!l!rrcnllon "The Too.riat BustMss 109-t.SS Rccreadonal Actlvf1ics ~09 0 S()ecJsl aod Social Recl'ealion Cftdils..!..! 17 SMALL BUSNESS OPERATONS One-Year Diploma This program repres~nts a concentraled one-year curriculum which has been designed for individuals seeking a ca~r in small business. Emphasis placed on prepnr~tion to meet minimum performance requirement.. FRST SEMl!STER Number Couru Na~- 10-:io:! Fundamenlll>of Marketing Fu~mcntals of Salesmam;hip Appli<;<l Bu9nen Moth Communication Skills [ l0l SO 1\elat d Accounting 10-0!) Small nu sii'u~&s Development and Planning 0 J QrfentpUon Seminar sncorm SEMES'TER l field,experience J 0 Jteta11 O~ration alld Prouwlja rz tm9-sz H'1miln Relollons OCa-ooa.Sma ll Business CO.nput~r Application Le D.dcrs)l'p rechnigues Employment Planning )OO OOO Rlec!ivc Ctt-dits ~ z J._!..1 SUPERVSORS MANAGEMENT TECHNCAN Associate in AppUed Science Degree The need for qualified, trained supervisors will continue to grow throughout the deeade of the 90s. According to estimates by the Department of Labor, Wisconsin will g~~in approximately 7,000 jobs annually with a <:Qrrespondifi$ increase of supervioory managemetll-related positiorui estimated.to be in the vicinuy of percent. All.types. of organizatklnswnether manufacturing, governmental or servicerelated-wiu iace increasing demands for training supervisors. rhe Supervisors Management Technician program bas been designed speciflcally to meet bis emerging need. The program content will provide supervisory training and education for individuals presently employed in supervisory posilions and also for those deslting to prepare themselve.s for such positions. This program s offered on a ftve-year, part-time s chedule with classes in late afternoon and evening to accommodate the working adult. first YEAR N r.unbe.r Cawrst N.cnrit l96 -l00 Prl oclpl..-ol Supm Jsion \96-ll& Manat;lng Human Resource5 rgg-- js Time M:u~.ug~mc::nl t96 l ~S Stre..s Maru~.gcrnent ~ Assertive ~on:.glrtg 196- tsl Training Technlqli<s Communlca.tion Skifla 1 CredHs l SECOND YEAR l96-18 Management. of Conlli<lond Ch'l!l ~e l Making M~c11nl$ Work JJS lmpravcd Prochlctivity Th'fough }'nx~ Control Erre<:tive Uslenin; J 19 Labor Man&i:~ment.Relalions 19&15 Problem. Solving and Decision Mokiog...! 10 Tl!RDYEAR Org nh tlo~al Le d rship 196-Jl Personnel PreeUcea 1% 1 Ssl<ty R~l~ted ~u;inesi Mathemati cs _l 1 FOURTH Y~AR CompUtCr Ttchnlquu Jor Supervi5ors U Economics P ychology ot llucnan Relations Applied AccounHng FF'rH YEAR 196-]05 Octupo!lonol Tre ds d l_.,ues ~ 'tec~nic:a\ Reporti g l OZ-0 Bu.tnen Low 80'1-15 American ln1tltutlons EU:CMVES: Elective aedit.s may be t.u~.rom approved DS~oei.ate Mgret c(>utsc-' on Prior QCceptt.nce by the Matktting Div~~on chairprrsot1...! ~~ l.l ll TOURST RECREATON ASSOCATE Associate n Appl~d Science Degree The Tourist Recreation Associat~ program is designed to develop the recreational competencies in technical, problem-solving, )uman relations and life skills that are 1\eeded for enlry-level:employmentin commercial recreation and tourism. The instruction develops the recreator's ability to ptan, organize, in: struc!, inform.and evaltu~te activities in ~. Facilities and equipment for-tou.risl recr_e.ational particip.ation. The program develops tniined entry level employees to work as hotel, molel.. o( resort social directors, mal)agers and owners ofoampgrpunds, sport centers, fishing or huntioll~:cserves, stables, pro shops, ski a~ea s or theme parl.<s, as travel directors or consultants, tour Jl])lnagers or guides, or in commercw ~ales.and services. FRST YEAR Pint $elne5ttr Number CCJur.tt. Na;,~ 801 i51 COinmunicollon Skllls l 809-i 5t F!ychoiQgy of Human 1\clailocs!0-110 LcadeiShip 109 '101 Jnt ro lo Lt:S\te Serv;ccs J09' 10 Rt trt alion and Leiswu in M~n Elective Sccood Semester 801-)5 Tcchnicol Repo<~ng l Rcorea\lonal S.fet}> l09 l06 Prasrnmmius ond Public Relatl;>r.!0!5 Principles of Advertisinjj Commerctaf-Toorlst Recreation Rec:N!ation lnternsbtp SBCONDY&AR First Semester American lnstituljons The Tou.Ut B.. ine Prlnciple:s of SalesmanShip ReaeatiOilal Ac:tivilies 10-JOZ Principles of Muketing to9-10 Field Survey SccQhd Seme tet' Boonomlco ' Rt:creatiou ~miner 109-lLO Profe~anall:s s uc.s 1 0~ 0.Special and Social Recreation! OZ!Bfr Business!;ow Elective Socidy' SUOGES'l'!D E.ECTlVRS: l M lls RecreaticnaJ Re.sou rce Man11sunent t()g: l50 Management of Leisure F:u~lll ties 109 ~5 Operarlon Md Malntenllncc ol Lcis ~~:re RcstHJrces ~ nterpreting the Lclsur~ En vlron~cnt Cndil8 ~ l ~ l.!.. J --..! 17 t

49 9 Ma rkcling l.lubjic Saft:ty 9 MARKETNG ELECTVES N.ittttbe ' Colf~Nmw~ :g: ::~ ~=~~~.. ~~~;r~ 101 )) /\Ct:OUt1tit~~ 11-Princlpk!-~ :!,.-,]>plied..reounttrlS 10-11i l riarblao{ t-in.lto:" to.l-o:z l~n&,lcs of. o\1llrhttlns LO HOJ Mnrkc:li11j: Rc~o.:~r~ h l~-100 SmnlltJ.usl.,\e!i.~M EUJay: a.l'>tt GHO l..elldt'l$h'j O.f O M~ tllft~n ront of Pn;,/'(':\.~Jo.tal Otg:lfl iu!ora~ J C, t l~ Vlsu.,Mercbandizlns CHZ Non-'f'ellilkoz Jt.f.tJ Rtut.ill~g~menl lc--1:; flrlt)cipk of Advef l{,in~ C- Advert~ln: add Pubtk RtlJHon~ Camp~~.i,as 1(-J~ Consvmf:C' Oc,b.nio( (... JJ FJ!$bton Promt~tion LN-1 rrtnc:lple& or fnhio11 M~rl..t dns J(L.i-15 fjemtnt1of Frashin11 J(l.l t1 M~dife 'Lumi11ga:Jd ol U(e t~ lbltb m~.u.okt l<l l-i.l U:rbilityhttjusrins l/).. 1 Ca~<.u.L.trln.k!C;:'n n O.t 'ropenyla.allroJnoc:..: ClonmH.'fci:,rl l' t<tjx'rly ;JoWl J\l11.. tpie UlO,.. 10-i-11 eo..~.~~r~!~;r~.,. Undt""'ri'~ lo.-0 Snits M.mtsemcnt C'~ Ctcdi:,... tltll:lgcill~tj 10.t-t75 l;leldtrt i J~ lsscrllinu OJ-ta.~~us-. vrctcilins ht~rmtw.,ull Mark.o;lirt& Ml'~~L mdi&o Dhpt.. r UJ 08 bi,..,.j:!oflf...t Xl t)'rirot:ij)u 10-7 'Tutlk und Non 1'mild 101 &>tllili~~t "'=' il()pl:r.rlk'll ~tucfp, nmoiin!j 10-(Ll PriLLr.:iplclof O;:~hL PrLLe!iShll 106-ll r,-pc...,., rit,~l 11'19-15 P.UZ:l.'DSl-fVk1',\b~o"~t ' lr~t r~:~to llaspi t.:~hlr f>l~llojscif!l:n t )Q1J-1J!1ron!Oi t\~t'm,.,n~t~tllil'nl 109-lll t:m..,...,~ M<:l'(h:rndidnJ O'J ~t: Su~r Hon~deevi~<a; )Q!J-1(\:> Tru'ld Agtncy Servt,c~ O'J-6 'frnvcl''lr'" "rtru"liug f'ri.jte& o( hisufii'cc' 'J. is ftc~~tl F.~i«t.! ln~"t'$a\fnt Prlm.,Ctlk liol l{e.:~s~<~ ~ JHE \teal ~:~1 ~1.: la"' li.l--1 lkal Estlllt F'io:.W'C',_J.JBfi RciiiK\!Utl At'lj)l'lt~ll O<-tli7 R~:;d tbwt~,\ppmi"'olll 1~ 190 l'ro]x'fij M~...g<:n~tm aut! Ot:T'doptn:ul rrt~pk or Supai":Wu::~ lo-111 rc-:o:tik-s Ull\l-t f;l) Meclit:.:ti Tcrm\noiUHr l 61<1 11)!1 J'und..:uuet~ l"b <rf SJillin,: Con,trutt«Jo S'n{))fl F~Kci-,; n l'"'n,ku~e ~11)-t()J ~ umt~mt'nbi ~<'L rs)o.'t'ch Public Safety Division ' h~ Public S01fet~ Divisklll prcpures ind i vidual~ for ~an!t'r opportunltlcs in fh:lds whicl! nrc impbc\ec by the rom~lexitk-s uf :;u~,i:.laod cnvironntcjl!-1.1 dlanscs 11nd hwr.iln m~eds <..'..

50 9-Public Safety Publlc S.fety-95.' SMEAGeNCYMBDCALSERWCES SPECALST Less Than O~Je-Yesr Diploma The llms speciali t will need to master.a wide range of c omplex and challenging skills to ajd persons in crisis. The EMS specialist must often work under extreme ptessmes of time and emotional/physical stress. He/she will need to make assessmenis of ill/injured persons, initiate treatment, communicate medical information, transport patients and complete medical reports. nteraction skills wi!h patients are essential to this profession. n addition, the EMS specialist will need to learn safe driving skills for transp<irfof patients, rescue techruques for special situations when unaided by fl!e or other rescue servkes, EMS management techniques and interpersonal communication. skills. The student. is also given an opportunity for dinical.experlence in hospitals and field ti'il.ining in current ambulance services. EMS is a helping, people-oriented profession serving humans in time of need. The rewilfds of such '! profession can be very great. NtJ.mber O>u.rre- t..ram& 51 0'. E'mei-gericy Me~~i 'l'ecbnician Basi c 5l-Z E~ -.V~llicte Operation 5 1-.EMS 1\eS:.ctu!.Technique~ ~MS Syst~ms M<.lagement 5!-8 ~MS Personal Commullf(;Qtions CrerJils l l l..! FRE PROTECTON TECHNCAN Associate n Applied Science Degree The constant changes and growing complexities of modern living and environment are creating a de rnand for couege-trained people in the fire service field. Opportunities for graduates exist with municipal fire departments, insurance and government agencies and in the field of industrial safety. This program of study is designed to meet the needs of personnel currently employed in fire service positions and t.bose desiring!)reparation for employment. Classes should be taken in the sequence as listed below. FRST YEAR First Scm-oster Numbf]r CoUrse Name bilro-_to- Fire Organfz;utian F'ue Pre.venUon SOl-lS Communjt:lltion Skllls ndustrial Mathematk:d so G-11 Technical SCience. Second Semester ~nclple:s c( Fire Cort(rof Building Coo.sttuction a.jj.d Design 50--l:l First Responder 80 l lndu:otrial Mathematics H Tcchni co~~l Sci.ence Blecti\'e SEGON!)YEAR First Seme!!oter Chem!sJty of H.u.zardow_Ma! e-l"i ;:d :~ l Fir~ Prol!'!.:!ion Systetns Stitndillrd:p.nd LOss Conlml 5<l:t-1 O Fire Ha~rds and Cause15 Credits 15 sog.zst P11ychology of Human Rclillionj ixj Elective iii Ser:ond Semester Wo:~ter S~Jpply Hydraulics Strategic Opc1alian <Jitd Oisa:slcr Plnnning 50-0 Ho:urds of ndustrial Proct~es Amerir!ttn [nstitullons BOl-15 Tedmlcal Repott WtHing OOO ODO Elective.1. ELEC!WES, 50~ 10 Chemistry uf HnzHrdous M."!terJalsll BqLtlpment and Appu mtus Pire Su p prcs~irm 17 ' POLCE SCENCE Associate n Applied Scienc.e Deg'" The Police Science program ptovides he student with an cducationall:tackground that explores the social, economic. and civi"c respanslbilities wh~ch are necess.:try to basic palice wark. Tb~ p~eoervation of law and order is an absolute essentlalm the healthy growth of ~ny ~ation. The American c~mmu~ity is undergoing rapid growth.as well as rap1d soc tal and economic change, and thjs makes the law enforce men\ career an increasingly complex one. Graduates of this program find job placement oppor!urull~s as unifonned officers or civili-ns employed m pohce departments on local, co~?ty, s~ate ~r federal levels. They may find opporturubes wt!h ratlro.ads;. depa>;t ment stores or airlines as detechves or specml pohce. PRSTYEAR f.iut Seme5let N11.m~r Course NQmC 5D-tDl Hitory,end Philo::illphy of Law En{orcemcni i Criminal Ju!!itice Administtation 90-1:15 Juvenill! Ptm:::~ dur-e.sl.!loj -15! CommUnlca-tiDn Skills- 809-:1 lntro to Psy.:hology Second-Semester Criminal Law Pro~dure.s Juvenile Prm:edure:~ T Communkatinn SkUis H rsychoklgy o( Per.!ional Adjustment ntro to Sociol-ogy OR American lnstitotjons Elective SECOND YttAR First Semester 50-,115 Criminal Evidence 50 lz Criminal lnvesiigbhcn Technic<~l RepOrt Writing SOcial Dl150rgo.nizatimt so9-07 Criminology ffective Second SNilc:>lt:T Otganization nnd Admfni!'itr.atir:m First Responder 809 StOlte <Jnd L<l~al Cpvcrnmcnt S09 lll Economir:-.o; E!ecliveo ELEC"r!VES: 50 0 Conslilutional Prolt:ction and nt C!ffO.Q:JHon Pracedure5 50-l Zl Pgtrol Procedures Trof 1c Control Juvenile Pro-ced ures 1U 50 - Forem1ic Phol_ographf JnVC5 tigatlve Phctog rap,by Advanct: Criminal [nvestigation Spcdol Prcblems Procti<ol Pollee l't'oblcms l Pru:lical Po~k e ProblcJ!lS ~ 1 50 Phy!!kal Educu l i ol~ for Law.Enfo rcemcn~ 8t i)..zz Public Speaking hbnormol Psycho logy cr~dlts J.1. S 11 1J.1. 18,:;!

51 e Trade and ndustry Division 'J\\C Tmde and ndustry l)h ision prepares lndividuaj& tor entry into the :skiued tnkies and engioc"!.:t=.ng tcchnotogics through one- and two-year pfogr.ams. Rclr\lining, upgr<.~ding aud remcdilltion are provk\ed through cw. seminan; and institulf'_,., Special ~er vied arc provkled by lr roulgemen~. Trade tllld lndustry ~ -.,_; e

52 98-Trade and ndustry SMALL!NGlNE AND CHASSS MBCHAN~ PUBLC WORKS TECHNCAN ARCHTECTURAL TECHNCAN Asgociate n Applied Science o.gree rhe architectural area is broad and challenging. t is the purpose of U1e architect and/or consulting entincer to supply owners with a set of plans snd spccicicntioos of the structure desired. The architec tura lt~hmcian a.~st.s the architect or engineer io the development of plans and speciliclltions and chccl<s on building ere<:tions and alterations. F~S1' YRAR ~hst Scrnc.slcr MturWr Caur~ Ncutl 6l, J An:hlh:ctutll ~Otf ond Or.ftlng 61 1Zl Com-lrvd ion M;tcri:lls i Technical Mathemallcs ~JS Tcchnl~al Sticncc J ComrnuuiCGtion SkiUll J SceonU Scmt:lih;r Arr.h!Lectur"l 'l'h~ory ant.j Dt'a!tiug GJ.1.jJ!l J\rc hii ~Ctllru l lcmt.lcrins rcchuic.:u.l Mulht!motic.s a 'fcc:hnh:nl Sdc:nc:e SQ9.151 r'sycho!osr o{ Hurn,n Rclnllons 000 F.lcellve 5F.CONDYEAR Fir.sr Setue.uer 1il 11 A1chih!Ciurn\ 1'hour)' 111td Dral11ns ll ' Survcylus; l(archl 61 1 Blc:ctrkol oad Mech nical i Mcchonic.l l!coaomlcs :1 American lnslltuliun.s Sc-cucll Semester 607 1il0 Streng1h of M:tteriols 61 t7 Slc:ciDctalllng 61.- J d~ Concrctc Dcluilln& 6f!:$i:! lful!ding ~sfima ling 61 1~ Job Orl("nt&Uton lllll S. 1'«hnlc:nl Reponing COO.()CO l!lceii\'os.lf.ctvbs: 61 1 t Architectural Th~or)' ;iotl Drahlng tv llulfdlns Codos Gl l-190 Speclol l'roblems RM.l7J H11sh:: Compul ~r MJ~ h Credits l l.1 z.! 17 ~.1 19 l J.! ts z Trade and industry-99 AUTO BODY Two-Yt!ar Diploma The Auto Body program provides lhe student with the knowledge and skill necessary to perform well in the area of auto body and frame repair. 'This includes 'the unfolding of metal damage and restoration fo. original contours. The student attains a high degree of skill in welding. metal forming. alignment procedures ~nd finishing. FRST YEAR Firsl &:n'ltm.cr Number C'bou1K' Na m! 0 0 Auto Body l <111<-61 Aulo Body Rel.tted Mal b fiutntte Reh11tionz Survey S!cond Semester 0-1 Auto Body 0 6 Auto Body Rclalcd 0 60 Auto Bo er~ :Ac:cessariel BOL 56 Commun1altlons SECONDYBAR Firsl Sentester ~0- Auto llody ll 0-65 Auto Sud1 ~elated ll <M- 1 ~rvi~.:e Shop Orsuni=-.Uon Sciem:e SCc:ond Scmc.qc:r DHl /11~0 llod) lv 0- Aulo l!ody Repair Eslim.,tio;; 10- PrU,ctplrs o( Bu.sinc:.ss Cr.drt.! 15 n.! )6 ll 1.! lj z.! 15 A.UTO BOOY SERVCNG one-year Diplom The Auto 1ody Servicing program provides the student with the ne<:essary skills for job entry into the metal Cinisbing and painting areas of the auto body trade. The program includes welding, panel replace menl and sheet metal alignment. FR~T SEMe51'BR Nrm11Mr CO&C Name 0 0 Auto BMy t 0-61 Auto Body Reln tc~. l Hurnm1 Rchl llon~ Survey 80 ~79 Mftlh Credirr 1.! - - ;.1'\ :!.!.i,., 1, :... :!" SECOND SBM!ST!\ 0 1 Aulo \lody l! 0-6 1\ula \lody Kclntod 80J 56 Co!O\UO!COik>PS l 0 60 Auto fln<ly Acc:C$50rl.eo.! BARBilRNG

53 '!O'O'Trade and ndustry Trade and lndustcy-101 ; '. AUTO MECHANCS Two-Year Diploma The Auto Mechanics program is desigued to provide _students with skills necessary in diagnosis and repair of mechanical a_nd ~lectrical ~ystems on automobiles and light trucks. Proper use of hand tools and test equipment is emphasized. The program s d~igned to qualify the successful student ror job entry as a general mechanic. FRST YEAR First Semester Num~r Coul'sc Naml! CrMil.s 0-0 Minor Repair Euginr.:. Pcrforma~c:c and FueJ Ststerru;; Metals Proc:-es~es ( z Communiciltions 1 8D-a79 Moth _!. Second Semester 0 9 BrAke~ and Steering 0-1 B,d!'!n~.:~: and AJlgilment 809-5~ Human Rel11tjons Survt:y 0-t Metals Processr:s l 0-1B Healing and Air Co11diliontng SECOND YEAR Fint S ~: mc~;tcr.$0-5$ All(QmatlcTransmis.siMs 0-56 l'ower Train 0-. AccessorieS Science far M~ dumk.s Auto Com puler AppJ!caticn..Second Semester "0 6 Engin t~~s Advaitc~d Eiectii<;i!J 0-7 Ori~ml>~.tion to.auto lndus-.hy 10- Principlcs.of Busin'!SS No~~: A({ COJ~~S" 'Jifll 0 pre(jx.m eet for g w~tlls; AUTOMOTVE SERVCNG One-Year Diploma The Automotive Servicing program is designed to provide the student with the basic knowledge and skills needed for job entry as a light duty service repair person. Basic hand tools and test equipment are used. Repair techniques common!o auto shops associated with m"-"s merchandisers arc emphasized with instruction and clssroom activities limited to light service work. f!rst SEMESTill\ Nr.mber Coursa Nome 0-!1 Minor Repair 0 5 Engine Performance and Fu!:l Sy~tems 0.-0 Melots Ptoc..,es l 801-5'6 CCmmunicatians 80".;Ji9 Molh SECOND SEMESTER 0-9 Brakc11 11nd Steering 0 1 B.:1lanec nnd A\ignmcnt Ht~man RdRHons "Surv.cy A0 1 Meluls rrocme> ll 0 18 HcatlrJg and Ah Conditioning 15 t. 15..l 15 :1 Crtdlts 6 5 Note: All J1t tn Serv{chlg.cotmes lti!j oppl)i to word complcllr:m of Jl:c tu. c.)'car Aula M!!cJ1anics dlptoma vrvgmm. l6 5 5 z.l!5 AUTOMOTVE TECHNCAN Associate in Applied Science Degree Employment opportunities ror the automotive _ technician include all aspects of automotive safes and service businesses. n the automotive service business, automotive technicians are needed as technicians and ser vice writers. With proper b~ckground and experience, advancetnent to shop fo'reman, service manager ~nd other highlyresponsible positions is. possible: O.ther employment opportunities include working in manufacturing as an engineering aide, as <1 sales representative for manufacturers of automotive tools and equipment, or operating your own auto repair business. FRST YEAR Pir$l Scmes!cr Numfm Omr$ r tarw 60.-lOZ St:Jrvice Rcp01ir ProC"edurei 60~-l66 Orivcability amllucl Sy!llems 80- l1 (nduslrial Math [ B!J1 151 Communlc,11ioo Skills,..~.c~~ 5G Com ron Control Systems Sccon~ Semester Technic<~ Broke-Steering Sy!stems 60 Vehicle Suspension ;md Alignmcmt lndu~trjal Mnth Jl _Ttlchnicul Scient'!! L~~omics ooo.ooo El~clive SECOND YEAR First Semes~e r 60~-15 fluid Power 'transrnl!islon 6"0-15 Power Transmls.siotl Sydems Psycltology-o"f Human Relatiom 806:15 American (mtitulions TC!chnical Science oaa.ooo El~ctive Se.cond Sc:rricsicr nternal 'Combu:stion Engines.li0-15Z. Computerjzed Engine Controls 80l-15 Technical Ri::pmling Service M~ nngemcnl ~0(} 000 Elective Note: Ari courses with 611 pr~[ix meet (or 9 weeks. Crtdits.l..l 18...l.18.l BARBERNG One Y r Diploma 'l'his program provid~s nine months <Jf full-time training in barbering. WHb this experience, the train~e should be acceptable to an employer as an apprentice. Upqn satisfactory completion of the Qarber ing program; lhe trainee enters employment as an advanced apprentice and serves an additionaltwo year$ and three months to complete the three-year apprenticeship. l~e Apprenticeship section.) r'!rsl' SEMESTER NumfJer Course Name SOl ~th Barber TechnJq:ue$ 1 50l:-11 JarberhlG 1, 'rheo)' narber Science l V.-.i! _5l.Communicalians SECOND SBMBSTER llarber Teohnique; llarberiog Jl, Theory Barber Science n :0 1 S11.les atld Advertising' H\lntan Relalions Survey 1..!. 19 DESEL AND HEAVY EQUPMENT MECHANCS. TWo Year Diploma This program pr<1vides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary for job success in the ever-expanding heavy equipment areas. Tb~e-areas include on- and off-the-highway trucking, earth-.. moving equipment and construction equipment. PR1;T YEAR First S.ernesler Nu.m.bET Cvar::;e Nt-lml! 1 71 Bmktts, S~spen.sion-and El~drl(:al 1 l9 Ora. wing lnletpcctation Me.therualit:!l H Communications 0.0 Metals Processes Second Scmeater 1-7 Ttan!mis!!iion arid Ot:ivcllne 1-S Dit!sel Equipment MaiQLenant:t! Science 0 1 Met11ls Proct~~!l51'!'~ Malhr:Hrllll.iC SECOND YEAR First Semester 1 7 Engines 19-1 Mobile Hydra"li"" Human Retati'J'ls Survey 1-5 Air Conditioning and ReCrigerelion Semnd Semester Credits lo.l!s ! 10 l.l Fuel5yslel ~Z 90 r~.mdamenl~ls of Mc::lallurgy 1 7 Dic:scl and Hea"Vy Equipment Shop Operation:; 1 1 Elcctrlcal A<:ces5<lries Diesel..1 ls ORAFTNG ARCHTECTURAL One-Vur Dlplom Thls program provides the student with the necessary,background in drawing skius and construction materials to fulfill thejobentry requirements for.a wide range of duties. in (:Ontractors' offices, buuding supply comp<!nies, manufacturers. of building materials and regulatory. agencies. FRST SB!iiESTER Number CoiJ.nc NQ'tff!. 0-0 Ccnslrm;:tiori.Or"' wing 0 Building Con~tn.~cl,jon Communicatlon.s M01themali.:5 U Science l '0 0 Mccllanical Systems SECOND SEMESTER 0 0 Architectural Drawtng 0-17 Building and Construcliori U 0-08 Codes and R~g.ulatiQUS 0" 1 Mechanical Sy5h:ms JJ R09-56 H~man Relations Survey Mathtm<~lics [ Credit. 5 1 :1 ELECTRONC SERVCNG One-Year Diploma The Electronic servicing program provides the stu dent with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform capably as ~ radio, television, video recorder, CB, microwave and small appliance service person. FRST SEMESTER N~rnbfr Course Name 1-60 Bh:clronic Servicing Servke Shop Organization 8()-79 MS!.thematicsll 8{l9-56 Human Relations Sur:vey Commlird(:J.tioos SECOND SBMESl'ER 1-65 Electronic Servii;iiltg Mathematics ll Scienc e J 1 6 Electronics Lob 8 z!..! Credits 10 1 l _!. l5 lo 1 z.l S.'

54 ~ade and ndustry Trade ana lridustry-io. B.fCTRONCS c Associate n Appl{ed Science Degree The electronics indlllltry offers the technician a wide range of job opportunities lot manufacturing, research 1100 development, communica~.orinstallatlon and maintelliulce of elex:trooi<: oquip~nt. Communications and industrial electronics cootinue to expand at a rapid rate, add tm po&tion:oe technician or engineering assistant within the in:dustry is one of the fastest-growing occupational classifications. FRST Y!AR P'snJ &m~ter N&~mbu ~Norrtt be Fundi!Jldlib Analog Solid Stale o.v;,...()c Anllym 605-!B Dlgl«ol Cir.:uil f\rndomenlab 80-1 Electronic M1th Tcchnit 1 Science 1 80H51 CommunJcoUOJJ Skills Second Semester AC F\Jndom nla!s Ano!og Solid Stale Deviccs AC Analysis Advan:>:<t Digital Orculls 80-ltiZ lll«tronlc Mclb ll!06-\5 Technlc l Science U P<~ology ol Mumon Rdol"!n< SECOND YEAR Pirst Semester 60S U6 Adv oc d Amolcg SoUd Slole Circuits Electronic Compulcro/A>sen>bly Languag<o lnlro to Digitd Syal~t t'.id5 l.6 ndustrial Bledronics Amcrlun lostlluliom Second Scmealer 605 \ Ann!..,& Sy:.tems OJnd Measur~met~ts (;()5-)5 Ml<!roproc'e.ssorand Digital Con(cof ~y5tcms SQ-\5 T<~:hnioal Reporting Ee01101T1lc: c:clivc:s elj!c'l'jves: 605-lD Ciccui: Amdysl.s EJcttronlc: Oitll Transmissions Sleclrontc DraJttng nnd Ouign '('roubl~s l 1ootlng ""d Mo.intenance '50 17 Cumputer Mnth (Pascal) 60S i90 Spacl.ll Probl~ms--Ma thcmalla ~its. 5 S.! S.! lg a J! 18 J NDUSTRAL WELDNG TECHNClAK''.. Associate n Applied ScienCe.Degree The ndustrial Welding Technology curriculum is designed to provide the student with kno.wledge1n the manunl, semi automatlc and sutornhcweldlllg proc:esses used n metal fabrication and construction indu&tri.,., on,., program acquaints the student with the skills required for over 0 welding p~ _n stnlctloh covers welding processes, rodes, 'procedures, material analysis aod testing lechniqu~s. Student. will program a robotic!ystem_. Graduates may seck specialize<! employment in such areas as production planning, welding tccbniciau, i!sjlecliq, product control, supervision or traiuing. _ H STY>AR FirJt Sc:rtlCster Numbu Coursa Ncmu:. Cnodil5 (1 H05 Pundamen to1l~ of' Welding 61-t 10 Shlolded Moll ~rc Techniques 81>6 151 Tec:hnlce.lSdenc!! J 80 15! Technlcoi M th! ' Comm\lnic;)tlan Skill!i.l ~ 17 S(coa1d Semuter Gas W~Jding Tcchn'Gue ODS Shieldins Procas Tcdmlqu.. SOH~Z Toclrnla<l Scitntt 10 15Z TeehniQ Math 0i-l51 Plychology of Huru:an Reln.t io~s. 000-o!O Eleellve..1 S SECOND YHAR f"tnt~tar '6J.15 SurvoyniWeldln& Prootsscs W kling Cod... Anolylls aod Te51U1& Alte.rnatin& and Oired C\lnenl Fundilmcnuls Weldlns Motall11r1Y ~c."'nomju.! 17 Second Sc~tcr Wefdabfllly o( MattriO\S Employme111 Oriculalitln liohm 'J'ochnlcal Reponi l 809-SJ Amt!rlc::»n ln$1ilutiou.s Robotic Wc:kU11g Syilonts Electi"'C!8 ELtC''\'ES: 61!8 Stcei Dc1l\lllnc Bask Comput.cr S]')CC:i11 Pr'QbiCJS UZ1 1S M~(a l W'Of'kina Tcchniquce MACHJE TOOLNG TECHNCS Two-Year Dlplome The MChlne Toot program provides the stllqent with the knowledge and sldus necessary to plop and carry to compl~!tioh a machined product. The student learns to work from blueprints, specifications i.lld shop drawin~; s, select a material or materials to pro duce each part, set up the operational procedure and produce the part to the dimensions required: FlRSTYJlAR Fhst.Semutcr Mlmbor Cornu Nom 0-80 Machine Tool! 11 5 Tool and Parts nspection! Loyoul and lrupectiou CornMunJcolions 80< 79 Matbemalica AND 80-.!0 Jllalh moti< lll Oro.wlnalnterpretrtt!On Seco11d Semci.tt!:r' 0 81 Machine Toot 0-0 AdvAne:d lnspetli(ln 1 Wtldlng /or Relol.d Trades 0 81 Mathtmaltcs V Humm Rel.atfoos D-88 Tooloncl Flltture SECOND YEAR Fir~l Seotester 0-Si Meehlnc Tool rn 0 97 Nutnerloal Conln>l -90 Melatl"'S)' 06-6 Science Second Stmu!cr ' lnduatrial Hydraulics G-8 Machine 'l't>ol V 0 9 lob Orlentollon D-98 Special Problelll$ 0 99 Computtr NtlfnC'ricaJ Conlrol Crodib 8 1 ~ l.l 15!0 ~ 10 ~!6 MECHANCAL DESGN TECHNfCAN Associate n Applied Science Degree '!'be Mechanical Deslgn. Technidan program is basically conceine'd witb manuicturing and its ' various aspects.' t is des;gned for students wbo are intl!rested in preparing for vorl< in the development and design of mechanical products or the ina~es, toots and equipment used in their fabrication or assembly. The increased usc of automation in all in dustries ha.s raised the demand Cor trained people in this f ield. F!RST YBAR FirstSemdl~ Numbttr COrW:WNDnv O«<its T chok:ol Orol'ting l Manuflc:tud & Proc:eM J Teehnlclt M1theroallco P ychology o[ Human Rdations SQ-11 ColllmunleallM SklJlsl Technh:"l SC!e~ce. t 18 Second Seme:,ter liog'\oz Techolcal Dr llins li ~06-\6Z Mtlllulld~dn& Pr~s t M~ nlc:.j Technical Mat... tl<s f! Ttchft!C! Selen"' Eic:<:tlvo.1 17 SECOND YllAR l'lrstsemes:or Tc:<hnloal OBiling ll 606-!10 Slreo&th of Materi ls Duaipti.vc Gcomdry AmeJiCJ,n lutilulions \ Ba:lncmlts OOD-000 E!octtv Secq!Xf SemcJt.:t 6D6-106 Technical Dulling V 606-ll Tool DUlgn 61l6-ll6 Machine Design Seminar Toc/lnk->1 Reponing fi06.t9 jol> Oricl1Uillon t OllD-000 EO!Cilvc.1 17 BLECTV!S: 61-tOO Prl~etple ol Mclnlturgy Jnduslrla:l Hydr~ul!c Monureclur\ng Costs 605-U. Valuo Analysis Busic Computer MathcntA.ics

55 10-Trade and ndustry Trade and lndu&try-105 PARTS SPECALST One-Yea.r Jiplom The Pat!s Specialist program provides the student, with the knowledge and skujs needed to en"ter. the rep!acement parts field. This objective is accomplish ed lll modem parts Jabo~tories with tile latest equip ment, catalo~s and teaching aids. FRST SEMBSttR Number. Course. Name Q~10 Parts lde:nti(ication and Sates flc\:.and Busin.!!ss Procedures 0.5 Auto Part:!l Distribution 0.6 Braket~ and AUgnm~nt-P~r l s 0-7 Englncs.Patts Mathematics JJ "SKCOND SBM!STE!\ o-a Puts Me:u:bandisins 0 1!) Otalership Parts and Distribution 0!5 Electrtcal l\nd C11rburetion-P~trl's 0 6 TrsrmniSijiOn, POwer Train-Pad5 $09 56 Human Rel"ations Survey CommunicatioM.$_1 Crcdir~ z.l S...! l5 PUBLC WORKS TECHNCAN Associate in Applied Science Deg.., Public works technicians work under tbe.s)lp ~ rv l sion of civil engineers in. planning,. designing and in specting the con5truction of highways, bridges, dam.s and other &tructures..our i~g the p lanning. stage, tbey may help estimate rosts,.prepare specifications or participate n surveying. drafting: or designing. Once constructi9n begins, tltey may assist the contractor or Sllp erintendent. in scheduling construction activities or inspecting the work to assure conformance with drawings and spccificaiions. The Public Worl<s Technician program is design~d to proviqe the basic skills nnd technical knowledge needed for a career in any phase of public works technology. Technical knowledge is provided through courses which etn. phasize surveying, dr.cting, materials testing, elemen taty design, cost estimating and.field inspection. Of. equa!mportance is the development of skills in com munication and personal relations in the workplac.c. t is the function of several general education courses.to provide instruction n lhesc ar<as. FRST YEAR First Se.mesler Nwm&et CU...r;se: Natfle '1 Civil Engineering; Drafllng J li07 1S5 Surveying [ 'l'echnical Mi~themalics 801-S Communication Skills \ Psychology o( Hum.ln Rclallons 00()..000 Elccllvc ~cond' Semufer 60'7 170 CivU Engin~riug Orfting G S\1rveying rr 8G-15l 1'~chn icll 1 Math'!'!tn01llcs &G6-l5l TcchnicaJSciencc f American ln~t itutions CJOO.(J()Q Elcollvc SRCONO YEAR Fir.sr Stme~hl' Surveying ll fhl l 77!.eaJl EJ!:m~ntsof Cit~U Engfn~etillg OR ~::~~ ~~~~f~:;;:;:,~: :;-n~ Surveying 809-l l l EC<:Jrl.Om1cs 607 l78.mtd~t~nics 000-GflO Elective Sctcnd Scme~t e r Civil Engineerin~ Drafting 'l'tclutlcal Reporting CivU F.l\gineering Estimathlg liil7-10 Strc:nsth of MDierials fim-19 jab Orl~ntalion F'ield lnspecliqtl and M,U:rlals Te51JJJ~.D Blecti e B.ECTVllS: 60?-JOO Speciol Pro~em.s !ntro to 0 il Eni:inecriug 607 i76 W ler Supply mod S<was!0-171 Baste Compuler Mathematics 607-l ft8 Lc:gol Elt:nlt~n! s o( J..:~nd Su rv~ying 61~ 1 5 Compult't Airl<:d Drallhlg ~ Buundllry Localiot) CTcd/ls '..! 19 z s (1 (1..! J6 ~ 18 z SMAU ~NGNE AND CHASSS MECHANCS One Yt!Br Diploma '!'his program prepares lhe student for emp!oym~nt in the repair of motorcycles, outboard motors, con struction e.quiprnent. lawn and garden equipment, chain saws and snowmobiles. Detaile i~tiuction is given in!he principles of operation, maintenance and repair of internal combustion engines and the equip ment they power. PRST SEMESTER Nwnbor Cou,stt Name 61 - Small Bn&i.~ Repair 00.8 Related Mcla)s Prace,sses Mothemollco tu.j7 Sen' lee Shop Organnolioo SOCONO SEMESTER..61- Power B.quipmtnt RcpnJr 0 9. Relnled Mettlls Processc-' 809<~56 H.uman ReLaUor..& Survey SOl-56 Coa,municalionsl WELDN(f One-v,,., Diploma Crtdils lo 1..! 15 This program provides the student with the knowledge and skills required to perform well with manual and semi automatic welding!!rocesses. Each student develops th.. manipulative skills required to become a Wisconsin Qualified Structural Steel Welder and Jeom s tbe techniques of pip<: Welding. 10 a..! S r1rst SKM!STBR N~rnbcr Course Nome Ctedirs 15 Weidlng 1'hoory and 1'ro1.1bleJhoofing ( t -ll0 Arc WcJdtns and F:.brlcDtion 7 Z 1U 0 Ky Acctyleno 0-79 Mfllhc11l.allcs ll 1 Z-9 Drawing Jn terprelatlon W~Jdl ng &19-56 Hunt<ln RelOlt!ons Su r~ey...!. 15 SECOND SE,M S'ER -i-1l Advam.'ed Welding and Fabrica!lon -5.sp.cialized SMelded Woldlng Process., -90 Fundarntnta.l& of Metallurgy 19 Woldlng The<>ry nnd Troubloshooting ll Communications.l J6 WOOD TECHNCS One Year.DjpJoma The Wood Technics program provides the student with the knowledge and skills required for employ ment in wood and wood-r.. lated OCC\pations. The program prepares students to use band tools, power tools and machines; select materials and supplies; pl<ln. organize and estimate work, time and cost:., select and apply.appropriate finishes. As the student continues to ~dvan ce. he/she may select work in the cabinet/furniture area and/or.construction remodeling. Current industrial prvcesses aud procedures are emphasized. l'rst SEMESTKR.Munbm C,Ur~ Name )0..0 Wood T~hnics Proces, and Procedures Drawing and Est.imttting 10-6 Machine Maintenance 1!0-79 M th n Cornmunic:~ lions 1 SECOND SEMBSTE.OPTON CAbinetrnakjUg and Furniluremaking 10.0 Plao1i<> Laminates Huma.o Relations Sul"l'cy &06-6 Scic.nte SECOND S5MEST5R OPndN 10 :1 Construe lion an. Rernodeltng 10 5 Construction Materi~J s ond, Eslimat.hlg _ 0-08 Codes and Regula:tian$ Mot~ rn er.dilt to z..! Notl!.' The Wood T"'"-nin prognmi hq.s o common {l1&t semal~r..wch i.j C.Wukd )o» au &ill inlwllt fah ajtti ~pring. The option ulectrd ij &chldulaf altv77atcfy.so khal oabi~tmahin&f(urnltutcmalt -inb is to;u&hl ~ach sprin: am const~cticm,~mwcling is "taught each (olj lo.l 15 :.t :.

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OE.\l!lOJ'Ml:NTAL UiSAHLiriES AS..<q;OCATil..0S.1 10 htlrcj tl) 'Dt~ivle-r M.ltl\l g.'!ll>tl'lt,,,, -,,,JJ9; :>;n.) il~ lnlro-tc'j rvtlopm~nl&l DisabiUu !:!-&. 0S.S D~Yd~mM&Dh~b\HiclU ~8 0l-~ Rtl11~iar M~n ~-rn!nlll.., U. :JOS-117 Dew-l.,r-m ~r.llll Dl ~fll\lile~ Commur.hy!.h lrlfislrlll~....,.,..., J!' l O:io-) 1!1 Pie-JdSl.urjl'lriDt>vt lop~t ntal Dl$<1l!ii!Ues !:!-& : :1.51m1R&r hl.~vclnpmcntll Di11.h!Jltlnlll.... " '""' ' ' "'-"'Jb 1l_~.J ;U Dc "t'l-opm~j>.t } Dl-Abii,H-n-H,mr:l-lr.dth MJ\Jit:cme.nl J ~OJ- ~:! [k ~fl ~~ll'l~fl.~al Dl ~biiihh UH\1; Manut:,(fl\~1'11,,,,,., ; ,,.18 :l.os!. ZJ!"\tid SLrd!' il\ Dc\l~lop~en.lal. D~biJil.irJ. J J!1 JO.S-U Sclmlr~out~Dr-..dDpmrlllal Dli&bllllln iv..,,..., :U:S ZS Oevelopmenl!f Dinblll i~~- e<;r~~~~5c lh'lg TechniquM.,,.,-, ;..,,,,,,,,,,.,,,,,.1Jil ~05 LZ S Oev~lopmtnU1 bin~bi1111~ A~st'l~il!lD o:~ml Pwj::Jm P l.llnnln!j.,,,,,,-;..,.,.. 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Ul0 15-~ r\oda Stl'~l.)l ('upyllltl. ru~: Olhcr Mh!"'i1J~j.,, , ~ \0lM ~dnll'opulnu"'cs: 0\ll.,t ~o-1 ~1 ~~~~,~~~~:~~ c~~;l;~.,i~~ s'~i\ls.::. ~ ~: :. ~:~ 5lll-SS HLim ~u&rl'i.~'l:,,~cucy f:~pt!ri.rn~l.' Ce~nf~h!tLU!,... _,.,, ii(j ~') Hlutl~u S...,ric..::,l, ~cnty Elcj~fl\!n~l! CmrNm1-:clj 'lt ~\URGENCY J\t:EDC/1.[, :fe'flvces lin-~:n.medk"l E!mct~ft~i~~...,,... lsb ajhja ~n.:a..,;,_ !.&~ H S._LS Vehlcle O{l-fr/Ulll !' 5U l~ ::MS~SC\J~T«hnll)\l.n...,.,. ;.,[58. 5li-JlG f.ms~y~temsmal~tm=n~.,... - :is&. l'i~l-~l8 EM~ PaWfl ~l Ccmmlll'l~~.ijo'l~.,,,, li07 J~UlJLCWoRKSTECllNJctAN F.Q7-U Civil t:n:,:ln~~fin~t Hslim ll, ~,...,,,,, (,J 5i17 1 W.~1/'l!llgth (!(.1-lftll'r]~j~,,.,,,,.,..,,,., ilij EO'i' l--7 Civil Enl'!tl(tflnt~Croltln~~: l '1 1 S~ Surl'~tln~ {A u:~ ,... G 007-l.!!i!.~uro~., ~!~B lf,] li07.t55 ~... m:::ylnsll...,... lfi1 6(17.\58 Surv.c:ylt«l\l_,,,.,,,..,....,,...,lf.l (:(J7-lG8 ~~~~!~ ement~o\1 Llml ~r'o'c~ln~,.. 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Colk1:t' l"lii'jc.,_,,,_,.,, leo S00-6 Sci-cnte- 1, ,..Ui~ 1!06 G ~>c t~ncq _ li-1i Prt l;\jjlf'l~ Clirl'uhtr;.--..,, -...,,,., \W lt07 'YSCAJ. f..d\jcatton 01 1M- J'h}'A~tall!tlli totl<j~ fot Pu'bi!C: 5-a f~y.,.. 1ro W7 D7.fnlrolg"l'rlath\nn... :.,.,,,,,.,,,.l:'o Kll7 1'1r.J Bne!b~ \l{t: o ndlll onin..,_._ S07-1t(1 C'~ n 1 ilionl~ KW~,ilhllifllng.,....,,,. l!'ll im i!ll lin11:~tblllr'ctm,hilonln~ ,.-..\,.,,"1'10 SO? ll:t :uh"ylnt:~jwdxhmrtit il..,, \Ut- 1 J-5~>1bdii!Ct'ln dl llan~n.ll l,,,,,,,._, 110 \OT--::!!. VlJitt rf,l.11f,.,,,,.., ,.,,,,,tm llll1 ~!'ii.so 'twll/vot~~',' blill ll Jtar-nn S.whn B~ll.ln l1c r ,.,_, 171l M7 1.~w1 n J1-A Jv111~..,,., ll ArfllhicSwlm..,,.,,,,...,.,...,,,,.. 17('1 ~Vi-;t:,~J Adv~llt~Lilllu~'t',J...,,,,,,,,,.,.17( ~ J.. tcrmr dl... lt'! ~ llt'!lbdll... l'10 8D7 l6 t:c.rmls 1-fiegl.nri~r. Adnll"'rc* lhgl,.,.,u.. J'fl'l 8Q7-} T.-nnh t.,......,... JTJ 60'1'-& R~"~~~~l'l:wt\1,.,,.,,,,,,,..,..110 w;~uo Ont( 1-Bc.,lm crs. 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S Lt tlers1'l1p Al~t:l~)dc~ ar.d Mo~iVll~><~..,171 ~mg.p;!!i c....-nni11~n1.prr.c~ and Pro~dicu.. --.:171 lio'rl:z7 HLp:., r..~ivclqplm:ll\...;. :.. 171!Jtl: 1S: FamllyinA.m: l it<~,...,... _..... t71 ~!l-!5 UL'b~ ~.l~tl Rural Communities... ~ 71 '0~15) PsrctlcokJ.~:y o( tl\l!l'l~n _R--!!lac\of\5,,, ~ 1.7l &l'!i>.l5l _Am~rk.:lll#.s~!l~lio!!Jil,..., '... J7l KJ-~1 :! -~s'n~ :--.ruj its Setial Piotll.em'.....,_,_-.H 09 :W~ SGd1\ Dilcrg n ~ati~;~n...,,..,...,. 171 :::~!. ~~~~~;~~t~t;p;;,;ii/:-~: : :: :~:: ~:: ::~;;!1tlU..C5 ContcmpofJ.rY S(acl~y..,....,, ;. 171!l[JOl--0 W(lmtn i:n.s«:cly: Sod! n~\llo.uon~ iln.l Sokini"Cilll11ic-.,... :... 17~ 9[19-07 Crlmin?J)',,.,,,....,...,,.17. 6ll'9 M Con~empor.DYY AJ ro-amt-rk~ SotiHy_...,1_ ;.>:09 W.Oil\f!\'s Wfn'kiWomcn'.~ Li~c:5--.,...., 171 8l)'.loJ1 M~cr.,-t: CoMrniU...,.....,-.;,..,,n U--~~.1. Micao:Ei:.oM~t:,,,, --. ~.,... -~...,... l7l ' gi)g.f l _, 0'-mfla... dvtec'jnomlcsr$\.cmj...,.. 1?" 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B00 -M li11~~sl' and Sodtly.,,.,......,, l, - J'Liri'eyolF.P'<Ofili.o:.t J 7J LU'J.J5 Humoi\Relallcns. ~~ :. 17 lict~-56 llum~11 Rtlatir.us Sll.rve~.. ;,,.,,]7' &10.SPE!CU 1!10.\0l Sp~~b \7 fu )-0 1 fll m1run~l'll:oi ll)[:ip~ch l7 ~1[1.11 F u Millllctlt~ll o f Or l'lnlc prll lillr.,,. 17' ll\ 0.1) lllhut.ndram" ''1'1 aio U.Z PubltcSpnkinl! tl10o!5q irlircljd''m ,,,,,,,... \1! Q 60 Bui" Df:).nt Pf lldax:liim ,,..,,.. 17 &UJ-'01 G ~C11115~ct h,,..,...,....,..]7;1 8U:O,\Rt S 1Xl ]1\lro lo o\!hu.rny.....,....\1l &S-Z01 Oe~~ ~~ alld 'Cotllr...,,,_,.,,,..,,,. 17l ll i5 U:l. Ddli!,n nd CQl.tl'r U ,,. 17l 115 D5 Dt-1\o'l il'x F111Wartltt'1Ll1,...,,,, \7j B!J ljct,1rt HJ!.c1r: Th~\1--ltJ~mJ!r;a., H. BS il\9 l.lfe[)j'llw in ~ ,.,,.....,.ti"j Bl S--1?h~o.a rn r.,l'- "-'"'''... l7 81 S J.1 Pjllt~AA[ ~,..1 7 R.S-~-1:;:!>o.inlln~ 11-.,......,,.,,. \ 71 8l5 lsj jl"wc'\fl'l.,,.,,,...,...,,,,.,,,,--1 7:\ 8Hi 15.! Je:wc:lrt \ B5 ;!S.S l' i tttlfl""kltij..... _ Ccramln l \ 81!1 191 C'c-um!csll ,,.. \Tl

59 Count DeiC'lptlons HOR7tCUUURE 001 HNtlcul1ure Batlc crtdllo l'his courat focutes on the Jtudy ol phtnt structures and luac lions. re(l1jlrements f~ growth -.nd produe1km, temperature fight. es!lenticd dcm~nts,.arowth stlmujonts ~nd'ret.ttdllnts. Tt.eN arc two lecture houra and two lab hours pe-r ~eek. 1.)01 11: Plorlcullura c:tedlu Th:is course covers con~rvatory and nowering.psanl&, 'idenlifylnj nside ood O<ltslde p!onls, srowlh hab!lo, clc. Some bask knowledge or plnnl l lructuro, runcti001s. etc.) or c:cmplolion ol ~ir: Hortl.CtJlture or 1 botaay courk ii rccommr:nded prior to t:nroltmebt {n lhu couru:. Tbete one kcture hour and two tab hour.5 per w.:ck. OOJ.1. Flower Sloop Cper llo,...batlc <t'eclkl This'"""" is c:aneem«< wtth the prinelplesll!ld methods neeessary to 11\e d.. dopm<nl and optratlon of floral ou1le11. Types or bu.u.ess CllUti<s, tnelhodo of p«>prletol$hlp, facio.. n the Rl.eetlon of o lotation and the nc:cesury qualifications lor UC: cusf\l employnu:at nd manoa,emcnt arc covet~d. There are three lctlure hdurs per wctk. 006 OPERATNG AGRBUSNEsS FOR RESULTS r..uaasement by ObJ Cv.,.A Syatamatlt Appro ad\ to Opi'C'ations r c:redtl This"'"'.. diacuu&s tho MBO '!'..,., ol b siness ""'J>O&<Jileot. t takes en in-dqni.look 11 mloo&ement'df tloe busioe.s! with the major objective of proliiabujty. Major \cplc.s c:over<:d iodude the OOJr-.:ep proceas ol MilO. rooj...,ttlns. d<(ioi~on ol manare.-t. tnd the func.t_ioru of tu ma.nagn, em011ts of Eocoblbhlna Monose!Uont by Objectivot 1 aodll Tb.ts C'OtlrSt: providu'"' idtenli~e look at irldivhiua.j busln $S soab and abject.ivc5, Rcv:iew of th~.mbo.sy~ero of fl1bnagement as tobli hed within t~o ~u ln.. l&trutiure b a part ~f )hoba&le conten!. Mojor topic lncludede.olmhip.objectlves, dtparltnento ao.tb, the deovelopment cl a manaaemi'nt teq:m.and.mejsurina results Dcale,.blp.Prolit COt\trcb. crc~il Analys;i o! deajccship Tt'OcndJ to determine the fiasncial position ol tbe brr.riness b the autjor contera oi this courx. A hisic: lock ct duler.ttip ~ds and what thelr «>n~pon.,.t parts coh.slsl of pr0o vide the local point of thh cour,., Fconlllle dealerolup'a <OOJ lin.s ~em. we CD oblain information D~tessl!'Y to dtt:ennide Slrmglbs :u~d w~ln:esse.s. 01)6. Pror>l Conlrol A10o1lyJ!o J credit The ptirnary oc.u1 o( th.il e:ouuc ls the indi\'idual dc.aleuhip'l finartcial il\t'ormadon and lts on"1ysts. This ls accornpli.jhed throu8h the U$C '?f profit control t'atlo.s a:ttd cornpadllon with febllohed de fe,.hlp ovcro~ Thelnform l)on obtoh1ea s re!ote:d to dealer5hip stren&liu and W!D.kne,ses ;and used ln stt ting go11ls and objectives. 01)6. Planning (or Pro(il biuty <n:dtt The developtnent of future plans for the de.1.lcnhip 1re tmflh.uiz. ed in tlils course. The elements o( marketing plan ue disc:u.ued, &r<! all o<c<m&ry ~kvound lnronnalicn rovicwod. "Deoler Trade Ttrtitory Po!ttlUtls 1 ' 11nd the ''Cost of DoinJ Busi»Hs Stucty l c.re used u supplemental materizlls Developmrnt of tho Mukct!Rg Pion t cctdlt ndividual attention s devoted to the ptoces.1 cf (Qrerutina and the fin.t de"elopment of nen )"etr's mtdte.tin.a,pt n Thi:& p110j\o ingp(l)co"' Ulill es tho MBO Y t~m ond enol)"is the dtalrr ship to delcr(l1lne ~bore the buslne.ss.ls now and where it is ~oin~. 006 :1& Dcolerohtp Ad ~rtlolngand l'rnmocion 1 tro,d!! Tbe gen eralnrca oj Bdvertblns s covered by this co\rsei lcclud ed i5 in!ormutlon on adve.rtisins w'rk!ng and developtnent, the advertising budget, the :ldvertisl"8 prclgram, product &ala d.veloj>ment ond resources.tb!e Dcalcnhlp '-De elo-nt <rtdlt Thia CQUt'i! deal& wltb thu conuuun!ty'a percrptloa. ol you, your. bulint M and your product. Thl1 petc:ept~ cr.n be formed rom the: wards and actions ol penon~l. from vis' 11 obe.rvation of your l:lu5in.ess, an.d by word of mouth. The development of rovoroblo!mogc Jmporl nf D bu.llneu su~ess. Thl. co rsels laugh\ through lbe of sulded, 'lndlvlduol instru,ctlon. ' llmployeo Moll.,llun '\ ~1't~Jt Thh course deal& wlth problem& entountere:d ln motlvatlng d~aler.dtlp pe-rsotlrw!l. Sycr~m~ and thtori.!s o tnat1vat{on end the offect they hove on poaple' bt~avlor are dlso>ss.td. Also includ ed are proctical exercise& tn drvdoplas motlvotlmaf teehnlquu for indivlduol..,,, De.alenblp Polley and Proeodurts J crtdil 1b1o coune coveu the deyelopmra\ oi o deolenblp employ~ handbook and tho writina o( policies aju proecduru lot opetlticn of the buslntnas rclattd to empfo) ee sat.wid.ioo.1'be roar~ is taugh1 tnmugh auldtd, jndiv!dtjal in!truction AsdbuaiD.., Op.,otlono. J <redll This coune expi.q.~ns th function of the own rlmanagaf of an asrlb~6)ne" company and detulls duhes and responoi)>l!it~. Alullyals ol the cornpony:sl!naocl l state~mdt, the wrifl B of murket~g, plan, lechniqu.ea!or worke.r mohntlot11 and Ul C'C plana lion and 11n01lysis: of Wil'fS i whic:h a. com.panicaw ifow arc.1fso CoYt:red., Opet11dng Senice O.putaKn.l 1 credit 'nli1 coum: explaina the fundtoij of the ~rvice maj\ ger in 10 aaribusiness eomp-ny am details duties and nsponsibilltid. An.1lytis of the tomp ny".s flll.l'lcia.l stcternent, the "''titra& of a m. rke!l~g p!u, lechnlques oo empl'll'u motivation. J'd t!lt planation and an.alyjis of way& i11 wh~ 1. service depa~tment Cll) improve profitability &rt: abo t o~t.rtd. : 006 5~ Man...,ment by.objecllvea creclll Thl' counc disousses tbc MBO system of busln,e<$,mon>sen1enl t lak an la deplh look at mad a mei~i of(bc service ae~rl m ot.. vihb tbe'objectlv, Qrliuproied prof(tab!uty. Ma)Qrtojil<> coverid i?~d'll;d.e the fu.c-~cuons o( depfltlment m~f&, lhe MBO proce~ s., goal-setting tul!d.definition of man1g~~nt. :Thi.s' cour'5e 1s tought through group a.nd i"divldual i11itrutlion The Service Man~~ie<. ~ erec.llt ''W course provid., an ln-clrptb look ol the po>!tioo ol H rvlce QliiDBge:. t tevtews he re~riojllbjp or the!le'nial~r to the mant~t tt.ul, deones respouibilities. fi5t5 activuies and a.tts areas of serorice manqement ulhorlty. TbiStout' ij b11gh.l tbrou!b'gulded, i.!!dlvldluj in trlldloo Promotfac 5<-rvlce C~~wib <tedlt Thl& cour&e is eonc.cme.d with adnri~ omd promctiaa t~ &er.net d~part mcttt. Study te d.ivkied nto two JMjor portions:1mage and ltn.lg< developmenl; Producc.. les and ljl]ct devek>pmcnt, Grqup ond indi~tdu, l lnstructlools pt;ov!ded. 006-~SB Plonnlng Service Growth i cr dlt This coutk coven lhe ~elopment of future pl.1ns for theser~. vice dc.po:utmcnt. Ancsly!iiis Q{ th8. depar(tnent aoo all neces.sary background injoi-m.ation Js rtvitwed. lndlvjdu~j records, 1 'De1ler Trt<le Tertitory Polentlols" ond the "Cc>sl ol. Dcing Business Study'' are: ~d as s~.tpplem<:ntal malerit.ls Mt<<h-OS Ute Strrlce Dcpe t"'""' <rtdlt The g<nertl <tr<"' of m<r<~adljin& and point-of-ale dlspl l are covered by thil course. deo$ lot drolersbip ~t& and telep\or>e sales t..echrliq,ud ue diic\llsed The Az' Mtchllnle tndlt This course o( tnd1vidual tns(nc(ion covers m~powe.r recruit rm:nt projrams,. loufce;s o qu.j ied personnel. Wtitirtgj ob de5cription5 fcc 8:& mecha.ftlc poaltll)nj;, the use o emptoy:ncnt ogeneics, adver'using aod' othet topla Rat deal wltb manpowc!:f, indudins trttlnlnu proaram11 and.retenuan J6l Hum a Sldo of Mon s rnmi 1 credit Thh r:ourse E:Overs the hclcrs o! b\tm.11'i behavior n they relate fc a person's performance on the job. Methods of bllildins work' t.n \ iconmentt: wk.!ch ce COltdlltive to persot11j &rowtb Hxt ~.:~tisjk> tion ate &=wd.

60 11-Coun~: Qescrlptlons Course Descriptions-115 ~ 6 Techniques of Setvtct Man a~:nunt 1 uc~ Th~ ccuue.studfu int.::rper&onal ~1tliOQ. s and the a~tpervbioo of employees. Toplc:s covered nclude cb1nge, pt.-er r elallot~shl ps, at r~tude, tooflict t nd o.~tnizatioatl a:trueeu~ MotiYoll"i the Servltt81aD 1 u<dlt T'hjs c:ourae deals. wiijj the problcm1 encountered ln mor.i.,tlrg servke dopono,.nt P'"''""'ef- Sym~oms of poor mo!lv.tion. c u.sa of mo11'11tio:tol problems Od stn te:gies for correction of U)Qse problems n dijtuucd. PractiCAl e-xtrdses in dcvt!loping p-ff'sclrl.ll motivation techniquciare 1 major part ol tbjs cours.e. 006-~ O.JldftJ /or Ser in: Results credit 1be wr\tib! of deputmcnl policies nd pre«duru!or opcraliqj the service. departmmt te the m;:,for f«us of thif CC!tse. f'olicy and procedure selection are tied to employee motiv&l~n as well u to dep>rtmeat profltobillly. 070 AGRCULTURE MECHANCS Sur-vey or AgtJcultu'fe Mec:tt.nlct z cred.us The competrncle1 to be developed ln this courst inchad~ undtt.standing the i.mporttnce of.the qric:ultt.~ral machitlflry in dustry. method' of.dij!ribu:ting aqd servlclng Dgdcuftural machjneryl ud the.jo.b funclions in the o:sanlzatlon of the Jocal agrjculru,., DCh!nery de leuh.ip l'orm Moclilnery: Till and Plonllng NlachlJtes 1 cr~dlu This: oour~c allow:s students to develop an under5iandins ol!ill"'! pltoung, lert!uzlag and spraying mac~lnery --adjustmenls, calibrations, rcpajt tnd maintet1 ncc. All common tiiia_ge, plantins, spraying ~ fenlllrlag machines will be 10ver«1. 07D- fforveslhog Jl!a<blnu 6 credit Tbia cour.u: deve1ops ah llnde:rstwlwng of crop harvesung m.ac.hincs- adjojlments. l»ubrotion.s, repair Qlld tnairttena.nce. All common gricttltural harvcstq medtices wid be covesed SZ Fl<ld Scnlce cred;u This counc to\'cn tbc buk Cundame.nt:JJ o{ fidd milit~ and servjce of crop JnacfJjocs. Sy1t~atfc proceduru to follow, 5ftD.ploms lo bt: W.rc or and the lechoieal knowjed~ and zbilincs ncccssuy 1.0 make the needtd, adjustme:u.s are t1so included farnt Equipment Repair cnclits This cltell e course s an Jn-dep<h ftt""-!ion of O'i'0-Z Field Ser 'Vice.. MOle detall ij givef1 in tbe arc.a:s or electrical service, ovcrbauuns. 01<- l'rarequlsite: FJeld ~via {07f).JZ1f Applied lltvi<vllural J\!01h or..uts This course is de.dgtt~ to fam.lliati~e students with comb")qn types o! mathematic-al problem:li ln ;grlcultur~ equlpmebl technology and to develop amf'tdcnee in 50ViQg tuch problems. T.hc first part ol the oourse includes a review of arithmetic, ftjndqient l busjhessca.fc::tilations &m( determination of the a.rens Qtld volumes of sl"'ple figures and objects. The remainder of the course 1 devor~ to tofvlf\g a.g;ric:ulturaj.equipment problems. Typico~J problem include determination of mceh!lnlcal advant~ge. horsepower, torq~~«and Ohm's L8w. Ohm's l aw. 090 FARM TRANNG }{ote: 17oc folloo!i s """"'" app/1 011/y roth~ Pqnn 'l'ra(nins Program. 0\lo-80 Aarldc..,lopment-lnlroductloo lo form Tralalaa tredlt 1'his ia a preparetory courae lor the farm tntinjaa: ptogttrn that :t;.si.sb Umikd rbaurct and bqionins former$ in rtcord.lu::cp:..ng, f..,_,n<l l nolysiurul oflldmounagemeac ptullcu. T/,i> ""'""' will Pn>Yide ~Mic: koowledse n alas_pccl1 of f rm opero~on, prepare studtnll f"' rulv n«men~ lnto the farm lrai:tln& p<agrom and...wyu perfotdo/\eo of <A<b form unlt 10 pis c a he establl>b<d and """'''lct«<, Op<ratmc the famo S...lneu z eredlts Tbi< fll1!-ycor co.ne empbosw:o the manaaemat ak!us atld <on cepu ne<:e&sj Jar sludcots to continl.le fannns wilh today'.s chanyog techncqy and fann bwir...,ll.. ocina-1! bui!ds the l.. ndauon lor U~e ctl>er CO\rtes ln tl>l pros ram. Specitl emflh.&!is U given to a tabjlshioa and recordjna farm business a.ad fcmily gools. St de to wiu organ;,., and "'lllnlain farm bu<;ness n:conls, lttterpret and nualyu the ~cb to wise id m11;ring. ~uzut farm bwifk'$$ m ooaemc:nl <kcbions. Baeh studc1\t"~ entice furmilj operation s om.-.lled, a,nd plans ere d~eao~ lor future ~«<~. sao!< '"" cbjedivol Studcnl> willevohate&ools and objt:ctives upon comple1ion or the courx. forty rtvc: hcurs oj aroup Uutruclion Dd twelve hours lndividual on-farm bslrudion tte ap\'en in this cotuje, OlomJ)h:tKm of this covrse s re.quirtd bdan.lr)l Of the follo\o;lng <WrR$ na}' bt taken Sell M.,.p:ment CT<dll! 1'hi.s a"t\ust coven the prepuauon aud impl~ement:ltiac of a land ux pljv nd htjps: stadc:tts: to wtder~cand.10u temins procedures Md rc:pprts. Students wijj receive irwtrucuon on ml!king, unde.ntmdjns :.JJd lmplwmentln,!tttiuzcr reoomm~::ndauoos and hu"-'trt!; The appjk.auon ol ftrrn manure.&, cbemic ls. aoh conser~ vation prolcllces and tilt managcment nd Hie usc of fann JMC.hlnery nd equipment u~:: also covered. SoU l"nllnagement ~'ll pn~us anodyis of the l rrn bu~nc:~ and!)fanning of cropping stro'1fcj;ies lo mee-t 1ludc:nt needs. Fcrty-nv~ hours of group.nd twelve hour JndJvJduiJ on.furm Jn.nrucrlon ~given in thi1 C'OUtlt, 090 8~ Crop Manag<l>tenl <red its Group.and inc.llv!dljal insltllc:tion is,provlded covcrlbj a.ll phases or crop production1 nlanegcment an(i..t:conomics. Speeific fopics.rl!late to variety, selec:llou, pjonnlns. p_c:~t control, harvcstil'g. SOrilg na Mnd marilcllng. ln ~ddjon, the rarm cropping program i& related 10 the tole.) Jorm e.ntcrpdse on &.short and lon,s ferm t1asi.s. Crop man.ax~.:mcnl emphasizes analysts o! lht farmln& bu.sine.u Md ph,nnlnt cropping pr ctices and.strottesles lo moe! stude.l)t needs. For ty~n... e hours olsroup ond twe)vc hours in~ d'1vid~l on farnt imlt uction are provided Uves toc.k Nutrition cr~lts 1'bis course enphasizn ljje ~ius, tec-bniqu~a and cdfjcept.s necessary for sound fhd.ing maj1111crzttnt. Jt coyer'$ the deter mln:ulou of feed vulue,, the tcono:nia of teed. nuttifionaj tcr ntinofosy. roquitcmcnta, fe:~d CUMUJhpdcm ol Jivutodt, breecfing ad ""deutar>dln; feed~~ ~bcl.s for pro!rin, er.ugy, rniocrol - and vitamins. cvaluahott or bast: feed and fudinc ptogram.s, aad metabollo ~of Jomtlll!lliv..,tock. UvtJt«k la:dir.g eff! tiency Will be DlUJtlred by U5C Of \!\c ru~ bu&iness anal )"is. Not _p~rt of nutrition, btk alto i.nclucd in thd cour&e, is a disctwion of bow the fum famuy can identil)' iu role ln the communlry 1~ how they cen deaj with Jtre.s-s tfdot.s. f orty-five hours group and twelve hourslndivldual on larnllnstrucuon ifc: provided. "09D-J85 Uve tock ManaJ"m<nt Z credlls The livestck:k mrn1geu1tnt c:ourn pcovldrs instroctlon on the: various phue.s or SC(ection, bn:t. ttlng, herd he:dljt. raising of rtpl.xetnl.!nt stock. and murk~ln llve!flodt and livt:5tock: pro d~. ft in.cludts the n lection, operation and ZNintenance of mujdn~ (ccdln&. ventilation, rruanur hondling, eguij,'nenl and fe.rm buudlhp. fn addition, lhe Jivc!'ltock program will be manag ed through \lst oltha farm busincsa 1\naly:&ls, Forty fivc hours of eroup and twelve hour.s.of indivklunl on fortn instructlon are offered. 090<J86 F rm Rccurd and Duslncu Analy1h ~ crcdit.s lflstruc:tiou i.s.provlded which rmphslfiu.! tile pradic:al" use ul a r~jc:ord ~yslem in (arm manr~g ement 1nd flnanciul ana ly~ls. ll lnc~_udes the calablishmtnt or lnrm brjsiness go1j, ret<ed1on s.nd.us~ or farm cn:d.il, l:irm bu~1neu erran&ementa,_ farm e~tc_l c planning and!ojm ncome LUes. rnsttuction Js provfd~d on the u.se ol.rnm pytcr.$ andfor compu.te:r records. Production and fimndal deci sian.\ wtlj be b1sad on each student'j form business 1nalyals. Fotty..{jve bow a ol&roup 11nd tw~lvc hours of tndividuol on-letm ihslruction lfe ptovidcd. 090-&7 Form Tralalnc Updrlle cndlll 'Tbis d.:.:.<n-c: eounc, prlmarity group lnlizuction, cab be taken lor up to '1 bolln 1 credit.j. tijrlculture i a hlgh-tceh bosh1e1s todey, '!"f only bocause ol now mcchlnery, equipment. b<e«<ln&!echmques. sc:loctlve pestlc;de plan! br..dlo& omd feeding prao. U.:.., but ill$o in the Us< ol b.. l,_ :!< Us, oomputcrt and nwkellna ll<! hods. La<al, stale t rod ledonll!l"'emments no impslng new rvlrs ud rcaul«licns, orod f""m prlco SUpPOrt bills ch.l.n&c yurty, AU ~1dre the f rmer to 1nUe decfsions llechng l1lc lor,. opor!loo. flocousc: of c&on&lns praduclion lccbr.oiofy alld form D1llNJFment dedslon.s, thc:re s o ucul ror the CJ.ablish td fam.et lo rcc:c:iv! up-to-dale lnt.1rucllon and iclorrnalion on cuttcat prf ctlcta rot lirm record 11nd.n.i.lySi.s. aplh. crop mmoo,f'tntol and liwslock nu.tt itkm and manaa~t. The S!'<'Clnc objt<tlve.s of tbls eour>e trci!odllled "'' y.. rly bo.islo ~tlbt Detds of uea (armera. 090 FAJW TRANNG-SHeEP PRODUCTON Not.: Tht {ouou:lnj coorsn o;pl)l 0111.)' ro tht FGn>l n-oiloi.j-sit.,p' l'rodudioll J'O'"'" JS Op«t tilltl tha Porrn B...,..., _ Sheep Producllon c:wllts T1U. first-year-course empllukesthc ""'""'""''" lu111_<nd concq>ar neoeo..,., for tho sh<tp produtllon 1\udent to eouuaue rarn>i"' willl todoy's cba &f"' cechnolo&y aad farm ~us>ne<s financiog.lt N!d the foundttiad for the other a>unts on thi1 Prosrnn Speciolemplulsls s &l""n to e<lablishlrtg aod rea:>rdlog s~>eep prod\1~ion and family golfs. The lludaot will or&&nlu and rneinl~ln fa.rm bu$inesr record1, int rprfi and andy::. tbe ~ccords: to a$51.sf in rrit~kjng.sound (ani\ ~us.in~l m11nagement d1c111ons. Bach stu deutti cnhrc Jorn,llpg Opc!'t11lon ts O.Sile,.sed, aqd pllln&.are. developed fqi Cuill(e needo,, goals.an~ o~jecilvu oslhey.rola\e to sh~~p prodttcct<m...studtnts wju ~valu.ate coals and abjtcuvu upon complctiun or the c:ojr~. Forly five h!>urs group and twelve liours lridivfdual on fa.rm1nsc{uctlon en: o( crcd in this COtlrse. ComplEtion o( th~ course bt requl('ed prior to enroument in.an.y of Ch.c oth-er ~tjrses Jn the prosr m. V90-8. ~9 111 M-Jerll<ni-She p l'ro~.uctloo. crodll Tbis courst cov<e:rs the?re~r.otfon.ohd implement tioj\ of a land.,. ploo oud bolps stodools uodero\ond sou!e<unl proc<d~res Wld reports os they re.lole to sheep product.1on. St~e nt.s Wjll. receive instruction on making. undt=rst.andmg a~ ~~~~otmg teruizer rc:comntend liona and bu~. O~tet topu:s ~ch!de the eppucatlon of arm manures, c:hem.qs. ul CONC'rvatiOCl prac~ Ute~, aod the mon~eat aod safe~ o( fu1li1110chloery and cquipment. Soil m.uo J1!menl ttnphbiut analy" of the fanning ~xo,;,us od plan nine croppln1 stnl &i< to me«stude11t oeed< Forty fi'tlc boun of ~~ and twelve boa.r& indh't~on-fann ln. s.truetion att off~,. ooo-8 Crop Maea,...,..,t~h.. p Prod~ctlon --.!-ttedlt This ccur>< oovers oll-phas<s o/ CT'Op prod~d lo, ~~ and «ona<nlu u relot«<o sloe p prodocboa. Spccl!i< t"'?'"' relate to variety, aelealod, pjanping. pc.l\ control, h rvatmg.. st<>'"vds and marj.ellns- n oddlllo.!m farm croppjng progrtlll s rebted to the tot~ sheep enfetprhe on a short a.nd lo.o.g lenn basis- Crop mot~fbcm nt etnpbasiz., onolysis of!m fanning busineaand plannlns crop pins practices end strotegles to meet.student needs. Pott}' live Mun ol group and twelve hours Jn dividluil on-farm kl.strudion oare: off~rcd Llv tqci< r\lutrltlon-sneep Produc:tlon cr~wts This course: emphas!z.es the :sl<llls. technlques ~nd conodccpt:sr ncceuofy lor tiquml fecdlna.m~na&tmentln ehecp pr uct on. 1 t includes the ttetcrmlnatlon,or feed vrjues, economics of feed, nulrilionp terminology, requtrcmentsj feed C()nsumptlon o~ sh.eep br~eding 11.nd undorstlnd.jng feed tiis lo.bcls for plolem: t.nerg.y, minerals nnd y)tamil'll, cv lu t.lon ol base reed arid f~edin~ progtar:us. a.nd. metaholic:,dis.eete of Jaet all~g ew!: Sheep lc<ding.cciclency will be m... ure~ by 11.1lns tho far':' busones~ atmtlysis. Not part of nutrhion, but also covtrtd in th15 cour:se. ls.~ di><.,;dil o( how th < f e~toily can dentify $ role ll the oom,.uru ty ond how they""" deolwith mess facton. Forty-lluhouro grm~;p and twelve bouts Jodl klual on fum instruction are ollu<d. 0!!0 85 uv.. tock Manaaement-51\eep Production Z cr_ecbto 'rbjs course relates &p<cifi<ay to "'-P proddctl.,. &nd prov:des ias\rutuon in tbe vario\1& phtel of setcethm, bredns. Uoclc. lxvlih..w;., rop!k<ju:fti slocl!, orul mor~ejlng al:eep d sj.op pro.tu~tj. H indwde~ the nle~don1 cpe.nlion u.~ ~l~e cf the beep noel!, feed, ~J.tlon, """'"'' haodlina. ~.. ~ tru1 1a.rm t>ulldlnp..oddlilan, tho &hcq> ptoifo> man1~-d t!lrau1b u.se nf the l rm btume&j 1Dijy~s.. f'of1y-fiv~ houtl!i &JOUP 111d twetve t.oun tnd\y(dual on-f rm tmrut'llotl a:u: pro'<«!«!, 090-J86' Parm Recordo ond Buolao.. ANyoh- Shtep Prodo<tlon ~edlto This course emphoi:oeo th practkaluse oc r«<rd s~em "'. f.,-m manogement and n... w llllly'sts. lt inclodeo ltie es\abli_shm<n( of farm buslncs goals. a<lcctioa and.,.?' form crcdl~. fomn bu.slness Dlt'DJcments. farm cstll.e ptaruuag and far~ m. comt ~acs. fns!ruc:tioo is pi"''-."itkd on the use of comp11.ters oodlor a>mputer...,.,ds ond flnoncld onoly!l> of the farm ~xo,;.,..._ Productioa and nnondlll decisions will be based 01 u<h sh:dtnt'l f rm bu>ln... antlysls. forty-fly< ~" sroup and twelve t:ow. ir.di idutl D(J-Jatro lnruuctioo ow ofien:<l c!lo-17 Form 'J'rolnlnfl Up.a.te..Sb.. p Proclooctlca a-edha 'This electlve eoune, prim.jrlly poup idjtnctton, can be taktn for ilp"o n boui11z credits). Sheep produdlon b bl&b-~ bvsm... today, no/ oiity becau,. of new mochlnery, cquop.,..,t. bmding tccluilqueo, selecuve petlldde plont breedlns, and feeding pri~clicis, but alw in the \be of ~sihtss ak1u~.. computer. and mocketlns methods. Loc:~l. state and fed.erelsover~~nts.sre imp\)ging new rule, arod rogulotions, ilnd form.~rice support ~Uis tharg.e y~~:arty. AU requ\rc_ the liheep j>rodu~e r'to.make de~$.10ns a fecting'thc.!aim apert:!;on. Beca.use o( changltls producbon t.d\dolo y and farm,mufegcd\en~ dedalon ~ ~ there ls a oeed for the e$1ab,lshed farmer to receive up lo date n\s;titj~tion. and info~matiqn ~bout curr_ent pueth:ca fo~.fufr'! rc~!)rds :and.analyw, sods ~nd crop m an~gcment, e..nd.shc.ep. au.trlti o~ ~nd mdmgem<;nt... Speci!ic; "ob)etuve.a ror this C()\lne ue rnodihc:d 01\ a yemiy bi1s1s to meet tbe ne~ds of Jrea 1heep produc:l:!z:a. 091 ANMAL TECHNCAN Ocoup~tlcqol Pr~tloll 1 cr~dit ThiS two-tc::me:stet course Js dalsnt<l to illc:qualnt anim.tl tecltni~ dan student> with the collqe Di>d lhelt corm _O!!f~- ~~~. is prdel\t«< to belp_i<>dividuils SliC<«~- \roll>l_"8 " ~oven to prcpa.rc Jtudents for the kidd of lnttrv1~5 w~ an.~ (OT lnt<tr$hip ond job plocemcnt ~ grlduauon. htlcnu)up.re <;lliremeots are streocd, and help 1s SYen to prqxm: s.tud~ts Cor tucb placement with veterirwb.qs. Twelve bours of bbocatory p<o-intermblp1ni1ructlon Ar ncluded 11 or near the end' of-th, sernnd ~n. Sh itats are al.lo upoaed t.o all ~of veterln.ary m.tdidne to familiarize them w1th ~t Jtin~of employ mont ow<>rtunlti<s)vtll ble when they gnd..u: t-ios Vetft'iDary.r.tecllcllt TCfllliDO<SJ' _. z ~;t s.,ndard tu:ni.dolasy is p.rc::requisi{e to co~ un.dentudmg ~ wc:1c a.s to ~r muoin&ful CJtcban,ge of WorJn.Olhon, Q:ae to technictl >ophlstico.tioo, this is espeoiollytru~lr\ vcte<w~ry clinics. 'nlia course l.s: therdoce do;igoed to. ~acb accev;a~je. (ec minology end.1peluns for each oo~n, duuc:ally rec~~n:abl~ disease or ope;nllon. Signs u d abbrcv\a\lons.,rc abo ~qcluded m 1nstructlon Anhual Husbandry lc!cdits Thl11 courit c:ovecs ttle Vdrlous b{e~ds..and speci~s of doatuh~ and )Qbora'tory u.nimals w~ich lln anlme.,l tcchnlcl:l.n Jtlil.Y bb wo~kms wllh nnd c~ ring for. Curren falsie U.inu.il husbandry pro:~hces ilre tflught wlth emphub on.selecucn, breeding, reath\g, carlng o~d..housh\i Cor each )!;nd. Buie types: or nni:nal skifls at~ al$10 taugflt, A..u..al Nutrlllon. ~reduo. Nutrltion for -v er\ou~.pedes c( domeauc and lfbor tory an~mab whic)lon ontmol technldan_ may be worklns with and mln&.-for iltlrened 1.n thls course. Disease Md body.fooc:llans.s r~lated tq nulrihon-trc idcludcd as well cu f.eect to prevent ~f unch~n of anirn&l health and productloa. three to four fle{d tn ps are 1~;. ed tn the in,truction. PrutqW ~te: Earollrnent id or coruplehon o. 091-J Z Allimtl Huobondry, or a>,...t of the loslructor Zooaod~ - _ 1 crifl This coyet> o comp!de &tudy of d!acuu which arc tr.~nsmossa 0 to maa from domesloc ot~ti.,.,s, bitdo. wlld anbmls ond mdc:ts. Also locl d«<arc vectors, fomites. food and f..o, <le. New Wusel.,.. dlscwsed ao wdlos t«10nt outb<eob C{ - trma.=..rssobta &... Two to three field ulpa ore ncluded durlog the c:ouroe lnlroduclloe to Mlcroblolo&r _.t,er<dl!o This is "" lnlro<oclaty coitrse n applied mktoboo 1 CSY w. aa emphasis on orgui!ons Uectlng oalmal "f'<cl... G ~ rtl microblolngi<al co.cep<s ond principles ore eover«<j~~ ecture end ~. ; -

61 1 Cqurse Descriptions laboratory. Toplts of lnltnittiotl include.taxonomy, s.lerlliz.alion o.od dbinfeeuo.n, Hf<ty, blo!on of rnlc'?"orpnlsms, ptllhoj,oenic organisms. anlllnkroblal,.nsl!lvlty ta Uns. myeola~y eucoryotio!ftierob)a) c!istesej, C!tofosy ud microbiology o{ aulk.. The course ts mlrictod lo DimaJ lecbni<q) &Udenh 0< Wilh auuornt o( divi lion d.. nlobl<penon Laborat<><y T«hniqUH cr-.lits The ltudy aod eppucslloa ol poru~olosy, urln.>lysls andbu:c b... toloay 1re covoft<l n tbi..,.._ Prueqlllslie: Anlmo!.Huboodry, or ~t of ln.olni<or Laboteto>y Ttchnlq.,.. n credits This co.rsels contiaullllon ol 091-JZO!Abontory Tecboq.osl. Tbe student is lnlloducod to prlndpi<s, P<o<edureo aod~quipmcnt used ln senun chemistry, automared be.a1ttolo:gy aud body flwd onalysls. Mlc:Jobiology s oover«< u on qtft>sioo of 091-lJ6 ln!joduction to Mkroblology. Slude ts putlciplleln en intern ship at lhe Wlxcnoio Animo! lltollh!abocatory to o!>krve nd,paitlcipat<: lo each of the fe~llonal ar,as o( 11\i$ Jabor>~tory. Pt~u,bi t~t: Satisfactory completion of 091 ) lnfroduction ~o Microbiology, Loborllory Tecbnlqu.,l, aod 806 1t Cheml.stry, An)moiAnalomr and Physiology ~ lritro to.wboz torr Animal SCJence c.-.dil 'l'hlo beglnnlnb ccuroe will ocq~olnt tho studel\t with.the field of l~bor11toty.tnimal cace. Laboratory procedures will be u ~ea to.augment the: lecture material. 'l'optc~ o instruction will iilclud~: a hort! Urvey of the hi&tory of loboralory animo! technology and lh~ utage of laboratory anjmo1ls. The Anbn1l Welfete Atl ond oth~r- r~ulauons ~reaining to he C~~re o('jaboratory animals 'Wlll be mph.. iud. The hu&bllndry o( loborllory anlmols will be Covered Jn depth. CoJiec:Oon of speclmeos. met.bods. of trl9tment. u eslh.esia, surs1cal a$$laun& tethnlque.s. humane e.utlw n sia, add necropsy proc<d<ues will bo discussed OJ1d procticed. Students will,..lntcln coloay of laboretory animals providios care 00<1 t~tmea t during tbi:s cout1t. Mel.t.ods of recordkeeplnj and JT"AO&.gement will also be discu;:sed. 091 Vctuln y Op:J-otJt>s Room Tcduuq,... U\'ldits This oount enoompuoc. the >lady ond p:octic:ol ppu<:allon oi steriia1ion tecb.nlq~ PRJ)arat:io:t ol the swgic.al site,.optntine~ romn oonduct, ""isti"l! lhe aur.;eon, end clenlal P"'f'btliiJd>. The studenl a!>o leotns the prlndple.< or rldiosnphy ond iu pncti<:ol appliuuon. l~uded n the oow"' an tbe uca of di>infectan~s and eat.uc:pflcs in veterinry medicine. nomencleture and J.ome basic uses o! &Urglc.al lostnunenu, prep:>tauon ul pock>, gowns, &l es oad the use ol stcruiution equipment, tho daulflootion and pltysltal p:<>penie1 olanttthedts wed in!atse and ~~mall ~ nime! vrlerinary medicibc nd 6Ut ery. Prcn~quisitee: Eluc llrnenl in or completion ol ~ll llrst -year >ubjects, specifteally AflimalRutr.. iot, 09H0 Anlnt t Rcatralnl z credits 'Thls course encompasses Hx study and prectitc of te$lrainjnx large nd t mnu anlma.ls, poultry '"d 1ab:lrotory lfllma[s utu.fzing.ufe lind hum1ne. physiatlan~ c~emic.u 111pcct8 o! testrlllln't Studl'nfs VS:C variou.1 Jrlnds of restr'alnt equipment and techn~'q ue:s AnUn.tl Anat~nty.and Pltylloloay <<edits This; course «<VCt' the a.nbtomy and phy8igjogy of an~mt!ll$ in both lecture :~nd. Jo1boratoty. Leclurt.S ln(oiril students of the: orj>~nlutia ~ and f\lncllons 0.sy,te~ lnvo lved n the living body, Loboralory sludlesllfe dlrec:ted loword locatlnsood ldo01ifying the.anotomicor parts. UluMn.tlng how tht.se various ptrtc-make up syst~tn and hi)w lhex S)'iitl:ms arc atl11'1 ifllegt1 part Of each other. C.dtvert.,., di""'oled aad &tndled n the laboralory. Prere qut..;<e: l!nrollment n or tomp!<tlo or Aoion l Blolc>Jy CUolcaloDd lloopltal Techniques crcdlls Tbis a;ursc awtrs the.sludy od pradialappllcolloo of b.<ic dinieal tedullques technlcltn might be expoct<d 10 perform id pr.jetlccs such a.s a thr1eriu1jon lor urine, prep.rin' u.d ad minis!erla, medlclae under direct.aj)er'yi.slon, obtjunlna blood amp 'e. n.unj.ca e~ rc flrmpat~ure. pulse ecd tapitctcjnl, siotp!c grooming lnlil trim, pltteklntloua),/lrst ald l rcalmen~ clanirtjj h"'''lij <118u, ll ll "'...,.., clellllhrr uleoojlr and equip mea~ goneral clililo bou.,kecp~j>g. pt<ptrlna tlledltanij for dlspenslni lo cllonlt 00 prc~<rlpijm oloucndinj ~lerlo.ttlra, mdnlltlnlnl nventory ar.d <leaning mobilelotje onlmol lociuu<s. Prerequisito; Succeuful <amplttlon of t il prevou enimoll<elutidan courses _,., ~ 091-JS5 Hoopltol Supply and Medlcaato S credits This counc ent.u& atudy or dnra~ omi elba s blilanca of vtlerlnery lltedicd im}jortancc. lam'-ermiaology, usage. musurtment. admi.ngaration, drug inventory and sale s-torage of drugs s emphas<zed. Prerequisite: SUcceasful c:omplellon 0( oil ptnlow animal techn\dan cabr.\es l,c:r...,lp (0hro or more a 8wk period] eredits l wnshlp (work rxpetitn<tj ~ry imporloat phe5< of pj'11c ticllltrunloa lor >1t:denu enrolled a the animal leeiltlitian p:a sr m. t &<net <lly followl Ute._nd wn.. ter o(.w.wo:ic"'!be couese.summer rroess and s conducted dwing a period of eia:ju w~b {or.0 hour~j. Pbc~1 for lhil trcialnt i.s witb coope:qllna vrtainari.n who'' licensed to pr&ctice in Wbconsin. The sjude.at wprl:: ij.jopetvisttd by usisntd -ct~n«ti&a J o~rut: tort. Prer qubfle: Completion of au fir.$l yi9c c:outae1 or pctmi.s. iion ol in.structqn Public Rolottort6 1 cudll The student' it lltibht the (und rncntal prlnciplu necessary in the veterln&rlan profenirm (or developing aood public and-client rtl:l lign.s. Cl)cluded ere proper telc:phone etiquette, p'crso11a ~ g~comlng atld hospital' attire, c:ttlic, flrat Sid!or d icnt.s ood job pp1icalion techniques. Several sues apeaker.s i1tc ulilit cd. 091 DARY HERD MANAGEMENT 091.:01 Dolry Butlnm Man-8 ""'nt ~ <rcdil Types of dajry. bll!inl'ts,.empl oyer~!flployee rejation&hlps:,.fin«a: cial records. dairy fqm' tnl tlon. agricultural finuec end cralit, in~urance nret.ts and lnvntmant oppartunldes for tbe ry f mjl_y ate covered Dairy Cottle ~lenag<m.. t a a-edit a This coura provides i~fonnauon. on infrciims.\ad parasitic di,.,... nd Dlher dlsorde,. of cbiry nltle ncluding prevemrve measures to tn Mc dev.:lopmmt of a herd bttjlh ptogt nl, Milk l'rodu<tioil ~credits A.. tc!ly, developmcnl ood phy:riu!osy of tile "'""ltlwj' &land. bormooet taoc:i:rted Wllh J.cliUon, rnlll<iog rnaaagemcnt, milkins cq\.lipmcdt selection add mmntcnan«, nnjtitis a:r.arrol, milk quality, ood laotocs affectirta lact t1011 ero bjpics in lblo coune Dairy Collie lnduelry credits Natlon laod atate tt<nu n tbe dairy lnduwy, production tntiog progr ms, 1>ilk tn;ttkctlrlg lltd Pl"l!taiJS or breed associati<w, daijy promouon Olglr:iulioos d agrltulttual aovocnmentjrl a:smcies are dijcu~td and atudled ln this COUJ$t, Dairy tlo,..lnj and llquifhll<j> :l crodlls TCflics ln t~i.:i course iflclude f&m),.sicad p l lr~njns. R lecl!on of conslrueuof\ msterlmll, lnauu~ian nnd ventilation.!ted handjjna end StOtaJC, manure bndlin&ljnd stotage, and' the development 0( plaa:s for ccmetructlou and rem odelt~ ot stall bemj( fi"h stall borns, n!ukln1 perlors, calf hooolng ond heif<r hou&lng D lry C.ttl< Feeding a <redlto Thla e<:nuse includes Jh,tructlon Jn ruminant cuacshon and utilizi.~ tlo~1 of feed nutrients. the nu!tlflonal roqujrem~jlll of dlllty ahim11ls, and Chc development of fe~;dllta pfl)grlma or lactmin& caws. 091 t6 Dairy P<ndlnJond Man"J rneot l t r'rli!j lnstructional lopla nclude scledlon, mart~,ern.. t end proces~ting of f...j eroj1 end supplei)>cnl foods r., tbe daijy berrl. fml'-1 apd ntlnagement practice for c::olves, hr1 crs. dry cows and dairy beef ate abo lnduded Dairy Laboratory aedllo Con1emporary lcpln in lito doiry lndu&try, student p,...ntllllons, lecturet, dtmonstrauons, ftdd trips. &pe kers..,.emsea Dd form vjsjjj lta utulz.ed ln Jhls cour e Dairy labo<oigry U ooedlb Thil is 6 c:onuouolioo of Doity Labonlory. Coatemporory topla in lhe dairy iadu.rry, lludml preoenlouoo., lrcluru, dornon&tra tioas. field trips, sptakcrs.. exercise~~ aod form visica are uuuzed. 0~1 60 k tended L<obo<olory credit Slncc Jtudcnts will be workids oo dairy f nm oflet graduation, lt ;. eecmar:r lor lhl'n to be able lo oonvert the b owlqe tl-.ey b.l\'e obtained n t~ cloaroom lnto proc:dco.l u&e. This OD\ll$f has b<on cte.i&ned with,.,.. porposea a mlnd-tltlt,lt lo ctcsfulr period D nala11e u ch stadeot's abiuty D do soperlor work on thr l rm: secondly, t s alarum for l<1mlng new tecllnlques u.d "extrti" that tbe lndlvidull dtlr) famuy perle""' on tbe dairy f&rm bt... d Labo<atary rr l credh This is a continuation ol Bdeoded 1-al:orarory. Practical Wotk crporlecet on o dairy form is utilized Dolry eanlo Brtedlof.... Cftdlll Physiol08)' ol reprod Cbo:J, inferti1il)', r~productioa Dtt~bf. prindpks ol &lrttltc lmpn>veimjlt ood "" lultlon, end sole<tio:t ci dairy,...,.'"' aenell< lmproveme l ln product~n and physical ttaitl! are toplcs (Ovtred in this ~rse Artl&lal lalfnlllllltiol l credit Tb.is course provides 'uiaing and practical experianc. io anlficw insemlnotton, sernej"l h:.ndlips, iosemin don r cords ajjd the servi~s O[.the lnclustty. 'J'be COUC Js orfeted to ltudents who have enrolled in 09t 76 Dairy Coltie.Srecding AppUtd A~cultwal Molhem lk:$ uedltt This CQUrsc covert t,a.,1c mathematics thul ~nvul.vc ptoblan.ti 11 h~rde.rnan i::rlpt to enc:ountc.r such u belancins 11hon~,.: fis.uring leed cos t~. production record anol_ysl., olre evelu~tlon, ycody r.. d requiremeols aad JOieseloclJ!y copoclll... cred11 and lite~,. ol mcri~. 09~ FARM MECHANZATON 09:t-10 Crop Ml><ftlnery Pundttmentall =!!>sic Jbop lundtmenlllt o<td field!"l lntenaooe of crop J&<hines and pow~ are mnred. Bh.ic Weldin,~ hydrau~cs are tocll.lded. Primary ej11pba\u b placed on suv ce ud nmntez:mce of troctor. foroge system and tlllaae oqulpmenl_ The~~"""""' >ectiol> of llte '"'""'s primarily lobonklry onenled usmg actual form equipmeot. Olher url(tl n Ute oour>e n< tude tudor P riur tr.&nee, tuctor featuroa and fe:m mflcbllery eoonoa\les. ne ~ set-up and maia.tenanc of inip_t~n. add sprayer ipp_lcalot aqtap ll!enl is also eo esed. t b o<lvioed lho.t.s!udenta in litis daa hive complet<d bosic farm morcoloery utd w.klins courses at the &;g~t sd.ool oc oakiacalleve\5. 09% 11 ~latc.l ol.t Hoodllo&, : <Tedlt Crop toritge and hlndllns li)'oit:n for lorijo and grvlos odudittg economic corukleratlon1are atudied, The mportance of formstead ptanninj to materials bendllng ls ~ GOVert!d, ~udcnts are rcqulrld to develop plctorlolly ond exfl!alri n d~. Jannste d plan they-h1vc dcvdopod loklnr lll1enals handlioj talo. ~onaidera Uon. 09 CROPS AND.SOLS 09!0"'Soll Monogcmcnt cr<dilo This course allows atudent.s to dcvf.llop on uadou.tandiug of soils ~d their rela Jonsblp to crcp produt'tfon wlth the tlsc of fcdijjw tion end U!&S to a.c:hlcve d~lred crop productlon go ),, A. unit of the coun;e deo!s with &Qil forrno~oti, soli types snd us and physial propenles rellled to crop production &sic, ol Ctop Production crtdih This course covers plant growth (rom aeedunga to mature pllmt~ Speci l emphasis!$ liven to corn ond Jesum " The nter relation.wps of sou u.nd crop nulrlent 'tot o are covur.d in at~: lions ldenufitd osl'lanl NutriUon ttlld Plant ~tl)'>is.. Additiortal ly, there arc un!u on bo>l< crop ll<"di<a'and qu~uiy =trol of crop prcduc.._ t recommended U..t ltudenrs'" lhjj <oor" h v compleled a booie hlgh sc!tool vccotlom crops tndlor agrmwrny COUt$e. ' 09 () Or ln Produ<tlo<> ' ' ~credit. Tltis co r.. <OVer& apedoc...,,. from'lltc tim< the...a is plutled uaclllhe gala s hl~sled, graded artd lor sale. Qa~U)' ro trol ij lncl d d in the tnslructlon. Oener&liiJbjcct oms n dude hybrid lclmion, oeodb<d prepor tlon, ltttll~lon, w l<t..,..,.gement and lrrlj ilon, peat conllolud morkoting llfl rles. Course DeM:riptions ~""' Specllllty Crop Procluctli>a \1 credlto The reeommended m&r~aae,menl prettlces as.sodated with produc lng for6ge n other speclolty crops lo co...,..d, The kinds ot special crop ncluded' n lbe~ lnittllcdon ore ~lemin<!d by enroll meal ond otudutllltertst Tbe..,..,rselsdivlded into uoill wllidj iodude plannna. wlmer aurvkal, lertuiralioq, h~~ne.wog mribxts and tim!na, ip«i~ acd variety Riectiot1, quality control >T.datonae. 09-SD AfrJ<oUtol Peot Monaa - 11 i credit This c:oucae cowrs ldonllflcatlon and mettocls of ~ntrol f~ specific crop w«d, i... et Jid rll.,..e probl<ll>s. T~ correct identification o( crop pbll il ttra~ed 8:1 well u the: u.st of (OtJed me<ltoclo 011d cbaniall to eonlrol litem. The moinl...,...llld calibration of pealicido appuatlion cquljl<oent utd ale hondlintl ol pesllcides ar.. ilo locludtd Elttencled Lltl>oratory n..mi Students ore placed n actual job Mullions for tin olght-week period 10 o~more bouro) with asrlbusln~,. to crop falm DP<~ ticns. Specific a~;gnments ere CCitnpleted by tbe ~tudent1.relating to. their work e,~~perictl t'l!:l. Period.it t'lismoojtl r~ ur. mc~uf:18' ate. scheduiccl for allstudcrit.s to distu:p cozrun,oq prob ems or'el:. perience. Stud~ t ""' perladh:,ollyv)>ltcd. b.y Mir do~ al thrir work O<:otlons. Prerequlollo: Comple~or>.ol oll counes"' tbe crop ptoductkm.prosr m. 0~-80 Ajtplled Ai!flctslturol Malhe~aUci Z credits This oouik coven bu.1c mou.c:matfes that ldvolve probtems a crop productlon worker ls apt to c:ncoubter sudlu t:slim.atiilg yleldt, delerminlng amounl of itonge (ocilltles, <OS\S per acre of production, record snolylils, credit and the uae of money. 09 FARM ECONOMCS A&ncu"ural lrnplemctll Buolneu M"""'""'rnlaad l!r:ortomlt'l :i oredlts This... inlroduc:es the prindpl<o or... orn~cs ~11<1 thetr lmpliceli<>jj.sde>i&ned to develap tlt~ bllity to follow oreallillc bud&el. to develop intel'&=t allitod.. ud proctic:., of""""""". li<>n 0 aod to http Ute.tvdc:nl unclo:bnd lite nlallooobip beti<em f'x6it oont.ro! &nd UCcellln 1.A lodu&tjilll ent:erprite. Students U'C eocouraged toslody eumples/r01t1 tlte-ogrlcuhvral cquipn<j>jin dluirf aslltcy 1 1 about lnd.. tiial cos\ analy.u, tontpelitioa, acalion oj deautfk. C'CODOmil: p1od"dioo 1:od the rela ted~ ' olopplie<ter:onomlcs farm Flnonc!ol Man...-t f Z aedlb Equal tlmr 1.o spentlo tbls cour10 on farm business rnmi!"jjleols.. d we of credll Buslne oarranie-ts 11\dudo typo o(owner.ship. operating arrana;emenu and ma~nts aa.d f rm property tran&!cr eoraidctalsons. Credit reviews on obtinijl& credit. types ud -'OUrces of credit avalloble. and casts reloted to bortowins ~p i tal..are covered. t is recolllmc,.ded that th!s cou.ne ~y tl ~ ta~en ~lmu ltloeoudr. with 09 0 (:rop.s Record Manos.em ent~ Perm Ftn.ntinl t.iaun111fnertl U credit Thjlil course h a louow-up lo 09~10 Pol!'7ft f jnanc1al Mamtgeml!nt [.t is primarily anolyucoi.jn n o iur~ ~ ~d ivided nto two sectiwjs- recordj analyjjj ond rewurce plcnl)lns. Th,e: recor5 analysts 1ectjon includes the de'lalopment )( financlll.l records, tax manogcme.nt, bnd the analysb. of budaeting throusb the \lie of these rec:otds. Resourc:e planniflil dc:~ls whh the u.st C>f records ltld.analy.sla developed carly So lhe course for ~etermin&tion.ol shqrt, intermediate and ton1 tenn goll~. Ptercqw"ce: Cornph!tion ol Parm PDllnr:iol Manosem..,l ~ oc constnl or instructor. 09-ZO CrOpl Record 1\!on"'em<nt cttdll ~ocord sy&tems lor common crops 'C tough! n this cout>e.. YJclds per ac:re w,ith!crtljh:ec ind peaucjde rat~ we ~ctcrmtatd. Plutlttg and buvosting occ also U.k.eu lnlo consuletottoo n tle-rdopin& tluo record$. 09 SO Agrl<ultural MarkotiDg and Recotd Z credits Jnstructioo deb with market loa crops through reuu or wholesale outtcts. future rn~cktu or by dlrec:t farmer sakj. Agtletrltun.leooaomiu l.s stwliod lu tertnl o( demand and.uptjiy. rnark<ti"ll- ptldng 111d Jl'llcrolro rl<d sbucturr. Mat~<till g pe:rfomatntlr:, tn!cnn1tioa aources. nd tbc typo o1 markdi.a& rtc'c!rds tmt netd to be maintained lite at~eucd:. l :t ~ ~!~~ i 1 ~ ;~~.. ~ '.

62 118-Course Descriptions Course Descriptions TAXDERMY a Basic T.a.xldermy.. 1 credit Thi:ii basic-course t~ llches indiljjdl.lll)~ the.introducto-ry elements o{ Axidermy, im:lu~ing th.e roll ectio~ and care or ~pccim~:ns, proper s~ lcctlon and us~ o1: tools, h 0\'1 Jo prpperly.!j kin, preserve a.nd sttl(f un animal skin, and how lo.mount tbc pro~ ssed.specimen. J.esal_u.o; r.: of specimens Js njso covered Z Taxidermy (F~h) 1 credit This cou-r-se ~ r ~jns i~dividua.ls in proce.s!iing and mo.unling pro ce~scd fi:5h :specimens, ndudcd is iufmm<!tion anth'! fic:ld oolleclio.n nnd proper C:~t t"e ur specimens, proper tool\l.se, and how to propr: rly!!kin, pre:.erve, st1,1f( and moun~ fish. Each litudent mou~ls three: o:r ~rt fish duriijg th.e cqurse: TaJiidenny!Bird>) 1 credn This co~rse!rains students in proces:.ing and mounting proces!ed bird.specill' Hl~. lnchldt:d is jn omuuon o.n the rojjeclinn ~nd pro per.;atl! of specimens, proper tool use, ;md ho\1.{ to prc~rly skin, p~ e.ser'll~, J>tu(( and mount birds, The J ~gal~:~ s B of!-pedme11s js ahu covered. Eaclt st ~dent nimlnts app:mximately three. to rour birds durjng the.oour.'ic, Taxidermy (Smoll MammoJoJ 1 credit This--r::ourse lra-lns lhdividu.al~ jn processing ilnd mounting pro ct.:ii:;ed smttll mamm~l specimens. Ttlctudcd is information on the ~llccjion and propc.r ca:.re of.'ipt.:dmens~, proper roo! u5e, nnd how ~n properly skin, preserve:,.stuff and mount.o:;mali animajs. Proper rlejd tare and the ~~-of 5pecJal equ,ipment is.:~i~ 00\'l:n:~ 'ra>ldermy (Head.$) 1 cred;l This more l!ldvanced coj.jrsc! ll'lllin5 jnc:u"viduals in prrx:c:ssing. and mounting. processed,jnijtlftl hl"ads. ncluded is infonnation en the ~oll e ction and proper cu e of sp~cimeos, proper too] use, and bow lo pmperly skin, pre:serve, stuff an~ mount :~nimal ht:lids. The: ptopcr selection i!lnd 'field 'preparation of the head is also denionstiilted and stressed. 09~ 10 Taxidermy ji..arge Mwmnpl.r;) cr e ~its This is an_advallccd 'ourse w.hich trnlns individuals in processmg and moun.~l'ig_ large mammill :o(leclmcns, ncluded is infqrmalian on_thc cue OJ tho anirn.lll in he lie.jd,. pteparijtl<:jn n the labon.tory, tool and equipment U!le, and how to properly skin, ptc.serve,.slur! an.d mount Jarge lll~mmak When the- t.:~xidenn y l!utm;:es in this program are orletc:d in sequence, it is rr:.::mnmende:d that this ~:our!!-e be lakef.j.jasl.m the sluu-ejlt benc:(i(s from prcviouili t~l)d training, 09_s.:u_ Ulsh Paioling/N.ovelti.e~~o 1 [rcdlt This ele-ctive course.l~aches the ~kill~. of paint inc!i&h :speclmcns and how to use otber novellics in preparing such mounts Taxidermy jl>o.ck~j 1 t'reda This CQutse trains.students in ptocessing and mounting proc~sscd duck :!ip~cime.~. ljiclud f!d is infqrmlllio» on the coljediojl,;md ptoper care oi.'ipt!r:; imen_s. proper too1 u.!! ~, and how to properly 'kin, pr.;;;crve,! lutr and mounl dnr!k ~;, The JcgBJ 'ljse. pi.'ipeclmen:i hs also cove ~ d. Bach stucjent mcmnts "lpprqximately threl! to fo\jr ducks durlng the course. 101 ACCOUNTNG 101~105 Applied Accounting. credits This is il b ll.5ic_sur\l'ey course df!'sigr.cd (or non-.ac:c:ounung me.jou. Topi.cs e:overi!d includalh~ aocoun!lng cycle-journal:;;, ledgers, nnd iint ncialsla.1ements. _Au duetnpt i~ m<ldc to-<~pply basic: ac: counting th.~ ory lo spccial~ed fit::.lds cf training. lo llt Accounting l Pr,ndplcs _ cradh::~ An introdu<!tiojj to t.he fiejd of ac.couoting j::; presented. The ao- ; couijoting cycle ofjourn~ll:ing lrans ac~ion~, pasting, adju.5ling ~md d osinb ~ n tries as w~l.qj lhc preparat~on Di xcounllns sla,emen:!' is emphasized far sent ice industries o.nd merchar\dising concern.$, Specific details of actountlng!m tasb, notes an d illt.t:rest, lnvcn tories, fi xed q55e:t:-, d~:p redation and payroll are studied AtcOUbliog 11-Pl[ndples (redits Proc~d~res far accounting f~r partnerships ond CQrporations llrl" sludled. Additional lopic-5 indude curzcnt and long if! rm liabilities,.statement of changes in ftn;mcial po!'litic:m, dep<tr\ment tt c~:uuntlng, manu(actu tin~ accounting, lll n~tly.'i t.'l of financial s t at~ments, lntroduction to cost accountjng, budget preparlition und co.shvo1tlme--pr(jfit analy'sis. Prerequisite: Acoounting J or equiv:ileut AtCUJndRg!-Applied credits Practical application_ of accounting ptio~ipks, bbsic bu..,jnt=.s.5 let minology, practic:~s and lechniquc.'i u~ stre~ed for- 5tUd.mtS not majofing in 111ccountin~ Atwunting,l Applled credits rrocedurt!s for.acoounting for partnerships :tnd CQrp<matiuns are studied. Additionalloplc!i ind.. ide statement o chankes in finan cld pol'~ lion, depattruetttal Rccounling, m<~nufacturing accounting, hud~;el prepanuion, anajysis or Ontulciill 5tlllements, ir,tnxh.!ction. lo cmt accounrjng.ttnd t'o.st-vpurne-profil<ti1hlysis. Pret"cqu[sile: Accounting -Appll~d- 101 ~ 11B Management Accuuntlng.f. c rcdlls This COU5e cmphasif..cs the m.anageri:~.l u5e bf.cc:ounting report~, the problem.solving. fuh r:tions of accounlillq in rc!:lti_on lo Cum:nt plannlng a.nd.oontrol. llerforri1,ancc cv.1 1 tu~ lioi. ; lon.g ron.gt: pl.nnningl bijdgds and Cf)!ll volurnc profit tf'lalionships. Pr ll! rcq\li.site.s: 101-lll A~oountitlg and Ar:counling ~1 Atcauntln:g Jli Problll!ms credit1 This coutse-h:.cllld.es ft discu~:.km Hlld cjdt'n~fvl!! appllcation!l of gencralty i.lt:~::cptr:d accounting pri11ciples, study of r.;cent devejopm C"nfs and p rojlauucem ~nts in a.ccountlng p111~tlce, he prc!p<uition <tnd lnletptcliltirm of fmandij.!!ia.!cments, and intcn.sivfl study of the Yi.!:lua:!ion~ a:ncl ptt:..st'rl!ll:(ioll of the various acco'\lnts: Cash, te~:eivables, inv~toric:ii, operational a.ssets, and in lr~l'l8jbj~ 11sse..ts... Prereq~lsi.t".cs~ lol l i"l Accounltng- l ttrjd JO A ~counling 11. JO ZZ Accoull.ting, V-Managerinl ~redlts GcneTtllty-acccptr.:d accour1ting principles nppbed in prepll.ra.lion. o( t'inanc!ai statements, :nialysj.s and int e rp~tnuon ilre: cmphmb: ed in this co1..1ue. Also lncllh.ed urc probletn sol.ving v!lluatlon, cash flow and fund flow slatement!j, p t~p!l rgtion of slatl:!mtnts ffcm h1. compl ~le ct~t a, errors and their corn:clions 1 and di~t u ss io.n of spedal iopics stu:h as leases, p<:nsion.s, stqek rig hts, long Lerm. nvestments and liabilities. Emphasis is on he special nnnlysis of finilllciol ::~t a lem en ts, Prcrcquis11es: Accounting [ Accounting, 10l l1 Accounting H ~ Accounting VU Tax orcdlh Th i5 course is an inlroductloj lo fll!d l!ro ~ 1 and ~& ale in CQme a ' htws with an emph11.sis on p(>roon\11 t ~x cs. The! following a rt~ llre incllld '-!d: ncome, de:duchol)l;, c:redhs, d{! pt~l.!il ion ga in~ llnd losses, U\d 50]~ proprletouhip t:1x situll li on~. The coutsc inc ludes the,: prtpbralion <lf Jndhddual incdmt! l,ttx retur.:1.s 111s d.-ss proje-clll. Pr~: requi.si le: 101-lll Atcour:.tin g L Audlllng credlto This c::ourse is.t1 sl11dy of the auditing code ar clhlcs prin ciples, C"tJRVCtltion lll &Llditlng p r oc~dur\!s r and todny's critica1j55ue!:s in the iekl of alj.dlting. Ernpho ~ l s s ptaced on lnternnl control lent«rc!.s llrtd preparati on of worldng p:tpcrs. A 1hort nudlt ta&.e is completed to illustrulc: 'vllrlous audilin,g concepts and ~r oce dur c:;, dnd the l n tensiv~ u s.c JJ{ Working paper!! 11nd sc'fl C!dules. Prere quls1te&: 1 01~ Accounting 1, loj-1 1 Accounting[[, t Dl lz AC"counting lll. Q J5 Accounting V CO$\. u edlts Ar C'u9 emphasized in this course inchtd~ job order co~t( process co:sl, $ls:t'i:dtrd co.sts, jojot cost and bud8 ~ 1~- Cosi;PrOfit \'":'~nc reia tion~hip s Q.nd other cost systems us~d.m busa~e.ss decm<mrnaking require that the,'itudent perf~r~ ac.counting,proc~du~es lo nccumulo.te rmd record lbe cost d 11ta typ1cal of. a bus111.ess eovuon~ men!. Prerc:quf.dtes: AccountJng and Acroun tin& ~1. to l Aei:ounting 'V CO'St 1. l ctedil8 th~ emphasis of this co~rs~ is on adv~~ced pro~lem!l m cost ac:. counling, stnssing appltclll.tlons te> deci~t.on rnakmg and prnb!f"m solving. Prerequisite: Accounting Vt-Costl A~coundng VU~Tax U... ~r cditli This ooune is an introduction to fe.derallnco.me lax la~s; WJth an emphasis on partnerships, ccjrparations,.and S corp_o~atlon.s.. The C<ll!l.se jt:cludes a.unit on tax research and hx ildllnm.str.dtion: A tax. research l>rojet;:t and preparation of. income ta.x return~ arc: required as- ~Ja.~s pr.cjeds. Pr.erequlsile: Ac[ouotlng VlVf'lX Governmcntllll AccounUng:. credhs Thls course prc:sents opplic.,tions Of ge nera11~-a~p.ted actounling pritu::ip!qs.lo govemrnental_and non-pr~ftt.ent:illc$ ~ s. prcsent~ d from the po)nt of vlew a[.uthont~ 1ve?~gantta UOns, vo)untar.y health organ~zations, a1.1d non p~~flt en t 1h~S as covered by the American lnstitule CJf Certified Pubhc Accountant5. Also (:OVered is. ~overnmental tetm,inology, budgeting, nnd b~~e~ry i'-cr.:ounts n!ld fund accounting. Problem-.solving for m~nt~lpa funds, i.mstilutional nccounting for education and ho&jdnl~, non profit trade as~ch.ti on1, atit:t voluntary health.emd welfare a5sodatioru nre dev ~ loped. Cuh planning_ and cnnt_rol,and cash reports are studied. rrereq\lislte~: lol~lll Accountmg and HH -11 Acc_ounting!L Applied Ac_cnllntlns 1 cre?u" p 0,. non-m:countlng maj-ors~ t!"te-coup;e empha:ai. ~ s the accountmg cydc-joun ili, ledger and slalements;. nccowltlng for a mer.chandlsing concern; pilyroll and c~;~sh controls Applied Aocount!nsll.. cr«<!t This i~ a. continuution o( lol l5 Ap~hed Acco\lnlm~.. P.artnet sbip and corporation fi.[counting _proccdur:r:5 a:re stud1ed. JD1 00 Rcln1ed Actounting Sl! l! Rc:l<tled A.ccotinting. credit& JO.-01 Rl!ia.ed AccoUhdrlg. -"~edjt.!i 'lbc fundnmente:ls oi.rc:cortllng b'-':~in css lr::msat:ti?n&, prcpanng s1n(emerus of inoomf and ex:pense, cash a_nd ~rcdlt co~!rol,_ pur cbnsing and in'ole[ltory procedures are toplc5 1~dll~ ;1.0 thls course. Coursework is rdnted ~ ~he :oludenls m&jol' f1 c:jds Applied Atco"ntlng-Bu lnes5 dlt Mathematics (Legal,. ere 5 Thto! CQmplelc bookkeeping cycle i.utudled and rcla1e:d to 1hc finnnci11l record~ of a legal firm. A r<:view of the fundarr:enlal ~r o cesses of arillirn.ellc, fractio-ns, decimals and p(:rcen1nge ~s apphed to business. staleme nts, bank re<:oncilialion ilnd incrunc tok form!l. A sludy is mad~ af vario\ls ac<:ounting forms, payroll rot PlS and!lodnl security records. ~Oi 0 Applied Acoountln& ll olne - tt Mothemollcs jmcd!tol) CT"" ' f. mph a sis in thjs C'()UrSe is given t? bi!u:lg, accou ~~mg a lldhm~ln. lain;ng flmmci nl records ih n mec:heal office. A rev.,-w o t e un dame.n tal processes of arilhmetic, ftkdi<:~h&, dccl'?lals, pllrce.ntagcs ond ibtere:ll is applied to business problems. deahng With bank rcconcwolion$ p<~~.yra Us and income true return... The tomplete bookkeeping c;.ycl c:: i:s shj.cl i~:d, U'd 11 model pr~c:l~r:e.'let (or o doc tor's owce is completed wi th t!!mp~j sfs on actua l p.ayf{)j forms. Haspital invenlory recor(\s are revu:wed. J0\ 1Z SOle Pr_oprlctonbip Accou"t ng. c:re!dlfl The prlnc\ples p,nd _procedurej of do ~bl e cntry accounihtg dealing with!en-' lee and tru~r ch ond ising bu sme~ se~ of the. ~ln gl~:o~n e~;.'ly!ltem ari! atrc!lscd in tltlt course. Spec1al JOuma l s~ sub$_1duuy ledgers and re1ateu acco~nt i n g pnpijrs are.cav ered m dct~u. A )HMiice S-.!1 wilh bu1inc:n p o~ u is ~o:oanpl c ted, Po y ro ll_p roblcm~ u r ~ cov ~:red, but not strc.sscd Partnership and CQr~oratlOJ.... Actountlng.. crecu.ts This course is a continuation of accounting prlnc.lplea ~nd P.ro t:edur e ~; petlinent to partne:.rship and corporalio~ iorms,9f.. bus.ine.ss. ownetshlp.. Accountlog -for..manufactun~ busme~ ~s presented. PrerCquisile: 10.l-1Z: Sol~ Proptletorstnp Acca111111o.g or equivalent, JO U Rclatod Acco)lnllni:.. credits TJae fundamental proc"educes of do~ble~try booic~~cpi11g in the coffiplete a Cco~n.ling cycle ~re: cov.~c:d-~urnols, lcdgon, fmll~~-~ cic:i statemea(6,.a:dju~ling 6-:nd_drutng entriej, ~d th~ p.oi! :cl~s-mg trial balance. Bmph11sis.is Ple.ce~ on _prop e r:c~sh.reeej.pts and-. dlsbur:semcnts records, cl.lrrellt p8)'t~j prachces,.a.nd accounting for a merchandising concer:n. _ 101 BookkC!!pln~ C~U The fun.damc:fltal proced\lres: (}f doubh~:-entry b~o~keeplng ln the r:omplete accounting cycle ~re co~~red-j~~n\al!l, lt!dgers, n~dal ~atettllmls, adjwiling and_do~mg entnes, an~ thl!:.post-closlng trial bah.nc-e. Adults de~hit~g a kb.owlege o( book~-~ ~rung, b_ut not in(~rested h1 rnore detai.lii!"d lic.tountil'tg CoJJrses, WLll fin_d ~t)js. courliie odequate. The mat~rw is pr f! ~te d from both man11ge: me:nt and t:mployee points of~ Pli.)"Jj)l\ Acto u.nting~ln~;:orn~ Tiax.. a:.:redhs This Js a b:lsic course which rover.s the compllt"!~9jl of emp oycc earnings, the r:eoord.ing of pay.. rolljourn~l cnhi_~: ~~ and the plfa~a tion of employct payroll tax returns. The cout-.5e l ;o ~o.rtrs ~~c im:ome tax rclurn pr~paration BUSNESS ADMNSTRATON Relafed Busin~!iS:_Mathem~dai. _crooits Thl~ course i5 designed for 1he two yeat.studen~ 1n matke.tmgr food ser.;ic:e a~istant and other areas cut~lde _th~ a~oo~f_mgr'id b~lness divisions. A con.stderable ajn?~nt of ~me 1s_~JlBlt at. the beglrmjng Of this (:Qtlr.Se to.n.view basj; D_lath ~cludm_~!r.u:t.ionsi decimals and pet e&nl:iges. _AfteT establi&bmg thls ba9lc knowledge f1nandaj problems of a bu s ines~.and ljefsojjai ~h.t~e e.re studied._thil ~!erial forms a sound M&is for ooutses.m ac: cou.ntl!l& finance, market~g, 'food service and other rda!ed business areas. to.-10z Businelis M'atbematks, S_C:f!cllU This tourse: is. designed for students _in,t~e admanbitrat1~~ a SSJ~t l!tllt ro ro1-rns. h primary purpose is to 111cre9.se th~ $ludent s kn:wledge and ski11 in solviug practic~ fi~.a nclal p~o_ble ms of a bu!linen or personal nature. The matenol J!lclud~d ~n this: coll:rse d a sound bo~ far olncurrent or.subsequc:nt Ct~urses in ac.cour~.ting &td other busiij,ess related 'ubjec:t!!. Solvmg word lstoryl problejjl5 is emphasltcd. 10-lO.:l Bu:dnc:ss StatistiCs. ;,. _. ~l'l!ditt This cournc is Hn inttoduclf<in!o- the tllcory ill':d appl,u:auon of basic statistlcal methods. E111phetis i.!.pl~x:.d on ;,;ol,.,mg prn~lcal br.l.,!iin~ problems.. Topir:s indu~e bssic me~:~.suru, prcbabjhty, 51lmpling and tlme eenes 11.nal)'s~. 10 ~-los Molb of f~n OliCC... crodlts This co.l.r.se ts designed fot tbe two year ass~lat~ d_-c:e:rce student majoring in accounting, Hnaace, business m l~-m~gem en~, and medical orficc mid-managemenl. The eo.une mcl~d~ Si a re.v!ew of basic: a1ithm.eti.c and elementary algebr~. Hrnphasts. pi e.~ OJ\ d o1"v1n 8 Tactical Word problems through the use of ormu.n an.:a.blc& Jhe matetial included in this coune develops a.soun~ Qase for subsequent or concurrent courses n related ~usme~ subjects by u!lins an analytlcal apprcach to prob!em solvlng Ju1ilne"Rcport WtUJ~,.. crcdj 't'his c~rn provides lnstf\..ction in the wr itrn ~ of b ~ S.tn~5 $ it The wl'i tt~n l t!por!ln vc)ve,. An histcncill ana11sl& of the ~:!:~, ~ith i n the to:mpany' the ndustry and th ~ c.c~nomy.. Studl!nt:a m a~e use cl fi nilil1cial annlr.;ls accou nbng m developmg thelr repathi Buslne!sCorrimuntcatlom '. 1 credft n thi& c:our~u:, both written and verbal comm~u:nll~~s ~ re r ~ studied. Dfcte.tlog equipment, hd('ph.one 1ech:mq uc:s, J C~ app 'c.a lions and vo~~rlous ty pes ot leuer.s used to communlcnte n.the buslnc.ss o/ftce ~:~ r e :;tudi:cd. '. ~.. ~ i)

63 10-Course Descrlplions Course Descdption.s Health Care Principles credits T1:ti! C«N.(e pro.-ldc.t d srudy c( the evolution of bedth care as we know t ln the United Stc.ttl&nd. a n\i.ew of i.h ~orlcal background. Ernph b s ploted on rnajor buuh problem. todoy, 'b~ care n.ecasuy for th~se problems~ n.d the.study c;( a&ing nd Cll.te of the ~ldetiy lnchtdins toac term cgre Maney Cld Donklng credits This s an lntroduclory C'OUr$e covering money co~fs bankia& in ~ U.S., and lht organjz.tion and role o the Federei'Rese:rve. OUter loplcs p~nnted nclude <lj\ introduction to monetary theory end policy and tn introduction to i.ntcm.-uonalfln)nce The rej.auonships among the eoo110my, the banking ~ysttrn.. ~d fin.1ncial nw.rkcts Are sjuwcd in the c-ontext of curtta( cv~tl l ntroduc:don to He.Jth Core Sy.~;teDJS credit& This c:ouuc ij an. o:icntation to the health care system in the Uohed State. lod.vdlng ""ntroduction to the various health care pncuuontrs nd orsanlujian$- 'rbr orgollllution anci adminlsln t~oo of o hnlth <1"' fodlfly including stofling. finan<:\ng, regula ti~ a.nd pubtlc education art Htessed..'J1te role of gdvtt.nment and tbud pa ty Aoanelna o! health <!ar~ is presented F!nanclol Man"8c!m~(.. f Health ~re credits ~~s course s dnlsoe:d to a<:c)u~nt ill~ stude:.~t with the lxl~lc e1emenu or llnllncillll mlnogement i~ hospitals and n~relng homes. Th~ purpo:je nd hsc of jptcrnal <:on trois to stl(ciuard the as!!.ets af the ini1itutlons lte.streped, CoUecliOn of recelvtlblcs c:ash flo~. nd thhd parly rclmbureetncnts are emphasb.ect, An' emph&slllt plated \lpon the de))t lrncnt h"ad'~ role in budget pr~tation (Cd tts imporjanct to the health an fa.cllity. 1~ l,environmental Health and Safety credits Tht$ i.s an utraductoi}'.c~ \Yhlcl:J ~pb.1sbes lftlenl ~nd statt be~~h end Dfc:ty ft: U~alory &latut~ perta_inibg to hospllol)s and nucsmg ho:r.a Stale liccasure r«j_mremeot&,!ed.er:d occ:t~pational hnllh.ud safely requirements ttre f!mpha.si11d.!nvironmatal SAfety rcquhement.s ol 1he Joint Commistciou, o" Aocr:etlita.tion of Hospilols ore dl!cu..oo Prtnelple11 or f'humce uedjls 111ia intennedlate level courjo view! fina.ncc ltom the perspective of the financla1 man;sscr. Topic.-s.siudied include technique of flr»ndal am.lysis. fo r~lllng. ~!'d budgctin&, o~ratins und ~n.tndallorurage, work.jn.g copual ma.nagmjcnl, tbc lime votue of rnoo,ey, COli or Clpital, Jong term debt and Slor;k finaocing dividends.,twf retained earni.nss. Students arc cxpecled to ~pply both rrtnclp~s of accountin& ~nd liiuk'e'. PTcrequisites: rol lll Aocowulng and A<c""nlin& n Floanc.lal lnslltutlou credils TJ:b lnlrodl!clory te"el couru: considers (be tole o( (if)antc and flbaocil~ lnftltuuons n the economy. ~opicl stud~ ltldu.dc money, lj~mnc.ial markets nd in.$lrutnenls, iq tcfe~t rates central b.1.nking, commtfcial banking :~1\d non-bank financial in~~luhon.s ineludlna uvi.nga aud lo:.n :ls$ociations, c:redll Ul'lions, flntmce compan-'ts, lnsuumre compauj~.s and pensiqi\ f11nds and Jh\l!uol funds. i0 19 Comn crclal Landing credit. T_hi.s adv nc:cq /evd course tons.lders fi.nance frolb thil poinl or Vew _of~ slnalc commen:bl bank. ToplC$.studied include: the (unctions and oparauono of commercial banks, analyils, nter prtlauon add cvt~lur-tion of OnudaJ s!att-ment.s, lendinr po.llde :uad proccdure5 and cl\arqcte.ristks of vujous ty~s of leans. ~~~~~Prior bdgrouncl or coursework in both.ctountins PcrOOJlalt1naD<e credit. T:Js lnlroductory level CC~ftt: consid~s fimilcc (rom the po1lu o lew ollhe lndlvld\1&1 or! muy unit. Topics shdied includo budget\, wrea, insutance, houslng, borrowing._ saving. invutin& W'1d estate p!aanjng. Sludenls tam bow to p:cp te budget nd re rcqulred to eomptetei persnnal budgeting ptojed lilpplylng rho techniques ~ mod. JOZ 8wn.- Or&Dnlrarlon and Mauaxemcnl credits This s a $UrYe:y c~ue <fe.. ~ned to impart on uddersttnd.in.g o( the econo1nlc rxf Jegel envlronft'\~nt in which buancj.se:s opente, ru weu os n unckr1umding of the orglu\iulion add m.i1djgedxl'nt of busihess ente:rprisn. An emphdsis i.s pill ted on businc$s t~rminolog)' tlhd C'Onccpu. J OZ lsg t'enonn t l Man.gt."fl\ent er~ts CO\rie h designed (Ot thk.-tnanase:ment C8r~rs and eombhld lbi!ory And practice in a~)!is ol!he mtnqemcrnr Jlr~s. 'M1e ptoce~ of tnlrnt(lemii!'u $ described in thc.xqucj\(e o! plannins'. grg.-nidna, letdins end contro(!in& ~ h~: ean.ol relationships between munagarial ellon ;mel the dfcd nf t\:nt acli-on upon cotnpnny obj cti\'ea, Syatems aad Proc:tduru crcdllj. Cu.rrenl n«ou ntin~ lnro\'matiou sy.stems. pi'oc!!durcs add rnelllods deslgntd to carnmunlcate fif\lulcitll data and roe port Onandal infar m.:.uon llrt empltuh:td.syste:msnnalysii ami design related to nta.nual ond computer $) stems, internal control, ch1rtlng. forms desi&n and report wrilins au!: lndudrd. Studetlls should be fo.sniltar with bhic accounthls procedures: ~W...sc:mmt Tocbnlqll<!s credlu This course dealt with problems facing mooo;;em<!c>l sod workers with special a>pbasls oo sopervlso:y personnel Dd rh<ir ch Jicnses. Man so.,ent prlncipl.. are oppliod to such lop!cs a. the r~oltion.s:hlp ol' nimq.gement to tt-.c business.. it.:~ employees, the owner, orhe.r custotneu and.lhe comtnunity. Problem solving ol the: supervisory lay ells emphasized. 10 ParU rnentf\ry Ptocedure credh.$ The rules trnd procedure,.for ehecti\'ely tondut:l)ns- a busln!!s.s. m e: cling &ret covered til rough lecture and prut'!ical exercises. Ar~s covered nclude meeting managem~nt n,b.usiness, dutjc 1.of oh1~efs, o.g~nda dcvclopjacnt. meeling minu!ts, formula.una ef fechvc mohons, purpose 11Ki straaegy of motions. the amendills J>fOCCM, VOLinz, nomlni Uons. election pra ~:rdurn. BCUoo in :a~::~~ comnlill«-'1 1nd byl01wa. Demru1S1n.tion meclings u c 10Z 60 buslneos law 1 crc:dlt Th\s "'urvey couf!'e cqvers legal prineipl~ us.cct in Ole buslncs.o; world. Conrrm1, JDltt, blilrnent5, cenq. cmploymeu1 and Jltopcrty law art enaphuizc:d. The course-is tr~.ught on a level w.itable (or an ~s.socta te: c.ltwhttudent. federal, stale and cast law ~erve ~S Ute basis of Study, 10Z l6j Du.~ln~ L&w crtt:llls This ~dvnc-ed tounu: is (or tbt student who has already mastered a baste buslnw low course. Mote sophistlad:erd bu$jueu 1.w sub ject rna_tter s covc:re:d. ln adi.jition, 1~ student it huroduetd to rhe ~lite~ of guvcmtnf.nt 01 busiueu. 10a JB9 i\fllllollon 5 cm!u The em~~;astj n thls.c:c\lrll! is student on-.silc tnlning in o hc.111l~ G.1~ (eahty or Or;&J_umdon unde.r the guldmlte of preceptor. Sxpa:wre lo the beillth care e.n,tironmtol is s.tr~ to provide as braotd a leamjna expcdtnce u possible. Tbe educ.ttiona] reatun: o this type or experience is.p'ntmount. N! &tudt!nts 1btf ben: quin::d to perrotm work dtthes!or the Jnstitutioa or oraanitation Cuntemporary bl'ut& Heulth C rc credit~ CurrtJ1:L tuples in!he he1!tb: core (j~ld nrc dl.scu5:se:d in scnilnar style. Sut:h loplcs as health c,arc teimbur~ement, pa.tlent rights, c~mpe'ehene~lve hcujth plannu1:$ und hes.llh nluintenanc:e organltft hons ace ncluded. The c-our!'.e emphasis is on.stud~nf!c$~rd1 in to lheso 81,\c.l Dlh'cr lqpics und on troup di ~cus~on. <lf loplcs Apptlod Bulin.. ~ Malhomollcs z crodits A review c r prtctlctal busines-' matbeduitit.s i.s lolloo,o.~ hy mathematical vrobj~1ns relevaruto ecountina. finance p!'rroll motrkcli g &tiel other related bllsineu problems. ' ' 10 Prindplet of llwlneu credits This Cuncbment l bus.int.ts course lnlroduees student' to the v: rie;j (unctions 111d optrations of a bmine&s enterprise. TbHe: f~ chons ue &pptg:lchtd both from the bu&:inicss :~nd tcnsun:u.~r po;.uta of view n t~rms of the markdlng.. fin a net and production of buaineu. PartJCuh r cmppwis i.j liven to the marketing end finance ~spects, Also consldc.'ftd la the: tebticn.ship of manag.ement to the dyn.ml~ busiau~ environment Ourlno Aw 1 credlls Th"! survey course ij ooncerned with leg.tl principles used in (he busjnns world. Tho oounob dttlgoed for tho on.. y<or dlp!oru Sluder~(. 10 BUSNESS MACHNES tll l61 Machine Calculation.~~ 1'l1i1 coa.nc:: s.trc~ the fu.ndiuhhh.l touch cpe:ra.ticn -and bu~int1-s applie:a1lons en cfectronlr: calcv.lntars. Spc:ciel c:rnpi1uis i> given 10 b"lne.. problems penlnenl lo lh<.oodent'a lield of!raining Job Survey..5 credit This cour~ en..-onlpas.ses.study olthe avnuabifity of emp)oy. mcnt 1n the Mude:nt's ~ of treinin:-whcre, when and how to ttlake proper f!pllcallon 10 ttw!: prospecti e ~p&oye:t. Anistanc:te in securing en)pio'jment 11nd staying e:mployed due to development of P9roprt.1te job clcpectltloos and work ~Ui~des arc. the dlil!f objtclins olthe rouue Dolo Entry. crodlls Stud<nls!Uing bis eout,. will learn to use ou tine term!ools ""'' oing under (KBYPA.ST) JOilw rt to enter, verily and scan tcorrtc dllj. D t entry concepts tnd tedtniqucs will be: strdied as the &ludq:l\t devetaps apced 1nd dfic.ie~cy in u.sing fhc equipment by keyin.s {rom l varlery of SO\.rce documents likely to be:: en~ tm.~mered on the Job. Upou cemp1etion o( llle ~om ':C. student ilte expected to be.)teylng between?.poo to 9,000 net keystroke! per 1\our. Prercqulslte: K~yboardlng (touch typingl peed ol5 wprri Dol Errtry Z credits Sttidents taking 1hb cour~ will review the techniques for uae of on-une termlnnls runnlflg under KEYFAST software to ll"j'ter, verily and s<oq loorrtcll dalo. Dole entry -copts nod lechniq\u,.ill be Slre5$ed u lhe tudentloctcosos spe.:d ood clllcicncy n using lhe equip:uwt by keying {com a wrid)rof souroe: documcnb likdy lobe eii<o nlered on he joo. Upon complelion o( he co aux. studcjltl ere exped.ed to be keying hctwc:en 9,000 and net kcyaijo~es per boor. Abo idclllded in lh< courso i> irutrudton ln formilt creauonlmaintenanct ~ng ftcbni.q11es which auo'" {or aptim\lm da!1 entry and vc:rific.lltion efficiency. Prercqu\$\tc: Succcs&.ful completion (minimum "C'' grade) of 10..JOS Data Entry l ot dnta entry wruk cxperienc~!minimum 'fl<'d pj 7,500 NKM Mnehlne Colcuk>tlon l credll ''t1is co\lrtc teach!!l tbe basic opera lions of electronic c:alcul:~tors and ~ng madines- lot.studa~tj not rll/ou~d jn the d11a en ')' program M1( rocomputera crrd.us Students «king this course will g11in h.1.11ds-o11 experience using the disk optr tton syrh:tn and othc:t appropriah: oofty~ue as tlley learn to cff tclenuy mtcr data nto m'ttrocornputc:rs (BM Pc:noo&l COtnputers) fe< the followins ty,.. o! business applltolio-.: Word processfn.c. eledrcnlc spreadsh«t. graphics, ~t management, and accounu.na. An lmportanr part ol the course is the tegular dl~u s.,lc>ns of C\lrrentlpasl f! novations ;assodilted with. the field of mlc:rocomputcra, and tho: dcvelopmcr..t of 1 vocabujory whidl allow's for in1eracllon with oth~:ra in the fidd. Prerequisite: Keyboarding (touch typ,)akill mlnimum 0 wmp. Reoomn1cnd prevlou.o!i or ca'ncurrc11t bdglc nccounflng eoun;e or work.c~<pc:rtcnce Ma.chlnt C lculotiua credut fuhdarnent l opcrotlnn and b\lsins.,ppficacion$ on ~Jeccronlc nleoioiors are tres.sod. A hlgh degr<e of proficiency l$ cxl!"ded the cornpleiloo o! this ooursc MAchine Cak:ulalioft Malhomati<s credits For sludcnts ln the datt ~tr1 operanon program, th.is count le~ the (uadamtntal optuuons and bu_sinus a~ti~tio~ of el~ tronk prlntingldl.spl«y calculation. BuSDrss ppl~atros:.s a~ elude pc:rcentaaes. \nvotm ond dl.scounls~ in1e~ a11d bank dis count, poytou, mark-up, ole. A hlgh ~tee Dfprotlci ~ncy ia e:j peeled upon completion of lhit coutn.. 10 $5 Machine Calculation c:<tdll lns!ncuon s given on electronic co.lculntors.nd odding maehlnu for ~ud~ls AO cntolltd ln the cu A ~ry operoli011 prcsr m Microcomputers ~ts Students nking thb couric wlllcaln oddllicmollumd>-on "": pt!'rk-nct u.sktg he di.k operclina: J)'Jttm ilnd clhcr appropnnte!iijilwilrc wi1b the BM Ptncm&l Computet n lhey learn to wotk with com moo buslncu 5C0ware a the rouowing. more advgctd. busincoo oppii01uons lot microc<>mp.tero. P&yroll. word proct<s lis. gropllles, ele<tronle spreadsheet. ond da"' bloe mllllliemenl An lmporlanl pan cllbe course b tbe reg lar dho.. slons of cur renllpast lcnov.ation$ ass.odattd w~ th~ field of mlcrocotnptners, and lhe donlopmeot c( VOC<>bulary wl>ich allow lor interlclioo "'ilh othero n the field. Pr<roqUillle;.Solis!octory compltlioll ol Microcompulen (minimum.. c- ;radel Job Sun y.s e<cdlt This co11ne oncompossea &tudy ollhe v:lllablllty of em~loy runt 1n the Jludenl'l H:.1 Of lrtlnlng-where, ~'hen e.nd l:iow to n>ake ptopu oppllc:,tli..!o lhe pro$peciive employer. A"iJtaoce ij) securing employment and ilayillg employed du< lo dovelcpruent of appropriate job expc.datioos ;md work attitudes arc the chid objectives of the. cou.rac.. 10 MARK!TNG lg-loo S..leacnanshlp a credill This 90uru: covers the rulea of selling, prospec.ting systcms1 at: titud't.t of buyer and,.,espe{ oa, product 'knowledge:, typ:c, of cuslomtr:t:, the s&jea lnten Lew, methods of bandlin~ objecu(!n-., and closins tec:hnlq\lll!s_. 1~ JOl Cqrcc.r Orlcotatlon....1 ct edu Studtnts (C. introduced to \he pllllosophy and goals of M.ATC add thtoir ParUculu progum. St~d~nt.s have n oppo.riunhy to ~~es.lo present slcills, knowtedge, atlltudu, per!on&l qljlilies, ~atk ex periepces.uuf outside adtvfty tnvolve.meatt and to then develop improvemenl ao:tts bued JPOft an analysis ollbis ~t aod the optiona &Vlablt. Students ate also lntnxluced to the: wide V>Tjety of n>arhliog nremlhro &h o spc<w Mlrtetlng Care<r ~y whuc they listen to aun speakers and' rnul f~mtr grw.duates. Upon CCJl!>l<llon or lloi> c.,.;o;e,.:tudej!~ sb<nid be more certain of llfe 11nd career g~. and ~.e aware o( those. kind.. ol a<llvl~eol)l will help lhcm to beco"'7 "'=:dully ~mploy'ed and to a(fvlli)co ln tbe field ar 'm;nkchng Prladples o( Marktting crtdlls 11li1 eo~rsc ia designed 10 ocquaint tuden~ wlllt lbe ptobi<j:n ar.d poucies o( nutnulact &.~ rers, whol~t::r~ 1Kitclai:Jer$ u lhest problems and poll eli: rel tc O lho marhtios of &oods ond &er vices. Pi~rdcular atl~uon ll &)\len (O channels of d.iltribu.tion, \ typu o! bu.sinel$ errterprlses, product planaing. points to catuider before euterin business, compdilloo, cincemiion o[ pcorno rio!w pll11.1, prleinli>om<ies, <ludy of.,.rtolin$ co.u, lhe role cl go-.rcmm.ent, r:carkc' me.atch, ctedlt policies and ma.nage.m~t tedmiques M rk<llnc Re<urch credlll This course pto~ldes an ln tro d uetio~ to thr principles and tech.11.i ~ ques o( rcse:o.rch awlied to th.c $01\ltll)!'l ofmarftehng pro_bjrms. The complete u:scmrch pracc-ss s ~tud.lcd, from formu.l11t1ng the re&earch dcatgn, to prc5e:nlation, to the concl~lons. Specific. r.oplcs covered nclude prjmc.ry dut<~ oo.lledion, ~etoddt~:y data, design of a re!t:~rch \natrumtt\l. somplmg procedures, ftel<:l in vestiga11ooi, nd waly11(1 ant.j nterpretation of~l Prlaclples of Sale martsbip c«dll The principle!, <:OJH:cpu. and theorle! ol seljhlg and thtlr itpptlctl Hon to the ractual ales proces$ ~re stre.ssed id this roiu.,e. Pet SOD8lily developmenl,.oolf loioj concepts, pcospocting system" approeches.. featurulbamfita. methods of derno:u.u;;tioo, lypt5 of objectiocs and m<lhodo o{ h>ndli" <hom, O!lld clo$ng le~hnlques iltc: given ~A atlentior'l Small Bus!neu ~lau1 m al crtdiu Thlt courw covers the principle& of e;,ptr:jtion llld manag~t appuable to $11'1Dil bus'indsd; ~at ~ttention t! paid to in v~iaat ing \;luslneu opporuuubes. and to org6j)1zh'g. fin ndng and coni rollin& snm buslnuses L<:odcnhlp S credlls Th< lheorl.., method> and tethhlqu<s of ~adersbip sod ~upe.tvi sioo, tttd their tppljcatiop to c.ue pzdltms. art ernph1s1zed m!his course. Problem... lvln,, decision makjni, O otlllna, tnm "'"'k and lt~dorshlp phllo&aphy r gfvea special etlenuon. The oavelopml!lll o( lh< S<il irollgeand ll oppllco\lon O the sup1rvisof-c::»p~yee fel~tionlhip is di.!cu.ned. '

64 ~-~ ~ ~-~-- 1.Course De5criptlons Course Descriptions 'M:arket!na Club Open~Uons 1 credit 'rhis. course is deiigned to provide stud.enls with ptnctical c.j: perience in otgani:ing and operating ptof~s s ionaj-bumness dubs. Th: functions u.ml ilclivities ce-nter around developmenl:in four majjt llire<u: Leadershipi ci\ j~ oo ns6ou.?jj~"~ ::~odal r~pon sibij;ty and vocational understnnding, Sales Techniques credits T~is i.5 a survey coun;e o( salts and the techniq\les of selling a 5er vu:c:. Eque.l stress is ph:u:cd un sc:lling the prodt1c:l 85 well a. sdltng t he servj;;::c. The course cavcr:s a.j phases o( lhe :sales app~a :il ch, demonstration, dase and d~parture. A short :set: lion i~ g1ven on dcvc:l()pmenl of the personality.and the art.or :;;cllin8 one's self Manage:men' of Profes.sion~ Orgsnjza.Uon5.1 credit M~l people patticij?ah: in_professiond o~niz a Uons or clubl!i al.some lime in their 1Jve&. This js partic:ularly true wwj people who are ill!ioil)e w~y connected wilh tht! Hi!ld of marketing. Member shi~ in an organization usually provide5 itnporlant b\lsiness conlads.js well as providing an '\Jpportunity to share 1deaS 1md grow profes.siooally. ThiS cour51! i~ designed to give students the: lool~ they need tq mana:ge- <my crganlzat1oji or dub. il i:r~ also d~!!iign ed a give student:;: iljl. opportunity to apply what thl!'y have' l~rned i11 an aclu.al professional organiz 1lion flmtimnment 1~~1 i1, Small Store Operation ('redits Stu-dents in this r:ourse are ~esponsiblc for the operation or un ac lual. gift shop {the C~aeker B.u-rcUilocated within the college. Ruy!ng in re_g.lonal matkf;~, placning, pricing-, promotion and sdl.ing JU! ajj par! o( thi.10 rout".se SmaU Store Opl!!r.!ltion U credits This:.is a.cc:mtinuation of l0 ll7 SmaU Store Opect11Jon. The st-o re is in operatio~:~ t1ine months()( the year VJ~utd Met~Jnw11disfn8.1 credits The princi-ples ac.d ch:men.bi of desigt'l are \ncorporated jfllo lnteriot and. exte rior- display5. Coordination of the tot<ll S9les promolion efforlls emphasized~ Students are required to build m11ny types of._di!iiplays. 10-l.:Z:i Non TexfUCs ctedit.s This <::tiilrse covers-the sources, m.anuf;1ctudng proc: cs~es. ca r~.ind usc oi non~t~liles m!:rch.andlle-jca:lher good,, fur, jewdty, hou:sewar:t::5, ~~i~:~a, crystill, silver and fumlture Rc.laU.Mcn;h,;mdlsJng.a. credits The. key f~m::lion.s involved 1n th e buyiflg and s~jljng of merchan disc form the basis of tbi~ cour5e. Management techniques and skiu;;, as i ~ e y dppl) lo retailing, are discussed and pracuced. Students ViSit ~how rooms, observe buyc~s ln action, and pnh:tice their own buyi11g skills.in the market when buying for tbe Cracker Barrell. 10-1: 'Retajl Ma..tu1gem.ent credits ' his h a practici1l 'aurse: d.e.sig.ne:d loin trod \CC :iludcnls to ~be: world or retail operation and management. Case studles are used throughout t he cou~e 'Pdndples of Adv~t.U ~Jng cred1ts This course j:r~ clfiigm'!d to introduce st u d en~s to the nfolture, int portanr:f:'! ;~.nd function of il.d-v.er_~islng ju the total marketing mix. Students $f udy tb~ re1at1onship of ~dvc rtlsi t1g to ~ociety, tht!!i-trcngths and w eaknesses o various media., tbe u s ~.s Qf the behavloral scie~s as applied to advertising, the. cre11lion of the advertf.setn!:!n! (induditlg copy,.llf't and Ja:yout dc-s lgnl, and ihe nature and usl!'! of,1dvertising ogencles n prcporing advertising c:arnp:1i ~ ns. 10-1Z6 Adn ru11lng a nd PubUc Reladcn Campalp.. cre<llts This course is desigmd to give e11ch _studmt an ()pportunity to study the vedcty of pr.omotionnllooll!li, met bods Dnd techniques used in the pjanning ttnd exl!cutlcn of s; total promotionlll c.a:m paigti. These tools include adver ti~ing, public r~ la tlo11 s, publlclty.!!rid othe r s.le5 promaticn activities. Stu dent~ ere provided with adual Samplc.s for purposes or dis~sslo n and nnalysls. As t1 c:lima>: lc the course, students arc ab1e to Mpply ZTid ltsll h~:l r know ted~ and skms through the erutiort o( a.wrlltcrt and ora:j J>romoUOnDl campilgn for a product, servic-e, id eo, place, person or camp~tny. Prcrequlstte: Principles of Adv crtl si n_g or conse nt Qf instruct or, Principle5 ()f U.nderwrltlng credits This course i~ dt:sigm:d to covet a b(oad undenilanqing of the underwritidg function. in insur.flnce. l0-t;z9 ComoUmer Bi!h~vior credits TJ)S course iissumes <1 b>~!lic knowledge of mar.k!ting..emph~sls is placed on building a foundation for rnnrketing str11legy to euable the mililteic"j to corn pele t:ffectlvejy. Coo tent j:; relcvmt to odl business ilt:~iviti e::~~ induding miltl.ag~ment, accounting, fin.mcc and mcn::h>~l'ldi sing. Kn owledge af -cun~umer behavior benr:lits the cmlsumt: r and Pmrno~\'!i gu: t~ter under.slanding of lilsk5 and pcrfonnancr:, The l:lpproach covets three miljor c:w.te:goric5; CCJnsmnC:r stral~y JehlthJg to good:~ ;md.~ uvjccs; Vflriilbles a~orlhted with the iodlviduttl; and.environment c on ~ l~ting of family, social, business, economic and ct1ltunl irlfluer..ces. cultl.mt[ jnfiucnces. HJ~l1 fashion Prornotlon cndhti The elemenl :r~ (l( sb!'s promollon are studle~ in this c m.l:r~~ with. special t'!mjjha:r~ill on aci_verti~inc and h!.shion. d mws. Procl'!dures; and for each, plu50 a g('cld amount of prachct~l Pppllca ti on, round QUt thi!i course Pdnc_ip~ci' ol Fa!iihion MPr.keti.ng. cred.ils An overyiew of the fiilibion industry und the career opportunit1es in this 'industry are explored in this ir!lt semester cout..se.. Flt ld trip~ and gue..st spe.ak.e:ni are key parts of tlle. course Element~ of Fa.shJon t:tedits This course is dcsfgucd to di.!,,..<.!jap profidmc:}' ili~d r:ompe~ency in the perception, corumunic:a.tion am.j CQardinaticn of fashicjn.through an-amlysis of its various <~spl!~ts;. Ca.moufJagin_g fi8:urc fall its by utilizin_g eelemenls of design, lhe-llistory or fa shion lls it Tel ales to today's fashion, terminology o( apparel!llyl~s,.andfac (ors lo consjder when evalu;~ting qu ality in- do thing art! siudicd. l0 la7 Merchandise Plnnnlng and.control crcdil:l This caurse outline... the boutc nuttlletnil-tics jnv"ov~d in mcrchun dising. Various terms of purchnse nr::&atiated between st:ller ilnd buyer.are studied as well a5 th'!! various types of markups that mighl be t: ncounlcred by store personnel Planning lind control functions carrie~ on to achieve t he cou~p e n}"s pred.!tl:"nnined ob~ jectives.are.j1sa ~xplored. 10 i8 F~hion nternship l credlu. Pa:rt timc wprk expe-rience and weekly semi(um; Jte hdd throul::houl the seme.ste:r to dis~us!i stt.jdr:11l pr-ogrcu and current tre11ds in retail. Jcb findin~ skill:; lobe used_ afler graduution are also a key part or ~his ~ouric Life ond Heo.lth ln!lurant:" ~ credits This to~rse is designed to ~: over a broad understomding of life and health insunntce, its to:cunomics <tlld related ar~es. l0-il Llobilhy Ad}u>tlng cro~h This _ cours~ explores a reus in property loss adju.sting. Emphasis is g;ven to adjusting proccdurc:i, record)nt; inform~llon, insurer's ll~bllity, methods u5ed in fixing YlllUQS or Dss-, investigation and scttl~menl ~a 1 u11lt y Jnswanctl. :J c:redu.s Emph <.tsis in this course is p l n~ an understonding cove,ages, pojia:y proyisiolls and!on c:r: pl :~; pecul iar to common c11.sualty, sun.-: ty and multiple-line canlr,,cts.. Contracl!li stud i~d i11 cludc the Shtndard Fltmil}' and Sp ccii'.automob.lle, Emp lo yer~' Ll!tbiJHy and Wo tkmc:n'j Cc:lmpensation, Owners', Landlords' llml Tel\arlts' Liability, c~mprc hen!ii iye Gr.:llc::ral Li&bllity, Comprehensive Per sonal Liability, and.li(e &nd K ea ltll. <::ov~ragcs, and he liab!uty in surance asp.::.::t.s or nuxiern. :m:d tipl~ line r:ontracts, l 0 J :~ Property fnsurante l ~t ~djts Emphasis in _this c-ourse is placed on unde rstanding tovf"n,ge!'i, policy provision:5 ilnd concepts common to f'r6perty Jnsur.ancl. Studles_include Stan,.-:Jord Fire Policy, 'Extcrlded Coverage Endorsem~nt. Dw~! ling ll ll~ Con te nts Farm, Building and Contcttts Porm, C n mc Pol1c1cs, B us1 ne,~;s [ ni~ rrupli on Forms, Pl!nonsJ Artidl:!!l F lo :~t.c r, Bailee's ~ u sto::ners Policy, and the: p mpe~ty c:overage11 proy1dcd b~ mulhpje llne contructs. J0 1 Underwr1t1ng Per~p.al.Lin~&.credits 'This course is ~s~gned to provide: students tb.e opportunily tg,~tudy the uttderwriung ~ecls.iou~ma!ting proctss in a detdj~ omd r:ha.jient:ing way as it.applie:o lo per&onallines probleru:s; il:lnd situa liqjhi through texts, cilse :s;lv.die.s and actual rating. An_ in-depth t~nalyllis of u~crwrlt~ng fa.::lon and pric:idj of priv.ab, pw:5enger automvbil~ 1 l19meowners iu'!.d ojhi::r persoiul.lllncs.. is pcqvjded. n.1ddhion, students explore l.be computer, account. undery..ciling i1nd producu relationships~ Property AdJPitlnK credlt 'Thii Coq.rsc explo rcs. areas ~ ptoperty Pnd JiabiUty Joss adj~sting, Emphasis is given to 11djusting proc~dures, recording information, insurer'.! li.ability,.methods u.ed ill ~slimating building losses nd. seltleml! nt. 10 J5Q Cornmerdal Properly aud Multipl~ lln Uuderwrltlng <reilllo T hi,~; coorse covers the application of ~nderwrjting decisioo making t6 comrncrciill properly ri.sks with heavy emphasi~ on illlalyzl.ng frequency and 5everlty of fire and either perils, real and ptr$0dl proptr(y-exposure and controb, iddir(:ct Lrus.expoS\lres. and ml!lrine.riek$, 10-lSl Comm er~l d l Liability Unde-rWdting credits This r:o~r:;c covers the applicat~<u:.. of the dedsion.-.making process to commerd&~lljllbhlty dsks. The.coi:n: studie.s.r:juud:il:le nof Dlll}* the major _lypr:s ofcom:m!:rcl.a[ lit~ bility ins\lrilnc:c, b.ut also such l()pic5 M the use of reii!suranc:c and t_he handling of.$pedal a~ (ounts" and lar~e rbk:i Fashion lnternsbip J _ t:red.lt:t Fu{j.time, supcrv(sed work experience during N'oVentiJer a:cd 01'!.ct!11ber of the third or fourth scme.:stcr i.:s. the key requirement Cl( thi!! r"oll.rse. Sl'..!Jllnats are held, pdof to this full time!:mj)loy ment, to di :r~ cuss the challet1ges atld opportunities. available to the fashion merc::h.1ndi!>ing!!.tud ~nt on the job. l0-l6q Sal~' Mana.genier:J~t ttedlls n this course:, st\ldents examine principle5, philos<:tpbi~s. policies, strategie!ii and- tactics employed in m,anqging a: solles for~. SpecifiC' areas co.ve.red.include: Organhdng a sales dc p a~tmen_t, opetadng a s~~.j.c s force {which includes recruiting. S:decting, tral:riinj, compense.ting, :supenislng and mothrating salespeople), planning s.ues rorce adivitics lwhi<;:h ipclud.e dl!!termining :r~o!les a..dd m8r.ket p<jientials, fojecasting.sa!es, preparing soles 'department budgets,.:md establishing tenito~ies and q_uole5), Mil~Y~:ing and evalu01.ting..~al-es operations a:nd salespenon's. productivity {Uld elfccllv ~nes.s. t0-1'll Credit'Manalc-men. t'iedit.s Priru::ipl.:::s ~ nd methods of credit. administrjtion in th~ mtt~tilt'! i!nd rd11il Fidd ure tcl'trered in this cou"rsc, including sour~:~s of in (orm~~rtli:m 1 credit. polir:yr credit cotilrol, le$all'emedles Ond."cOJ!Cl lion techn!ques. 10 1'1.Career Planning ~nd Deve1opmeiit credlta this courso: o(iers ~ highly indivjdu~~:ur.ed lipproach to career planr.lng:. 'thls is undertaken through a :sye;tematlc r e~ew 8.1ld nnaly:sis Of tach.student's previous work, acdert"lic and otbtr U e.f!xperiente.s. h ch student-then jdentifies and asse!iscs pret~e~t. krrowledgl!,!killi!i, 8ttituded, i n t ~ rc sts and volues e.s the.:se re1ale lc llislheorarel"'r ~J(~rnatj 'lt!$. FoCUS' then: turns to the investigation and utilizallcri of sources of inlorm,~j tio~ regarding ~h e mar k~ ling opportunilict avallable in lndl1s~ ne. and spet::ifu: c orn p an1~s th.ut might best ut\li:te: Uc:h student's p~ rsona l tp.ent$. ea-ch slnd~t also develops llnd sharpens his o r her job ~rc h kn ow h~dg<f": and skws in. the J'el,'l;S o{ pu:pa:rin:g s qualificati ons bri.ef, writing 11 oovcr leller, prcpoujng fo.- nnd participhtin & in a job interview, utilizi n.g the servh:es of an em ploym~nt agtmcy, and!heclively working the hiddeh job w.~kct Of;~upa.tlo n l ltet~ e Kh. 1 tred l.t This course etlc:ourages studentc to objedively evaluate WhG th~y t~n: and when: they ;lte going upon graduation. The ste ps necessa ry fclr waging 1 succd.j!ul Jcb--llnding campa;gn are cl1scussed and carried out by.slu d enl~~ a r~d individual taped jnter views ore made, Guest speakers from the fl~ld are invited to.speak about their (areers, Each student wriles a term paper sped fic.ally re!atcd to his or her caree~ objective Field 1'ralning Semlnor :.(;1'Cditll A~ a prerequisite for thh course, emp1oymenl: is necessary in an approv-ed.ctcupation. PrOjects, reports and dlscus&jons are r:.oor dina ted with Silui'ltiOns-r~lalr:d to t;tudent employm.ent. tartir:ipa~ tlon ifl. this.cla~s is- subjtct to emplo)':er ~ppm ~ l ti; svoid misurtdcrstao.ding or misint~retalion of COuts!! obj e ctiv~!fl : 10-~ 18. MeMWc.ar Rt!raJllng. credib Menswear is an excitlnb part of th~ f Shlon lnq.ust"cy: This course ex pl()res wbat' ~ happening n the: menswear industry' today. The course is team-lallght by OCQ1 Madison bl.lsine:ssperson-and a m emb~c q( the staff... Hi 17g Mmrk~tlng'Technrlqu e.s. _..crec:f;'~ This course str.!~es m.arkf":ti:ng: a :r~ appli l"d to t=ha.nnds of dls~r.i.~j tion,_ manuf&chlring 1 wholesaling. Tl"ti'ljJing, :!!~k~ hu~n l!':sses and the consumer, and relates marketing: careers ~o til t!: procl!!!$ of distrihutins; goods and service s. l0~180 nternauonai. Markt!tlng credjts This. OOW'5e offl!r$ an anal~ia: of tl-!e international m ~rke_t structure. Emphasis ~s givt!:n to foreign mar.k~t!lo\uveys, tradc.pfqj1l.otion activities, impoi'u~g nnd exporhng problems, fic.ancial. ft 11ft1res,. ch~tn.neb.of <:llsttjbuuon,,.and trade agreements. 10-Ul Super-Yisloa. _.. _ c"'ditll The t'hl!orin~ methods 1nd techniques of l~dersbip.and supl!t'vi ~ion;md their applir: t,on to cll!epioblem!l arc emphasized in.this course. PJobl l! m~salvic&, dtd :r~ ion-making, goal-setting, teamv.,ork and lea-dership philosophy are given sp~d a.l.1l(entid±t-, l0 00 Sm.t Bu&lb~ Da~clopment 11nd P~nnbtg cudies This coune provides an. intioductian to proopect\ve smnll busi.rless owners. to the prindpln invotvcd.fn pli.1,rtning 11.nd opera~ Han. AttentiOn is given to :smell busjness sppraisal and op~rtunitie~.. Emph!1s.15 WU be placed en factors that contdb~te to a su~cessft.d sn 1aU bu$i:n~~ operetton Fund11m*litals Of M&rkeliD credlt8 This is ad jntroduct()ry c:ourj (!; that.h ~lps students.understand th~ role &nd functions of producen~, whulesalc:i's and!ctajlers. A surv~y approach is used to study con:r~_umer psychology, wa.tketing.r.esearch( advert"isi.ng, pricing, gcv.~~: rcmen1 regula.tlons ijc.d. consumer organiutjons,-atter:ation is paid to product pion,;"! Men:.h1n.dise D:lsplay Z credits Thbb sic CQUrse~hdps 5tudenls apply art priociples.c_o fashion merc.handise and display. Studerds']earn"whal contrti1utes good design. and how to ttpply lt.to di:iplojy.. Several interior md ex.-. terior dlsplays.are built, and student!5 ob5c:cvc:.and-evajuste disl>lliilys in the community Survey of.f.a.."jh.ig.d Prbidp!cs.::rediU This course explores the 11a.ture; of "fasbicm" and the retdiling nf fashion merchandise. Bmphu is }$ pla.a:d on.5ourees of fashion in formution, the J'l"'O\'t:meDtof.fashic:m, c:nvironmental influences on f~hlon.int er~ st ~d d<c:mand, Cashion terrnlnalogy, c:haracteri.stics of Casl1ion retailc~. currc:nt p!11clices in the produdia.n and mer chandislng or [Qshicn prndu c::t.s as.well <Ul vajloqs a r.t:ers. in the fa!bion it~dusij y Fundam~~talt )( Salesrnan~h lp credits Th~: (u nd mcntals -of the ~1e: ni:jd its prar:ticlirl eppllcatloli in th ~ r~l il bws;ineas world ls empb.as l:z:ed 1n this rol.lr.!!.l!. Orl.'letlng the cu-&tome~;, presenti ng the merchandise, h Bndling <Jbjectim~ s, r: l<ls fng the n le, $uggeslicm scllihg'. srz:d seuv'!g.big tklcel mertb&ndil!e are given spec:ial attention. Sp ~ci11l emphasis i5 plac ed. on case ptoblem:t and ~n indiv\duat s~l ~s pr~e nt lion Orlenlatlon SC..Unor credit TMs-isa course for 8n studmt,. in the markeling fashian retalling prqg.ram, Students have the opportunity to l~ o rn _about the variety o Careet op po ttunities avoilable id rashion rctaillng. MATC Markellttg.C reer Day ll:!'ld a C hi ecgo.lo~bion flcld t~i p, ~hl ch a r~ bdth course requ~reme nt6, further understanding or tnarketingfn9hion careers. Present!! kill~. knowledge and abilities ere asses$ eel a11thcy relate to lhc student':! chosen field, and Jtudents are taught tbe most dfecttve tools for :s;ecurlng She pasi.tiqr. they de-site. Upon compjcuon of thb coune,.1 lu~n1 1 should hii Ye secured a. jnb n rctall o r a closely-rc1a.ted fic1d. This job should be: ccmtinued. through May of the ncxl year and is used to meet the e:nploymcnt rcquirctncnl for course L0 7 Field EJCperiencc,

65 1-COurse Descriptions Course Qesci'Jptlons l'5 G-1 Saln oad ~dve rtbias. 1 <ndll Thi.s lntroduc::tcxy Ale& course s.trc~ the pmp~r appueauon o.salu ~niques to JkJUed occ:upa~joo.s. &ties rechniquu ~.ap!'lled to JOb dl><tpllnes. not only to create greater efficieo.y on tbe ;>b. bu< ols<i to mprove worltiog rolafion$bips with fellow e::mploycca nd CUliOmera. Tf\e c:cucse includes i!!pplieation o( the sa.lcs tpproach, demonstration ttnd clox Booslc Salumanoblp ltrcdlt This introductory u.lfls cowae streues tht.prop:c application of.sales tecbniqutt to skiued occ:u,»tions. S.Jrs techniques arc applied lo jab cli!cipllnu, not only to create l«ater effit!cncy oo the job, but elsa to improve working relationships with fellow empjoye:u.~md c:ujtoc:neu TeKtlks ond Non-Textiles for WWna acdlt Tbe otudy of textile teunlnojosy, natural.,d... n madc n~>m. the splonlna of yarn&, a11d tbc construction; design. special finbbins; and labellna ol fabries is the!ubject ~n~tter of thls course. Ab u~de.rstudln.g of the ledmkal voc:~bu.l&ry of tejctila ts nec.e.js.?ryin order to.select, use and core (or (abrics hllelliscatly, as well AS to mike r:ecommendation.t0 f~ lail C\ll-tomers!CRitding tfle f1ber enotent and properties of appar~l. Because of his, a gteet deal of emphasis h pli1ced on textile terminology and cba racte ris ti~. Sorne non t~:ttlle f11bhian ac~sories $1.1ch as sj~s, ha,j1b,tgs. jewelry ~,d lur$ Yo'U~ b~ surveyc~. The course w~ll be jummarlzed in th~ spring with ~ field trip to a knllth\g mill and A maauf.acturing camp.1ny. Other Held trip dutln.-lions include a dry dtaner. funlar and j eweler. 1G a1 Retail Operation Md Promc>l19n CTedlto Tli.~c ls more to recifllcs than j!ut sellin.x. 'J'biJ course is daltned to &ive studttqts on opportu.nily to inv~ti&ate the variety af C:UHt oppotutnilies focznd wirhjn tbt cdail store. Toplts lndvde stotc ors~ntullon, ~rsonncl man~gemem. customer 5e1'Vice$, retail credit, &bi'ppina and recxivint,. fmao.oe.::r.nd control. ad merchandlslnj. A.a emphul$1s placed on &dvcni ing and»lcs pn>motlon Pas h.loo n Busfru!ss C'fcdlls 'l'bb course qovers the buying, prmins and prnmotion of fc.~lnn merchend;s t:, lnterpreuns consu:~ r Mmomd, budgeting. sdccuoo or merchandise, promotlon, lnd techniques of fashion coordination Fldd Expcrienco credits As a prertquislte to this eour~. tmpid"frnen1 is nece~ in an ;.pproved rc.uri'jln& occupa.uon. Prcjccts. ~porlt Jld di.scus.clont ;arc <loofdinated with lih11tions rdil.ted lo!i.1:adtat ed"jpl~'tnfrl Participation in tbjs class b wbjea lo employo.:flplo\ o c"-oid misandcutaodlns OJ nililnrerpretalion c.f tn.use objecl.ive1. A miola1~ or one rmp'oycr evaluation pu student is a require men< of the course. : 105 RELATED BUSNESS Prlndplef or Data ~oceas,ng cteditt~ This is an analytical courn iolroduclng the:'princlples and methodologies of cuto01aled dac.a processing in busines.t uu., Arti$ pa n.otcd nclude bualness ~ems, hordwtrt, &oltware, dat~, procedures and personnel. Progtoltntninl langvages such., B~C. COBOl. rnd FORTRAN ore sludled rod> a wer's point of view. Can>putellllmcy. BASC l ngu ~ progr.tmming ond micro and/or molnfr me compulcr u-""'<jl1pbaslned throuab a comb\rution o clanr0001.and labofnory activlti~ (op tiona'! The mtjor applirntion a re.u are in. OO&in~s accountirla. 10$ 10 Survey o D t Proct1si11J ct<diu This COUC'ac is pri m~jru y delianed to inlzoducr: office occupst!ons Oludeot.s to the /laid ol dota procesolag. The role of computer do to procosing and ts ppllcatlo"ns is explored snd examined. Shadcnts ru provldal!n nc:qu.1id:tncc With U.e termiqology and concepti of computer dlll proccss1ag. Hands Of) experience b provided on conlputer tennlt1alt and microcomj)utrrs wllb bwinf'sj SO(tW.1te: and 1rr introduction eo BASC progrc_mmirtg Dot a ProceMinc Concept$ <Rdlls Thls c:ounc providu lri lntroductlon.iu lhe rleld o( dati processin&. The role ol computer data. processin11 and "Lts 10ppScatlon. il ex~ and examined. SNdmts are provided n acqunlntance w.ilh tbe tenninolosy and conccpli of computer dllt procr.s~jng. Haads-on e:xpc:r~n.ce b: provided on ccmpwer loermin b and mieroeomputers wlth butinr:a soflware 11od. an in troduction to f!aso progfarcnnlna. 106 SECRETARAL SCENCE MtdicoiSecreUiry lntem>hlp cn:dlts 11Us ls a l1r\lctured coune.eneomjxl.minc tho5c ar..:-1 req~.tired f01 ucct$s(ul fob epplic:jtlon and nutintcnance. n additloo, t provides t. tjlinin& program that allows th~ student co observe 8l'ld apply, in pr1die.ll mltjrt't. t~ theory, skills lld tccbciqutt studied n tbe medical OCrttary progrom. Tbe oludcot compl<res a lhrce wecl afflllauon ln 11n approved medical tei1hy under the W ()CtVi.sJOn end so\cbnce Of Q tetc:her-roordfuator and ta~ t11tlng. experienced medical secrttary S.cretarial Wurkihop crtdlts Snldents enrolled n the admini,trativt :.ssistanl-scc:retariol pro atllm, wbp Jutve had pr.vjous shorthand rnsfr~cthm, are enrolled ln this cou~111 during their fir~t ~me&~er. olfeq " reinforcemcnl and reiuu:mel'lt of.s ~o rth olld lhtory, pn: ltim~criptlon work, :sptcd dc\'elopmont, ac.d dictation-transcription. An inten,ive review of punc;tluiuon hi also presented in ~hi.s course. Tbe Jli'\al $JX!ed icqukement 1s SO wpm lor thrct mlntzt~. 1~10 Alphabotle Flll g (Fit$1 9wkl of ~.. tor( ~ TUs course oovers the rulu n< llling «cords slpbrbeti<olly. B:a.slc.filirlg &uppliu and tqulpment are studied. ProcccNre,s!or inspectins. induaaa, coding. ~ ros.s-reftn:ccin'- sortjna, add fllina r«erds are ~pp lied. 106-P Subject, C..ogrophk: ond Numtric FBas (nd 9wks of oemeotet) 1 ere till - The &tosrapbic, numeric.- find wb]m.method.s o/ recordl &lorase an dlsc\jssed; 11nd 1hc ~of coordinated simubt.ion!t provides runuiasily with ' fu: seeps nec:essty to store and retrieve cor~ ~)poodcnc:c b)' these methods. Procedures rclati.n& k> ~uis1 lions, cbarse out. and fouow up iystcm' to retril!ve records ort oloo ludied. Prerequisite: l06-10alphabolio Filii>~: Rctmdo ar>d la onn.otlno Managemeat credits 'This eourse provida informahon "bdu U)e totj!l t~rds ril.tmbement sy&tem ed provides 6 lml)'.lo(lcdge base fen entry nto tbe in fonn;u.ion llla18jitflltnt proleuioo. lt abo provkla; an op(x)ftuni ly for prol<ssionals to brn.l<l<t and upd.tc their koowiedg<. Tbl$ COllr&e involves lhtdenu in plannh1g lbe: (ec:qnis tn~~nagujjestt :iy ~e:m-ojtnwng. S(lfnns ond controlling th~ Sf-'lem. Ptere quisl<es: Alph.1b<t1c flllng and lij6.t0 Subject. Gcogrophlc ond N mcric Piling Sborthnd credlu The gonl$ f1>r llle!lut mesler-of shottbll.nd include leamln& th~: (heory principln o(gnsc, U10tlhand and mnslerini: brief (orms, corrcc~ wtjhng techniques 1 :~peed dcve.)cpm~nt, an.d pre tro.n.~cription ale ll~ lrapld rc:odinb. p~~ch ion. JUmmJ)r, spell lng, and dlc&a(lon/tnuucrlptjonl.. The minimum shorthanlt diet lien ro~te ls 60 wpm. Ofi.l 1 Sborth nd credit.> 1be 6«Und acmester ol.dwrthand pravida: for t be r~in!oicemen t af Gre:u shontwad (N'"inc:iples, lurnio.c the uperc founs., em continued work on.speed developmettt. SpclJing, punctuatioa, zramnutr, and nwmber usaae arc empba,ijtd along wilh tn Jn. troducticln to 11111'1\:>le doz::amet~ts. 11Jt find dictation 5peed on.:. tfuee mlnutt htke ror.studejs tnterir11 the awru from Shot Ut.md l is o1 minimum af 80 wpm; Mudents cn terinl.tfle' couru from Secretal"i.oJ Workshop have a final minimvm dictatloa rale ot 100 wpm. Allshortbrnd tokes must b<.,...,~bed Y(it~ 95 per cent accuracy. PrCtt!qulsitc: ShCMtJi;ad or Seetclariot Workshop. t 106-llS Sbo<thand ll aedlll Thii coaroe s de>lgned 10 develop h tained h<lrthond wrtuog at hisltrate of rpeed. Emphlllis il plotld on shorllland opeed developm<ot..,d the development alan incnas1ngly enlafied busln<u OCAbubry. Spolfinf(. J"'DCtuation, :JDd advauoed ltanleriptioo polnteu an also empbasi;cd. nte.minimum dit1a lion rote to enroll in!his course io 80 WP!)> for lho5e students who enrolled 11> ShorUtaod l 1t MATC at the. beginnilll! of tbo!r pro gr ms. Those. ludenb who have had :ihorlhond instructiob prioc to cnrollinj otllfatc. or lbose prevjqusly enrolled n Seae!Arial Workshop, mu5t be 1blo to. write 1horthand! the rateol too 'N(JJJ\ at tbe. b!ginolns or the course.1be fmal minimum writ~&.spe.e.dl for acdil in this coa.rcc are 100 \lr-pm for those 6tudenu wttb oo pr<jyiou horthtnd nstruction prior to MATC enrollmtnt ODd 110 wpm lor hose ol dents who h:rve oken Secrelln.l Work<bop. Pmequls!tes: ShorthU.d lot Secretarial Work bop and Sborllwld n Shorthond V. +aedhs The emphosio dur1jt8 the llnol semester of shorthand i& lh< taking bl dktadon Jnd t~ produc.log. of mailable transcripts.es a.. seeretary would WOfk tn an office. The time for.dictation of mau.able- ttanscrlpt!l ls gtlldu:llly iftcre scd t~rou&h~l the semester uniu the l~ng,th o! dletauon lln~_tran cri~tlon &lmuhl.tea that of an <Jrrice oit\jutil)ll. lnlllatl'ye alid.re:iponsibilit)' in the solv ing oflren~ption prob.lfma are. stu~s.sed.. Djctatiao speed mu.st he malntoined durink this semester. The minimum shorthand die h!ltion 'J)ced. wjth 95 percent.accurate trencrlptkln, i.s 10 wpm for g roduat!on. Pret"'ltdiltta: Shorthand l or Srcrctftr\at Workshop, l06 l 1 Sho,Lhand n,.and Short brnd ll U Applied Sborthond 1-Nedi<al cretlltt Thi> course s designed to build a medic:r! &horlharlcf VOCilbufary. to develop cfldltioa rpeed on familiar aad!lllfamiliar medlal matar~l. to ran~ medie~1 djrtatioll rapidly and accurately lnto usable 'etten and reparts. to reinforce :spelllnz and understandln' ol mtdieal terminology. and to become familiar with te.rminoloay rcfa(ed to various Jn-edical spe:cia!tie:$ Z Applied Shorth nd li M~cal trtdlt This course > a tooll~uot lon of AppHed Shortboi\C Medh:al Advaooed SitOrthaod Worklllop. Z aed!t This course s an atci\cied<lay,~orlhaod cla.. which lullills Ute r"'!olrement for Shorthand ll. Credit. for wook ex pcricnce may be ainn foe U..e two-credit deficiency b~:tweelllhl: ccwsc::a. Prereq.aisite; l06 1 t Shmtha.nd or _job experience. 106-l:tS Ad t<ldshortbond Worl<!h<lp z credito This t9utse is a c:ontlnuotion of OH and fulfills the requirement fo Shorthand lv. Credit for work e1pe:rience mt y be giy..'11 ror he two-credh dedcltl\ey between the courses. Pxere quisil'": Sh"'lhond J or M v1nced Shorthand Workshop J, or job axperianc:e Court RcportlnJ Proceth.tres.crectlts Prore.$sion:d courlond conference reporting procedures n~eu~~;ry fqr Guc«ssful employment ln the shorhitnc;t. uponltlg field" ere pre!~ent.ed. Topics indude~ Methods, of tnm~crlpt product ton, dat ly copy rcporl lnl!l, usin.a general and lep~ referen<:"e mat trials, lose! cltotlons, profes1on l standordnnd lbio. repo<tins technoiogy ouclt a. videotaped depositlllos and oompot<r 8111>1cd lnmsaiptlon jcatj, operouoga lreelanoe reporiijli buol.-, resume prepouatfon, nd reporting depositioos, commission be:v lnzs. ond busirte" meetloas Typewrlllo.J S <recllt in this cov:rae, lhr type: writer keyboard. (alphabetic, aumber, and >ymhol ~ey ) welntrocnced alonj with dovclopment ol speed aad JCCUrtey ~!Us. Prodvcllon typlns focuaeo on buk letter otyles. envelopes. e<nlerlns. limple tobles; outlint and reports with Cootnores AduA<ed Typewt1tlna WOt'kahop credits This s on.. t<nded-doy. odvonc<d typewriting d.,. which fulf~ls the requirement for 11)6.17 Typewrlllng ll. er.. m!or work OX perlenco may be alven (or!he onc<redll d flcl<ney bclweea tho tolluc:s. Prcrrqui.&tc: Typewtitiog Jl or job experience Typewrlll"'lll cftdtts This ism fntt>.rmcdf1te covr.sc dt$i&ne.:'j to itnpro\ e smlght-<:opy opced &Jld occurocy os wellaa re!in krtowle"'" and sltilllo lue cessfully typo general burinesa carrorsport<lence, tables, man~.ucrip1 s or reporta and offioe fofms. The c:our.sc: culminates w i.th min.i-simu.lat5ons Ad anced Typewrltfa' Woc1.ehop u credllo This;,. conllnuolloo of 106 1~ Ad'vanted ~ltlng Worbbop 1. wmcb fulflus lht requjreroet>t fer Typewrlt1n1 V, Credit for work eoperience may b< sl en for ihe oae:-cn.djt de:ocltncy between the courses. Prerequisite: 11)6..1 AdYlnced Typewriting Worilsbop or fob expe<lenoe Typewriting Z,.. cdltj T~is co no is deolgned lor non seae!ari!!lotudent.. Ke)'boud rn&slery aod control, l<oowledge of modtine poru, rilnple tabw. tion, c:enterins and letter Mt-up Jt e,mpb.asiud TypewrUJns JJ cnd!to This ;, on intennedi "' cour~ to develop n><ed aod JO<CUJOCJ lo typewriting 1nd training n dler plac=ent. tabl!lotion,. manuscdpb, o(fice forms and roush draft material. 1'he tln&;t of tj'ping ~peed ls from 5 wpm to 55 wpm ant:!" UP, on a fi"e minute tin1lng wllh 8 mu:lmum of thn:c c:rrors. Prerequisite:: ~06 11 Typewdting r Typ<wriiiDg ll. credlis Th~ advanced course strf'!le' mailable work at marketable ~sat; well at deds~oj\ n):lking "'nd prlority-se.uing abili.ti-es. l.e«rning modulc:r lncludelltlll dev<:lcprncnl: ctv notd pcblclplos uf <bulation, ecrrespoadcr!m, atonuscriptslbusine" tcpo<ll, and business onns; llh intcoductton to machln.e lr.jasf;rlpuoo.; ond fur~ U... tuinina in Jt8U"e arl.s sl<uls. Tbe fu>al sttaighl-o>py &j>eed for. five.minulc timioa is a mlni:num of"'sdwtjm. Pre:r~uisite~ 1)pewrillng t or ts tqulvolent. 1CNH & Typ..wrltlng V ttedlts This advanced couree lntegratn the use of the-microcomputer to efl'ldenuy produce documents for.m o"fl~~ ~ula!.ton. Emphaai.s is pbced en el(eetlve ded&lon malrlng. pnonty setting. and problem solvlnc. QP\er.,eas of emph$b indude ~hine lrc.nscriplion 1 communlc"alion skills. corh.positiqn, and proofreo~ing/«<itlng skills Secretarial Mochlnts :nredlto n this ooun.e, a.tudcnla develop skill in opuatins ""' ani proccssln& cq:oiptnt"zu. They ncelve tr.tlnlns: on.s7and... looc.and.sham:f" resource systems with empbnlscn machlnc operation teclmi CJllCS. Students tum the bask::. record, edit, t e:floements o:l Oocu menl :U.iea\bly rundlons. 10f>.10 Shottluuwl U tt~dlts n this """" an emphosls is ploced on tbe reworoement or shorthand frrinc:iplu and the coalinutd de-jclopm<:nt Qf shc)rtbnnd speed. Spe nne. punclu.1tlott, lrtii't plac:!!mt.nl o~nd d\ctauon ltanscrlptlons under tlmcd condillons are emp~ited. Tho final dictation speed s A rnlolnt\u'' of 80 wpm for _,tud~:nls entering the cour:>e rrorn Shc>rthand t Court Orientation cre"dus ln lh!s cour.sc", sludenll rcarn he procedures, pi'aclit:e.s and legal terminology of courts. Heavy emj?hcs1s is on ~ourt structure and pre~t riaj proctdurd Macltlne Shorthond credits 'l'lli.s ls a bolk: ntroduction to machine shofth.ld. covering theory, keyboerd oi\c phonetics ntceuory for maduoe dictation nnd uansalption Mac:hlae Shorthand credlto Thie CO\JCl wm pravid~ dictation material& ror tej!lforc:ement of N!cbint s~ortbrnd theory ood ~iotiolls, lor speed end < curacy clevelopmenlln wrlllng nd tron=lbing, and for er.tentlve rcmlbock of shor1hend notes. Bxleuslve prpctice '!n two oicc teitimony ond an lnlroduct1on to colloquy, ju.ry charge, end literary matttlcls ls ohertd. Outsldeo(Jf cless rra~~ine prac:t_i~ is requiteel. Pttrttquhllte! Mnchlne Shorthnd l (nurnmum Wt1tmg peed of 80 wpm!.

66 1t"6:course Descriptions Course Dei\CtiptiQn<i Mcu:hJn(! Sborthond ll n~dlu Thi!i. couue continue& th~ speed building process. M<lterl"ill from courtroom proceedings li11d -deposiuons is used l(j buud writing vocabulary. Tbc emphasis is on writing twu and four vokc testimony. Spc~d atblinntenl of <10" wpm :is thi! gm.1l a( (his J00-1\olachlne Sftofihand JV credits Thi~ course: s a c:ontlm.uuton.or log-15 Mtu;hlnt Shorthand ur. The ()bjectlvc Qf the co'l.use is to write 5 wpm Cor llve minu!es oq tmfa1niliar ruatl!rial whtl <ll!cas1 9_5 p~ent :lccur~cy. Gr:!.dull lion fr9m the phjshlm reqtlires the ol1owing writing 5pcClds: Tw<l vok-e, 5 wpm; four V<Jice.andJu~y-chsrgc, 00 \ prn; 6:nd literary, 180 wpm lfive-minule Lakes w1lh 95 pe rcent Olccur"'cy) LegsJJTcchuka.l Okl~tJon l cred.lh: T)1js course i~troduces spedo\b::ed pa:actlce jn wrhing ;~.nd tra.nscrlblng legal material Uury <;hirgcs, voir dlre, e~pert wi1h~sses, and opening <md elo~ing 51ah~rn l" nlsl and technical mtliterilll (li1tm~qr, congrt"s!liorull, and scientific). Writing t~chnir:a mat~l'i<lf: fur flutnt alld 11!ccuratl" rtoadb.:lck i'>!ltir:.'ist"d & Legal/'J'echnica.l Dlctatfcn credits This CDU.:iC.i~volvc.:;;.iJdv.:.m~!ld skijj dcv.elopmt=nl in wrjtina:.and. transcribing ji.iry d~lirge at1d 'l~qrary tnaterials a:nd s n \nlrolhu:: tion to medlcd dictation and transcription. GrnduatlQn from the program requires the following writing speeds: Jury ch;:.rge, zoo wpm and literary, lso wpm!five-minute takes with ~5 percen t accurolcy) 'estiinon}', Chargl: and Dcposltion L rcdil!i Jn tbis CO\J;se,. students Jearn the procedures, prac:lices 1nd le,gal terminology of.courl_s. He~vy ernph11si.s is placed en the nclu~tl te~tijtlqny Uncllltling rules or evidenceimd jury d~.<~rge ill ltlab 11s weh 01s'dqiosilion procedures. l06-l50 Sccrc1.ilrial Procedur.::t;.. t::tedit:!l AmQqg ioph::s CQvcred n thi5 C()une are the function" of an. of~ flce:,.an e.xeculi'\'e and a secr~t~ry, lecrctqrial ethics, non-verbal conunu_n_lcition~, incollling.and. outgoing mail, travel l'l;nd meeting.:lmmge_tnc:nls, s~pervbiojj- tt::~::hniques and proc~~;:dures, profe:s.:dohol Stawth ahd Qevelopm~nt 1 time Jllanagem<::nt, tcft:rt:j~ct=.! nnd T<:po_rl-5, and.s-=:t:rdm ial dct:i::sia.n-making. Pmbh:m solving te:chnlques fer typir::ol office situatlon!i are al!ioo included. 1~-151_ Coutt Reporting lnfcru~hfp credhs n this CO\!rsc, a.dvanc~d stndcnt!i take dictalioj'\ )n rourt situati-ons With~ as.sistahc~:. ruld.gllip;rnce.of a qualified ~epurter. Stud~:nt perfotmance and work is_evaluated by a working reporter. ntern ship platement requires <tttainrnent of ~00 wpm writing speed on two-vor~ testimony lnateriaj. 106-!5 Tran&eription. credit Trrn~ctipt.iQa Eat court repor!ers focll.scs on!h~ devejop~n! o1 the following minimum reqij.irt:menta: Slraig.hl t:opy typing_ Spl!t!d of 60 warn n~t, t.r~nscdpt production a lo page1i of lypl'!d tro:~nscri'p1-(0&a.j in tv,ro hours with ilt" least 95 percent <1c: urac'i r ad!-! proficiericy in transcription mech<1nics (format, spelling, pl!nct,ui.t[an, s!ylc:, proofreading, e:c:~d OOruopPones) MochJnc Shorthand Workshop cr~dlts Thjs coutse s r11quir~ during the summer prjor to l"ntering the lhhd. semelilcr uf the court._l'ld conference reporting pr6groro. The major -emphasis of the summ<:r workshop h int~nsc speed and accllnr:.y developmenj-on. a variety o materials. Oppor.lunity is provided_to utilize word proce5;orb and computers for tt~st&cript production Mlcro-Kcyboardlng ~ crcdlt. Th.i.'!i rnur.re covers the. usc of lbc microcomputer to tesch kf"yboardiog lbeginnihg typm.,tiung). With the use of ~ftware, the keyboard h. mastered, Spel"d arld accuracy i.s de:veloptod ~nd leuer. and report formats a.re introduced Appllcd Typc..-rltlng crcdlh This course i5 de5ign<!d to revfew gencraj (yping principles nnd to provijle pr:jcucot application of type:writillll: to the m(!dical fieldj p.~:~rljcul.ltj)' Jn ~he insuraoce J:U?ll.. St~dents type medlc:ll!onns from case study informntlon. Spef:d ond Q(curQcy on g.eneral ond medical copy are developed Ap]Jilcd Typewriting. c,..dlto This ccmrsc covers ~he funamentql prindple~ and (mtctio:p use? in offic~ m.anngcmcnt. tt!ncludes a stuqy -or llnd prllctica.l ex, p~ricn-ce in the: {allowing: Wrillen ami non V'(rilten t:cmmunica!jon.~. word pr~:ujng, mt>eliong:;aud conferences{ ~rgonumics, filing.and re~o~l;ls mnn11g_t!t1i~nl, dictation procedures, and ohicc iiuointllion Appli~d BusJness Trmln.lng. crcdscs l'hl!> co1.1r.!ie ~ove rs the fundamentaij?rlndpt~s ji:nd prll-<:t'i~- u5cd in office manngement. [t includes a 5tudy of ijnd pn.ctlcal experience in. the following: Written and nar'l. wriltf!n Commuhica timui 1 word proces.'ill'ig, meel;nl!l& Dnd CoiJferenccsf ergonomics, riling and records rn.a:nagcmen~. dic1ation proc::.::dur-es, and offic~ aulomalion Applied TypewrUin~ lll-modlcol. creillts This course :stresses medical offi~e produdj()n. lyp~llg including mach1nt! tran:scriplion of advanced medical material and mate ri(l.( dictated by foreign ckn:ton. Thi~ oour.\e is de.!igned to_ increase m ~: diraltranscdpdon ~peed and JccurCtc)'. A rocdic.11l-offke simutatlon is c ompleted which stres~e5 lhc:' llbility to follc.w minimal directions 11nd make proper judgments in reliitiqn to medic~tl-offi~e protocol Vcterbuuy Office PrCJt:.r;:durr:s.. l crcd,lt This course 1 for animaj fechnidan.mn.jors 1 iflcj\ild<::; the {t.,mc1io_ns of an uffice,.an executive and ohke sla members, re~~plion and app.:~lnlme Jit procedures_. tejcconununi.cations equipment, ~r~,;-ices iutd prnccdllt"cs, records tn;;magemenl lind f11ing ptqcc:dur~;:s. A Lclcphone: lab ossignm~nt for ilo simulutr:d \'clerinary prpc;:tic:c: may be inci\jded Appli<d W9td PtO<e>Slng. cre<lllo This course is dt:signed <a d~w!op s~ins itj Oper~tini \Y\)rd P.{'O cessing equipment. Students receive trnlning; in machine transcription, using mcdi<:al matcrial_s, and on automated typ~wrilers. Students alsq become. famluar whh tht'! work flow and logging procecjurc~ t1:~ed in a word ptoces5u'rg ccnlef. Em phasis is on building a!itm fo~da.ti-an ln medical trbj!st;ription skill:s using automaled equipment, 106 l8j ntroduction to Word P~qc.es51ng: credlls Thts ~ourse i.s for sludenls <:nrolled ln lhe two-y~llr administrative ;;t.ssis!.t:at infotnh~lion pr~cessing progtal'l\ 11 precede~ BU other ~e. qui red collf!h!s in the pmgrarn and is de~sne:d to introduce Ute sttid'l!nt to lbe fil!ld r.if word proces:tillg and MsiJ'!r- futur-e in the world of.adv<lnc-ed t~~nology in th~ ouice. Students learn w.hat fs meo:~nl by- W"ord p:ocessing of information proces~ng, and how i.t fils inlo the".qtal in ormalion ptocessin& sy.ste~. The emphasls of th~ C<JJ.rse is Ol'l. }ln:requis'it:e.skill! for-.~ct.:e:o~s in Word pro..:euing, i.l!. writtl!n and,otd cornmuni.:;ati.on JSkilt.'l such u gramma,:.!pe- 11. ing and pllll.ctu-a:tion. 10&.18 tnccr.nauon Proces ELng c"ncepts. <:tedlb Titi~ course-hu been desij;ned to study Office aulumahon and the concepts of wordljnformalion pracess.lng:in lodoy's busine~ en vironment. Studcntsl~:orn ilbout all1bt:! office technologies and ser:. the viia~ role-played by th~ cq.mputer. Major rtreas of Lnslruc Lion i11clujc hmdware, :~JofiW'rc. ld<:comrnunications, and tqtl11 of!ice integration. Thc.~uurS(! a( study begins wjth input and out p\ll procedures, pror:ecds through the dis.tdbutlon llnd retention stilgcs, OJ.nd focuses on the offi~ Jn.lcg-t.s.Uon. Stndt!nts ~plctc the many career oppurtunltic5 in \he chtmgin~ office, The major em pht1i! of his C<ll\r5C i:s tm undo:rstanding how cun1puter lechn6!og.y is affeding lhc workplucc. 106 ltl tnformalioh Proce!lslng Technlqut:! i 1. tr~dlt This: course is the (frst "lutndhm" course des~gned (or a5socl~te dcgree-stutll!nh in the. Administratlve Asslslant lnforfn&lion Pro Ccssingptogrnm. Trainiilg Will be on the NBl System 6 Orfic~ A\ltcmlltiOJl Sy:~lem and on the NBl Slandi!lonc Syst<:m. Stu~h:nts 1ee.rn h11si~ Jevcl op~rauon:t Sl!cb os. how to lie up the system, keyboard to c:rcat~ do.:umcnl.:s, mqke minor revisions, and store lexl, rccall1wd edit lc:!'lt and print ti!xl, Th~ cour"e. pro~;eeds to more ll.dvanc:~;d \lnctlons rcrcrrcd t(j as "Rcfinc:rinmt:'ii'l of the Sy.\tcm. lfl6 18 lnformatl{ln Proc.cssing'lechnlques U crcd~ts Sj ui:l~::nl.s c.nmll.ed jn he AdminiBiralive AssisMnt-l~formation l~ro('c!i!ilng progrnm continue the:lr han'ds cn triiinlng to perfotrn more fioophlsticated applications ~uch os statislicil1 tabulation-. lllt!~t! ror boilerplatl:.applie ntlons, format and reformat, do mn.jor ec.li~ing ond revising, 11.nd excc..c special software p:ick:~ges such,,_,. n:cords pr(lccs.s.ing and math. The culmlnatiotl of lire cqtirse tollsl.,l& of 11n ohke!llmulatlan proj~cl. Prerequj~itc: nlormallon Processing Technique::; Word Precessing Mnndg e m~::nt J credlb Emphasis s on understanding.lllnd applylng: managemetll sk~lls.to wordlln ar.malion procl!.!i.sil"'& operations _ln ;J.h organizali.on. CDntt:lll indudcs the re.sp[]nsibhitil'!s of W/lP mnt'ulgers and super ~ imt&j fea.slbhity.studfe s-~ system.dcsig-n, equipment :sdcction 1 centt:r"layou.t ;~.nd environment, impleinent&tian and.system evo:~luatlon. writing proccduresj pn1parin,g bi.ldgets,._s Lec.ting and trainlng personnel, produc:li.vi.ty standt~rds and evaluation,!!nd. managing op'l!ntlio-ns Word Pi'oc~_sslng AUillaUol'l credlts Thi!i. strudured ~ourse en.conlpasses a.lt &relll!s required for :S1JC r:es:5ful job appllcatkln.and mwntenalk't'. ln ilddwon, ft pro!l:id-es a training prognim lh111t t~llows the student to observe lind apply, in il practica,l_manner, the thenrr. skills and techni'}.u«!s stl.ldied jn lhe_rdminjstrativl" ttssistant-lnfotmatlon pfoce!isingprogcam. Duf. ing thi:! f\nol semester of study, HL~ sl~ent works in an appro-ved word pr~es.si.ng.cejtt-cr under tlr supecvislon_ and guid:rnr:l! o{ 11: wqrd pro<::el»'itg Sup~rviior and.teacher-c<jordlhatcr, lntcgrat~d Of flee Technique~ credits This ourlh.semester o:'!qut5e for the Administrative AssistJnt J!l!oiJnt~Jfon Prou.sslng studen! provid.es trufdjng on,sophisticated inrmnhltion :processing functions such as Wang Office, Giossar.y, Dcci:;hm Proces.sing, a.nd ll'.0 Spreadsheet u~lng the Wang VS-95 System. Prerequisile: 06 la81nforma1icjn Processing Techniques ll lnfotmfi.ucl.~ ProCf$slng Techniques ll credits This oou~sc is the lhird 9eme:st~:r training for students c nrolled in he Admjnistratjve Assisi~n~~Jnformal!o~ P.ft~.cess!nf progl'arn: Stttdeilts L~arn to _set up the system, kc!yboard to cr~al~! documents.!ia miner correcting <'lnd pmoflng,_stare and- flle t~xt, (eca.ll and retrieve text~ lind print tut. Mure. 11.dvance otppllciltions includ~ a~ehiving, metginc print, setting llbra.r_y-p~olotype, \lsing WP Plus StyJes, referenc:~s and.1uthor aids, nutih, and c1o:s:htry appllr:ati-ans. PnrCquislte: lnlorination Prar:d! ing Techniques.! SeeretariallDt&rri.ahJp. creqlts This s~ruch.rct!d co1.1r!e eri,:omp!ssm ~hose areas f<'!quij1'd [CJr sue ces.s(ul job application llil)d nili.inten n.ce. _lo odduion~ Jt provides a lraini:ng-procram that l'lllows the Gtudent to Observe and apply, in a pra~ucal mnnner, tbe theory, skills and tet:hniqu~:s studied in the administrative as~\slant-se<:rttarial prpgram. Eligibld studer1ts work (ot s: Sl!rtleStl!r..iolltt s:pproved busi'nf!ss" offic-e uncn!:r the supervision and gu.idance of a c:oopemtlng employ-er, lrni!% -M.&chJnc Tr~nscr-lptl~n credits 'fypif'!g i:ofrcs:pondcncc and other buaines~ d<jcurnents from mc~hine dictatiotl i!i &tres!led n thh course:. The items to be trani<:ribed.gndually incren.e: ln lengttl und dthiculty. Emphasis in this course is on mailabuity. PraeUce n sp~lllns, grnmm r { pur:zcluriion, hliinbcr exprcsskm.~md format js alsa prol'we<j. 106 l0 Rii'!CGid8 MatJagf'~nt t rl!!d(t.: ThM coul'.'ll! c-ovet.s;!he basic prlncipl~s of lillng, S!udents leijrn rul~" by coding.u"jd filing. cards alphabeuc!luy. They study me1hods of fillng by using miniature lel~ers nd filing boxes. Methods included re alphabetit:, vatiadex, nurnetlc;: nd geographic. lo0 0 Applied Ofllco Proccdurco cr«<lu This course provides training n-reception,.app~inlment schcdul lng, mail handling,. ret.ordki!eping, fundamental bookkeeping ~in dulling eo.terlng dnlly trnn5.!1ctions}, 'billing, banking an~ payroll rroccdure! Shorthand c""'ll This js1111 in(roductory.course. n.begirwing Gtegg-shc>{U1md with an empba$bi on briefjqr,ms«l'be student is expec;ted to achieve 50 wpnt by the <Jnd o[ thh cours_e, which wilundude diclatlon and tm!\scriptlon. B.uic ldter 5tylu and placement are intcoduced Offtce Procedures. credit The purpo~e of thi!l couz:o~l! is to dl"!velnp knowbdse a:nd appreda lion of bllo;;int" :o~s pmcf!dun"'s.and practices as ~~ll as. a better und!!'rstanding ni good pu~lk relations. Djs:cussi<ln ce:~tecs on pro~ pf'::r performance of clerical d.uti~s, bus)ness etiquette and good puhuc relations AJphabetk Shorthand credits This tours~: provides an introduction to Forkner shorth:jnd.{s.hort haod.done with U5e q"f the alphabet]. Emphasis is place on producing mailable copy Advonccd Alphobotlc Shorthand.. <!<~its Por. students who have had an.e semesttr Qf For~ner eborthand. lbb ccltjt$e provides them wjth a sal~ble.skilfby the.en" of ihc setnester. -The goal of the rourse is ti:l tnin students. -to take short hand ur:cu(i;ltely o.t 80 wpm and to transcribe mailable copy. Grammilr and punctuation skill~ are a(so ~:mphelllired. 106~1 Shorthand U :... crecfits For students who ht~vt: completed the Uteory- of shorth~d, thi"' course _inc100.es a revh:w of theory-.md pridcipb, c:xten::iiye sp~d devt:lopmenl, instl'llclion i.n lu.cg\.!gc: skills.&~nd dementilry diclatiun and tnmsctiptiwt. Dictat.ion sp~d:~l range fra.m 60 lc 100 yiprn. 106 Stenography... -ctedus This Gdvanr:ed cot.tl'&~ is dcs.igncd t9 in~ttll_sc-s-ttoru.~rld vo~:abuj!ry 1 speed dcvelopm~::nt1 build diciaupn-an.l.ranscription skills,.and to-proyid1: fwther training in language skills. Di~otioo speeds nnge from.. 1D to 110 wpm Lepl Transc.l"lptlon _ Cfedlts This collfse indudes typing corr~~pc>nden~e -1nd other m..sjness documents. from machin.c dlctstion,_thc-ltcms ~o ~transcribed gtf:duauy ijtcre-!lse ln lenglh snd dimcully, w~lh legal corte:spond.em:e and d6cumenl5 i.ucludl!d. i.n-the last half (]f. the cuurst!, Pradic~ i.n spellin_g, gra.mrt~ar, punr:tuatioc, number elc~ pression and fni:m.at :is :~~ prov}ed. 106-SQ Lcgqll'i-llllitrlptlofl..ll t:tcdh~ '1lls oo~:~rse fs devote~ entirely to the transcription of!ega! cot:. r~ond.ence and documents from ~_ctated_ tapt;~. CiYil ~rocc.dur.~ and perronalijljll!)'dl.robjie, djvor.ce 1 CJimin.al, b.ank:ruptcy, rojledicns, billing ilri.d legbl bric:fs are included. Punctuation,. gram mii,r,!ipdling, owube:~ C:xprcs~ion, ~apit.!ilizution il.d ather fangu!;l.gc sklus,.as 11pplled to~~~~ materials, are re'!'i:ewcd. Legal tetm!nology and -other 1ega1 applications \such as cltutionsj at'~ induded. 106~8 Legal Transcrlptionlot Office Proc~duro 1 ttedus. This cou~se covers procedures such as appointments,.reception, telephon.e, moil handli!)g ond filing applled to low olfic:e work. Also included ere [ego( and.liecret&ria{ ejhics, WDtd pj:o<:~lng concepts, and en introduction to specifit legat procedures ~uch as the s_wtirtg of court ac.tions A:gpl Trilnscrlp11onllllt Offi<;c Procedure. 11 credits This. course is ;r continu.tion of 1.06 B and emphasb:(s Jcso1 pro cedo.re:l a.nd terrninojogy jn ctimlrullaclions, faniil"l court_ mal t!:!rs, pr!l b{l(cr ~nd other ~pedafi:o:ed w:c:ll:l. "Lborntccy.n~gnrnenfs i~ tcleph.onc handlin~~: m.&~}' he indud~::d. 106 ~1 Typewnti"g l ccodil For persons desiring to learn the tu~jch system o typewriting, this tourae ~ven parts of the machine, maslery of lh~ k~-~~rd, drills for rh.ythm o.ild anuncy 1 correct Lypiilg habits, simple lclte_r,.;et-up nnd ~abulation, and timed wdtinss.!06- Typewriting. <!'l'dlh Trnining is given ln typing :nauabje letters from rough dcoft copy wltb t;orrect punc:tu.r:l(~on, capit&hulion a:nd: &pci:uing a be added by the typlst. Drlll i:o~ glve:n on tabll.lntl.ng frm'r TOUgb draft copy. Practice ts provided on various ofrlce production forms and typ iag munuscript9 from rough drort Dnd lodghdnd copy.

67 18 Course Descrjptions Course ~crlptiom l9 106 Mocl\lno 'frons<rlpllon. credlb Typing conespondcnc:e and Ql.her bu:;ine:ss docu.me.ats /rom machine dictation is.61rwtd ln tw course. The item& to be trmscribed lrodu&uy lncrcne n lr:ngtll ond difficulty. This cou""'..,,:>-.,.._mailable copy. Proc:tice in spelling. gr.onmu, p v.ncluthon, num~r upthsion and forrrut l$ tjso puwidcd, TypeWT!lng ll ttt dlts This course stresses praojrudlng nnd producing mailable wpy a\ office role of speed. Projc:et1 indude typin.s for various dtpjrtrnenls-tlc::rical, purcba!in&. aales. pusonacl. accounting. directoc ol sales and dlrc:ctor of office 5crVica. Ooe quarter or this coarse Lf devoted to tri!l"-tibidc:from moathlnn: l'olochiootran><rlpllon cr d ll This courae eaables the &tudent ro obtain sptdal ht!lp and provid~ sclaedultd time to eomplch1 anlgned d a.nwork.?~~~m~:::~:!f:t~:~:::~ er student, tbis co~cse ~=s spetd nd Ottutacy aod 1he-devtlopmeat of typewrilillg kilt.. Lener wriuna. t.abuldtlona and timed writings ore iacludcl in.the lustruction. Students wkh n~ than one semesaer of previw s in strut lion ~oujd con.slder rtibler.ias fortypewrfling:. )06 9 Applied 'lypewrl1lng Mtdicol ond lcjr J <redll< 'thll coune provide& a review ot cones:pondenee:, m::r.n\)scripls, tabulation 1nd bush:telrforms. t de~op.s.spctd and accuracy And h'hroducu (he Studtol to the preparation of!ega) a.lld medical docume ts ~ forms. Tht speed ran1e in this COUfe i, S tq 60 wpm. 106-SSO Applied T ypowritlns il (Mtdicaland lq;j <rtdll.1 Thls co{lrje emph sius omcc: productioa typewriting i.ncludirfg tr,nscriplk>p from dictated bells: Medical and legal documents are prc:poued. The typin& range tn thu coo.ne ls frem 5 to?0 wpm. J00-56 Allplied1'ypewr1tlng ll oredlts Thls s ao inte.rmed~te typewriting CO\:rsc fof :au:dical a.sslsttag tnajon. Prcftciency in typl'ng letters, mcnos. ~b.lcs1 aod rrportj is dcvcio[w!d. A unit on mutblne transcription is presented and a medicoll artier: sjmulat.ion pro:itct ts completed. A miniciwd typ in~ speed o( 0 wpm (with no more lban 10 ~rore im five tninutesl is a course ob;cdivc~ 'Prerequisite: A Typewrtt(og J CO.t'X, 106 Medical T ransc:rlptton T credits Thls courae is dtsigned to ntroduce the 1tud1nl to machine traj.licrtprw>o 6t medlclltlaleri.a.b; Empha!!iS l!l placed on eff!clet\t trans~ripuon l«hnlqucs, recognitkm of key medkll tet:ms. cor reel spelling 1d punctuation, md 'l'edolited formats O< medical tq>o<h Mtclkcl TranocrlpU"" U credlto 11tls course ls ddilg.ced to &lv~ the student" transcrlption e.: periel)ce on 111dvanced medic ll motc~la.t"indudin,g: dictatic.n by doctors w1th 1 vnrlety of foreign acd.nls. Empha!ls ls p\a~d on effklent trnhscripllon kchniquct, building tr~ nscriptkm &pe~. correct epclllng and punctu:1tion, and ejti<:icnt u.ae o( resourc~ miotcilols Medkal TNtnscrlp({oaioC lolem>hip cred!ls This is 1 structured cotuk encompassili.g those areu requind for suoccstl\tl job apj?11cauon and 1}\.Jiatenance. Tn add!uon, it prd-' vfdes 'l tralninj projr::nf\ th:u mllows l lte student to olw!rve 11nd &pplr, \n a p~cticet manner. tht 'theory, &kills and Cer;:hniques studll!d n the m.!dlall tronocr!plioniii.prognlm. The oden! oompleles 1!hrce wtok allillat;.,n;. approyed medical focilityunder the aupctvisicn and suid.ance. ola te:.cher -coardicahn and a <OOF<nlina. c;xptrletlc:cd mtdlc' t~plionist Job Survey,5 credit This c:o<me provid<s a Sl~dy bllhe noilability of emp!lfld!rit n tin: ahtdenl's ilrta or tr.1ining-wherc, \ofbco and tpow to ritjke properoppllcollod to M proopecllve anploy<r...u<i.tooce n secorlos cmploy111<ntl1 the eblof cbje<iivo ollhls coome Prln<lples ollftformollon Procenlna <r<dll Jnlrtnluclocy L:OUrlie ln WOrdJ[l,{ormalion PfOCeUi.ng: ~fin ili-on of the OOftCCPS, cotnputcr tetmin~oiy, tlw: tole Cl( worq P~ng in office auto:n.o.1ion, aew otnce tecbnojopu ud tb~r appllca Ho111, typ<t of Job and llkill requlremeo1s, career opporfw!ilin, n u.a.mln&1ion of the impact of a.tomation on t bc: offici! en"vimom~ Dt. OG-81 lnformollon Pre>«<~lng Opcratk>ns ae<jib ntroductory omd advaoc:~ ~veb o word procwin: techniques are tau&hl on the NB Office Autom011ion S)'$1e.ut 6 01' the Wang VS 65.\Ule.af the- rt itttqratcd 5J'tem. Students will be able to dcmonwrgte all balk: nd lntenned~c lc ej cornpdeoc:ie! in in pun1nc,. editing, storins;, fuina. retrievinb and printing. 107 BUSNESS DATA PROCESS(NG Comput~ r Opertloasll l<r dlts This course: is a rontinu&uon o/ , Computer Operations 1 1 txp ndtd to a broader scope duling with.the operatk.n of.an en tire d ;~ca ccafcr. C111uroom lime is ~.studying opcratiag system t onctpts (lntludlng 18M's MVS opmting system), data cnmmunlc tlonl, "OS" job <onlrollanguogc, MVS utilities, JES~. data ctnter Security, contin&enc:fpl:mning, equipment and facllltlea planning. dot a center man~gement 'pe r~pectlvcs, nutgnlll'llc dl$k, arid the CPU. L.lb time is.spent studying and usins BM OS JCL, OM MVS UUlhics, ;nd )ESa comrmindi. MA'!'C's tn.l!nlrm\c coml'utcr s used to develop the proj«ts and to com pltte the fesz. c:omput~r tslstl-d iuilr11ction {CAQ ~ Prere qu\silcs: Computer Opc:roafions 1 and Computer Concepu, or eorucnr of Jnstruc:tor. A gnde of "C" or bet lee in.,n dat1 pmcessing cuurs~s ls r~quired. lbls t..'dursc i.s.ofrereli ont}' in tht: ft~u semester; lt is D lhlrd sr m('sle:r c:ourse Progrommlng credits Programmlns J ~an introductlon to the fundaa:h.-nttli of tbc com puler proaramnung dc:vtlopme:ot proceu, iac:tucoog structured proarom duign. codlda, debugsins,.and luting. BM Sy&em 711 AskmbJer W»o~se b vrillzt:d ~ lhe ln~ruction1j vth!cle to bring thr. SNdeot u close M pciutbte to ectuallbacbin!: lan&.oose ' imtructlon1 ond other CMChlne atcbiteclural cona:pts. The cofllo" pfctlon ol ~ven prowramming.asliarunents is required. This iss rigorou1 arune for d.tto processing majors which r~c.!i ea.(cn sive l:d:lor.11ory work outsi~ ol cl.u~ lipproxut~telt JS:011Dors ~week~ PrerequiUt~ : Compl~lioc or contur~c. t uuol lm~!nlln Dala PJoces.&lns Techniqaes.ln addihoo, comp-letion or con.cuntnt c:nrcllmcnt n tb7-) 1 Computer Concepts, or equlvatent cxpuicj\c:c, lt advised. 107-J l Co"'putcr Opua1Jons. credits Thls ll second ~emcsle.r coun e.. ofjcrn only i.n 1hc spring scmu1er, Jt b a 1 'hand.s-on" co_,rse.d.eau.ng with the concepts,and prindplt of mtdlum OC tompu1ec. ayst~m operations in a mulll ptogramruing and d1ta communications e:avironmcnl. Con sole operatk>ns and inputloutput peripheral ope.ratlons are studied And pracli«d. MATC"s.malr).(r"me cpmputcr ls usc;d for hwd:hn opt>tt~liou. Prerequisite,: JQ7 11.C0mpq~~r Conccpt.s and rd7.j ll r roxrammlns 1, or CQitsent ol instructor. A.snltle of 11 C'' or bcllcr in all dntn proct5slng l107) C01.1rses.i!i n~qulrcd Co!llpultrCorw:epl ~rodlts Thi Uri\ cn.rae: for cbta processlns majort is daig:ned. to prepare tha 1tudenf. or odvaott:d.courics n eon1puler data p~ oper1tions ond progr.unmlna. E~ph.l.sis in this course i.s on da)a prcceul11g 'erinh1ology, blttdware, sol! ware, data rcpreseolation1 sy~ema 11aly~ls and deslgn 1 procedures. personne1 1 program duign and ~lal is.s.uea arrcctt:d by cottiputers. OT- 111 Sy lems Analy lnnd Design etodllo Thls co\.ric 1pproac:hes da~ pracess,i.ng 'lpplication ituations as 1 sales o( computer lnfxus. 0\11put5, files, prcx1:!sstng steps aad COf)o rots v.11h n rnp11 si on ptactfc;ul dts>sn c:oosldemlioos<>f lb,.. components... t 1nchutu prtaenling results of dtsi,gd: work to U$C/.S and m.,ntsemcnt. Prerequisite: t 1 ProgratnmlnK 1 ond either comp1clton or :OJiturrc:nl c:nrollment in Programming, or conscht of irutrucl()(. A cr)lde of ''C" or be ter n nil data pro ce&>in~ couroeslo r<qulrtd. For o.to PtocC61ln&.Qnnpulor Opera tion> mo)ors-pmeq Wtt: Pf'08'ammiog. gr.xle of " C" or bt:uer O ptr llnk Syslcrm Servlcto and fnrlllllco cr dllo 't'ltis \s A eourso lh BM operotlna system.ercbltcctufc and in lhe usc of apcra1ins systc:m senoi-!t:s M d (ac:i.litic:s. Students &e.rn through lechun, rcjdij&a~ixnmcnts 1nd pndk:e prognunmidi usipmcnts. O~sln thls course re b:s5ed mlirtly on tmts.. MNjD'r (oplcs o( study lnchidl!: Opot.rfin& syste-m o.rchlrechue, UM MVS ]ES job Control l.onguoge, BM utlllly progrot'l1s, dump ruc:flna, sub-prqgram linkllge :md 1r.:msfating end linklds prognrn.s. Prtrequh.Ue: 107 1' Ptogrl'lntning ll and o grade of "C" or betler n oll dalo proe<""'t! cw..._ P rogrommin~ tttcllts Tilts courx offers o dt loiltd stlldy of 1bc fe~tur., orod Opjllica tion. o! ANS COB0!.-7 n bu1ln... dal.r P"''"s~ "' environ mcnt. 1nlenne!dlntc. COBOl. prosramminb l~hnlques, stn.tctured program dcnlgn. structured walkthroughs, tnblc lo;.d!ng iln<l se.1rching. he SORT verb, dc:c\5.\on re~, e1cfl)cn\&ty-dump reading, ond both soquenual ond klclo.ed sequential (VSAM KSOS) 11C'CdS metltocb arc sfuc.liccl o.:d.ozppli~ over the cc~ of six prog:rammins p'rojects. A brief introduction to 18M JCL an JOCAMS u1ill\y s olao in<:ludtd. Pf1'rcqulalio: grade of ''C'' <if better io 107 tll Ptogrommlny l Programming ll.. c::rtdlis Thls ls 11 coutu in!uruclurcd progrnm devel-opment. Student.! are required to c.c:i15n, Code and tet lhrec large batch applicll~ {a report P"'BB' m, a oequcnllol update end an. dli.j ood to code a portion ol ont smou ntroductory ClCS proctam. Mojo< topics of study lnclude: t1le theory of.ltrut:jured desit-n, str.actur~.pr~ ~r:tmrning ~tra tegltt, tools for logical ~alyiia 1 table processing. Lesting s.trategtes and muih program strudures. Prerequis1te: 101:t ls Programming li and 1 gtade of "c.'' or biher n data proctuins courses. ' la7 UT ProgrornmJJ'V "crhito Thi~ course de~lops COBot.apptic..ttian progrumt tha1 ac:ccss cb.!talwie.s. VuMlus ~ta lilructura rc studied. Projcct.s h:,d.ooe file de>i&n, database loocl, relrioval and updott_. The fodlltl.. of a dllta dktioruwy ore utiuze:d. A fourth generatioli llnsu ge d bo used. ProcCquUite: Pt0ranming lli. A grade ot c or b~ller in all data procestin~ courses ls re~ired.: PrOjlrommlng V ' ~1> 1111s 1 oludy nrod practi<t of tho PGJ proglatnmij\i leng\lege, with n intrcxjucuon to the basks of COBOL.. 'Jb.is course is re quircd ror the dato processins computcr cpr:raticn:a dcpce. Prerequisitl:; 107-l 11 Programliting. A grade. of "C'-' or bett~r in an dalu processing coutse.!lls reqult'fd, SyatemJ Analysis net Design U credits This course lnlroducos M studeol lo U.e full eye!< o( S)'stcm.< desllfl and dovelopmcnl activities grouped into fivt pba<eo: Pml.>lcm ddinttion,<ttlailed invatigo!.ion and.tuullysia. systems d~ &n. Jyltms development ond 1ystcm implementation a.nd evoltja\lon, 'Thll is a eompetcncy-b sc:tl theory and practice: course u.s:lng team tnd independent projects. SQmc progrtmmlng f.s re-o. qulrcd. Prerequisites: Systems Anlllysi.s and Ot!sign (and Progremmin& 1!. A arade o( 11 Cu or heuer n :all data proce~~t:sing cot~.rscs s t'cqulred l'rojrommlng V. coedll1. This course ij a 11~dy uod practic:e of the RPCU P'OSrllnming langu ac:. The courx is Cl((crcd "'on elective to dl dnt.a Proc:es.t! ins ~udent.a who l)nvo succesfuuy compjcted co&~r.sc J J Progromml s, Pf1'Jequlsltea: Programml s or eon:scilt or ln&truclor. A ~rode of "C" or bctttr n all dsla proc..,lna courses is required. t07 1 l'rop ammlna V t:rodill This coune intrcx!uces C CS tcw.tomet ln!omalion Control S)'St<m) ancj tuches how lo d.. elop tff.cii e interacti e COBOL progrms u lns co:nrnorul levol CCS, Tht four"""' tomrno> lotcmctive PfOJrams-1nqulry, d.thl~nt ry, fl\e malntenance, nod menlj cte studied. Prerequisite: Proarammillg ll, Oalo Proo...tna Technlquc Credits This murso lnlroducej lhe Jtudeol lo lht book lcd1nlqua for doslgninsjiructurtd p rogrumt. Addltio!11llly, tbe studca1 wlll learn compw.ta n'lmber\ng aysk'ms and data rerpresrotauon. Topics wullncludo e<>mputer numbering systems (bon Z, lwt 1, doto represenlsllon lflckc<l dcc:hnal, binory, EUCDC, an~ t\scll forrutsl. prosrorn duign toots, and rrogijtrt structure ft Cumpulor Opttlllono lr.ttrnlltlp ' 6 credits This s the nn l of two, oo lhe job, hands..,., c porlenc.. with in structor JUpervt:don n repretent1utvc computer irlstafl.uons in 1ho Modl""' JJ<a. The emplwlo n ll:lr CCWst t oo oponling small (rnlb!) lo ltl<dlurn-tt.od imalnfrant<l c:amputtr..,...,. while ob<crvln ond poztlclpouns n lhc work flow lnt<> arul eli! of the data center. The r;:omputer oper tlona program is..-mainfuune'' orien1cd, hence studentllnt~rn wul not be placed tn ao inlonntiot> c:ed<r holltllilntr only microcomputer. The stu denlllnl<m sptnda about zo llou" pet w"<l< t im place. ollntero hlp. l"reroqulaltu: OHComputtrConcepls.07 1ll 'm- pammlng r and 107 ll Computer Oper~ttoM (, or ec:nent of.in struct,.. A arodo of "C'' or be1ler n ou data prooesslng courses s req1.lred Compulcr Opera tions lnl<ntlltlp 5 credits This second ial<:rn!l1li,j course provides work experience in~. large, cornp)tx date center thot of fen o brq'd ~rum. of mnin- frame proc:e.,ing madc$. The studentjintetn $pcmds about 0 hour> per w cck al lhe latcm&111p slte.!'tere!(ui ~es: JOT S& Cbm puter Opert1looo lnterushlp, or coosontof iasttuclor. A gnide of "C'' or belter in all dp.ta proc!s1ng courns is requtred. 1q1-10 Microcomputer SoftWato tredlts This Cbtnae ln\roducea th~ a,t:.jthmt to.soft~arc: pack&se.s u~ed on tho BM and JBM cornpatlbte.mlcrocompu)ers. The sl~cienl will Jearn to u:.c varia us softwdre tools to!lolve d.,la. proct:lsl':li.p~ blem >ituodons. The Opero1lng Sy1tcm MS OOSPC-OOS),!ilcc tronit Spreadsheels (LOTUS Z J), and ljata Bose Management Systenu JdBaselll + 1 will be studied. l'mequlilte: System. Analyst U1d Design! D<lta Pro,.,uln~ ntern ship... ' <<edfls S1udc:nts are assi.sn.ed te> d:lta proc:e S!ng departments Ln busines~ and gca~c!mmdnt. They WOC'k under normal lupety $iaa &ijunior prostlmmecw Cor J6D hound complete unble compul~ pro. grams. Pruc:qobitc 107 1Z Programmin~ ll aod" Sy tems Anal)'Jond O..Jao L A ~rtdt ci"c" cr beher in au dlt proculln& counes s required. 109 HOSPTAUTYMA~, RECREA TOH RESOURCf OPERATON, TOURST RECREATON lot,oductloo to l.c1iuf: Service aedita; 1'bis courac covers Jhe1tuchm:, purposes. functlonsand i:jlfet r~latiooshlps of private. publ.ic, aoml-priv te and commercial r~cfl!lllliontll ag~lu. Trends and career oppor1uuil.iu io touris.t rt natlon 1nd rhource operetion ;).rt also included Ree..,u~a on~ Lcl ~rc ln Modern Societ y. credits This course ls on introd1.1cllon to ~~~sure 11nd rctre~tion a' it af ltct.s both JnWvidua1 ond 'roup bch,av.ior. The co11 rs~ covers: the soe'olosy and p1ychology oro broad range o( leisure and rt~rea uon toplct Pn>&nommlng 1lrtd Public Relations cr.,tl'" Pl:tnnine, orslnl%ins, conductin" evalu1ting recreation experiences, e.upport 5ystem1and pubnc rel11llons methods i.n. private, publlc 1 soml prtvatc, nnd commcrcloal tourist Agen~:~u are covered ia tbis courae Rca-coU..n Sakty credits Ttd.a COUCH comblnea bot)l the cf~1~ivc and JJ'Ulic:!l conteot of lhe A~Mricn Red Cros.s' "St1nderd FirM Aid" course ;~ad U.t: Aniericon JiMrt Auoda1kln'a " Bittc Lir~ SuppDrt" course. i o d;. didon, k provldh training in more advo.n«d nners.ency core techniques for cmeracncies more likely lo be enconbtered by rccteatlon aad louriam pro!os.sfonols. Upon sucoe.ssful comphrliob of bis c:ounc, students wtn recelvc: ctrtiftcatloo n Stnnda<d" Pint Aid (hom the O.Oc County Choper of lhc Am.:ricon Red Cross) nd n bnlc: Ufc S<tPJ1o11 (froot lhc: Amcriteo H<ll'l A<sociiltJon. Wi>eonsln Mlllkl\el. ~~~ '

68 10-Course Descriptions Course. DesctiptioJt"!1: loj L 10 Profca&JonaJ Jnul:'s (redul!l Plan11ed at~d slj.pervtstd mini Oeld practicum cxpcticnt...s i1lthe 5tud(:nt.'s optipdj ruea arc Jhc purposc oll.his oow sc. Students tuclt~.! pr~e11tations ~ con1cmponny i.ssues in t.j~e Leis~l~e fidd. The t:ouue develop$ mdc:pendent rompe!enc)' m speclflc leaf'!ling ure a!&, 10~ 115. Recre~tfonlll R~aurce Ma11agement credits TbJS course provid~ 1 :study of the principles of fncillty mana~sement, progra:~ service managl!rnmt, personm( mrnagetn~nl, and fimnda.l mat'lagement skills nll:'!edl'! d to n,anilre a recreation enterprise. l09 1ZO Com.mcrcial-Tourl5t R~crcaUon. credit$ This courm: i:s iln examination of the historical dev.elopmcnl EUtd crowth of wmm.~rclal recreation. Emphasis is placed on tonrjst tre:j\d::;; in relntion.to comm!;!rclal recreation Restaucant Senlce MRnagemcnl crcdu~ T~i~ cour-se emphasizes ~he m.;magement o.thl'!!lervict'! pha!le ld1.11j.ng room! and COV-t:fS coordination of ml'!du ambience ser vit.;e and food presenlatic:l. t_also indude!l perionncl m8l'oge. ment, effective hjri.og~ training and.!lr::heduhng pro~cdutefi. 109 U.S lnlrodut;:tlon to Hospitality. Manil:l.s:emcn( _ crcdu.11 An introdudion to m~nagement and the hospitality icdt!-slry_, 'this cour:se: setv!:s t~s ft fou.ndation for he more.specialhed courses that fouow. Th~ fjrst part. SU"\rQYS tile industry, natio_nauy and klcally, and ~xamines closely tbe! two rn~or compcmorils-:-::boh:l;l_ and r~s1aura~ts. Tbe.secf)n~ part provides llll overview. of the w<:~rk hospitality managcr5 do. J09 J~,. Ho-el and Be11tl!urant Sa:Jes _P~o.mofion credits!hi_, ~u~se stresses the df!'v~lopmenl ~f the Stlld~t's alj_lity_ to J~en~f1 an~ sell t~e..~:nnventien msrkd an~ -t tesiqbjidl promo~ uonal_techn~qut'!s.d~sign~ 1o increa."!l! the sales of businesses in. the hcsphn.li'ty jn.dus.t,y, ;. 19~10. The. Tou.rlit lsuejnes.s - aedu$ T.hh course cov~n the ~mpcnents of tourism, modes of travel and ~hy people travel in relatiqn to ret;:~eation destlflo.tlllll d~veja~ent.. 1P9 11 Prflnt Offlce Mauage.ibl!nt ctt:d1t.t This-tourse ernp'p-!uizes,the cruciy hllmari ~pd public,rel~liol'\ll tespon~ibilitie_o;. of the fronl office.!ltaff. nstruclioo.i:r.~~luac.s the' pril:tciple$-o[ mafl.egen1ent as ~Jl RS routi'lle_prccedurelj and front o fir:e. <~crounting techni~ueli. _ ;. _ -. ln9 1 Boverage Morc~.a~ldng '. <redlio This course studics-1he deve[opmellt-srtd nature Cf afcohollc b~v~rage, linc_lud.ngtbe-effects Ofaloohol on the body),_ exatnirte~ laws and r~la.tions regar-ding the.sale ofbevem~,-tncludes responsible product knowle.dge of. been, win-:s, spirit~ and stan diird driok ma~ing procedures, and studies buman relatiolu and bar ma:aagement issues arid cost control pro-cedures-.-succcssflll complelion o{ tlje c:ouu:e pro~des.b~tdender's ~wareness certificath:~n rcqui.red by lhe dty o Madisoni.. Pterequl&lte:.M\&t b~!9 yea~ O( age or rccdv.e pertni:l~ion oc.tfu: :instrl.l(tof.. Ul9-.1_ Rc:s;ta ~raat Mamtgemer,;1 UdJts An introd_uction to tbejood oli:j)d ~erage opei'dtibns within the ho:spltality induslry, l!jis courae begins with 1n overview oi the COfD?On~nts_in ood ~.crvic-e today anq issu~s facing tbem; ~na})'z.es lh~ p~or::.e~ of develo_pidg: il ul.ark:cti1j8 Concept jincludlns menn pl!!.nn';"-sl._ ~a!dln~s ba~u:: t"t:5taurrnt_ ac:counting conc~pts zjn.d 11pptopru~1~ P,r1cmj; iind Co!it _cpnlrol methods Rotteatlonal ActMtleo crodlto Thl.s t'our5e covers developmcmtaj.activities Jn the srea ol.i rts trhs1 music, d~amatlcs, ga~, dance, outdoor recrfl-lition, ' literary, hobbies, Vo!untarysctl'lfdes, soc:lnl.and ~pe ci!'! eveit~&. 10!1- Hololahd.Ro tour... t Law credits The purposes a thi!i CQurse.a:re to lnve.!illsnce th.e laws 1pplleable to lhe own!:~5hip ll.lld operallon of_ business in th e hoipll llty n du~try j lq help the!ludent understand problems jn litisutton, and to Cre('le an awareness o what.specific ueu requtre doct.alled lcgnl-llllcntlon. 109~.18 Su~nhory lidureltccplns J credtcs This course provides.:~n inltoduclion to he fundgmcjllais uf hous~kccp(.tjg m<1:nigemcn!. The: t"<njr-'ie.litres.scs em,doyee tminiryg,. rccocdkl-epirlg and ~:xecutiv~ respon5lbihtics. 5nlllruction il'\.eludes developing slafi, t::<jll!rolling C<J5.!11 the room and Us prjn. dples, health, safety at1d prafessional growth. 09 l0 Field Smvcy 1 credit Students lnvesliglllc lhl! fields in which they desire futute!: employment. Thl!}' tht!n sele:d li. problem for!lludy in thi~ ace.l. St!'clion! ur thl! COU!'.!t! r~re ii1dividualized Management of Lel5ure Facllltl~s crll!dhs fn this C.OUSCl, COlls-idCrt:lliOfl j~ gjy~j) O planning; U181lnizing,.'ilrJ/ ring, ditccung, coordin.1ling, contrulling e.nd evnluating recrea. tiona~ facilijy u.&dge Opllta lon and Mainten~nc~ of UJsur~ Rc.~urccs r::mdlts This cour!!i~ prov\dcs ba~lc knowlcdg~ in l"nd drevdopmctlt im n~nts ror r~realion as wcrl as building Uai:ntenanct,_pQQJ aperahon aad malnlehance of Bti!D.! U.!led for Jei;sure. Equip-ment ilcqulsifion anr1 care am a[sa ~:onrl!d lid1pllality lnlcrnsbip credits-- Each. student completlog lhc degrct:: program mus.t include on the job experience in h.~ hospitalily iudu.stry comp(merit of choice Requirements lnc~u~c irteen ho\ln per w~e:k of-work in the ft<:ld, a teaming: centrad desisned to maximize prafcls.ieh"~ grow:b, semir~sr participa1ion and leadct!ihip, and quartezly onalytic.al papers. Enrolh:lcnt in ntern6hip i~ limited VJ ~Ludeots wbo halrc:: :luccessfully_cmnpleled_two setrie5ler:s Urthe flospl.tu.hy 'i\\i'lna.ge~ -ment pro.srtm. ( Ho.spib:JJty lnlcrn hlp. f. cn:dlt.s 'rhis course is a.:;ontlnuaticm of Hospii<J.li:ty nh:roshfp [! 1.09-ll;o Spoclalond S<><lal Rocreatloa. crodlto This course pro~idc~a ~ludy of the rc;::rea.lion service~ ~eidg of fered to a.wiqe vadety of special groups-iq.. soei.ely,.jasjc prin c:iples u5el;i ~}' providers, as well as current pfactices and future tr-end&, are cxami:jcd Tra'Vel Agency Servk:es ' credits Thill ~uri begin.! wtth tb e-tnj:v~.ifldut~try bao:;~round, tlle dm ~ons pf the trave~ indll:~.try~ gcograpldc~l divislon~ of the Un.~t~d SM!es and t.b~ Western H~nrlsph_ec~; ud.ute tiqte :ZOn~s-a.nd heir e:hect on_h;avel. Stud~nts learn -a.bout lj'!_e.alr industry. routes,~- ~clle::lu:l-es, f1res, r:t:servali.on:~ ptqcedures 1.ticketing, rdu~d -tlild tc issue.procedures, as wen R& lnmsporlalion laxes. The c;ourse also erpjains; how ~o- sell " cruise-an expl~n_o~i9n of deck; plaos, rate struc:t-ur~s llnd tlle ameniti~s :~ba:ud_ :~, _crlll=ie yessel Tnlvel Atlcncy Training credit. Th~s ~urset pla~~ empbosi~ '?n ~~~~ncy selling tecbniqll ~::: $ 1 office pohc1e:s an procedures, th!: functio111 of ai:lr.-genty, as well. as dom~lic air 1_ravel includln_g uirllne reservations fllld-tkketing. 1Cl9-no ldh!fp retiog ~Jle 'Leisure En,.ironn:tent -.-crcdlts 'this course concentnde:s on learning- abat.it 1he eri.vironmen1 and learning to behave in ttie envhc,nment-to knew-bow to uuze ~mt Pttscfve wilh emp~a$is on (he understanding cf and de:ve[ap iag llb appreciation fo:r tbe natural environment. 1~~175 Recreation lntcrnshlp. z credits Tb1~ course!nv(llv!! volunteer!icldwork extc:j\dlng for _o nc s~mestcr... l50 hmms total. l Rec~~Uon Seminar 1 c~du This course- inydlves a::rilic1l issue$ and.ltends, sharing cv~jiuation 1 and jdtegnttjqjl Of Jjeh:J pracljcllm, 111 MARKETNG-NSURANCE Prir,clplcJ ofln urunce credll5 Thf11 course ~overs ri~ lind haor.ar(i Jaws or pmb~pi1ity, lns\lrab1e. ha:utrd slluahon~,!lollbrogation, in~ur11ble interest, Cb jnsurance proximal~ cause, r~;egligen.:t::, d'=dur;llblca ond vniued policies. ' lntruducilon to RJM Mnn.~~a cmcnt ct-tdit1 't'hls ccunc.c-xplorc.s procedurce for ~d-:nli ylny nnd. cvaluoli"g plopt;rtyj lncomej li!'biuty!lnd pcrsonoj JQiS e~~:rs. ]t revlc:ws rl k management techniques find ln!rodu~! the ron)!wdrk or flnandnl!lnd.sc~lnl c:ritcria by wl1lcb bu&in~ss mok~s- dcdsion!'f. 19 REAL ESTATE 19+JS.!;.Communlty Pl:annJnt;.FundamentaF J credh' 1'hts cuurse provld~s o stud) ar the 5teps needed to ensure s.ounti d_evclopmenl of new residenuaj and co.mmerd.il ;:,re<~s l.lfl~er olit p~ivat~ entrcprise sys1em as they pertain to developer ll.nd p_japn jng.c:o-mm)ssjon- regul.otloos. 19 l75. Real Estate lnvt!stm.,nt cmdus Thi~ c::otnse i~ &n intrcd:ut:hon to thf! ba!lit: principl~~ an'd prac1kcs of 'in\ft.:!ting ln r-l'!llll'!.!ltllrtl!'.., 19~180 Prl~clple1 of Re~iE$tot~.. ~ <:requs Tttis cauue :;urvey~ the eccmunlc.p.nd :;ocla) aspects of re~ esfrtt'! apprnlsing, financing, tbe-o~en1tion r,-.( _a rc11l (;S~.te_office1 real eslale dpcumenl.s-, conslrucljo.n,: propei:ty management an d porite ownelllhlp Jte11l-iEs~otr: Law crcdhs This course covers the runde.lll~t:ltals. Lo be observed. ln hahdling a re~d estate tr~m::;adion Rnl state Finance. credits An applied study_ of.money m'.ltkets, lr~tere$l rates and the fin~~ ing of real e:s:ta1e, thts oourse _explqteslendlng polkies., rul.t.:.s and ptobletn:s involv ~d ln fidanciog teal property Rl'!sliHst.riiii'!'Markeling _~~~its 'l'his course studil!'!'l rnruket.analy!li.s, sales, planning, t!aff tnmpen ~tian and s.:~le.s mana:gerrtf'!_nt joc~udu,g s'!lectioi'~t-cra:ining Jnd Sl!pervlsion !6 Re~tll&t l.e 1\.ppruball _....<:r~dlt&> nus caurse,.presents the.rudi~nta of_residential appraisirl_g with an empb!lsi:s c_n the s~gl~ famuy borne. 1!1-187 Reallialale Appntlsalll ' <rcdits A continu11tio'n of J~-'186 Rl!al Elrlltf!' Appraisa] 1, this_ course t::( pl.1ins lhe,ftzz:~d&!n~nt.tjs o~md techrnque& of.narrativ~ reportwriting with cmphelsis on m.grket 1 - costqn~ incqme-llppro.<~.cbf!s, and the.nla.rty zclstcd proble.r_m, Property ~n&geinent int be,9l0pq1.e~t s ctcdit\o This cours~ covers the functions of proj>_erty m~~gement and dcvelopm~nt,. milrkel nnalysis, tf!onetaryjnfluences,!ease and rent '<.:Md~l\~gornanl\gemcnt planning; rn:aintenimce; teriant:.!l.-and psychology _of f\ccupaocy, syn<ticate.and corporate OliiQ.ageirtcnt Rcll1 Property ahd CllSUdll)l. lii.sl!r.wu:~ Law crll!dits 'l'he he.slc:~o of r~d property and ce..!luauy -~~surt.nt:e law, a:~.they pertain to a particubr probjem.empbt.min& pr!;?t~ction.a~.~~mst losses, are ~ludied wilb 1he ipten~ior) of.1lving. the:.stud.:n_l'<:~ gene raj bal kground. 196 SUPERVSORS MANAGEMENT TECHNCAN ~100 Pi'JndpleJ of SupervisiOn. _. c:redits This-.i!i on introductory course ill lh<: bastes of supervision for pctlng a.nd a~iring supervi~ory _nnnagc:meh.t per:!onnel in m~ufa~ turlng o_r service ~nquatri~. The c~ne i$ ddigoe to create e. foundation for further management atuc!y by cmpbu.!liting skill!iinbjed:s such M plannlng, otgarni-zing, ati11rfingj co~~dl~hng and contioljing lbr()ugldh~ use oi ~petimrentallrearnijlg actlvith:s, CLSC StU~)'i gtc;up pro'qlc:m Mil\linS Dnd siinulation ex:crcl~ es. The cour.se ala-q includes an introd1.lctlon1o l~ history at supervision, manaa;ernentand m()livation.styles~ and future trc:qd:, Octupatlorinl Trends and ltssur:li Z ci'cdils This cou~e elfers an asmlnauon o! c ~tren~ tre-nd1 ln bu.siness, tndli&try, heflllb, sen.' lee, o:ovc:rnmcnt and other occupational sreat. t!ndlldes "'" anazyels of lhe tssues raised by tho.lie tt~nd~ and th~ probable Crft!chl rm tet:h11nlogy l!.nd jobs. The course abo cxlmdncs ~he supetvjsor'& role rww and jn thtr (ut1.1ce by rnonaging change. 196-HJ Penonnel PracUt:e& credit1 This-course cnvers the proccsa~5 of rccrultmeot 1 inte:.vlewingt pla~l..lmenl, o:rlcntat\on, evaluation, dledpllnej dccum=ntpti6n, srlcvanetll, handllns!rlnge be:nefil q~eetlon!. and resolvlng employee perft)[mance prob1uns. Concenlrat1on h on the supcrvisor's role: and llllllon with the personnel nuthorit1 of the org nimt~on. J 96 1 Ma1l-dJfng Huma" Relou:rcc. s crcdlta- Thls course orfcr.s a det.alt<:d study fj! behnvio:rln crsllniznuo~s. ~mploycc motl\1'-a(iou r ctors, evsluv;tion sud f~edba~k mo~hods, employee development slrategi.~s~ coordination -of empl()yco productivity~ mana~ng conflict aad needs assessment. 1Qfi.U9 Labor Rl!lBtioml cfedlts Thi!l course examines, throush practical -.applicatioh nd clue Eludy, Union nd t~nn-unit;m ll!;nvironments:,-re,b.tiol'lshlps with employee mqtivaticm -factor~. tl\e s1.1perv:s9r 1 11 role in. ~:~ntract ad minislrot\on, id1.pacts of sovernmetlt resula.ticn'i.s l'nd legisliilion. be.rgaining and_gdev!lnce.p[otcdures.!96 1 S..fety..~todllo Thi5 course covt'!rs current safety technology, dealing w.ith OSHA, C<Ws- or.s.1(e)y progums versus-lru51!'s 1 the.id11urnces Of stress and motivation problems, ad<?pting-a h\;m!ln engineeri~g-appr<lach to the job e.nvjrc-ume.nt,._.and carryov~r from-thl!' job situatit.m to tl'le employee's 6afety tttuh.td" 11way from. the otgant~uon S R.esuits.Qri(l.nled S'!Jp~rVis1_o~. cted.l(& 'fh.is is an advinced,cour.sl! de.!.ignl!d lo 8;ive.the s(udent.!\ m_ore detillled look at supervitory respdhsibility toward pcoduct~viiy. Orianh;~Uon.al ;~.re01s emph.a.si:r:ed include straf!lfgic: n~ opeca_tiotj p!annln_g, orcnnl:r.;~uon design methods in rll!gaj-d fo thl! S11pt:r vis Dry le"'cl, relationships to <1nd coordin;~.tion o dfort- ve~tically <:~nd hotizon(sily with the orca.niza.tion.;~.t structure, l~:~dersl'lip Toles to increru~: productivil_y, internal and cklemel cnvironmen tal effl':cts on org.1.n:imtioclll d ~:~ Lgn. 'rht coutse abo ictiudeoidcn~ tifita~icn o quality r::on1ra1 application~ an.d its irnplici11ions- in fu(~r~ phui.nin_g. AU an:l!ls indud~:. prar::ci:ol tl.pplic.atiol1s, silhuh.~ lion and group di5_cussion.activiti~s. P,r_erc:ql.l._isite: J96~J.00 _Prin cipl~~:s 9f Supervisloan. 196 LZ9 Organhatiao systema'lic5.... J_'tredJt5 The emphasis of this Course _ls on the individu11ll:; occ upational.. in~ ter~st,.a study- of organitational bebavipr and the operati'on_of. sub-systems within. Topics will include coni tal system5, opera." tion systems, loss preventi;;~n.. reportu!.g systems and cosl reduciion strategies. l9q 1Z Mttkln g MecrlrtgsWo~. '.. t cr:ed.ft The em;pb.asi~ of this coiine:"-ts p]tli:c:d on und~(st;mding pr(jb.lem~ find procedures nvolved io tjj!king m~ti:ngs wo-rk a:s ilin or.sariizer and a. pa~liclp!ml. AreB!l or study include rnec:ting prep.!l'ration, agenda developmen{, oornmunke~j~ll,:objective-- s;enlns,- meeung ~nvir011ment5, and the use_p(aqdiod.suabi nr mooclug cftec:!lven~ss. 196~i'5 TimcManap:nent.._ l'crct.li't Tl1.!! erilphash of this cours1: is plar::ed on und~r5t11nding problems Uld pt<ltl'!durt'!s involved in lime-jrianagejdenh The COUniC: pro~ vide.$ tooi~ f~ &v~lijatjng how time is used, and ocf~rs suggeslioj\5 for-bilprolling the~nse of Hme for greater.effectiveness on ~nd.off tbejob Dat.D P.rocess.Jng for Malli'lg~r!' J: credit This cour~ will provide- a fundam:enttil l.tnder:;tanding of ~mman bu!l'iness compul~t oppbcauons.. Jt wh jnlroduce b~sic: ~;cmputer functions and terminology. Analysis Of the processing: unt::hon wm include output, jnpu!, fij~; processins steps ari<hontrols. A. ptimary concern will be 10 deve-lop cdmmunicalional undc:nilan ~Jng w)t.h programme,r! and pro~.:essin& pejs,cnnel to obtain de&irtd_ compute;r products.. 1%' 1"1 Effective Listening Cor Supervisors 1 ci-edit This coutse. i! d~igned to eumine the-c:onununic:atitm proces.s through e.o ernphams on effectlvc listening, t encompasses tden!\fica lion of poor listehing habits and methods or improvement to decrease rplsunder.st~tnding.. and Lmprove indlvidualabhity 10 grasp <:enccpts nnd re~e~in in ormatictl Asse'ttlvc Mcmagtng 1 cr ed~t This course io.lrodu~! ass~rtive: beho.vior or sup~rvison. t deal.s willt d.eve.loping_a!lsrettive oejuwjor en11blifjg a person. to act tn hl5 or. bet bc't ttitcr~;_.s~s. a stand up for bim.s!:lf or her.self without undue onxlety, to express hone.st feelings oomfonnbl1nnd n ~x _ercise ha, or het own dg.ht$ w\thouldenying tbe rights o( others.

69 1Z'Course DeKrlptlons Course Descriptions:taa Struolllon m nt 1 credit ~~~ ~ourse ls d~~ to aid 1\lpervhora in unde!'1tancln&. iden t f)'lns od< doohug with Job rclated lrt,..lt w~l "lll11111<: the "'""'of &treso ond offer wsgestions foe rcdu<lng llreu. The goal to improve lncfi lduol e!fedivwess by lessening \lleliu!ihood of fob-related health problems TnolniDTtrblllque l<>"edlt This cour>e eumln" opeo~r... of tho ouperwot'sjeijlonoibiity for trolnlna. ll lndl>dc:s ptoru,lns. odmlnlslerll\g ODd.. alo tioj trolnq proaronu. llevoluatea tb o<h scs and disadvantqes ol y _ried lroiolng ml!thocls and des<:lbu methcxu of idontilyloj u.;~ req"ulnmenb., ~smc needs, ud assessing training c(. fecttven~o ond coota S Probi..,.SolvloJ and Declsloo l\loklfis <Rdit rn;, ~0... mints the pr!'<'" of decioion-makh~& lluoua/t pro ~lem MknHfatlon, Mternahve ~neratioc {brdillstormi.nsj. 5e.lec: hun of ltemmtvu, Unplemenladon of ~h.ltions ond control of dod.>~n& The coyrse olso ntroduces, lh<oukh practical oppllcoj Uop Wtth ttal)dc <><sanlz,ot!onoi problems, dccision-rnakin& st.stans such., dec~slon. tr~e, critical pc1th analysis "probobillty th""ry and sta<lstlealallprooches to dcclsion-maj<ing fn the super visory level mllllf,gcment contc)(t. 01 COMMERCAL ART ZO JG Drawina Fomdome tois oredil< Thls course is study of per.sp«ti.ve, proportion oonstruct!oil of solid roans; and rerwierlrt& ld JiM and tone \lsllti a va.rlety of.ut nntdia. ZOHOS "Dtowq l'llod.r~ej~tajo z cmlits This i.! olll inllodactmy dr~wlng.u,. cmpnasiziogsound croit.l...,.hlp and the Slody of basir.lr.. hand <ln. wing okiu.. Tha <w= ladudcs!be rudy ol perspective, proplrtloa, cora~.n<tion of solld fomu, fight and shade, ond rcndmn~ in n.. and l<>lle "'-'itb v riety of utmcdhrrm llblratlon <rcdiu Sccond rur &tudents haw the opportwllty to d""elop ouinbc< of lcc.'hruq"' \n this cour.e throus,h assignmeota directly reb\ed to ~ol illuslt11tion lad product reodering.. AlJ wor.k is in b~ck and whlte and deslptd ft;w li!le reptoductiou Lctterinc TypOerophy. - z or..ut This courjc c:oven the fundamtntdl.'f of trpoer1phy, how tq ~ ecute loyoutleuerin1 ia ell styles, ond how to apetily type ond copy ci.st. ~phasb is plnced on Sht lructure and fonn J( Jayout" l~n~dnc and how lt i~ ~cd ill today' a adverlisjns ~(l "and deiigft. ZO-108 TJ1>0Jiophlcol Design crcdllo Thi! s' oontll\ll8tlon of 0J.t07 Letterlng Typogtophy. Th em phaois ($on typography ond od ve rt!olngla~out. Tbe use of type ln graphic deifgn concepts ~~ cove r~. Preroqui,lte: ~ Lolterfng 'l'yposraphy-. ' llluolrallon credit AssitJf!ln~ntl for thl1 coursa are ~reclly related td advertising and. tdltof?al JUuttratlon utillt.lng tonal medjunu Qnd color. n dividuoli>cd aaslsnments empbaslu problcm solvlng aud produc tion of camera-rudy art. PrtrequWte: 0J J06 Ulustr lion or equlvolent.. ZCJ 1 lollrodudlon to Cartoon na credits Thb course inlrod~ the commercialul student co a very spcdi.uud aroa of the fi ld, yet one n whfeb on lndlviduf will very Ukely heeome nvolved n at the av<:ragc odyorlilins 11ency or art J(ulfio. Tite s!.. plidty 0( 1 good C.rlocn d<ccpuve n that t appoa,. easy to do. Tho student!urns tho\ dmplleily s difficult to KJ\kre, The t<ucft:af rumslw.ic Uttoon COlUlructi.cm. attion, nk! & ond leiter tcchnlquos Commordal CaT1oonlng credit H.. i"8 l<ttmed tho bis<s of carloottlngl.fld nommerclalorl, slucienlt now leun the appllto~on of tblt kied of work. They tt1so com aboul Jyndlcatlon ond bow lo r.. rl<et lho!r work on a freelt~nce bui ~ ZCJl-1 19 Lllo Dr~wlngl eredlh TtadltlonaJiy, the tralntng ot the 1rtlu has jncludc!d nh:nsive drawlna from the human Ogun., lin to my Jnd tfgur~~t codlpojiuon, o\ mo\lery or the figure povcs tbe way for other'" J"osslon. Thfs fntrcu:f~ory cotu~ vi~i lift drawloa U muu, not th encl. 'Tercquilila: 01-lOO Dnwl"S Fuodomer.to!s or equivolool Z01 UO " d ertl lnj l.oyoutl c:rodltt Thit ooursc offers prottitallro!nlna n vl~u&lnln, ond a you!, lhroa,;h VJrltty of Uilgnments. ill m cb the u.me Way u an odvortlslnr &ency. The studedt l<ams to work lhroush!rom Oib layout to ammt-r<ady mechanical, l'rerequillite: Ldtorio& Typography ) Gropble Oeolp J crodlts The objectfve ol dd COW"X fs to deveklp lwcm:'ira:ensionar. nd. vanc-ed dells~ concepts. Asstgnmenla are offerl!d in layout, cor. porate JymboJs and vlsu l de&lgn dyn,wmks, The course covers &rap hie dntgn elemenu. theip.aso K hlbctkms Graphic D.,tan J crodltj This <:Oursc cov u lhre-e dimenslbru\l, netvanc~ lt de:sig:n pr~em!. Atsignmenls are offend in applied \fisual grlphics, from p1ckag~ design to environmental ond c<~mmunity dc::~ign. 01-ZG. Publlcoitlon De isn. erodil Thi~ CQm o covers ntw.sp.pr:-r, m'ar idnc mf: b(x>k de.!dgn:. ns db~ jc-ative s lo help dtudcnts undcn\end the bas-k concc:pll of publketioiij rom dc.11jjn to productlon Adv nced ProUle,...Ju tratlon.c r,dltl Thi.s Co rse caveu Uuslration ior fuu-colqr reproducti'on ajid.the u o( oil media (e.j. ocrylk:. wotcrcolor 0< ml d media)." The' cmpha.sts is oa problcm ~ lng and content. JlluStraclon auignmenu Will be of more nomplelt oo..position. 01-ZT Advan<cd Problonu-Grapblc DeoJcn -~,;..clllo a!his COW'te, $11Jdetlts bav &fl"l'j''r1\mlty lot pllblicotioo of \heir designs by dotlsnilll for non-profil aser.cia in tho Madison aru. Students are eneoura.;ed to do tbejr own rth.udl ants probl<m-5<>lvioa for a \'orielt. o( pr<ljeetj.. Z01 lj8 Comprtltellllve K-arin& cndlls Primlrfly 'bslnl fe!t tip sn rken to cre01<t layouts U\ color tbl.$ coune emph"lut ptod d recdorioj-cgmpint! ill~mra~;,w material ood dlaploy type. The techn!qub taught "'" Widely u.cd by coaun~lartists..,, Dulpur>d Color. Zcredlto 'Through the tilt of design and oolor, the oludentl:lln lellrn elcmcnlt ol dosijn end develop an oppr<dodon 1o< t"bo principle~ d unl~y, h.umony and cnlor. l..!chuc aa.ct stud io etertihs are inchtd..:! Dcolsn and C'!llor 11 z credits This course s a conunu t!on of ~0)-t:iP O..lgn and.colod. it covers ~dvanced de~gn aod color Worki to further '1ieve~op t~c;:: ~1thehe.s of detjgn. Studlo work l1lu threc-dlmeu$iqaar dcsiso,. Prerequilit ~: ~1-19 Doslsn ~d <;olo( Adverllilnli Layollt n. dlls Thb cour" lo a contlnu t!on i>f Adverllslns Layout[. ZO-S9 Alrbruoh Tochnlqllcs. cr dlt This ~~ucse c~yct$ o varltly o( technlqut.j and the u.scs of sir brushing ln technlcol draw~ns, Af(:hitecl~nal ren<fering a~d photo retouc&lltg Studio Technlqueo l z ertdho This. <aorac on l trd<uetlon lou.. basic tools ond moterlals of the comm.erdol rtlsl. Problems n pend!, pen and ink, ocntch ~:~~ v:r=~oklr, dr&w(ng in.strumtnts and studio proc:eduru Z0!- Pot1folio Preparation z credit& StuQ;nts worlt to prepore a Simple partlollo ollhclr,.,.'* fot pro $p<(t!ye nnployer1. SludeoiJ lite... perv!je<laod Wled n tho choh:o ol samples. amouot of tamples, lrld loyovl of portfolio. L<chuos eovcr Job lnluvk:wlng ud job markoil Oeponmerllllpproval ot a CL 51ted pcrifouo Jo requirej lor Jro~io.o udlo Tecbnlqu.. u :1. crtedlto The <lll!llwis ol thlo coot,. loon lb ota( medlumo, wash ud opaque watercolor, (cit pcm.. end the exploroucn of color throu.sh vorloty of ""ianments. Prerequf>lle: 01 0 Sludfo Teehnlquet. ZOH 1 AudJo.Vtu l Technlq""' Z" crcdlto a oddltlon to ort-cn papcr. tbc ortbl eloo wesllght as a medium. 'lllij c:our~ Jntroducr1 t~ co.mmercl.t.l 1rt tludent 10 a nrle-cy o! mediums used lncumlngly n the r.old n whlc& thel""'8"15 ~gned to be pro)ecled 0<1 5C'etn U!f18 Ught lnd <lectnmfc means CommtJCl l Art lnternoltlp 1 a..ut Arran.sement.s can be mede: for thole students -who han a wotk illll bowled& n pooteup ltehnlquea for off-camp.. taporienco in wldc ran;e of 111.tbidioJ, public butuutioos or large COrpot'a lien art dtpltt.j'eais, Uld COm.n\ercial1rt CCT.c:ie':l. 0 PHOTOGRAPHY Pbolo&rapble Compotltlc:n Z crcdlt Th\s course it 1 su.rvcly of composition as an bnport Df too1 of the pl>otogropher >rhlcll }ltlp! k> eat bll h purpo>c ond meaning in vi!ua-1 statement. The blsk: cornpdsit\cnal elements are analped, 1s they may help to focuj on 1 'ubject, $hlrpctl Pt n:eplionj 1 puu!gqclh~r elem.en,ts, llnd communicate. The courit ncludes ap inlroduclloil to the field of ptoies$1onol pholosraphy. 01ol07 studio Pbotosro~hy cr.dlls This oaurse covers baste thoory and ptoctlcal ppllcalkon in the. use of the view ctm~ra, Jenaes t~nd lijht lneters, ex.pmute techni q'ues &nd i-ellijed procesdng: systerns". ReqUit-ed~ x5 vlow canlcta and sturdy tr!~oa OS Stud.!<> Pbotogrophy. credlls A conuouauon of Studio Phofogrophy l, his"'"'" cmphuites lht portrayal of Architetturo1 form.,, light, balanct: and con1rol of penpctdvc. Pre\-equitlle: Studio Photography Studio Pltutoaraphy ll.. crcdtl5 Tit!$ eou"c emphisizeo photosrophlc ~elutions fo< many oecupotlooal.,...!1\lch.. l dwtrllltnd (t"e.lanco. 51udeots wlll6c en <Wrosm to stt up )tdt.lduol proj«u ond their,.lu<ions. Fr. roquwtc: 0l-Hl8 S!udlo Pbotogr pl!y ll G<-ophlc Arta"Pbat"'T"phy cndlts Uls cou.ra is an inuocluctloq to tbe pre-pre.u ar-=- of litbognph.ic print na, """'""" tripplng, contoelln~o p;oollng and plotemolting.. Hiib contrut pho!ojrephy will be cov<rc'd, well.. holflone aad ductone ~ctio:1. Automated ftl.m proe:cnin as'well u troy proc<s5n! will be used. Mllntroduc:tion to diffusion tr.losfcr balltotl<s wtu be eoy<!red. Sl sl.. and multi-<xllo: $tripping with pin registration win be lntrodoiced. Stverel methods ond reuoos far fihn contacting wu be covered, add ayste:ms crganiu.hoo wiu be stressed. 0 t Graphic ArtS Photogr phy U i:redlt. This oour5e is c. coniiauatloo of %0l UD Vr:aphic Ar1s Phafosraphy l, providing tm mean.~ lor the itudertt lo LtH the knowledge and &kills he or she h1.1 acquire.d to underst nd llld perfomt mofb.d!(flottll pr<icedurec. A <lr<lng emphulo will he plaoed on filin oontaellng nd. complex mulll color l lpplng. Mdhcds.ofpin.rcgislra(lon wjit ~covered. Pagination al:td $ianature stiipplng will bt cove-redj o.long with step and repeat platcmaddng. Process color scp uauon ls dj1c~uscd, A.ud (au.r ccdut" >tripping il ptrformed by th"o student. 0 1ZO Llghtlns Techniques Z crodlt This courscintroduces rho lows of light, quolltlcs of noturoland ortillctal light sourecl. t toyers ll&ltllng for form, texture and atporation uslns basie llgltting teciidtquc&. ''M use of standord t.tu.djq lighdns for btl nee and ~orrtcl expo.ure i1 also covered. Z0 1Z Commtldal PhOO&rDphf crcdlh This cou"" rovers product photogt&phy with an cmphosls on crmlinj solutioll1 lor adverthins Uhu;tralioo \l1in.s color and blll<i<.- nd whltepholosrapby. Prcreqlrilite: ZOJ-108, Studio Pl!otogropby Conomcrclol Pho~opotphy n c:ftdlts Tht. CO<tt,.;, 1 no Unuollon of 0-Z1 Ccmmerciol Pltologtaphy J. 0 1 Porlrolt Pholosraphy Z orlldlt.o 'fhb tour.. covers the theory ond prfncfplu ol porttalt pholoirophy 1.tucllo ond environment portrolturo. Bmphasl ls ploc,'<l on lilhllnt. posloj od< chenctcr anolys!j. Prerequisite: Studio Phot!J1Tiphy and or consent ol lnstruelor. Z0 11 Cl>i<>t Pltolo&taphy credit This course is a.u tntrod\ldloa to 1\ddltlve on.d.sublnctive ca!qr thfory, the use or color enlaraus to cofot bafu.cc prints, flu en, ~klr film nnd p:apet procdsors end buic ~o: retouc:h methods. Prcrtquisite; Shadio Phutcartphy or consc.at of i.nmtuaor. 0 1 Color Pbolosrophy crcdju Tit count ollowt thelludentlo d<velop otdvontxd tllilt. usrtj co!or nestuve pnd transparency mtterieb. t C()Ycri the prope:t vse of color mot erial$ lolhe 1tudlo ad<! on location a relation to,titlhtinj. lillratlon and color temperature. Prere<ju!oite; ;!0-11 Co!oc PblltaJrophy. ZOl-170 Photns'lll'ltY Z ncdlt.o This course covers buic :!Smm camera oper~ion tod bbd:~ white li.m devdoprne:nt and printing to provjdc n~nt' with.1 solid ph.otograpbic foundauo1. Studerlts proyide their QWn.Smm ca.m:~r.u c:t'ld bufc ~teri&j. ZOJ-171 Photovaphy Z credits Thi ~.eoutse b contlm.:nltlon Qf 0 ~70. Prer,1qulsite~.0~ ~1'?0 Photography PbolotlfapiJy lu,. crodlis This coul'se coven adv.. tloed blnolc: and wlllte. prob)ems ~nd.begi the tberuy d praclloo of 5Jnm.color pbotog,.phy PhotojournoUom '. s crcdl~ Thi$ coune '"oven journalisfie f.hotography for tria.!s public con aumplion wlth vls~llrnage be ns the imp:1ct point in telllted e:veot5, deas or clrc\lmstanct&. The ~tudc:nt is ocpq.scd to techni. qu~ in which event$ can be communkatd and evaiwlted purdy thtou.jb visual nleln$,'1"he!hushed product may coflsi.!it of published photos or photo e>sayo. Prerequialte: Studio Ph<>l.og'raphy or Photocrophy or ooosent ol inotructor. ~0-176!'llotOSBPhlcCommvnltJon Z"eclits This course is explotltory jn t11ture. Projeet1 may lndud.e the phcid..,.,, d...,tary pbotograpby, odvettislng photogr.>plty, -po$le%s. production of anaudil)vbllll progrtm or puttfoa photo(j,.phs into book form. Pr<rt:'ludite: 0) 106 Studilo Pt.otogntpby or Z PbotDiniPbJ U i'o.tjouo Preporotlon. cr-..!it. This coursi is the colminatlo~ of Fho!O(Jrtlphic stills oequitcd '' dunog atudy for the..,..;dale dezr«in Photograph)'..Jd""!"k pow put into the form of a portfolio-a cry ilcpottant lool \Ujecl Co-ShoW emptoyers the 1tudent's skilh 1nd a v bi.lilier. Res:umes..,d opplicatlon nformation will 1\10 be prepoz-cd. Tho l'ortfofiq Sllow... 1~ h!jbncht the setnesler' efforts. l>eputmcntol oppro lll ol the fjnlshed portfolio s required. Prer<q l>il<,; 0-1 Coloc l'llotosraphy Photogrophy and 0 11 Commerciul Photography Cinematography cretlit. Tbis cour'e "rovidcs 1\l lntroduc:tlot'l to!hm.;as a medium of ex pre.!sian. Empbali.!l il on the conc~ptlanj shooting on<.l.~di.hng of a baslc picture story. Shrdenti will becomd fu.rniuatfzcd with the usc of ah Cultdlimcntal Gmm mdtlon plcturit equipmull. course olso c:overs th control1nd manipulation o( photog.taphle images through film editing Pbol"tf~pby lllltrnshlp l crcdlt. This course is dt!ltisnetj li) provide Ute Aludent wilh An opportuni ty to ~h observe.and galn work ~xperlencc with Pf'Oie-s.sionDls in vorious AreA! ol p~orosrophy. Prerequisite:.011 GPA ud< two...,.,tor ln the POiogtaphy proarom. 0 PRNTNG AND PUBUSHNG Z0 101 Typopaploy a acdlt> T!til course an introd tllon to the c:on<t!pls and tru!hocl of typdiirapby and lts opplleatlon to lhc lllhograpblc proce<s. Lceture material!s tclllfor<ed with lab<><o!ory oalanmorlll io rcprocn< ~on mc'jiod5 ullrts lite lobort!dr)' computerized typesc1tlog cqutp...,nl. Stadenls u"!dbl<!he m tcriahcy prod~~«for Uthogtophle reproclucdcn.

70 Course Descriptions Course Dc!st:rlptlons-15 ZG 10 Llthusr Phlc Toch ulqu<j crodlt This C:oursc COVt:U U1~ preparation o( Jnage (or repf0due1ion through curreutlndustry procedures. Afld technlqllt!s. Cour.sework. lnclu ~es p~otographic reproduction~ rulin, ticribbiug, opaquln8. retc.uc:hina of atesatlve&,!sy<iut and assembly o( stripped flats, nd the selection, cere Uld. makina o( varic>\.slmllge uniers. 11 a1m introduc.slht stwknt to the concepts and operation o( tithogtjphic press sy.\tmu tbrou&}j bands-on uprtieoee to produce dnsj< and mulrl«>!o: imag<l Fllrlher inruudi n nk mlx.ln&. eolor wubtaj,. i~e rcgis-trtian and other oect"ssary p1ess operatioll& are uplored Gr phlc Comm.unic tions Procetsct. cndllt Thl' ~ >~ bule oourae in J1repa ratory graphic proced-ures C)lpOslng students to copy preparation,. typesetting procc:dures a11d pasteup fmechanictlf,pi'epflrathm. Type hi$lory, use and phofom~:c:l1aplcel cccss~re studied and uhd tn lhe laboutory. The cou.r.se f~atun~s lecture. demorutralion aod proj«t proetdurn. t covezs :nosi composition sy.saems aocl prdc'dcres and eacttt inlo ~e tmasfer. Socne print~ CCOilOmkJ.ve!txuasN Graphic Productlon ProcnJ<o crodlto ln.5truction &nd ma1trial or t.lti$ courae art arro:~nged iii: four basic are.~ of graphic lmagc: c:cnv.er~ioj\: ( J lh1! photogruphy; () halftone p hot o~raphy; {1 image lrans f~r-i.e. stripplng nod plating. for tlift tjresa-au.the fcjt"cgo\ng ln negutivr: foun; and (1 th,~ w, ar~d popular ''true pre licfcenlng" using :1 continuous t ot;i~ neg>ttlve 1nd the e.nlarg!!t \o prtpare pocitl e halftones for pridting LlthopapbkTccj"'Xr""' U c,.dlto 1"!tis b..tc c:ounelatroduces.lho >!udal lo pre pru.lechniq>ts requlr«l by the lilt>osrapllle plllld!j process. ~tud ats recet ll strud:ioil ia the btcka-:ound s.nd proper operation oltbf! prooea ~:n:era to produc hig.b.contr&:,t aesatlves. The.studentwm be i.nstn1cte.d, in ba,ic jmaz.e assembly through tho use of sel~ted lab e~~j~~~ M~c~tn~ and ~ray proccs,ins.~ negnti-,.es ~ill be Ul.u' L Pr.., Toctwology i credlu This is -an (1v.nced COUJse io lidqnphlcproduction pn:x:cdures. The st.:dent Use$ producuc.n equipment io-aolving p«:blcms and exeforts let.hnlques n press m.aia.l:maoce, papel lumdliag aod the ~i:xin~ ollc>k. YlriO<ls l<chniqut!s oxplorod durizls 1)1.10 Lftb9&Japhit Technique& are abo expondocl. Pre.. quisito: ~ 10Z Lilhosr.:pblc T~hniqu~~ ~r con~ent of instructor. 0,11 Presi Technology or.ccllt Tbii continult.lon of Frll!!s.s Tedmolo~y ladvanees nto multi- orm and mu.u-<:olor reproductlojl L.aboratory i!!!xpefience b offered in quality control of lingle nd multi-coklr preu \W'Orlt. 'Ju«JUisllo: ~ 101.ithogruphlc Tedmlquu or i:oosen! of. m~~ "'))p..,apbyn.. s credlta Thisc:oune J oootinuotioomw. O ~aphyi"with m phasil on computerized typeseuina p rqcedures. The course pur StieS copy preparation, mad~t~p, formattlng and tbe use of tlee tronlc. lnput-ov.tput d vkea. Methods tnd oqu(r.ment for storing dala on uled. Computer typc"ttins 11lguogo o learned an~ used~ 0.!-1 l)lpopapby W cr<diu AD al<!>slon ol0-11'r!'ogtojll>y, tid. oourse emplu>sizeo ~:cmpute:r ltld dectrcnlc concepb in Jetting type. C1as.aroam txet c'i.ses toycj foam, area display and rext forlll&ta. MuXU:p, lafojt oqd compldi"!! tbt cam (!l-reody mechoni<:ol rw omp~. FJeld lrlpo, reports and economi«re l e d thtouaj!cmrt tbe!h!m~eter. nput output devices are studied lltld comptrt:d for general and tpeclfic uses Jihoaropblc P.repuotlon (puteupt cr dllo This cour5e oovers the preparation o! mllchlnlcal layoutt for lilhogr PhY Tho loborotory nporii!oc< pcovld" pliicce n the usc of m lc:rlels and rffim!que.5 to pfocb,c:e. wide varidt or mechanical$, ftcm oioj)e-lo moltl.cclor projects. Preie.j.OOto: 1l-101 TypostGphy or con..,l d ln~njctor Blnd -.y h todllo 1n lhl$ rour1e, Mudcnb receive C11pol\lfl.: tu j'lnlllllng opcnetlons for all klncj! of tnlntcd maleriah.. Pmb1cms in phmning ami machlnery capucity llrc explained lo ensure ctrici ~.:nl. upcrution und to mee' production deadlines for delivery of the pr-inh:..j producl. 0 1 Production l'l&nnlutand Conlrul erodlto ''bis covrse s primarily l~:dure-orienttd. 1lte i:rntrt.n:lor l"''\'l'tt areas ol printioa production p:ocedur... problems ond irnfustnll solutions. Production conlro! is studird through 1n tt.tphuis 011 pcrsonnd respoftsibllitiel!l, use o inveotocy form.s and outer media. Studenl8 should un~rstmld most elf'mtnts necessary (or chltient printing production jt) imlll to med\um-s~zed commcr ciul printin~ shops. Spe cifi ~: wurk asslgnmer\tsare inrorpornltd. Z0~ 15 hulrumeatation for Graphic Arts ;l.credltt Tbl1 C~)JriC is de.sijned to famlli11r:ize Jraphi.c arts Personntl with, quality <01~ 1ol devlee> vailoble to 5lllbli.sb q...uty staddordi lhn>cahout prlatlne plop. Quality cootrollnslrumcjl!.s stcdietl win emphasizo ~evic.. used in all phase& of llt~.<>gn>phy. Jn..WuJ'1tQts 1nd devia:j ete ~udled for duia:~a., epplicalkm and evahlauon BothnA~g. credlb The lnstructlomi emphasis in thl$ cootse ia. on the funament ~ll of recognizing au operations needed n the production ofn prloled picee. Vadou5 teopniques are: t=mployed 10: assist the s.tudent n ar rivins ate job estimate. P'u.netiacu and US.JC of variou.s printing e~te)op and industry cost 5ystems r ftplored " Sp<d.ol Prol>lemo. credlls Thi <XlOJrle COY<~ production ptinllna lechnlquu. Stueenh will be repon~lble for on mli.-e project, SM to filllsh. 0ot 191 lntro to JndustrfaJ Prcxedurt6 a-edit. SuJ.denu may ~Jec l a pro)ect (lr project$ fonowlng plevi_o ~, Or current.coune1 of 11udy which i\~eilgt he,n.nreas cf printing_ in ~fr:~~ J~~:~ f~~tc:;t..concej;t wlth aild under the, supervisio'q 0-!9 lnt roduc.t~n to. Prtntiac nd., hbllsbidb 1 crcdll 'tbis orientation coa.tilb of-a stdes ollecluns ar.d. di!:u.ssioris deslan< 10 help tbe stud~ : iust to 1119 oo11,.. md,lo bi!lber adedcd proaram. h c:own general ~pttlonat JDCo."'niation, scbool.phik>sophy,.>lo<lent ~ic.. end pollc\oj. ' 0 19 Job Orlontathm 1 cr di; This cow&e h deslined to prepatc. th~ potc:a\tial paduate (bt a smooth trans1tlan lrom college J,o:lnc:hulty. A serits Cif'.lllpeak~rS1 ' lecture' and &roup dlsc.ussianj ate: utiuzed to lnstrut't tht student...,.u.s t mploym<ol in the '"Pl'.le rto and re~.ln<usiries Layoui<UH ~....,, The luodoa:=.w d layout snd deslsn for prepnin!l odv<jtioins occleol!ll'n<rclally ptint<d -.r1.a are co.crtd n tl".io ~e. Areu of lnltructfon cneomposs desisnr.lllclplea n lfl>olnlphy. color, display ltllerinsf and:b.indung o, an work.as they -relate to advcrlllin! nd product deaigno-ob.uwork Jnoludes.t.youti co~yfitt lng and ccnit~ction of camerl rcudy mtoh~lc:at.s using the layout 11 a guide. CO(rsc. empba.s.ls is on the development o( crtitivity and preulon n 1he.layoat following accepted priocjple Copy Prepomulon add Pastoup. Z.ctccllta Thi; couroe oovcrs the pl'q>erotlon ol c:amcr rad) med>onlco!j fo: eommo:mour1>rln1td ~nalerial. StudeoiS m11h decisions u lo apprcprlolc interplay of phoiojr pm, eopy 1od art in finol design. Laboratory upericnce provjdt.s pracli'ce uelns va ri~nls materjals and tochnlques n prepa.rllll camera rudy mechanical$ far.h_ho8f phh: ~oprodu ction ln single_ and multiple cojor.s. Woh,.l irulriactiorli for furt.bet proce.n1ng or tho Job ~re ah o ncluded Prlntt,.compooltlon creduo 'lbl..,.,. s on lnlrl>ductlon to pr.. pr<jllrllory and preparatory cnnposltlon proctdua~ lnclud!n& typeoertlna aod 1ypopaphlc CDCtpU, opplltotlon> and purposn. The'"" pcovides opprox lmalely 5 houra of Myboard prlcllce. Bmphuis is on com puterbcd lnpul nd output devices, copyfilllng and preporing lhe mechanical for camera. Cln~ses t111ke two field trip. Audlovi~ual prc~entat lon arc rolnro~cd wuh workbooks and 5elf tesls. fl.l :19 l.llhokrophlc Propuratlon tt<dllo hl his coune, the ttudcnl g.tin.".werklns knowl~dsc:: of b.»ic black ond white stripping lechnique, he various technique!> t:~f (lut layout ond lhelr rei:uion5h!p a varlous ldndery cqulpmc:nt. 'J1u.: $ll dent becomes (miliiir w)th coltlr proofing proc~sse11 cruploycd by hu:fustry. A wotking know}odae of Contacting is utilit.td.too, with keylioe techniques..., n color 51riJllling. 0 ltutrwnastation for Greplllol\ru <redlto Tbls CO\f50 io d.. ltntd to forni~cize grophk oris ~"'""'"'" with quality conltal de! vices aniloble a estoblisb quality JWJdards lhroughout o prtntln~ pint Quality oon1rol irultumcnts :studied i:mphnsi~ devlcel'l u cd in ah pbo5e.s of lithogr:tphy, wilh SCJme ~Uctpte6S devices 111udtad. lrutrumtntt and dtjvtccs are: studied.fur dcsij:n, dppllcatlon ond evaluation; 0-rl JntrodutUon to ljthograpjalc Pre~s ~redits 11lis ooura: is tn inlrodu~ion to the orfaclllt)l~raphk prin1inz press jdbplia>torl. T!uovgh l cture, dentonotrallon and 01< pe.--i.mcc, students learn press terminology 11:1d basic operating proc:cdu:es. Tbc in~r rdatio.iship of preu l)'lltm& Md 5uppU~ s Me discussed. S.udenls do..single and muld-color prea work. 0 7 Llthoz.ra,Plik Press Operations cndus ''hls cour.ae!1 deslsncd to affoid 5t~ents ddiuonnl exposu re :w1d experience ;~ t atiye to o.h$cl lithogrophic press work. lt"i.!i n con tlnuntion of 0 71 fntro lo Lithographic: Press. Z0-90 Bh~ry Op<rollon crtdll$ Thi5 cour.sc o fer& 11 S1udy of 6ru5hin$ operations employed in sm:&lj. to medjum~cd bindety opeutioa... Ptpet mtthe:moilc:s, euttioj, fo.jdiogwtd binding arc covered ia lbc course. laboratory work irdudcs muc:hine a,.,tl Jutod project which m.1bl: :rl~als lo uod~riland Vilrious methods of binlling tbc printed pica:. %0 9 Utlu>Jir phle Preparalloa. % <r<!llts Thiii course ls deaigncd,lo ;~_lrod uc:~ lhe studenl to basi.c.hiqgle oud rnuhl color sb ippipg t1c:iiniqueli.. Lithographic rtatem-!liu n~. metb.ods are studl~:d anti p~ctical t.c:perjfii\cc la.offe~ed ia._expos ing and procetsins oegotive acting lithu[vaphio printing pl tes. Basic cmudctins prcadures are taushl ul ilizin& lilh~rapwc: end d~:platmg rum necessary id prj?duciaa flnl~rd Oa.ls. Process ccmera.. film contoctlng md proofing proctdutcj tre introdllftd lo the student. 06 VS VAL COMMUNCA TJON Communlcatloit Probiem1l ciedit1 This courn cov~ra projects dealing wilh typographic and pi-et0rlft1 elem~:nts. Problems nclude single-page loyaut!s, brochure design and J>O'ler design Comunaakallon Problomsll crodl~ The doi_gn of graphk::& for projected mtdt il covered, including charts, &r ph>, flowcaarl$ od mop<. Along yritb tb tradition>! studio tec:hnlqt~cl, computer gijllphiu l'flttm is lcolllled 10 orale conlmunlcatton gropbics. 06 1U) Dl play, Deoiga n<l Production ucdlts Tl!,c prcpnrntlon of Jllan drawings aod lhree dlml!!nsiunnl model$ for displa.y 6)'Giema o.nd exhibi t~ re covered n thh coune. Q&..l17 AudloYl,tual Technique's ' tt~dits Thi COtlrsc covers tbe preparation of ''50ilwArt" malerjsls-for overbud projcctloo ond ~m project.mla, and the operatio-e.:r.d light mai.atmance o! the cqulpmeat Audlovlsul Techrllques ll crodlt.i nus COUtU C0VCts1hc prtparalion of television paphicst acd1te ~uxraphics, and a muhi imagc prc<ealallon ynahronl:led with uudio recordinj. Z06 lzo Prod\ldlon, Planning and Contrul :Z credlts n thi:~ COUrt«!, he st'udent deve lcjpll ll bulc undcnlolidill& of pro duct ton lellmwork, production controls, nventory cootrols. co~ cstimcling and bud!" ~~&- olorage and retri<v )'Oiems, ond quaj:lf central ltutructtonal Mcdlo Sy tcmo crecl\11 Thh course CO\'tu the: educollonal oppliutlona ol ftud iovis'~ prcxluction. Sludenlo nreitncclln the pt.nnl"'l nd prepar tio ollnstructlunol malcrl l lor ofl et, phot<k'ople.. prlnl diopl r and projected rn ill. zor.. J0 Tct~blu ProductkN' crcdltl 1'_hi, cour:'ie llurvc:y5lhc printip!cs of lc1ccullug fljlcrnliou~ in cludlns cumentleehniquu, ighting, SOUnd, Jlln,, seiungs, ~cenery, floor directing, scrlpt art ancj on cnmera performmncr:l. Lech.ue, r~adlng, 'pec:la) a:ssi~nmenh mnd projects provide an underst1ndins ol the lelevbkln ir.c!.wtry, its hlstory, development ond principles of operation Sound Productloa. TcdlnlquOJ <r<dllo Tbis course eovers th.e: techniq1ks o! aoun<hrack mu:in& for cudiovisual.sound-syndted pro~uctiom, includlng norr;hon.loca. tion. r~:cordina end mu.&lc ~;~" PodoUu ~~~ varatlon Z cr~lt s Th~ student's porlfolioo sample!! i.!l the culm\ruulon oflwo yean of study in vlaual commuiiications. ot~rin& Job interviews, it s he hy rcr.showlna pr<upe:ct.ive emplo'yera c:xatn_p)~s olth_c ~tu dul's abilities. 'bll class ls lld open laboratory giving cac~ stu demt time and ~rtwrlty to 1'f'OrlC OD lndmdual auignmcnts des:igned to idu.tlfy p~r5cinal abilitic _,ed to prepan the cct:s.. plcted PQrtfolio under pro!e>siocal guidance. 0fr180, Adv nrtd Mcdla PnJbltas credits This ceur s~ in ad\' need prob&cms in visu conunu.rlic1i9f:'s focuses on one or more medie (multi ift!cse. video production, g rt~phlc de! Bn. nlc-.) lo provide lhe _student wlth additional ex pericnce: nnd ptojncu beyond the ilit rodu~::tory course.1 in these Jreu.-Emphasb ts ploeed an slrc:njlhening the portfolio.and Mar V C=ol experience.. 01 qlothng 'ollorlog for i>ressmukers credits This course is anlntroductioo to the pr$nclplcs and techniques us- ed in- coat and 1 ckel Cdnstruet:Mm.. Machine,!u$lble and hand tauoriag lechn que~ re practiced. DeciaJoo maklng about-wh:lf techniques are but lcw differc:dt fabrlc::s. daipt,.wearidg condl ti:cns and time lhnil.1tioju U pr&d:iced. A prrnelu b constzucted a.sinc-fwlble interfacing tec:ju:ticlues, rrer(qu.lsites: SOl UO Drees Prir.cipl.. and Dress.Priuipl.. ll. 0l l60 Occup llonaj Rc eorch and AMlyJis ' -ctc:dits Ares5 or employment in dothing related occupations arc studied. Ench student apenc1 four haurs per wce:k worklng: in~ related b ~ne:ss to aaln practical kno~ledge. or the working wodd and lo apply s!qlls learned n class.. The t"cur$e lncludn praetie.o.l jqb 51tills, ~eloplns a pl1n for obtaining cmptoynient ind exploring Ute ~ orld ol WOl'k. 0l-5 Workroom Management credit& The a~ture and scope or sewing p:aductioo (appnel and home dte.. mak!n& >ludio>)... oiuclecl. Stody or the workroom.inclodes work 'impiu'icdtion,luyoul, produdion cani.jol. Wage5 and recor dkecplng. and supc:rvisi<m. A projec-t is completed.c;trrying put be analysis of the cleslgn, cuttlng, $ewing, pre.,sing and packe.glns of :1 product Appll d Buslne5s for Ho1ae Sewlna iadustries credits This course b deiijatd t~ help the ludeal el up bio or her own buiiness. to ktep CCUt'ltr reoan:b which renect costs. mnkups, prolits., etc. OJtd u tl.sly RS_rcquiremer~l.s. A look et topics r.lehes diopb:y, Civertlsin& and )llyroll is includtd Home Sewing Bruioe"' Practlcum trcdlcs The focus of thls coune s ort lhe.aperatlon of a fabrk: ~lor~. sew iag center or dre:~smaklng shop. ncluded are b.1sic respon sibiliti!"~ such u.u1tl techofques, dcalina with per$0nne:l, train-. 1"8 PJ"""'. aod promotional aetlviti... Prottk l upcrlenee is provide-d in demol\l.lrttjng and t~acbing con" ruction tech.aique' Car e"ning ctotm ln retail $lmes and produclas fu'hi.cn slows. 01- Allemllono lor Mea one! Wo...,. s &ady~o-w.. cr dlu 'rt!i! courae covtr.s the prlndpfes djuj =kllb nvolved in the fitting ;.nd Dllrring of men's and women'!\ rcady lo weor clo1hing. Sl\ldents.!lut up nmj operj~tc.1 dn!s allcrotioa shop. Pum:quisite: Oro.~ P'C\plcs and Techniques.

71 Course Descriptions Course Dcscriptlons l7 0J.i7l Tcxlllos <r«fllo 'fhb CCUtse s r:111udy a( ll Ural nod U.n medc nbefs-ihdr adva.ntage:, linw Hor.a, u~e end CGrt, Yurn and (ubrtc coutrucllon and fi"ishe> au btdlldtd. EmphiJJ s pjac.,d on text~elows ~~~=.~d!wk!ord.s. and the undentandlng o( conmlo.iy. :SOH 7- l!xperlmen io with Fabrko ttrotts :rhla course covers retellrch und development of techniques with _ unus.u~l lind difficufl to handte fabrics ond new produas. Bm pbam" placed on EMklns ll dlsctimlntlory choice in ttie conwuctlon teckniques U$Cd ln tnaklng Jlarnltnls. Pr ereqttislh~ T~iles Dt,..tn1kin1 Prlndpl<s, 01-Bi Drt...,.killg Prlnclplos S Line, Color and OHJan n F&hric ~:nd Drus: crcd(u This ~c ctrurse a..uisls the stuclent to lurn art principles nd apply them to fabric and dreu. Fuhlon a dolhing,l.lahion d e!lgncfs and the fashion lnduti.jy. 11 related lo the heme ~cwijjb b'uinns, are t:mphaaited. Elt menta of WArdrobe coorditlj.tion o.rc. lndud<d. Stud""!S'JWP "' port/olio. 0l J 7g Dero.rativr Tt :djjcs and C~ ft J 1; ct~its Tho techniques ~f knlttlns, hand 1titch ry, smocking, applique, tr.tpu-nlo, and PlCehworic l t d includ ct Sam,Piu are made of u.u tec h n lque~. One ~ech..~:~ lqu i& d~ ve~opcd. ~nto a project Dressm lri & Prlnclplts 1 t:rccllts Tl~ dresl'linlilking ccn5trttcfto,i tcthnfque:a, (o..brics and product& uttd io ho1r1e seo;. lng and appard production fllre atudled. The stu dent deveiops a sample portcouo of numerous techniques. Garments.tre t"'fl.suucted to c1u1bje stuct.,nta 1o sel«t o.nd apply the teehnlq\les lhat arc suitable for the paltenu end fabria of their c:b.oicc, subj~t:t to the 1pproval o! tbe ins.tructor. 9Cll-181 DresoliU<.ng Ptlacij>lel crroi!s This.cour.. p!'o\ ides stvdy o1 tlle principles and apptitiltion in volv<d to sole<~_ fabrics and n Ottine llld con.uvcti"s prments. Aoalys" aad evahoadod ol melhods osed in dr,. m k tng. frotn- trede: to o:ruture, are on~phastzed. Construction of gannenb js im::luded. 901 fas l:qulpmtnl ood Demonstration a edits This coo. r~ involve$ a comprehensive &tudy o1 factors ajfectiog theu:jccuoc, usc lll'ld care ol equlpmenl used io borne $CWing u d J'>"fel p oduction. Spcelal omphasls is ploced oo the.tudy of lhe._bome $Cwin& mfchine. Students wilt present deruanstra lions and cvalutte CODOlt raal dtmonsannlcn& D-18J l't indpl«of Peltc:nt Sll.tdy 111\d Fltting credits The >tudy anc! pwctia: of lltflnil tecltnlquos and poriorn alleration are cppua:l to a ~ic drese. T1kln1 body me:t$urtments, ajtl!ring a path:ra, rec:xjgttl::_ng a poor fk and wflat causeajt, eatab6sllina :W.lndards (Qr t~ good frt, and correcting a poor fit are ~teas Joclud :;t~t.~~~dl,idaally nu<d baol< dr.. s ls tt.veloped by m h 01. lll9 Ap)illed l'lttlng, 1c.Odlts Thh ~u rse in volve s ad\!ant:ed.study 'in the PtitJc:lple.i arici lh~qrcs of pa ~!ern study.111d fltrlng. TJ1~ bulc inform.1tio'rt '' np: ph~ {Qr altenng commercinl patterns, flllin.& zarrnenl$ for dif. Jertnt type$ oc.tlgur e~. undentand(ng cue raqul.rements for dlf fe:rer~t types of'k~"'entt, fabric and desipa. nformation on tnese..subjc:cto is p~tod end opplled to project& atid P""""" >il""bo"'. Preto!jW.,OS: AppUod Apparel lmir and 01 8 Principles of Pattom Study Md Pittins \ptikd AP!J'rel Dellp u.dl1 Thl$ C'Otl<'e1nvol <tllludy oad application ol tkel«bciquc:s ol f>"'tcrr\ designizls throoj; b Oat panna. Orlglnal'aormtnl!t..., dcsipod lllld conshuotcd. A.bulc f>aa pattern is dovclopcd. Prorcqoi>~e: Ptlnciples of Patlun Sludy 1ad Pillinr. 0 FOODS '00<1 Sclep <o <r«fll Tho phy ic<. qvalilic< of ondo nnd!he P lnclplu ol rood pre para tionond nnll Uoa urclncludcd ia!his couroc , oud Scl ~ncc U z crcdlu Thb JBhotaloey cour!'oe provide~ ptoc1c1!: \n "'af'tuws (oud prcpata Uon 1echtJiques. tems c<jtumoaly ~\1&.-d n comme.rci1l c:.stablisltntcn!i arc prtp r<.oj M<t luted. 0-J OS lntroductlnn to Dlt:lt'tics und the tlu lth Care 1"1\eltl cr~dl ta This cm1rse covers Choe pra(es~l of riiefcflcs, fhe rore or dletcuc tcchu l ~~:ms Md thclr rdaitonshlp lo o1!1er parnproft!,sionols and \he hc11lth C'ilre h.. 'Um. Other 'arcas oc aludy bu:hldc he llll and hcohh CJif~, c.'cojmn»icj: of hc:jth eire, ljuvcrnml"nl lt:gujations aml shw.dunls-, n~t ritional tara, and nllcrnute typu af hu.tlltll c:~ r e. ixt~:ndrd laboraiory expo r len~1 e11pn~ MUcf!JilC.S to heatth core sen ices, dietetic pn.c1lce And devcloprncnl or buic skills Cor nutrllianill cart, rq:.(lrting end ol>kt vln~ Food Sci<\<'0-0.T. <red ll This COUrU: Studies the buic UCihods o( rood. p rc~ration, sum dords, principle and techniques. S1udcnts particip&te in tcan1tng urivities cmplwlting &O<tld food prcfi.orollon melhcdo ond kills prcse:rvint the nutritional vatuet o( food by un<k:utuding the phy M:ul il!)d chc:mico! proponid o/ rood, storagr oc foods, nd quttllty.standanls fer the finashcd prcx.lud. Theory prcct.-dc.s cftcb unit of in:o;lructiqn ond b hen corrtcd nto laboratory cx.pcrimtnts by ~lucl~n ts Basic Nutrl\1()11 crcdlt Th;~ ~~(s e covets nutrients und thr: normol prncc.ssc!lr or dtges. Hon;.tb5orplion rjnd mct.;~bojism Jn rcj~ttlon to lhc nuh;lriuu J s l.lll~ ~ of the human body. Students )earn to rccot;nile both basic health ond 00f1 heohh relatecj f1clon such as c1jitur:d and socio ~nomic fattnrt whicft dete.rm1ne 01nd tnflutnce l\11) lndjvldupl's ouh ilional needs. and nutrltlontts st~ l us. 0-11~ Bolle Nutrltktn :l credits 'Jb t-owic iuvoh. u tbt mjdy oi nutrition ~nd ils rej Jcnship to the aormolaod abnormal humon phy lologlcal otntes U.e. prqmllc)', lactation. infancy, :~doteseence, g:er atr1c.sj. CUrrent c:oncqlband d.!ve opmnts il'l hutnan nutrillon and lhc ir appl~tion to prartlc~l n.utrition problcnu tre lm:c:s.tlgattd. Curnnt nutrition concer.m in Jilcrarurc are rxpjortd. Studenls use ap proprite methods of cakutalinzllulrfmt compol\uon o( food to Oilytc did a and develop uusfxtory diet pions o.nd m en~ (or the vuious stag~ af the human life cycle. 0:J:.ll Nutrition ducallun z credits 'T'h} ~r ~e emphuiu.s the psyc:holoey cf learnlng, teaching philo.sop.lltu and tedtniquu., ln rcrviewln~ tcc\uiqu.es. dcyelop. mknl of t~rvlcc c:duc:.uon pr~ams, &~nd llk dcvcilopmcol o! training m.1tcrii:sj brocllutc$, pusren aru.l ho1ndouts rda:ling to n\hriuon and eduution. Tlw: purpn~ ol the COUf'R; ls for.studcnl.s to recotnizc the imporlanc:c o ( 1\\tlrttloll eduquon and metilods Cor pcep.u-ation of materials ~ ut r l t lcn l!<lucauon...-edit Thi.s 'cd\1bc Covers the dev'elopmenl or nutrition education prcsentelions lobe given to the: public. Guetl Ject\trer& are invited :~u~:r~~~~se~=il~~~-nutr itlor: agc"cles 'f.' ~th programs dealing with ~0:115 Food Servlc" Monogomoo!ln Health Core PoelUllu -.c.tits Stu:de ot~ receive addftlonil backaround ln Cood n rvlce m.o.nage ~ nl w1th etnph sls on basi~ (l()oc:ci)s, opplication techniques and mail'&tjntnt trends. ArtM of Jludy are lrutltuuona.l food pur cha.sloj: ond ~contro ls., JoiGndardJz.ationr Hrnr mouoo procedures. _sanjta.han qnd.aeltty, ~pl')f:nl and employee relations Applied Clihlc:ll cndlls "''bh. CCWjiC proyides 1:1n OPJDW,Jiy lot Sludent.s ta pradicl! *Kf refine 5kUis il:l cllnh:al aulrltio:tcl care. Cunentlrtnd.s h1 cllnk:al uutritloa will also be dlsctu.«d 1o ""h nee app!ic<tilon or normat nutritional care skill& to relevant clinical prob1enu. 0 1~0 s.q-.l..,d field l!xpcrlcnco n NutriUonor Cere 1 a <rroh Slu'!<nl ~ o rticip~le _in at ended lobo,.rary oxpor_lcncco n local porttdpttltng in t~ Ut1011o. Studtnto apply and utube counseling. obscrvttdonsl, Jntetvino-ins and 11"essn1ent {~chniquc..s la deter mining lbc: uuttilion lltatu. CJ( the ])Uent. StudtDS a1jst the supervising tfu!tidan!a ~ OOiiCJTChl or the polientollual{on ond l~plc~t!o!l of a ~ re j>lcn. Menu wrh 1lS 1kiUs, diel hahuc UOn tl!d.mqu~s. anuhariu.hon wilh mdleal tennlnology and em ~ure- ro type.s of mdriticn ecfuceelon ntaterlaf.a arc: e-.pho.siz:ed Mtdlcal Tennlnolocr n Nulrltlonal Car~ Z credlta 'l'hi eoun< l t.>llb >tudcnlo n he heohh cono :tyaicj! to develop o nolrltioo tr11d tnedkal voclboltwy. 'ntc ""'"'" involveaa workbook and workohop <1.wtoom J>P<ooclt. 'l'lte fl\lfllose oltbe course s to old n uadoutandlng be wrlllc and~ ords rbot pertain O tbe health Held. :i0 i Priltdpl<a of Cht!Wolry <rodlt A lecturc-dejqonllrallqn ccnu~e. coaslslioa of a a,urvey o( general, or& nlc and biological cbembtry, litis course s deslanoed to rt\eel!he needs o( lcchnii:al le el dietellc practltlooer>. Stlld<ots win be - d Jo lhc =npqoltlon, phyok:a1 propcnin oad reaotlons and inte:r.ctions of inoqanic: nd orpdlc &U'bslencn Dd the basic c.onctpts.of met1bolism l'ooi!spton Mlllllllttnent cndl!l ~h.ldedb R-C'f'_}ye an orjesh!io to food~ m.tmtp.nterzl ud tlle buic~.. of qt>lrttlty rooch prodtlction Jid sen ice. Monagerneat-t 1.lted Jeorrtiogo<:tivtlies will lrtdude supervl10ry t«brlique&, employee selection and evalt1auon, J\Aintal inx operational rkdrds nd.product tnes. devtloptbent 1nd.introduc: lion ol policy and prooedures. 10<1<1 supply and oqulpment pur chastn~:o cost _control: l nd d~ve(opnu:nt. ct lob du criptlqns. Quanli ~!y-food t'<lated Jearnmg oeovllioj WU tncfucl<!: Pteparoflon methods and kills in volume fudlng. menu plonning, tetipe developrntn; ~d NndardlutJon, food ~ forage, aaniloticn and safety trdunques, wor.k simpllfj C11Jon, de"tlopmtnl ot pr~uc lion sheets, fore:castlng tecbnjq\lc&, purchasin& and inventory COJttroJ. Studentcwjlt gain txpc:riecce. in YuiouJ hur!~lltlonaj.!tutnas. 90S ~ EWiployment Research z Credlt 1 This COl>< provideo lite tud.oot wlllt a wceltly dikla»ioa o1 pro<!lc:um e>per!eltces, provltks on opportunity foueportlng and disc1111$1ng curceat trends and ropic.o n dictedcs and tho oulrillon field. and al!aw foe dictory!u<sjinkcro, Sl denls are r<quhd Jo present 8-rn.i~tu te senlllllr r~portl, to report oo nutrition Wormation frotu relevanljou.rm)s, aad to rqxxt oq speeches and pr... ototio~ he&rd at pr~~fes>lonal meellogs. 0! 0 pid Tk r pr credhs Student> tlevclop l<nowlodge concerning U..: prtaclples and melhod of diet u a therapeutl~ n1eaure ln various pat.hoiojical condltlo111. Student a plan modllled diets lndhldualled to meet nvtrit!cnal ne<do under nnr=j and pathological coodluons and to mttt tbe needs of tlte po!lolt n order to promote odhomt<e to lite dlel pll!ll. Current Hlerllure conc:oming trtndo in diet therapy and development of porsool files on vi>ual aida and other t"""hiot& moteriols is.j.. included Dlot Tlterapy n s credits 'ntis s conllrtuatlon oi"dl-1d Oiot Tbt'"l'l' 1. Nulriooaal '""' requi.jemej)ajot diuue.s leu lstclu.~tttl1 epcou.ntenjd or auociated with apecilie a Br<t p ore sludted. Coso studl.,1st n. d~tiryina,p roblerns, Jn ~cveloj>lng oolllt!oo&, aod lit s<lti"s ~t~t:::!r. The ~t~ con ~ e,p of provldlnl n\1\titiona~ e&re!,,is 0 1 S~P, enlaad l'lo!d'l!xperlon" n. N"trit!onal Cont. credlla TU d~ field experience provides for d ~vei tllllllcnt and ap plicodon o.lol(llls n~dcd ror providing nultl!looof.csrci to Jl"tients requiti.fl& varjous rn,odifie:d d.icts. Student' s.a.in e~po ~ rc to JXejlralionol modified fond!terns and become ocqua.inted with vori..,s JDodiGed lood products ond tube feedlnp on the morket. Student till.. Kctplab!e lechnlqueslo proyitlllli nutritioo edtztation lo Vl.ti<nll 0\ltrlbett &Dd a&es c f hldividuab in variow aetlirtal !'iutzltloa P aqlcoun omlu 'ntlle<tend<d lob<trr.ory n the last oemester o(!he lw,.yur~pra- 8'&ll'l s deoi10ed to allow rot stud t nt d.. dtllltlledi and applic& tlon of pr.. lously acquired lmowledje, skills and ttl!tudea on tbe job, in the role of die.tellc t<cltnlelan ljt hcsllb ogtodet. lndl lduallud ""'"'fl oceo are plonned ond closely auparvlood by rqistertd diericians io tffilitta:f ospiltfa. ncjnlng- homes, etc. and ore coordinat<t\ by the dietetic faculty. Prorequlilte: Comple lion olthree seme.sten of couuework nd tj:ten<kd ltboratory ex~ perlencosln ll<> Dletellc T<cltnlclan ptojjrlm. 0:J. t50 Phydol.trn for Ole\elle& crc.illo Tltis_CDUNl! presents tile stt:dy oflhe hum~n body, llajtnclutcs ~od ils fwtcuo... t deals With tlte body 11 n lniqlrol«.. "C hoo1l uolt,lnvolvlnslhc dtatlstory, roopltotory, di~..tiye..,. creio''f, rtprodudi~1 nttvou.s. enddc'riim: 11d munujnskcli!j l"tsten\i. Smpbtnlo is plo«d en tha relollonjhlp of e~ch system wilh nutrition and nutritional cnro Decora tive Food 1 credit J:-,a::.;:=~cz :=~~kl~ prtcuce in produci"' 0-5 Mea" Planalr:1 and Nvtrltlon 1 crodlt 1"be fuoction.l and sourcn ol nulrltnts o.re atudied.. 'l'flis course piovida,.. on uodorstaadirli of lbe principles or menu pl... ni g related to various l)'jl<s ol food se<ylec tllleralions. 0 HOME MANAGEMENT AND FURNSHNGS fl'ot01 nterior Design J '"'clllo n thts course, th ~ buic elemebtl and mlltetiat. cf nterior design arc $ludjtd. House.ttylu\ P'C't planlling, fumlttlre arranging floor and wall materials lighting and cce~le& A r ~ covcr.e~. 'Th,e empl-lasls o! s.tudy is on rt,sid ndal interior&. Vrerequl~Ue'&: 0-10 FundoiYientals of Oc~gn, $0 1 Uaslo-Orarllng, 0 11 Applied Malh % FuildoitlllOniala of Desl~n ' crcdlla This course present~r th.e coah~xh ral forca, prlndples nd. elements oc de8lgn in ordtr to provkt.e a conceptu.tl bash rrom wbl~b to so!"t' and n-oluate dnign problem nterior De$11J1 credits '111< emphasio of this coune boo the tksijn 1nd matcnals of kil cl:eos ud batha. Wood idat tifie~lioa, cuegoods ond ~pholsteml fvmiture mnstructiora ue also shlcmd. Pr1requ.lsltes: Q.l.l01 JnterinrDtsip, ~-11 Ronderlo&. 01 1'1TdUes, 0-lll Wiadow TreatrMtJts-l.O. 0f J 11 Window 'l'rl.'.lttmonr.- r.d. c:t<tlits This COil,.. il ~ed lo provi!l bacl<ground lor.juation, adtdion, co1\5uuction and inauutrlon of various window trta\meats suc:b ~ r:ir-jpe:ries. valance~, m.ujoled end roller shades, Au.sbian. Roon:tn rutd bolkton ohitdco, ~ordwore ond ftn di118s. Arras stressed ~te me~iruenl, ~ct.tlon, c:alcul llon of materials, dwges; and ptesootallon of lhe..ror.,.,.,tloncd.., wcu a $ rdl:ted accessory items tud!. at t1ble.l!bcns, sbowa cur toirts. pillows. bedspr...u Olld la.. J"hades. Pr""'!uisile: Appfied Molh-LD.. 0-l t Renderlai crcdju lo this COUite, lhe student learns lo tiode ond modo..& ontelric forms with a variety ol media, couecls ao<l develops color ""'""' i ns s rej)j'cieuting the v t~uj!otrn,s. motdkds and tuturo in.., interior, n:ndc~ a floor plan, clevatil)n:j llhd pcnrputavc, and pgr ticipatcs ir::.-.tlm.ed renderins excrcl:'lcs (o dt)vejor speed. Frere q~l ltc: 0<1-115 Bttolc Dra(ilng ~~aoro Draltiog credits Cn lhls course, the sluden t learns tu uae bti:sit drdting ~uipmeul,;md the. symbols. and 1;J.!1guaae o( building coru rue:tion, and draws interiors. and furdlture n plan,. ch:vadon ond pcni>ec,ivc:: 'Jiotory of A rcb!~tu re ond ln teriors J s c:rtdut This cooci1u.ltion course p~o.ts the u l, archltecturc and fur nitu.rc lroro the Rococo period lhroueh the Dtn c-talury. PrcreqWsilc: 0-11 Hi.slory a Archilec.lure and ln\cfior$ ( Comr erdal laterlon crcdl!l This course lotuses en the opoce plannlna, llshling, (um!sh!ngs, materials and finishes, and cocles of commerclotllnterlor>. Special c:mpbsl> s ploc:ed en conyentlonlll occe plaonlna. lnclllcllal pclvale olfice,. rectplion 1rCHS and confct~~~ rooms. P.tc rrquisites: nterior Dcll&n, 0 11 Ren ring, 01 1TJ 'n.oxdl~. 0-r Window rtem:nu~nls

72 i8 Course Descriptions Course Descriplions 19 U<i-fD Buslnou Pra.ct c:c5 or lli.ll.!rlor Dc~l}otn crcdlls 'rj1is cour.se cnvers bl.,lsi:n"~s t~rmiuology, l.oeltcr uf Asrc(!menl rur lnl~jll<lr Designers, legal form s o( btjsines.5, gcncrol bu ~~n<:.ss pta-clicu and ~roc.:du.re s includin8 bookkc<~ping units. funp hli~ Zl'd MC sptoci[lc proc:~durcs ror desi&ncrs wltk. tt:~llrd lo conlrads, Uabiti~ies. spedflcations, 1r_at1e forms 81\d com(luter usage:, Prerc Qllisile.s: 0 l0lntcriot DesisD ll.and.'0--js i lntro t.o l11jcrior Deslgn. 0~ 11 Applied Math-J.p. ct dlt This course covers Lhe calculation of interior de>ign m.:ttcridis nf floor cover~ng, paint a:ud wau ccwl!ring6,..,lfpcovt"rs, wtndow treatments and uphob.tc:ry. lncluded arc c::alcula1i"rms on ptlyroll, commissi(]n$, mqrkup 11nd insuranc;e lntc!rior Design lnletnshlp credits Student.,; work H hout-5 st an i11terior desigr! rdated busiru.'ss to gain practic11l know'!'d ge of thj!l, interior d es~gn skills learned in the citjsl'lroa~. Once a week Lh',!)' asscrnbl~ to iscuss their per so-nul experie!nt:t!'s an the job. ln addhion, students prepare a job 1C:!iume. Prerr: quisites: 0 10 lntcriac: D~sigu ll, ~0 151 lr1tro to nterior Dcsig11.:md co~eut of instruclor. 0-ll AppliM nterior DeJEign crcdhs. 'l'bi~ cout5~ providi!s s1\ldents wllli the- opporlunliy to so~vc a variety of interior dcsf,go problems. using pnrvious courst- ~ellrnh:~g r:>:pc riences as wetl u new informa.lion g<:neriltt:d by the: in dividual problem~. Complete board and arnl p-rescntatio:ns ;J.~om. pany eacq problem.s.o!uzi<m. ll'l:,;;dditlort, et~ch stt.cde11t ww prepare a. _portrolio. Prerequisites.: Q-10 Jnterior Design ll, lntro tol:nt~dor Desi~n. ~ 0-10 S~Wing for the! Home credits This caursc slrcs5e~: custom work in the constructfon of d raperies 1 shades and r c~att: d itcm5 for the home. Areai covered irlclude bedspreads,_ sheets and <:ases, table linens, pmows, :ihower Cur t:til1-s, Jampshades Sl\d vaiance5. Students con.slruct draperln, insub led Roman shades, ~d other items of rclsled home ur nis:hing~. with ~ome choice of projects. 0 J.1 Hir;tor_y o'. An:bitecture and nteriors l. t redits Thjs cour!lt: pre.serlf.s."~e art, ilrchhecturc _and-furnuute (rorn the llgyptian. through the Baroque periods RellphQl&t~ry-.l:>. creditlli 't'hi ~ COllrsc p~oyides a T!!Yiew of fumihm~: canstruc.uon and l~brics; guideljnes fcrdr:tercnining wh ~ lhcr kl uphol:rter or buy n~w, and the pr9ce~ur e s for measuring t~nd e:itltnating the amount.of fabric.rnd construction nt~teri11l! n~l!'!ded. E&eh stu!:lent hses uphol.!itel'ing ~tliprnent and ioojs and i'lpplles upholstering pr~ses by constru.c:tlna: and upbol:olerin,g ajocfstool and reb1..1ilding and \!pholst~g a chair btt6~ucuo" to lolerlor Dt slifl credit The focus of fhi~ Cour~e i:15 on the l~terlor d~le:n profes.sion, in ~~udins tl:!e defjniu.o» and history of interioj' design, th!!!.perso.tull qu01uhe6j!lptitude&j prof~sional organiu.tiotls and mogll1:illes of lhe ioterior-designer. The broad t1st18e o r cat.:~:r oppqrlllnitic.'i an~ ta.5ks performed by the::.intcr'"lm de!:'!ijgn~: t a:r-c: s:lso c ~: plored J.D. Spccloi Topic l credit this t:dut$~ oovej"s an Jn.dlvidual lopic oj sped 11l intere.sl D th ~ in tcrior design student a! determined by dass consensus. nstruc tors fer \his couue are working pro(e.'\si.onals in lh ~; areij; o.( lbc 5~cj~) topic. ndependent! ludy i.e: llnotber option (a.r tlti-5 rours-e. 0ol ls6 Open Office Sfll!e mo Z credits Thia C<l UTiie focu~ en the plennina step:li ind p:ro~ Ur es of using open o fi c~ systeir,~s f\lmhure, rom the programming. of the re qutrcd space, to the wo rkstation. d~ 11 lgn ana sy~t enut furniture.llpt-dlh:.ilhm, incjudll8 tcn u.dj ~s!, lighting/ ell!'c~ rica ~1 a11d com mul)itatlod n bling concerns. A typtcn1 open ouke space will be used.ns El oour&c praject to c:u ry thro\lgh Q ~ l ph.ases o r th<!. p1an nlng an d des i~ n. Prc rt'q ~t! si ~s: 0 f..l J5 &:iic Droftir1g or f;qft!!crd o instructor Lightln~ l cr.edlt n thl~_ ~ u ursc, 9luUe~ls ~etnot1stral~ their mmolcry of tlte light in& n~ L"'\!lpClnenls, including 1lu: iu:ilalh <lou qf V!.lriOUs ro.tflli?s nnd ltltclt Jixhm. s, MLl lhl! ccmtrol of Lh~.: <.limml!r buan.l. Studenl$ Will identify ond ~v:jl\jelle a \laric.ly o lightir1s.: ap plic<~liom il:i wei! as phm and ~xecutc the!l~jming o( the res~dcntij[ dc5\gn St\ldio or ~ht: Hcht~ng h1b. Prcrcquis.ile..'i: D ll9 ConJUCtcilll hllcrlots ot COSCril or ins.trodor. 05 COMMUNTY DEVELOPMENTAL DSABLTES ASSOCATE lntr.oducuon to Behavior MtU'ldgewen_t crediij Thl~ (:Oilrse f<)cuses on the principles of-current bcha\'ior theory 11nd managerucnl. EmphR.Sis is on hum;mistic. non~punitlve ilp proac:ht":.il lo wotking wlih ptorsons o;., itt~ ~eltovjoml challenges. SkiUs in obscrviilg _and D.t!ll.!i.ufins behe.viot and environtncnts, prosram planning, d1cb;ion making, ill'l.d c.\'al\lating_program~ are included. The curren~ (cchnlques in the (i e!fd_ilrc cnv~rcd and practked. '.()5 1 :1 Jntrodm'tir.m fd DtlveJopinmU.al Dl"'bUUlt::s. credl.ts ''hi9 cou~e provldea an overview of deveropntente~l disabilities a11d the gll.lduale'-5 ~ace ifl the.seryice-sr.stem.1t indudes Hdd ~ trip!) to agenc:ies that work. with people with develapmental dlsabil\tics and meetlng witb employers a nd e>ther.s in.- the field. Thc.eouf"Sc ~lso-jut rod«ces <he.nu~jor dcvejcptnenhd djsabil:itics ~nd lhe.d(tets <.n indi"vidu.q(&, (iuil.uit & and.com.tt~unlli e!'i. 05- ~ 15 DCYelopine:"nbll Dhllbiliti ~: s U crcd~til 1111his C(liJtsc-, Leg~l is~es which have o~nd conlinue. -to shape ~tl i' vices s.ro investigat~d.-the (<JCU::i 1!1 on indiv~dunl rights. and libcrtles as well a.:1 r<!:!!pon.sibilitie.\. Further site visits, opportunities to beoome an ildvo~te, ta observe iliid iriteract ln the.lcgol-s.y5lem. ore iridudcd, Pl:ercquis.ite: 0S..ll lntrod\lction lo OevQlopnteh tal DjsabiJities, 05-1 Beha~Jor Mala.agemt:nt U _... Ci'edJts: ' This couue continu~s the 01rCa of"iitudy begun -Wilh lntrcduchon to Btbavlor Management, provkiit1g grcliter depth t() tb-~ Rcttiill ; lechniqtj t: s~ Studenh h«ve-the-dpp[j(tjnhy to condll<:t 11: c arnpli!!t~ unctianal analysis of bl!haviot and wri1e a behavior811 progr11m.. Prerequlsit!i!; "n"1rc t6 Beh.;:~.viQr M.;lnagement ' 'DevelopirteQlal, D!5abllille5- CoD:.munity '... LVJ~g SkU! ~ '.. credit> 1 Thl& oour.se focuses on attitudes and thcl_r irtte_at:t o!i.-_set~~ce ::r...' Sludents le m to.teach functibnal community living :skill:s and r.::soutce.s!hilt l.'dn be utili:red in thr:: cumrnuziity. ' lihi.field Study n J>cvclopmcntoi rn... btuti<s s ctodlb Students choo.!r:. ftom P v~jie ty of QptlonS" to'work for nlp_c hours o1 week u_ndcr q~111ifi~ SQpc~ision. Ttlht fs a~.opporeu n.lty't a. ~~tj. ly the sk11ls lear.ned ln the first y_ehr of the program to B(!lUal work situations. 0S U9 SeJUlnnr tn lkve Jop;neoti.u. i l)lo bi~ues!.... c<td!t Students i~ volve ~ Jn Jljcld Shidy J. ijtlentj_a we_ekl)'.~ l'!l Ul a r discussion s ~~Sio n. Seminars focus on the vqrying ro!es- s~i:t e_l1 ts sre taking in fleld "stu<lynnd ~ss l st in inlc_gration oi"t_li_l'!?t)', :ski1ls ~md -ejt:pedcncc. Dl.scusslt;m 11:1so -con tin~es to coyer lire.u ot _ t~&hl a. emp,loyrnent, et ~ ~ ~ ', ' - ' behavl~ :U De.vdoprncntal Dha.,Oitles~H ome;. llcaltb Man gell)ent credill MedtcW etqjcc:i and t omplic: a.lions of d cve J opment~t disabul ties ore: co\lered in this [OUJ Se. Common medicittkms "'nd efjc(:ts, adap tive)~tds and s.lipporls,_ ~n:lt tin8, _tt!c ft U~ d to a~l!!it P~ opje _Bfl! COJCrCd. fii~ l llid, p! "VCtlth/e. h~ Ot { th 1 ~fin)qu~s, a,nd resulatjo.n.i'~qu ~tcd f at uariou.s 'relid en ll ~ l.n ltcrn ~ tlvcs wu be tll\.lght,..,. '. ' U Dc.volopn.entol Dl sabiuile :._J:i~m~. Jl n ae m ~nl_. _ cr edhs Thi6.l'ai.Jrse cov-ers varyj ng:tespon5lbi1ltieii reg'ardi~~ "htime m ano1 g~ment, 1'9pks lncllj.dt d nre. budgetin_g-, b~ okkf:e pi l'j, pu.r, c h nsi ng ~ rcrord k~ eyi n g, compl~ing w i~h rcg l.llnllot~s ; Sthcd \,dlng, h~ufsc! matntll!!rtlmce, ordering s 1.1p_plle:;, a,nd nu~ri t!on. <15-ltJ field Study n Dcvclupmentol Dlrabllltlco Jl cr<d!ts Students im:re<~!!ie their d~ti es ~n the job during th~ scc:ond seme:liler. They work n conjunction with th~ CDDA ln~lruclor ta pick from a v~~;dety of opti<ms {(Jr this field stud)'~ w:hh:h r~q"llires t_welve hotml of jub contact per week. Supervision on the. job Js required, Arld th.~ in _structor will observe each student durl\1& the 51!:nl!:liler. StudentS keep logs or-their lu!llvi:ties SctnJnar in Deve:ropm~lal DJsobJJJeoiV ~credits This!le mi~tu is for students participatillg in Field Study 11. Di s~; us.sion focuses on cxpcrient:t:s on lhr:! jab, a!lsignl!d r~!ldings,.?s.~crtivenes.s and employmen! ki:u.s. 05 l.z5 Developmenlal Dlaablltth.>!-C.O.,.n eunj Tcc)l.i>lqu.. uedlts CommunJcadon tkius Jear.n~ in tho!, p~jous semester wiu. be us. edt<) dev<:lop individual):zc:d (XUnse_ling tecbnlqut:s. A review 9 1 counsding approi!.ches ancl techniques. theripeuth::-relations, and recosnili:an of when 11.nd how to COunsel are covered. Students practice theie approaches Wl'lh each other ancl the instruct-or. 05 Developmental DlsahUUes-----A:s!llessmenl nd Program Pla~~nlng <redtto Students conduct an indiv.id.uau~d as!!essment and translatj!l, the: informauon ~nto functional pr.ogril:m plan : VocationaJ S~ylcetfQr Dcvi:Opmentally D1$11blcd lndjvlduuils. credits ~ve.rat approaches-(o providing YO(!ation&l traiiitng, services and employment to individuals with. d~sa blllues are covered in this course:. P\ludios me~ani:lims and rel!ltionsblps.ta C:Q:Dalunily program& and setvice.s t~.re t uaht. Site Vitits and guest speakers are part of the adivitiea in this r:utricqjurtt ~ /Group Dy.niu:nlc.s uedite Students attend thl.s CO\U"$e, taught in. thc Oc<:upstiona.lThen.py program, (or h'lo of these tredits. The d~ss ocuses on vw.ues ~)d»hitqdes.1nd how.. fhese-.,ffect relation.5hi,p.1 Uld interactions. Group p:roc~s!!it!l; and ded!lion mll-k,)ng ~kills are covered.-the third crt.:dit is l!t'lr~ by p~trtic:ipaung in class w~th-the CDDA instn ccoc. A m~rj\1r foous fs on nan verbal ways of cornmunlc.r1tirig and building relauqn!ihips with ptoplt'.: with ru> Gl Limited -\lerbal abilities. 01 CHilD DEVELOPMENT Child Growtb adt.l D'"i!koptPtttt.t c:rl!dits The.first course in this two s~: rn ~:stcr :sequence. i:;_designed lo help th~: student gain an under.$~bnding of the dc!vejoping child from com:ept.itlll to thre.:: years of age. 'The physi~l, soclalt COg!l ~tive Qnd ema1ional areu of development are consldend, Developmen~ tal tasks! inividu.e1 di ference.s, and the growlng interests and needs ol. the chijd and care-giver ue highljgh!~. 07-0~ Chijd Growth and lkvdopment! ctedlls Th;s course is a.conhnuatloti of Child Growtb and Development. lt ts designed to hel_p the s1 ud~nt gain un underst!lndlng.of tbe ch"ild from Uttee ~Qts -of.ogc th rough the teen y~ ~ts. G7..JO P r ctlcum Semlruar 1 cudlt 'rhis course: ;s deslgned 1o prqvide a small graup uperrence for students doln' lh<~ n obiid c!ife setliogs. Wct:kly meetln&:t empbasiu.end int ~rp.ret.irls of lielci-jelalelj eltp~ r i ences and belp stu.deol ease their uaderstandlng of group ~ ynamics ; Applied H uman Kelatlono for Child C" re Sen'Jcea u edlb Tb.l:li course i:s. designed to help students develop an apprc:elatiao o. the d iverse values held-by dlfferenlsocia.j ajid cultural groups. The prutic l deve l opm~ nf <) f mtdti-c::ujtur-111, ncn-sexis.l cur" riculum. ill empba5ized. 0? l5 Jnter cllod l Selll 1l: Workln& with Children <redlto!n (hr! firb1 tt'li.u!! of thi!! two stlmmter eq_ueitc: l"!, t ht!!!j(lldflnl CDVU > th N >JO p rl nojples Of CbJ)fl.to-chlld and <hi!d [O dujl(nten.ctkir9, Students become rsmlllar wuh aome of the rusons for dtudrct~'s bchb.vior and c~p!orc po~tlv~ ways or influencln& il. Students.lit~ ajso inlrrn.lucc.d to teeh~lq~ a( ob5"e~va lkm, wlfevaluatlon.and re c:ording. Note: Students enrolled n thjs course must be cnroue_d in supervi5ed UeldWOrk or ml..l&l \'Ql\lntecr wec-kly :n a chiid care center..01 i6 ln~eraclloodse!tlnj 111 Worklnl with Adulto 1 credit n this second course of the two s~mester sequence, the.student studies the basic principles oc.sta!f ta-sln a11d s~aff.ta parent rda. tionsbips. -P81rticular ~dt el)l.job i.; devoted to clablishidg.u)d majn. t~i.ning effecti>je corrurn1ttic:11tion and to givi.n~t and recelvlng mut.ual support ntroduction to B rly Childhood C.are and Educatlon c:redjts Durirlg the irst nine weekll of thi ~ course, studenls become f.:jmiliar with prcgraflts and agl!nci l"!s that provide services to chjidu~n and f l mme.!l. Tbey OJ:ho study the history and philosophy or ~ariy childhood l!duc~tion _,nd b~ome :J,Ware oi career pa5sibiliti.::;. Th ~.second nine weeks will focus -on the importance oi play in ~h.~:: Jifc of Che young chijd and tht'.: te:atdicr's role 115 pluy facmtator. Dcslgb of the pbysh:al environment. wiu also be studied. Note: Thi!l oouae should be. taken si.mulhmeotjsly with Child Grawih and Devl!lopment. Stu<.fenb n()t cruoued ic. Super vised Student Practitt~m, sbould pjan %D volunteer in a child care center. 07 JZ1 Orlentatlo.n 1.o Employment 1 c:redit Studen.t:li ~evelop an \lnder.$lal)~in8 of employment pos.sibililies in the fi eld o-f child_ care. Thvy learn and-ptat""tice!eclmique5 of joh applh:atitut. ~nd lnterviewing and also p~ep~je resllmes &~ic ~an:: Hcalt~,. Sqf~ty a~~ Nuitrltlor'l credit!! SUJden(s Je-um to provide lor the safety, health imd we ll ~being oj young children. This ptacti.c:.ul course includes Red Cross firt aid traiding-nnd also focuses. ou riutritlcn, gcciden.t pte\fention and idenciflc.atlon of il!n~. Tct:hniqucs ol good ca.regiving ~u em phe.s\icd throu8houl Special :Suvices credits This course cover.'i th.e l?roce.ss 5nd inipucallons or m.aln~lreamlng. ~:bildccn with.special. n-eeds nto cbild.:are prcjgrams. A v~~:riety of halldicilpping condition ~ ate studil'!'dl-and coping JJtt.fltegil!'s wm m developed. SU.denls become ar:q_\.lainled. with.sl!rvi~s and resources a"ailable to parents and tl!atht!n of ~::hildren: ~ith spedal ne~ds. 07 5& Activity Plonnlng cretlil This course covers the process of planning, implementing. and c:val.ui.ting acliv"itie:s. apptopriat ~ for childn! in c:hild cart! set Uugs. Differences between 'trul!'tttred U1d:!SpPn!aneous activlties ruedi.scuue:d with iln em.phusi5 placed on fo:sterins creqtivity und tn~etirig the dc::vdapment:at n eed ~ oft he child. students o~erve; plaq ond.imptemen1accivltics in liiea <:hild r:arc programs. Tiley are ob$enred perjodiciiuy( and con!esenc:es with the supetvitor are scheduled,' Nole; Student9 taking this cour5e must be enrolled in Supervised Student Practicum Cor should phm to vclunteer ln a Child care. center ArtMiy Planning. 1 <redll This is 11 continuation of Aclivlty Fl;mning [. 1'-opics to be covered ind ude m u:"&ic, movement, drl!lmntic phy and other creative and C"Qgni_tivc 11ctivlt!es. Lab Um c: WilZ be given lor pl1nn ing a:ctivitltos.. JO?-J5.5 "teaching StraleglC.s for the Early ChUdhood Setting Z credlhi ThU course coven; conlcrnporaty app roaches tc guiding ehud rcn's bebnyior, lind students Me ~pokd loa V,uj e ~ of tcac bj n& sttiuf"g\e.s.. Tec hniqu~s of as~~.ojlng ~ndivid ual n~~d!s and st r~ngths a r ~ expjored with t fl e: o~us qn providlng the ophmttl [ean~i ng en vtn:mment lor thll_ young c~l kf. Note: This c-ourse mv:; t be taken ~n tonjunctlon With 07-:61 Superv ised Stud cfl.t Prat:ticu.m tr Su pen lsed Student Prac: Ucum l and s~mln a r nedlt5 Studcnt:li o~c r ~c and!ntcr.1"t witl1 childr-en and ad ults in.areot cblid c-e.re programs. They abo obaerve1 plan and implemen1 il.c Livllicl for you lis ch.lldrcn. Periodic obac rval\ans ond <:6nferenct8 di'c!il:hed~led wi(h :J.p~tvlsor-s.

73 l0 Coursc DcAcrlptlons Course Descrlptloru> Supenl~ed Sl dtnt l'roclfc:u l U credus 111is cm Ute-job lrdmin& experience offet1 the sradtcl llle oppot tunity to apply he know~-c..tnd s ons acquirt'd in rclaled cl6nwork unch,.'f he supe,...i.;ion of quni\ord ln.structors and clt~gjvcrs. Collfercn~s wilh supeni.sors.jre scheduled &o bdp coordinate the experk:n~ And to help slu!senu anal)oze prcbh!ms u well as or:uul1te and acllkve llnln1n8 p1s. 10 COMPREHENSVE HOMEMAKNG Home J\sslltut credlb This enlry le\ f!l ccuuc is desssncd to help,tudcnu develop the skills necusa.ry to Hiisl n individual in fh~ honlc care ClltJiroll JM.nl. Skills in nuldtjoo, hume.managfrmnt. envirodj'lenl.l Yfe. ty, communlat\on Olld humon relatkms.:~re: lnd 0 ARCHTECTURAL DRAFTNG 0 0 Architectural or. wing 8 crcdltj This couue empha.sitcs ool)unu tl d~:vcloprm:nt o the b s.i.c s)j.us <H:quin:d' ln 0 0 COil&ttuctiun Drawing, phn dev~jopme{lt of ikill~ i.n orcltlteclur:~l p1annlns a.s rtl,ted to site d~vi!lopmrnt, building deiig,n and c.onstructlon tech.nlques. ~rojec.t work is directed toward rnos( phnsc:~ of llrchllec:lure from preliminary d sisn..to construc1iqn dnt'l\'inga. M Jor tmpbfll h is plt~cd Oil Jh~ d'r~wi~ ptor::e~ ~sit r latcl to tbc eomrne.rcial building prijcest. 0-0 Cons~ructlon Drawing 5 credits This counel)rovidc& thorough 1nd comprt.htntlvc c~tt;l8e or rbe b.uic okill ond concepts ol <!rjftinc os a tool o( arthiteclurc. ClauwcTk-is dirtetcd. to rlerd & comprehension of gr~bic: r~esen.tation and th dtwlopmenl of complete iet o! arc:hit«tura.l working dnawin«ldterias. JiDework. 1ccuncy, -symbol., and ditnensi~ing o'ce ernphasiud ll\ deve.loping dr ftins bitity. Rendering. pl:lnning. layout, nnd <lesltn ore oloo pptooehed. ScroduroJ fnk!tl'it1 is di"jcusscd in rctatton to eocb student, ~rojcd. 0S-08 Code. M>d R"'ulatlons uedll$ This to\rse ~rl toning rcqllirkment, rcsidcnlilll and commercia~ buildi.ng ~. saniltlry rccuhltlcms, pertt'lit pplicnttons nd boikfmg pc'fmit and inspection procedute.s. C011tracl d«u.menl~ am ohice. practic~: are t~lso db cus.srd. 0 i6 8pikUDg Corutruc.lioft J c:redits This course indude&lhe areas of permit applic:.lt;on, c.odc.s. ex QVOJtion. footings, found,..tton.s, ex mplec cf n: mills. diffcn!:nt s1ruclure types., roofs aod gentr&l tou~ id of rcakicnti&l bd.ildi Z The Sluilent is given the OllPottunlty to work wllb buildit>g ma!eri b when.pmsiblc BuUdiac Conclructfon U. Z crcdhs This ~ Dr$1: jncjud.ts the areu of elcctrk.tl Unbll;ation,. w:ostc systems. wbt.t;:r sy:st.cms, insulat\on, heat lou, heat n~ sy5-tc~ <lesl&ri 1 tooling.sysle.j!'s, YcntllaUon 1 se~tic &y.stems,.mu.niclp~l sewaa-e and new iuethods o! obtailung pow~r. Drawing. i;tj:tn.s.and nstallation methods for lho ~\>ovc cre:as will be: cover~ Mcchan1tai Systf:!o11s l..,.rcdlta Thl&.OOU'SC s design!!:~ to rumillflrl7.t ltudent~ with th.c bnic mecha11 cil pdhdpj~ o{ ccsldcnti.d bcung. vchthauoo and air conditioning, electtiaal t~.nd plumbing, with cmpbush on thc:rmill tffieiency and energy cont~r 11 tlon. 0-1 l\l<><:hank l Syotemall Z uodlb Tkb courit! touciles on.ht~otins &y$cema dtai&n. coollng sy.stetn!, \'ftulation, electrica1 so vice 011nd wir»"l& t!eetric.l ia1ertio.n,. lighting dl!!tign., nterior westc: wtttu.s.y~e:m. Ja.s_pipin&. exterior plumbing systtm5, waste. trc1tm cn~ "'-cll5. woli:t supply end pubuc g;u~~o,. diopolol. Prerequlllte: 0.0 ~la:b.oaical Systcnul. 0 AUTOMOTVE-BODY..:.. MECHANCS-PARTS 0 01 Olk Brakta crodlt ThiJ cc111se c:cver.s thr lhrory of operatkm and.scrvk:ing pro ccdures Co~ disc brakes and related va1urs a.nd ml!l~r C)'lindcrs. The operatid!t of ipec:i~l btake rotar ruurf dng e!quip:mnl is included. 11-SOZ.Fucl Syit<nt (Tunc uvl credit Tllii: mutk covets fuel syslcn\.j and ar'bwctor cireui\s ror v rio\.ls ll\qke1 ruxl j \)'Jd or tarbijretofs. 11le t'ou:"jc also indudcs rebutlding and,;et up.ij\lltrocn\$ with lho \l50 o{ ap lnf,..r t.f ex bt:nu.lttnalyter And n introduc:lx>o to clt'dron\c fucl5} stems. 0 0 Auto El<ctrle Sy>tonu l cred.lt ConvcntKm.al ignilion syatems 1 "h rting l'ysk:nu, charging systems Rnd ba.tlcrirs nrc exploint<l and 'tsted, on d. rcpoir pn:u:cdures are covc'fcd. Oisgnosfns of rl~1touic l&nillon )1.sfCmi s allo covered. 0 0 EttiJr~< crodlts This introductory COUts~ covers the theory ond repair o lhe: modem internal tombuuon enclnc. Vtlvc: servicing arad engine rebdllding 1rC abo indudl'\ &ak~ts-drunl credit ThiS..tuUNe' O')VeH the theory ond SC.f'ficinS or pctscstnj,et car drum brake: aod power brake ua\h. Prcr«Ju~itc: ~-01 DiK Brelles The Front Wiled Dr!vo Cbo"l <red t '1le purpose of thb courg Js to acqu11llll ihe pracudn; mt:chank: with.the fundan'lentals of rot) wheel dri\'e cars and cha~!.sis work p(trfotmed on them. 8il5k rep.:~.ir techniques ror Mc:Ph~rso n strul 5t:rvice, C-V joint s~rvlces, br11kcs sen-cc. modc"tn Zl lignm~:nl theory and fuur, wheel lllgnmcnl ror popular domestic ilnd fnreign c;us with front whtel drl11e,..,,.ll be stressed Autontatlc Transmissions l. crcd\u Th~ course to\'~ts disassembly, inspec!{of\, rc;u~mbiy, and d j u.sting of vjtrious lnn rn)s.'ooni 1nd heir linkage. Prerequisite:. E~Mced a uta "'!echallic Ad,. an«d Enghtet z credm:s Thli COU'$e COYtrS lhe rt butlding or 'D\Cidern :&SOlinr: tnginc.s. ~to "'"'' t>.v 1 kno.,ledl:" of engine theory and be bl to u~ the _equipment involvtd in ent inc rebaudi 'E Prercquisi.U:;.-0 Engines or instructor ~rmlssujr. Q..10 Paru ldeat1rcuttan And S1111l~. cr~dilll 'l1rls cq\rse.introduccs the itudeat to dte p ns rcpl:u:cment bus.ine.ss.. 'l'be. stud~nt will usc catalogs nd mlcrofih:n readers, Jurning to jde.atiry varloua paris. A ''erit 'y of manuf...cturc:r'.s Cttlalog $Y.slenu wiu b& ustd. Tb sndent wiu also study 11des t~qu... ond ael pbone "'"& 0-llS AdY""c.d TUM-"f. 1 CJedlt This course covan tbe theory and ttslilll or WU~.:rcnt types ol electronic ignittru\ systems. altdronic wltage ~ulator1. and b<ul<; fuell!ljectlon <)'> ems. t lnclud<s the u"' of Sua di po>tic equipment and Onyton chasks dyiuunodltl~. Pttrcquite; 0-0 Fud System> end (0~0-A to EleClrlc Syl).nu ot: n Mn.tctar permission, 0- A~.es orfec c~dk' This. C:OUT5e encc rnp:.s&es ths tttudy of LliDft\otlve ejedricalae ce'odes such as light.ing, J,G\ges, wiper' wmh.e~ and cruise conlrol. Emphasis i~ pieced oo electrical tfo.bltshoohng using ted meh~,., H.. lln '.lnd Alr CN1dltlonlnjj. credlll Thl$ course covers lhe b.1sie prlnclplcs Q( htatlni "nd _,ir condi lioni.n&. Dttailtd ltudy of hce.hn~ s)'stcnn, air t0jlil~nlng systems, induding vocuum ond cjec!rical coni rob, atnd aulcmauc: u:mpe{alurc control sy1tems arc corric:d o"t lrn 1be clllsjroqm and the lab. 0\agnosi.s and typk: l a.crvtce }obi D.rc <lone in th~t lab usiag up-to<!at toot. ood dlq!\o<lc equlpntent Office... d Butlrw:ss Procedures urdlt Thls course covers inventory proc.cdvrn. clerical Wotk. paper routing. and general offtee proc:c:dura c:oncernlng hillin1 md c:oj.!<cling (a< portt.d<partment. 0"-5 Alllooullc Pa l Dlstrll>utloa crcdha Tim ioul.sc ~ pujchu!q~o sblpphij, receh jn&. invt:olory and stool< me<chiu!diilo& of the portt.and 'UJ>llles of po"<ji jobber &lore> ""d w rchou&e operotlons. Medwileol parts, toob and equipment. 5ttppli6 and ch1jmlcals lor the utomotivt trtdel, «n wlllk-in or do-ll yourscu custofl\crs are 'COVered. ' 00-~: Broku..,.r AUan... ent Ptttl 1 crodlto This cour"' "'"""theory. nom<nclotllfe ond operation o( front 11r.d rea,r suspenslon systms, steerlnylio.k a. dn&m and disc br.tltes. h)'dra"llc and power brake oyot...,.. Loborotory woril. '"' modeltl$ UCd 10 fie rhc throry nd oomcnclature iogttht.r. Students operate dnun lltld disc bra~e lolbos. 0 7 ~ Put. a credlll TAJ.s coum coveri the theory 1 nomenclel\jt and operallon of automotl"c engines. Vuioul machlnina ratlom art. 6bown, and camp!ete vain jot» n do:)e on crllndt:r hetds Parts M11ebudl&J>C credit& 'lbl> """"-'< >tudi.. rnethocb of merchmdaing port> and ouppue> to the customer la midy typu of businesses including t utomoti...,c dulerlhip. heovy-duty tzvek dulmhipa. lartn llllpl<mtnt dulrr.s. COMlrudU, oquiprn<ttt. parts jobbera ond plltt> wuehousu. 0-9 Dtele'ohlp Porta Dbltlb lot> credlto This tout5e <!o'f'tts puccmsing. Mippins. inventorying add mercllandisi" ol Cencral Motor,. Potd. and Chrysler por1uy>tems. Heavy-duty tru.:k. he vy equipment and tgrlculture ;,re ioduded. Auto body ~hec:t mcte.llnd lritn parts are also covered'. 0-!) Auto. Body r. ll credits This cour.se.provirle., an lnt~\lc: tlor~ to ryjty acelyjebe- w:~lding,. brazing and MG W~lding n.s rtlatad tu tht U\Q body industry. Stude.tt S Ylil\learn the prs)per Ult or the ha)1unet.and dolly, hy<!roullc pqr_to power jacks,.~ orh<r ntdol atrelgb.tening tools. The proce""' ollt\etol fislishing, pl~>tk: nlllng and body meier applicatioo win be ta11ht on fenders. The reflnlsblnll phax will include insbucficn in lbc proper 'Uf: of dle 'ljrt)' cua. mmi.s.hip& po<><h nd fenders, and'-""' repalrtn, or pone~. and lenders. Also inclllde<l wi.u be inatn<tion n bl<ndl"i and tintina of point to acbieve proper ailor mottt:hes, th~ lili&ru:ne.nl of docn.s. fen.dtrs, hoods.,q deck lido,..,d oil"'""' ol.ohop ond point solely pra~ 0-1 Auto.Body 11 credits Further developmtnt of th< weldlna. Slralghtenlng nd p:w>ting skills is achiev~ bn,erformhls: tltrse actirirles on Gutomobi!cs.. Such opemlnm as welding on replaocmonl pan b. minor frame or body alignment. trai(!lltening old.omaged sheet metal. min p~ refinishing. spot n~pair and panel repair are co.mp(e(m 011 vebicl<:s. Supplemenl:lry op<r tloos uclt as trim ffinoyai.jlinor me<lumleal, glo,. <eplocemea.t. and <lectrlc.l wlring wul be per lo:j11<(1.. the U«j arbe>. futthor slillllo daejoped ill the 1<<11 of hand and powe< tools u well as moj<)r po-. er aq~ PW>t mixing Wlls.,. also taught &o tho otudent i> obl< to mlx liwbet paint to aa accept.a.bte. color mo~tch. C Auto Body ll 11 crtdlla All abe ti<u!s Jear~e<l in Auto Body f on d. U ar< oppliod in llhr repair.cf sevenly d.ma&td vehict.s. Tt. a\.,.d.ku mdu.d.e the pro P"' welding procodu~ cf HSS 1\llgh Strenglb Steel) and HSLA. (High Slrenst~ LoW ~!oyf otter. ~rto"' P"'lel rqploc:<'1lenl ond unlt>ody structutoloec!ionln~. Coroplolo rcflnlohlng nd ble~ding o( paints are perf()rmt:d on the repolred vehicles. Safe,wo:king pro.:cdure~~o are ~mphe:si~ed Auto l!ody 1\1 11 ortdlls t contlatiollollof Auto l!ody JU, thb cour.!< ln voj ~ atudy into d<dicated bench oysltm for proper vehicle repair.. to!!"h<el eli&nment owd.l1ez:ti.d.& ieomclty. The 11tudry o( gl.au instali.ati az:d adju'stmcllts. interior trim, roo/ COQYC, ocd ~""'l' equip menf is alio tn.volved. The Mfe work\nj p1occdurcs tn lu ~ato body ohop "' >lr<osed. 0- All to l!ody Br:palt l!ltllll.olij>c aedlb 'bis is tedurc. dclllqnt.tralion pd dijc'\u.doc\ course.ad cover aujo body repair-q.lmot\jtg. The.tudem wlllle.am!be proper.. qoenc:e fo: wriun&d eotlroatt. tbe u.e ol porto boob, and the vl!lo<u use ol. an estimate of rtpalrs. Eacb >ludent will hove an opport nlty lo<lo!.ome duoleali,...tlrtg of domlaed whicle>. 0f 5 fnsln Performance Md F~rol Syll<- S aecilto 'lite ltchnlguu ol dlog<tosb orulaoalya!e ol he clect~j and fuel >ysiems ~te SUdled. A compul<tiltd lin onaly..r will be. d to dia&...,.. drivubilily problem<. Repolring ond lesll... pro etd\ltu are empha.sizcd. Tut cqalpmmt ope radon is Pf&diccd~ The prlnd~ ol. carh<lr<lota, electronic fuel lnjtttlon. multi-port injection and sy!trm. controls 61'e Jt d~. 0 6 Enpnoo 6 ttedlb 1'he1heory ol au1omctive JUO(ine and diesel enxine operetm. CQJ;JNdhm Jod ~gn. alon& wilh mcihods of C'Ji»e problrnt dlognosis, disas.etnbly. repair an~ reauembly. ""' twlie<l. Students bccom< t>milior with the tool. machlnu, afld equipment \Uied to rcpaizaulomodvc enalncs. mpbtils 11 pl&c!d upon the d.-.topml"ttof diog<loitle ability and work akuis. l're~ qul~ite: Li&)tt Rep.lii-or in5t.ructor approve), 0-9 Jhake.und StHnna s «"!lit This COUrt.e: is a '{udy of the rundctltca(ols of pt~ssen~r car brak~ oyllerns including drum brekes. due brak... hydroullc >)'litem.>, power brakes and anti skkj ay.stem... ncluded a.re the fund.anm fils ac steering systc.m.s, rnanu_al l trerlngjcara, and power Seet in,.,... Lal>oiiJtory worlr. wlllolrus broke r>vetbou!j>d compo nent.reconditioaing ODd trouble>hootlns of brakes. Al>o lnduded an: service tajujtment aod. ovttbauj of manual And power ~c~ lj1i,...,.. -'0 1 Balan dna d Align meal 5 <rodll "'bis course invdlvr:s st dy CJf the baste principles o( passrn.g!!r car construdton and suspens\oh, lh:es, whteh, balandn.gand wheel. lignment. Laboratory work wju streu ln.!lpeclfon, Correction or replac.emetlt of all susp.ension parts and the role they play in. pro pet vehicle han~ling and operatlon. Wheel t111d tire rtp~1r. balane Ja,, cjilenment procedures and the use of mod'cm wheel augn rnent.machlnes, headlla,ht ilhnlng a.nd uoubleahootlng are stressed.. 0t! Clutda a nd Standard Trttaurnlntont Z credits. Thl.!i course coven fbe dimmembly. ln&pectjor and repair pf sljndard tra&~ni.!.!i.on.j llld dutch a!sftnbuu.. 0,5 El<ctrJcal and-carburotlog : l uedll5 TU:s course wit OOVC.J the. theory, nomcndalmc aod oper.~tloo of automotive carburetors. and teitlq of theae: unhs wtu be done..!wi< tut><>up procedures will be covert<!.. 0+.;].6 Trarl~Dduio.D PowrT Tnla-P.vtJ trrdlts This CO'W'se covers the henry. ope.rallon, ndmendature and.ser vlcidc of the aulom.ttic: tr.d'smis.ston, m:mu.:~l ua.nsm1s.sion, dutch, rear axle end drive Jlnu. Labora1ory work l.-; ~nc on <ll()dds.. 0!55 Au tommie 1'ranttndftlcna 5 credil6 This"""""' lnyo!vos a study of the dect<k al. me<:bsnkaland hydroulic >ystems o{ the modem auto...uc tronsmls.>ion and tnnsoxle. DemooulroilotU and proctiu will provldt.stud<!us the OJlPOrlunity to bea>roe projicient n dla&nosls. service nd COOl plet tcbuildiog of thc:se systems. ()6..56 Pown- Tl"aln. 5 credtu ntis C'O".ltse offers~ Jtudy ol C"'utclles..si:utdtlrd tr::uumissiqu, m:mu~ t~s-jxl.~. drive line$ 01-nd dl( erentf.als. Otmonst.ratioaj and p.ra~i.ce.wuj. provldc 1t~nts the opportunlly to become pro frcient in diagnosis. se(vlce ond complete rcbuudi~~ of th..., sym,emt Advancrd B1~ctdcat fi erl!dits Thls cour.$e invnlves a comprehensive study of the etectroille system's of automobiles. Bmpbo.' b b pl;~.ced on the operations cr.1'e.naor-ba&ed <:omputcr &)'items 10 l11.clude both dlsltol jllld anulos circuit1. Studies wiu include ~letirollic h\llrulnecllt.l~ob, engine, tr.ll\$mlui<ln, brakes and ch.ws con.trojs. 'l'h~ uu o( manufac turer's dj sfic.stic: test eqs.dpmtnt ~d proeaduras wjtbe 'follow: ed. l>< looslrallons ond lob pro<tlce wl~ proyide tbe >ludonls an OllJ>OrlunHv to!>«:orne Pfollo\<ntattraublosboolln&. cllosnootng d tepalrillglh.u oyst~mj. Prerequliltc: 0-!5!nglae Perf«macce d Juel Systems or instructor lppc'o"yal Auto 8ody A..,...;.,.. credoll This...,,.. involves lsludy o/ the buk principles o! bnke syst<nt opd'ltiog$. w~t Jignmenc, 'uspcl\llon 'OCf s.teeriog,,.ir condi tionina and Ol)Olisg oompon.. ls ar>d luel ylleros. 'nit coun~ n clude the automotive elt:cltlca1.syttem.consigtlog of bu1e electricity. sofderins. trov.hre.shootins wllh a mdcr, e-lerlor Ug'hti.ng, nstrume-nts~ wi~s bield wipprj, motors a11d their citnila.

74 1-Course Descriptions CouAe Desc:rlptlons-1!1 61 A~to Bocly 1\clllt<d cndtts Rclo1ted informaikjn is pr~stntt'd Oil Jt pbascs of tulo body wckting.. mef.al ~lnightenioa wllb bo.od togls, and bj dr ullc equipment. Colli.<ion d-e luiolysis o! sb«t a><ta ud,,mjbodic:s is S(ud:ied. Differcall)-pel of $heel md.ll..nrch aa HSS and HSLA, as well n the properl\cs of sbcc:t mrha) arc disttused. Wh<r. and.how to u.e lead ao><l plutlc fllltr to prc'en«d. Pall!! ~uiprn.mt sueh as the opcntioo end milinte111me o! rht S(lr.ty gtjn i$ st\ldied. bt~sive di1cu&soj\ t.ku place on refmish prod ucts, surface prepa_r:kion 1 s.:jnding nd polishlng. lhin.ntrts aand reduce~ snd lop COJ.t pp11cation. hulructlon in.shop, lool and p~inl S~~fery is ptiaented. 0-6 Auto Body Related JJ a dlt To further promqtc: knawkdse of rcp~ir okll)s related to uto body,lbe ronowing dlscu.ss\on areas Ate included ln this CO'Jte: The evaluation o( uto:nobilc bod es and.:b.mtjt rep.tir t«mj quu, unibod.y construetiol\ and r~pr~-tr tcclm~. structur-al t~- 111\nol"!!l', ""'~'""'"'" dejisn, oolbsion do mage dloil,nosis. vehlclt prep;nation, metal oocndion end ~rtf replqc(rnen(. Addili<>N inm~lon m.~y include sjess insta ll~tio:n, dtctrka1 accessories, door and window servicing, a.nd trim rcplactment Auto Body lleloted ll. «edits t'his.:;ourie ls an jntroductioo to the det1ic ted bench Foystem for rep.1k or Ullibody vehjcle:s and proper ~.chorjng end pulling pro <::edutc5. Tb~ _in on111ttlon.cor removiqgand rep~~c\ng etlginl!& snd r)lnnillg gear-components b inclu.ded. Tbe proper-car!: and.protl!c!ion of <m bc:w'd computer in autp Jt rrreued. The st~dy. of.shed metal idignmeul, fram~ and. unibody stra;gbl~ing, along with ptoced1ltu far rettor;ng severely dama,ed. vtbic:l:s, is olfued. 6-7 Oricnlation to tbc Auto ndustry r.,cllt 'bis am~ is~ study of the role, function aod operation Q( all d!.partmcll.~ in a!tnallend.)q.rge auto"ddtlve busi.oe:ss. empbasil ins t he ii!rvic:c dtp.ufment. SptciaJ attention ts G~Yen 10 the re5pen.dbility of Jhe suvka p1non lo the a~toibolive eilahus.b. ment ol11d to the comrnudity. TtHt stud nt win r c:elve spe:tifi<: occupmional ij:t(orn:llltlojl whleh en~btea h1m or bar to rd'f tth dy seek ernploym.elrt in tilt Uiomotlve Jervice lnctustry. Pen~} d~ta shut. job intervlewlug led \nlque&, letter.s of application. see~ references, and r6ump &recovered. lp addlt\oo, 1oforn01Cio~ on wa:ge.s, beoe/ll$, ri:lecbanlc ctrdfleclon aod job-hlet~-' tion ~ covered. 10 WOOD TECHNCS 10.0 Wood Tech.aks ProcHM:.! a i1c Proc:c:du- ' l t> CN<ilts The. touowlng cour'" eompdn the e11rric\&hm foe 10 0 for a tofaf.of to cre'dttt: Hendtoal.s bd Poruble 1'ow.,. Tool ~atlon oud p,_ c:edu<cs' 'l'hi> cvurse provides 1111 lntrodudl<>n to tht ldentl icotlon, Rfc use m.d c:are o( bandtoojs arid pocteble po~ed.oof&. Jt deyelops skills in using hand and port.tble JH'W~t too1,- lo.square ~~J~~n~o~~~i~~~~~~.capejoln \s, $and su~raccsllltd oth.tr Mdchlne Wood WorkloJOpen&tiunl nd Procedures: Thi' c~url.c provides <~n introduction to the lden.ti.lic:atian, &if lly, u.e and ~.e o! woodwor~ing,-pac;hlnea. The fu,ne:tlon, oper~~ons!lnd pro(edur~s of var[ou:s w~wotjdn& m111c1unc1 ~~ empha.!ji:a::d. Wood i'rppertleo a.od JdtntlficaUon: Thb ""'""' pr<»idco the student with in!ocmation ot> wood property ~bltloterbllc& ud mtlhods of identif!tetioc. The use or modtl.mln& cbaraclori5tlcs of,. oocf aod wood prodocto it lodudtd. flnlsblng Matorlala aad Proc:edurcs: 't1tls <OUJ>e provides J\e otudeat "''ith nformation on wood.fidithlns product m>c! ptoctdurd. nterior Clbfn«:a.d fumiruri: fzolshcs. crlerior Wood fuu.hes ad< inteeorwau finllltes ore ncluded. Fiittt~. HardWue and Ad~sh'tt: 1"bl1 CO\rsc proyid.es in. fom'.atlan on cunent fasttn!!rt, bl.rdware and adhestve:~ lo the woodworkl<tg industry. Seledlon. coot, lrulollatloo otnd 5p<dol re quirementl of fasteners; h6rctw re Bnd aclhl!ll" ~ art eraphasbed. 1t>-Jt WOod Technics C.blncttn lntiand Pumltur..,oktns 10 erodlta The followlug counoo COtDpo-loo t.bo can lcutum!or 1t>-1 r... a total a! 10 crc:d lto: Duipl.aa, Plannlua an<ll!oumotln1 for Cablnetmokb>tl nd f umlturtjn&ltin(; Thlt coo roe provldol the Jtudent with bulc desi&n COllccpts. materi.m sdectlun, &Jl.tnning rcd:niqtt~ 1od melhoc.l.s o! a;timatjng ln 1.1\e cabinl.ot and furdkllc makin_g Uctd. Ccrutructlo. P'OC'C!dure end Operation~ f«c.tlinetmak lnj: 'l'bi:s course providt-j the lti.uf nt with the. prbel'durti Jlld operations lnvoj\'rd in the s.pecj l1~ flejd oj ab;nejmakina. Style1 or cabinets. melhous of tonstruttl.on, ~1ctial scje:clion, finiolting procedureo and inatall tl<>n olcabineta is ncluded. Constntctloa P rocedures and Oper.etloot: ltw F&Q'nJtonm k fng: This course emphaair.es the skills..necessory to plan, sc)ted"1e 110d oonstruct furniture. Method' or productlon ~md construction fe<:hi'quts related to 1M prcpqr uw o{ n'-terlqis is elsa covered. Ca binet and Fumlt u re FlnklM1: This <:oursc provides the SCt.l den1 "'th methods e.nd proceduru rar finit.hu uaed i.n eommer. c~l n wna1t sbop abij1et and furniture produe:tiun. Prert:, quwlc.: ;.;.J()-0 Wooc,J TecbtUcs Proc:~ DOd Proccd~acs or in- &1.nt<:t0f consent. 1o- Con.strllction and 1\emode'lln& JO end" The fouowlng COU.l'K f mmp' bc the cunicuju m!oc' D-~; PGnJ, SUe. La} out Mnd Fctfl'l(.ladoru: 1'hJ..\ cour~e Jnuoduce.s the student to plan, interpt«tat~n. 1ptelf\ca1ions Md buij~ing codes. in Ught nsidentiol constr~o~c:tion. Site ptcparatlqn, ld.y0\11 (oothlr;s,!oun~uons.tn'd formwurk art ndus:le<j. Floot, Watt, C~ Ui ttg nd Roof FromlnJ TlU' c:our;se lntrodu.ces thc.~' udent to the fundamejlla.le or floor fr11ming and "foundotiot. preparation. Convent!ona.l wa.u, ceiung and roof framing lire in ~!uded ~J~g whh informauon en v.,rlous method!. ~oonng Materlot,, Windows, Exterlur Doors l\d E,_tttlot Wall Finlih: Thi$ course 1ollod~s the st\lde.n.t to SKfngJfht. fl.lshing. liiciu, aoffits, ventiiis a.nc:vtltrlcwsjdfng materials. Window :md door i.rtstal1atioa is inct~ed. unulat>oq, ln\ej1<ko Wall Plalslt, nterior Trim a o Stairs: ThU..,..,...-proVides nformation oh h.. < lou. tllu(y O<ld[t, io suj tion. npor b&trieta. we-atbc:rst.rippi"j add vwunj. Cons1tuotion on.alfits, ciryvl alt, hanglo.lntenor dooro. imbllini mt.eor. trim ilnd fixtures, iauau.iug pre:fnbdcated kite ben ~nets. and luod...,tal.nm- COUlllldlon ore a eluded. Re-modellDg RHklentLal Coastruttlon: This course_ptoyides information on removd1, repalr, remodel and r.ntoretion ol re,identi!l construdion, (oun&trlon rep1fr, Jruulaling. c:utwn wllli cocutrw:tion. roof repa.ir,,offll construction and ventilation, inh:riof" w:d e-.terior lrjol. art n poftd Miu:.hlae Mainlt.nabCe J credit TltiJ coutoe pr<wid«lnl'ormarion on tbe"m.tl.atttlllll<:e ol hand end raad!ine woodworking tools. The reeondlttonlng. lubricating. sbupening a.dd rouj.ine Mllil'llenance. o!'woodwofking machines.,.. illolw!.d. 'l'tonbleshootins. a~sruneat o! part>, el<ctricol re quire~nenij. ~power tr.io systems arc 1lso indudeci. 1()-0 Plostlc Lon>lMCe$ lo atdito TillS coune provides an lnl~otlon to the fi<ld o! ploolic bm~&es inclndios: Orad~ and te~alutes of la.mb\etel. typea o! ltdhesivo and their mctbods ol llpplicath:m, methods ol applj.ing ptt:ssurc to secure laminate,, Spcclal sku s specific to bmtlnates including routing, edgebu!dins. rmchl.nh\~ and rotming ace streue-d. Nt!W p_(oduct'linas are exumlned lncludir1 the Jmm system. of pllstlc fabrication Conatructlon Moltrlols o nci l!otlmotlna rcdlts.n this course, types of building.,atorlols, l~elr usctes, costo and appjh:otioos for llght rc~!lidentia( constnclion ore explored. pjans arc i:qtcrpr-elcd for buildjn-x matc:rl.b, JDkCDUs and r.iliruaune fot bills o( rnat<riols. 10.Jtl5 Drawlnt~.and &tlrnatlt~~~ Z <rtdlll This couru provk!es an ntroduction lo dntwlng aod estim.atiag as t rew., to woodwo'~df oc:cupatlona. Area.r of drawing n true Uon nclude skeleblnz lechnlqu.., orthoaraphie pcoje<tlon, i:~emetric, oblique aod per~~ ~ia& Methods ol estim11ting ntl.i~i l s Uld codstru.tdoo c:oste, tc:dding prints ~lid in Lorprc:.Uon of drawlnss talncludtd. 1 DESEL AND HEAVY" EQUPMENT MECHANCS 1Z 1!/«trlcaf J\ccessorlu crcdiu 1be operstinj prindp!m 'oj ~mmon rltetrk!l acceuo.ties found on dieel~tnd heavy equipment are ~ver ecj in this couru. Em pbaols ioplaet<l on diagnosis, repair, t<siing end mointcrt<ulce of el.ruical _...,lcs. 1 5 Air Condltlc>nii\ODd ll<hle<ro\lon Z oro<lllo 'Jbis <:our~.comists of scimi:e, Ofltra1tanaltheory, di gnoj\a acd tet\'icc (UtK-dduto rrnled tn an Of'dc:r \ofhlch lcad.s to proper skih 11od \lodcrstand'ns {or croflsmto and t<:cl111ician.1. Tbc major cmphuis lli in the ereo or tulomotlvt air cond.tdoning 11nd hjghw y tru~!i_porl re.fciseracloa. 1 '7 Df~J apd Heny l?.q111fpmenc.shop Operadon 1 credit n this course, he studtnl lurns whot 1.\ uptcted of the dicxl m«ffonic, Lbe <Ole nd (unction of the scrvl«mano&cr, the ports deperlmtj\, B<:.S dt:per ln~ol ~nd tbe company OJAni%.01t.Ku\ l s\rvctu.re. The cours.e: also c:ovt:rt new m&~chil\c delivery procedures. servia: rcport.t, n:poir ordcu, warranty polk:lc:s.00 a Sludy of the l test procrd <t.,nd tteholqiics in lbe indo lr)'. l~ntify inl: t:mplorment. opportun.ltlts and pteparauon f6r S«k lng emp~t will also be a pul of the course. 1 8 Dl.. el Equipment Moltt\enooca 1 credit n ftus course, studcalsl-c.un the t~njqllcs of preventive rnuinttn.n~ f<lr lcudls and conslruction equipment. :J'bc ~rsc i.ncludl::s.~ ~ud~ of oi~s. fueb, Jubric:dnts, mtra.tion, tirel, rims,. «rocks, belt:s ;md_cha;n.s Br ke!i. SUspension nnd Erec.tr'lceJ. t o credi'ta Tralnin& experlence.s in thb cour.se 1\t~ sejcctad n prder.to ac quaint the tudent wuh tbe!kill! and technical " know how" "l\cces~ar.y for proper n1.-lntenance ond r!p&lt a( the chissls \m.it.s of hlshway lnit con.structlotl equipment. ChnssJJ units Juth Q5 drum abd disc bra."~es, hydnta"c vacu.um 111clalr brake sys\entl, 1«rin&..and suspcru\on, tgolllou, cbatgi11, Ugblln& sy5teins, st.u" ti~ ~)'SlC'ms and wiriag 'C' included in the in.slructioll. J-7t Transml.nloaa.od OriveUne Ocrcdilt: Study and trainlng--cxperle:ac.el jn thia e<~ urse are presented ifl ordtr to acquaint the 1tudent with llondord dlaj:noo\1, tfisas~mbly, iolpection, nassembly and adju.1tment ol powrr tr,1jjsmisslon units SDcll a5 uninrs:.t jalnu. power dividers ;md power $1\i!t transrnlssion, torque. convertefs, mat~wll tcou1smi.s iiolls and dutdu:.'l)pfcol equipment sed lo this fn.structionel ucitlre hishway truclcs lltld CM'trurl.loo cqujpmctjt ilobincs 10aedib Scudy and lltboratory erperif:ncea in 1hb course are nrran1cd to provide tbe $ku1nd knowledge netde<llor ~r<>'pe> dl gnoois, rll...ombly, in~ction.ud repair ol oil dlnelengfne (X)t\1 ponents. 'l"wo-cycle, {our-cyc:je. in Une llnd vee enjines used in trucks nd ronstruc1ion equipment art used n thl; course.. EDgine. main.ttnuce reqwrcmcnu and opet&uonaj standards ere also covert d. 1-7 F... J SysleJ\1$ 10 end its Theory at~d litbnrototy actlviuealn thb <OUT><., orr.. ged to provide tuden\.< with tbe worku>g knowledge n<eded a properly servjce dk:ej fuet sys!cnu. rroub)~.jhootlns, rebuilding..c~librati ng o.nd tum: up are ncluded. Un1t 1nJt:ctOD. noub, n line fu<:l pumps,.di~lributor ruel pu.mp,, tltrbo Ch~:Jrgers, and ho~ ~echo! these affe(;c englna performlttct1 is dcm~mstrated with the use of ac.gine dynaw10metec anu other types o anl;\!ysi~ equipment. 1 ELECTRONC SERVCNG Bosic Electridiy and DC Clrtults Z e<edlto This c:ouz:&e.tovers en i..~troduc tion to DC t lectticity, iocludltz ~rernentt am.appkauon of vouege, C\ltrenf and resi'sw:c«!\ &sicmathematica, ~eric add M:Jrndflc nolatlons arc empklyed. Otun's Low is stttssed aad Klrc:holr U.w lo employed. DC cir cuit ;molysls ls pursued with capac:llors and indu<loroln RC and RL lim.-co donls. Serle&, porollelnnd "'rlu1>jtollrl cittuiu ore D.nal}'t.C< with th volt-obm millimeter and DC powar OUTe<s &a.;., Eledrictty end AC Clre lts Z credlto This CO\t'!e covers an introduction to AC electricity mduding ntasuremenlt lind appucadon of ~llep, currc:nt, t1:sbft rtce. rcoctance omd imped~ncies. AC aod 6\ne W ltvclfc lntroduc:ed. t!.xtet1si t usc of the: cathode ry o'w:i11majpc s requjrcd. Pbasor. algebra and complor numbers ott u ed. Anolor;ue and digital mlr-o!-tl1nrtle5t <quijrnlent orr ernploytcl. Complu AC circllil> :~~h:itt~~~~=:!~tlmin~~.uft~~:=-d thot lludcdli comp!eto t-0s Butc Bloctrldty ud DC Circ:W prior tu.eruo!ling ic th.is cou.ne Sonlco Sltop Oraonlutloa... m This course E:OVers rheatchins, pu1dmsln& prjc:lna, stocldna and inventory procedures lnc:ludlns clerlcal, papert.yor. m.nd general o![lcc and supply melhodlo t will relate ta billing, collect in& and propet port rtplactrntnt OJ o..odsted with tbe eledro lc ln dtatry. Bocb >1udent will use <&td.lop. mlero!wm and sclremotic wirinc diarroms to properly tdo:nufy patu, oomponents and devicu including t~t ~!qulpm~rat. Tht student wuj become: ac quo!inud witb tlectronl~ deal~r'- jotlbe.n and woreho'o~sh through sch<duled field trips and on-altt vhlls or conducted tours. They wiu be <><p<>5ed a training rts<r<li S tools, chemjc.lt; and repair methods. Sales techniques Olld te!cpl>one application wiu be :stressed. 1-~0 F~no~.,...,._tals o!eiccuidty 1 or<dlt 'l'bis CC\lfH is study o( the fund..arnenul Jaws govcrnir.g DC ami.ac electricity. Jectrkal C!rcult (Jdora lvclt.ltge, current, r~jialij:!:c~ and pow~) rc disc\lded in de1 1l. Me ten to rneuute these fact~ ar~ used e.xtcn$lve\y in tllperlrqt:ntl. The student becmne~ f.1mili~r wu_b maj:nelism and elu!rojt1..1.b'th!uc d~k:e.j ;nd experiment& with.n,olors 1 seneratora :.nd relays. 1 $ ntroduction to Dtl)tw C l~culto z credtt This course features lectures nnd lobor.rtory excrct,es that emphasi:ze the theonr ~nd use o{ bltlqry log!<: g~tes. conlblnatkinttl Dgic, BoolcOm expzessions1 trutb. tabl.ca, nunlm1zation maps, binary and decimal number systems, binfy coding, encoding add decoding. logic df!vtcc~o, "binory oritbmc:tic and arithmetic logic t:lrcuifs. 1-6 Digital Circuli crallta Tllit course lealutl"$ W:e:hlres a.od laboratory exerciua tha1 ml p~ze the th l!ory :mel me of syn chronau~ &oainl devtcn in dueling (Jip-llops, ootlnler.s, sjdft registers, rnemorit.s. famwuiu Ubn. with CMOS ogie device:s 1 D to A and A to 0 conversati~ use or dual ehonn<l osclllootope, aad DVM'a prlnclptes or <erial ; nd parujld data t~asmb;sion. frecequbite: H 5 lnlr0 to Di~ital CircWts. '1-7 Mlcro-$yslem5 OetiJn «edits The purpose or ibis course ia to allow the 'tudc.ot to study the d.. l&n o! microproc.. lor 'C<>rollctl,Yrtlcm, S>CC!riC<1Uy rnicro-crimp1lter. Rac:b student bu.ildl 1 micro-computet es the coune prngreues a.nd ru.y keep tha mac:hin ha or &he builds. 11 is hoped th1.t Whez\ the e()ur5.e tl fini5heci, ltudedts WiU Ule U\e: machine to further their owll eduetuon of eomputwdona:! needs. 1 8 llllcro-systtnu De lgn U credits Tbc mlcnx:omputcf" is designed to democultate tbe hardware aod. aoftwa~ cootcol of ptriphenl circuits and the: hardware and $00. ware ftedbsck lrotit these. drcuit$ to rhc micropr«es.sor. W!tb the txteplion of thc"fmrtt panel whchc& al'l.d lndlatclt llghts, the. en tire m;c:hine is vrir.- wrapped, which "&!lows the studt a.t tqm ke design changes easily to aecornmod'ate: spccifw needs Elcctrontc Com~un lcfciom l.credit This course coven thcory.and practice ex.a'mln:.t,lons in basic el~c tro~i.cs, 1'tCliJ.l1Ct: and irilpedat!cc, C:Qn:tmUtllc tlon (Unda:n~n ta1:s Qncf J)'~tcms. efecfrott tubts and trislsblof'&, resonant clrcu1ts and RF Osdll.odors in preparation for obl:~injdj&:t second cla5.t rscflo telephone FCC license. 1'60 Bltctronlc s...-v"ktog 1t>crtd.lts This c:ourse is.an introductory study or e.lcctronlct whldlooncs Ohm's Law units oi me.uuremenl, electronic chcuitl, component perts, UiU'tSis.ton a.rad lotegr~ted drcults. Tbe program provjcks the hxleot "'ith lu\owled&t and akub natesury to pulom> atpil.bly u a sel'vice technician rep&jrlnr &lld m jnro.int.' rcdio, TV, vldcorcoorder, 1"1\krowave. and srnau appliances. 't'he course (<!'atures an introduc:ttqn to mic.rop1"0cessoc's nd mus loglc cllip.s found in many of the foret'ltmcd. 1 J6~ B!oct;onlcslab Z crodlts Time fn 1bis C'O\rse is.11llofted to servl~'na clecttonlc cqul~me.nt and building studont projocts... j..

75 .. ' Course Descdptians Course Descrlptlons kcl"'nlc Se<vlclns U 10 crodlt This cor>e pnwldo:t the opportunity Cor student< 10 be<:or.o k!u t!d ~.n tht.. u of tmt equipment b:.ldtool$.. schemmic di.i)grmm:t. p.c. ~OUtl, nd s.ystetns flo""chw.rt.s to be bje O ecll!f' the: 11eld of str\llc:ina c:lectr\e.1l equlpcneal,uch M listed in the ct.ute:nt catalog. 1-7 lilecttonlc Communb:aUo~t.s ll credits. This courct ncludes thtory t)d practiceex.:tmlna15ons on RF.1mpliAert, e~mpihude ~nd {rtqoency, modulated tr.1nsmlttct~ ~nd tccclvcrs. mcasuripj devjcts. (l.m trmsmission lloe~and ilnfen n.as in preparation {w obtai cud& a second class radio tcltphone FCC licco.se. Prerequisite: 1-5!5 81rorcnic Conunu.t~lcalions t EkclronlC :! credits Tb1a c.oursc 1nvolves n SntroduGtory Mudy of ekdronk:s a-ad covt:rs Ohm's law. wtlts or measurezr.. ent, d«trkal circuft.s. CCtTl P<'fl"D pooru, el<c!oil tubu zul mo.w.to:s. Follo.v!ng th n troduct;oo is a study and application of radio and television aer vic:in&. electrl~al 01ppU.an.ce servicing and~ ins.uurnent repair Eloctronl<:$ 1! ~ crodlts Thia course co~rj elec:trgnic circuit theory 11nd pntctitnl :Jboratory exercie:es \nvol't'ing n:rni-c::ondudars, }unction diodei, powl!r supplies, juf\cllon ~rtu"'istorr., sm.o~u-sip1al a.mpli{iers, large signal smpiiuere, operatjot1td amplifie:&, amp! iller lroubl~shootlng, 0$"1UalotS, rad\o Jt!CCi~~~s, line:r-inle,&~tltcd. clr, cu.its, and declroa.lc control devices and r:ircuib. 19 NDUSTRAL!fYDRAUL/CS 19-SOO l11dustrlat Hydraulics credit 'Fbi! course «JV!/J the funda:dentajs of flu.id power and U:c compoocnij s to pri <lple. function, te>minojou nd use, 'fh up plk:atlon o( bydrtulle bow< oystems O various mo.:hines s stodled, oi011j wllh n>oimenanco ond troubl..tlool\ng Mo~lle Hyduulla credits This ooursels <lcsll" d to acquo.lnt the Sl"dcn' ~<ith the th«y ond kcvice of h)'droolodc l'fr<nis, The course is1pedfic lty desism:d for pplic.ltioo to the.~obij~t"equipmcnt ~ndusl'!. 0 MACHNE TOOLNG T CHNCS 0 0 Adv.,.cd ~ l eredll This course ln olves o atudy ct rup amplifitohion ln.specuo" equipment ond procedurd. Emphasis is placed oo su:for:e fi;jhh, Oatn..s. optics!, mechanlcol, elet11onlc and P"'"'"'""c PJi,US s)'llt""- A.ctu..l 'D.dlifte shop i.mpectioo edc p_(oct~ M~ employed. Z0-8 Kdoled Metal Prooeuu crodlb Tbjs basic metellwarkin.,g course 00\'oer& s:dcty, ; rout.tnd ~sur.. ns. nu~ehi.nir\1. cxy ~tetylene weldi.ttg.. brazillg.nnd.cutun,&, ;p.rc welding nd properties c me tolls: 0-9 lleloled MeUi Processes! credits Ti.)ls con\lnufttlon o[ 0.8 involve& \he study of sheet metol work, 6oldcrin&Dud broulna. fo"fiina wnd heat lreattn~nt,.grinding, tool horpenin~. mo:folco"inb. MG -.nd 'l'!g.w ldlng, m t l (ab'rication nd the rcpa:lro m tf <~l obje~u. Prerequislle: 0-8 Rebt«< MeWs PrOttSats l or 0.PM<!nl> Pr-.se$ l\ct ll Prout.te:J J a-cdhs Tbls bole: met&sworldng course coven safety, layou11.nd meuur i.ng. mtehlding, oxy ooetylene welding, brazias attd cutthtt;.. ar welding and propct!ico or metals Metoho Proc..,..n.. credits A conunuauon of 0-0, this course coven sheet me.tol work, :sollh.-ring and brozlng, forging ond h.. t tnatmen~ Brlndlns, tool wrpcnin&o molol r:as~lng, MG and 110 welding. matal fobnq lion and' th~ repair ol molal objects. Prereq ime: Z0 D Mclab Procuscs l Loyoulond l pectlor>s credit ''ll """"" fs on ntroduction to plecloion iaspcetion ond loyoul of ni&chlnod ports. 'l'he emp!.. is is placed on method.!. eccunoq, aalibtttiort amd techniques lt.sed in the mochine tool fndusuy. 0-5a Tool an<1 Porta nspection c~odlt ltsi)(clton rt:quire.me:nll and procedures Q lhey rcl fc W tooling and lin.lshed ~"~"' Ara covered Jn l}lis ~1li'Rl; G11uging_ Rtld con 'tcouondl J')lccauring equ;pm~nl nre uub~ m d etern:nntn~ con (onnancc to parl pclull nd speciftcatiop~ Machin Sl10p credits This cbl.lfk cove r~ tim: opcrttlon, care and nomenclature of mtehlne toob. u&e nnd can: o hand tools ;and l!rec.isioc:' in :.trumcnts 1 011d cornpulatioa ond loyou~ (or b.sk m;tclnn~ optr tioru. l?mphuij ij ~aced on byoul, drill press and 1Dlbe opctat\on.s. 1lo58 M <hlnc SK>p ~ credhs This coum hils mo'e emphasis on the lathe ~r.d itlduda an&tc tllrulna. ta.('f:r, a pet turning. threading, knuru.n.. borins and reaming. An lntrclluct)on a the shaper and :crulhng mlch\111!11~ covered. l)rtlllng. capping D.nd SSt'.tnbly ar.e tvjtlinu~. Prert quisilc! 0.$7 MaC"hlnc Shop or iruttuctor permissloo M ehlnc Sbcp ll. tttdiis This C0111hn1AlioD of ZO.as& empbasius shaping. and muiins, oper~tlon& with :tn introduction to grinding as it rela\~.to Sut faces and squftrlng. rrcr~qulslt~s; M:~chine Shop 1 und Zt> 58 l\r,fti<:hlne Shqp rl 1 or ln9tructor pennijjsion, 0 60 Machine ShOp. V credits This course covers gtlndlng cp~ralions-cz: lin dricclz,.surface: 11nd in krnat Jnde~hts; lilrjd rotttry totble work ~rc cov'crcd. J:.n lntroduc lion to numerical cot'jtroll tool ilnd cutt... 'T Jrlndint and e\ect~kol. cucnrgc mochmlns s provided. l'rerc:qui>itri: 0 57 Mochloe Shop, 0!>8 Mochhloo Sbop, 0 59 Machine Shop ll. ot i01trod.or p.:nulsskln. Note: The touowinj course compri-"t' the ~culum for W.80 Mochlna 'ruoll fa< a total of lilt' credits: ~0.00 Ertalno Lathe i This courst pcovidc' an \U1cfe!'lt&lldi:ll ol opentionaj principj!$, r.ommdaturc".1dd pitts nwnttjw)ce.. lt.devejops dills in turn Q'-!ac.hss. center dti11hllo (orm turning, ~hou.lders, tool g.omelry.lool grindir>j, tool positionill& <td toql..jection. ~0.01 ll> Kino Lotho Thi~ cou.rsc pro11lcka en unck:rstandinz. of lllnits, Hts and to1cttnccs amj dt.'ttlope skull in laperinj, angle: turuing,loudin~, drilling, 'Ctll\~nl Qlld barilll n~ llu ~ rcqvirem.:nfs of v~ worklaoldlng mctbnds are emphasi=l 0-17 Pow.,.Sawlag T1is course provld15 an undcrllandlng or basi.: powu sa '!Yin$ operations and rflluirf!.ments as related to types of operomoos and different materillf. Sl.xle selection, ~and eeds,ar-o.l&kl md contour uwing on jnternjllood externol rorl.,..., salety and lrouble,hoot(ng are olto lltcluded. 10 ZO Drlll "'"". This coucre provld~! an unde,.t.tnding of driu>, drilling and arlll Jns machinc:f.'. Emphuls'l Ptaec:d on SJ.fcty, workholdin.g, opccds nnd feed holelolotlon enil quality, drtll sdcelion iuld drill mbin t~rta~cc: Special open1hon~ ar~ a~!lo inc1uded. Nole: The foilow\dg wurns comprl1c: the curric.ulurn for 0 81 Machine 'f.qo! Tor lot.ohl Jilr>" credlts: 0-0 Sn&~ Atlle U1 Sludent.s continue. ~nslne ltthe work with empbasb on speed at~d OCCUDC)', pec!el Opctlllort nd mu!jiple piec< p<oddcljon through lb use of sptc;lltoollllg. oitocllmeots ond wo<kholdlng methods: lndudlng ltoo pla\ llnjiine LolbeiV.. Thi <OUUe provlcks.oo un<ler:.condlng oltbrud chiiw& ond devc:lopina Jl<i\ls in the moc:hining.oltll<oe lhteo><ls llllnlnalllochiftel Thit ~uo provides an ~ntroductton to miutns wilh cmpbu ls on l}'pcl of mochines. tc:rmfnocogy1 safety, ~e:~~.sand feeds. O!tlcr maunllng and JCicctlon. OpcrGtiaru: inc~ud~ nlounlizis worlcpl ces. "'' lo; ond step milling. 0 5 SNper The purpose of lblo CJlUUOis lo <levelop a basic undcu!ao<fing Of wpcr opcrotloo O<udlng cutti,. tool., Mlety, epeeds ond r.,d,, motorial~ lu'orlc~\lorl, machine 5et"lp, squarlnaond c>lcr lldarocw~ s. Zil-5 Turt<l Lolbe The purpose o( tltls COUUe l to dc elop D Wldenlondieg o( \he P'rindple:s, CUte, 101-up ajjd operation o{.a turret l.athe. Ttlrrti"" foc:inj, center drillklj. fotmins. boring. driliin&. reumin~ cu1-off for single-point &JKl apeci.,l tooling are covered. Note-; Tbe fouowlna c:outlts c:oh!.ptlr the c.xtk'liu:m for Z0.8 Mac)1Jno Tool ll lot a total of len c=llto: ZQ.O Mlllins Machine Advanced work on mh1\g rnochines whic.b lndud.e:s vatiul ond horitonta( macblnea.. Sawina.. rorrt} milllcg, straddle: milling, finish considcr~tlons 1nd kcywayt and 9Unes oi C covered akmg \vilh 1pced1 and (tf'ds!ot paruct1bf materials. Slomdvd.tf tkholcnts l.lld -."Q(khcldiaa pmbtcm~ un: covered. Letter 'ins on ports lllld die compoacnl>;. occompllshed with 1 pantovaph..0-1~ MllllnaMaeblr>e'lll 'this cou.rsc tnvolvos oddlllonal wort in l)lillillg wilh ad~oncea set UP" and tootin&. SlU<en\S ocq<>lte ku!s.in aetting up m>d umerstandlng bozlns. t-slols. OJ>1!111At and fo<m milling. Holdi f 1~gul ar' part~ ud time for opetatiodi Ol a similar nature a:e Wes.foed. English aod nltlric dl~ensicni.j. spe~:ifications al'e us.td. 0 6 Shaper.. Thia co\ase involves.~dvan.ced oper"'tions un Ow slw.p~r with em pho.:~l s an a.c'c~ucy and m~chlne capab\lhy. Angular r::uls, h orito[i~ tat and co ncou:~ cuts. dove(alls,!n ish, workhalding.requ,lre:m~;nts 'nd job e'umo,uon tre sttc:-ssed. Z0 Grlndlns.... Surl ce and cyllndricll &rindlng, Jr.duclinglhe s~lls neceswy for step, straigbl, taper, inlernal,and external QPemioo~ are c:cweu:d. Workboiding ooo wheel """'ntlng. cool:ml :\lid finish ~ emphaslz<d. Note: Tbe fouowi"s c:ourses c:ompri!e the cuu~jum for 0 8 Machhte 'roo& lv foe a l~ l of.~eri tr~lts: 0.1 Mlltins Moehlne iv. "J'h.is. course COYerc eomp(c:tlon of mllltug m.ad!ine-oper.llions with ~mph d on iadu,1rhd rcqulrtnitmt.s end.st.dlldaird.s. Operations hlciudt roter11abl~ work,jijs anll ralures,. indexing, rework 1nd' pantog-raph. ~cdlll ottochments and set ups for 1dvancecl opera tion are ahxhw.. 0 SS Modern Moehlnln& Procu.. s Recent developments ln macklnln& and taoiinx tlrc introd.u~ ami Ku.denb will swvcy the library for literature on tbc hiat developu:c:nts and pr c:tice. luecti"}ccl disct.arge- machiniqg oper : ticjns and appucalions 1ro studied a:oog with t!'lecttodts~ fmish and moch.ineltl'<lps. 0 7 Ad " Bted Grind ns "nils tourso enoompasses tbc devclopltl<llt ol skills in tbe gclodlng and measurin8 procedures for parallel wr!ach, squ.ariug and shacpening of muiins c.u!tera. Nntc: Tlila ot~dt lbcii Urrs or ~unco for Machine 'l'ooll, U, m and'jv. Z0 Bg r~olond Flxt;;rc 'l credit Thl' course le lm itnroductlqn- to toor ~ign no.d gaug!og pr«cti~s. Empho~ll S ort jig>. llxlure du\gn, d mping. loc~lln& devices. tooli.n.a and ptoductian methods. Pre :sct and qualified toafmg ror NCCNC s presented as t relates to conventiorhil pn~ctlcc. 0-9 Job Or.., t llon cttdm T1ri> COUto<! detlgned \O'nfnrm.Wcfenls 'oboul s(!<clfic occupt tionollnform don wlllch prepore; them fot seekklg employ.mnt. P rsooot dall ~httb, Job inte,..,jcws, resumes ""d retod>me!>do lions are tove:rcd.. Fotmer pdduote!ljl\d rtpreseotntives Cl ltbor, rnanagctilcnt t.nd. lrid.wt-ry r.rc nvited to di.sr;um variqu5. aspre\s o( employment. :!0 97 Nurnerlcol Control.. ere<!' s. This course ij duixnca to be an fnlro;hlclion to minu&j pr6gram ta_ing of numcrlo:d c;ontrol mbchines. H OO\'ers the: history, jqs1ifictllon, tyj)e' of conlro~ systems and tupe: pn:pention. Studea\s win program a pnrt, punt.h 11 tpc and m.ake t\c part on a numcrlnl conuo1 inkhlne Spcc.l l Problems M chlnl! Tool. cr~lt The Jtllllenl. will build nd prove )he die, jig. fixture, mold w spt!ci.ll tool \ntrod'ced 1111d developed ln TDol and Fixlure class. (Z0.8SJ. lnstnl<tor lf>ll<oy& as wdl as 1 wrh!cn n:poct ond e~udo.n ere required lor cr.edlt Cornp<11e< Numerical Control Tllis c:ouu..-. ij dc'jisned to givr the.tfudmt t.sperience jn using NC Rdil software on D '1'1\S 80 comptrtcr. Student.\ wm progfam a port, pioithc port ond prepore a t pc. The pert wuilie mode on vertical mill with 1 Centurion V CO<lplller control aystem. Cr\d relemt<:e, noatlns mo. MD. tool otbct<, autt><d cycl., dd pari lou lien ate. coyered. 1 MECHANCAL DRAFTNG 1-10 l'undamtnlol of Drafl!n lcredlt 'ltls ~troduelory coutu providtsin511v.cuon and practice n tbe ~se of drawijjs instnments, views, projedioju, sc:d.joa.s aud dnowlllg convcntlons. 'l'i<hnlqu<s ol dlmenslooluf pitt$, scrow thaods O)nd feste.ners re practlee!i. Speci.:d _problems. ate en1.&ned to imprcwe and develop 5tudent akuis in drawid.& intcrpretatton ~d. pr'-cllce. ~1-9 Dr.a'wln&lnt'erptetation. c.t~dj ts Tht blslc:: principles of.enbineeting drawings 11.re. interpreted in. this course through expl.tnatlon, sketching.u~d fiiebrlcaung of model:;.. The tudel'llll!atn.s the pr~taure$ of hilerpretins m du,str~l welding drawln~11 develops a vis~itl~llon of ' he pro}ec\s ""~ports, and cal knowie<lge olw~lr\lnc syntbols ruul lhtir oppli<otions. ~ 1 9 OrAwln& lptuprctatloa 1-c:redil T'nls courac prcae.nta the (undam.(t\tal principles af inttrpc"etiq and Uu U.dnt dntwjn;:s."whclhe:r tbe drm-"illj.j ace ctvoijy bl.,.prints or no\. The ml\l<>rlty of clalstoom lime h open\ workins wkh end iutorpr<!jb qnw\nga and P!illls. &sic >kek~ing io oiliio covered. t l95 Drwln&lnt~rpr<ralir>11. credits The basic principles of ct>~lneerin& drewlngo rc dlscus>od in this coum. Thro\J~h intt:tpr!t.ahon and ~chin~.. the.mudent deve.lop1" vlfw liulioc ollhe part, HdJDD orssaembly. DteW inzs pertinent lo thotr~de &Je USt:d alnng Wttl examples and di~n al monuracturlnt proc::e~utts. METALLURGY -JJO Apt>M<d Mriallurgy <rodil Th1s b.l.sic eovrse lse:sjp d lo introdocef~rous.and DOD furous tntw. with emph>slo oo ldentili<>tio:>. ;pplicali<>m, auoys, heal troelmoil ond lanur.. noiy>ii Fund...,..ntals ul ~lttallurj!y credits This.coorsc b Gn introduction lo rnetnll~rgy with edjphasis on.ep plicw.tfons. &c.lectkm, ldentlfle.ation methods and ajioy lnfluenc:~s. P,operflet&rt ltt~dl~ uuih.fn,t testing, rnic::ro.structure.ijlterpretll~ ti<m and f>eoii"'olmwt proc...!. 'fool leels, weld hcat.clfccts,., failure Ullllyah ~~well na machlnabuily varlftlion~ ln casllron, alloy steels ond non (errous.ma.te,lal$ are covered \n detail. WELDNG 00 An: WddU.s nd F btl<alwn 7 cr«uts tn bis eoune, 'lhe ~tudenl b«omi!.hbmpet nt i» SMAW t1tick.,<)weld fill. Thebasic AWS weld joints n th<il und horizontal position, ODd welded... mbll<s, otcperfortned using AWS.mHd stffi cl.<:trodu ranain& from. lis" to 71Z" on m~d steel pllole..froo-ho.nd and wni-autnnoaric oayfu l llamecuhing to:bniqlld are o}so intrcduc d. 'tho.stud)' of 1M use nd cue o1 band tools uoe<j in weldir.t: and weldlng (e~ric tion i> abo.vet<d..-01 Weldin& jo.y-lyimt). l crndll 'J'h c.ourac: provides lhe Mude:nl with \he fundamentals of. o:w;ygen-ec:ctyleoc wckiing en mlld steel ia the. flat, horbonlal and verlictl posfllona. Also covcrcc:latc: the brazing and welding tuhnlqum lot repair ol cus!ings. Z 0Z Weldlfllll (Arc) aedlt 1itis coura:e ls bsic to.zll olber fc wc1ding eottrse.t: u lt b desigii~ ed to cov r d.e lundomenutls o/shlelded mnol "" weldias. The st\ldent olio ~evelopathe 1'1\A\ltli>Uiolive skill> required lor the "ddins ol mild o«.-cl in the fl&t posit tom....

76 -C.oLlrsc Descriptions Course Descriptions-17. ~ -0 Woldll\g lllilr<l credit This course i~ 11. continu"hon o lht! fum.lamcn.l~ls omd nujnipuhuive skills foe welding in the hodz.onlal:md vertlclll posi. t;on.s. Studc.rlts ll1so cern the \SC.S of vajiou:s types of AWS elcclrodes. PrercqulsUc: 0 Welding 1 or shop _elil)l!ri(:nc!. -0 Oxyacetylene Welding Z ctcdi_~ tn this cottt.se, 5tud~nts becorm: rompc:tenl in tl!e a~cr fuel!edud~ ~.:~uc:1 o welding, bn1:ting and.!ioldcring :s.leel5, c~st irori, aluminum 11.nd. nth~;( non fe:rrou:i JO<:lab. Other prllcesses :and prcpart~lion5 u:;l d in the (Abrkutlon, majntenanc(! and repair of rnetajs such as!iproy powder, bard surfudn& and joi.n)hj of- dissimilar metals are ulso lllug:hl. 0 Welding V. 1 credit 'l'ht5 11dvaocu! s.htddcd mel ill arc wefding t:ourse ls designed to lm''' a wc~dcr or q!lullficnhon in strucjutal or pipt! Wl!ldln prq ccdure!i. All chl.sstflcntiom of d~clrqde$ ar ~ used in lhf" d~veloplfujnl ol lcchniqlc!. ior cod!'! welding. Pr~r~equisile: A minimum or 9D hour< of J-J0 Weldlns, 0 Welding, -08 Wt"lding U tro~ning or proo( of shop cxpcricnc~ in all welding poslllons. Z 06 Welding V credil 'fhis course is designed to pr~vkle iiln understanding of the tun damentai.s. or sas tungsten arc. and gas metil!.ate welding pro cesses, M.:inipulaUve skills arc dev~loped for,_...el~g with th;c 1'Cl and MG proe~sse~. Prerequisite: Z.:.0 Welding l far~ iijl~ 0)1rg.cnj_ or wejdins cxper;.t"nce..-08 Welding ~Arc) ' tredit Thi!i coursl.! helps the student" to d~elcp rn>~nipulali~e!l'!chniqu~s il!ied in all positlons of welding on plate uslng the.1ap, tie and groove joints. This c6ur:;e js requ:lred for training Q become a qualified welder on slru,dural!iteel. PtcTequisl.Les:... 0 W~ldiog lian:l and -.0 Welding: U (ArcJ. Z 11 AdvancOO We.h:Unc and F!lhrlcation 8 ctedil& n this oourse, ~udcnts continue thei:r de\l'eloprn~nl (J( SM.AW!kil1s in the ver:tical, o"erh~ad and pipe posit tonsil~ per AWS imd ASME <:Ot.les. using primarily E6()}0 and low hydrog~n eh:drode:i. Air earbcn arc fabrication artd <Jyout techniqu_e, _projects, welding symbols,_ weld. as,sembuc.s: and mctsl We:ld repsjrs are slso stressed. --1 Welding for Related Trade5 Z credits ThiS CO\.lf'S!! prov~des an introduction to. ihe area~ ~f iltc rtnd ox.~ yacety1ene wcldlng, Tllc fl.l~.wtent.tl ptincjples of jo!ning ferr~m5 and non-fertou!l metals a~e ~ludie.1u\d demonstrated. Basic weldii)g proce~e!j eq~ipment!jperation an~!iafety proced.ure:i are pracficed.in 1~e l.i::boralary. Emph~sis is on welding pro ~dures :md practlc:e ig major area.s of WQr.k su~ as macll)ne Shop, autornotlve :n~d dic:scl me~~~cs and sheel metal Weldiag.Theo.-y and-troublet.hooting. J J. ~r!dit This cour.se cqvera.the ptlt!dplcs ofshi:elded metal arc (stick.trc} w~ldi.ng.and.. the o:.:y..f~el welding and.cl.ltting proce-$51'.!1.. ) ern. ph~dzn ~fety, sbielding g>~~, electricj~.r ;~nd troubleshoo.ting. A C:O::npr~he.rlsl;ye ylew is taken of quality control in welding. Pipe w~jding a:ppjica.tions, hta:i.ulenance an.d repaits and r~si:=tance wdding ;n.e. W.n> di:~~:.wj;se.d. -5 Spcclalncd Shielded Welding Processes cr.editl 'Thi5 Course is de~ g ned to deve[op :!ki!b.required:for Semi~ automatic welding wi!jl.the gas tud,!:slen arc, gas metal arc ~nd submerged ate processes. on carbpn steels, staini~so.'i. steel.and. aluminum on plate and pipe rnaterhl lta]so c:cweu manual tl!dmiquii'!s.on. th-'.mq'adtyj!!'n~ and pja.li!ic pivce.f~s:. 1 Layout and Fi>bdGilllon. cwlllf This is a metals course eaveriilg the ~Se of b.and and power tools, machine tool operations. and the basicprinciplc!s o! measurement. The basic concepts o( layout omd pattern devdopment,.as. key opply to fabricotion and assembly of sheet metal, plate and pipe n the w~ldulb,.jnch.:u;tey{ are al~o provided. 61 SMALL ENGNE AND CHASSS MECHANC 61 SmaJJ Engine Repair 10 C"red 1s n 1hi5 course, the. principles of small internal <:om.bu5:tlon. engincs-ind\dlng twa cydt: i!llld fout-~cle-oirc studied tn detail. )Je.SiSJ:l, cons: ruction, enslne tc~tiilg, dia~nosing, disa5sembly, rep;airipg and rea:s:!iembly, and engine brc:1k.-in arc: thoroug;hiy covered. Engine tune l.lp, <::<:~.rburc:tion ~nd clcc:::trlcd.l sys~cm~.tn: also induded. Snowmobiles, dein ssws, sharpening and. balancing (][ rolating t!lc:ments are co'lo'ered. Stud~n1s becomt: fii.ll'aliitr with be tcob., rna~:hin~s o:md equipment that are used for encln~ repair work in the po'"''c:r.:quipm!:nt shop. 6"1 PQwer Equlp.mtnr Repalr 10 crcd,~i!i T.he n:pair oi eq'qjpmtnl powert!d by.small8i)s engines is emphasized in thi5 <:our:se. nduded lltc: Cha.tging syslerns, elecltic. slarl.er.s, Hnk<lge. hydraulic drives, belt drives, che.in drive~. g_ear drives, c)u!ches,_ brakes and all.olher elements of a po-wer!r<jn. motorcycles, outboafd ntotors, and.occcssories used on power f"quipm~nl and engines, 61 Motorcycle El~ri~al S)'5tll'!ms credh!l Afte:r SLCC-eS$(Ul complelkm <f this course, studerus sh.ould be: abh: ~o undetilaud elcc:lridty as t pertain5 tomot.orc.ycle systems atnd be familiar Wi\h the p:ropet use o t~n clec:trica.l rtiet"er ~n Lesling and lcoubh:shooting. Batteriei, cha~ging, Starting, wiring, and au l) pes n.f jgnjiion S}'!tems will be conre.d. 501 BARBERNG 501~.01.Barb~r Tf!chniqtte.!'l 1 credits This -C'}U,r~e ~ an introdm:~nn tolhe v.ariou.s!'!r".ice.!> perforrnll!d by the barber. The lnsttuctioti meets.the tequirl!_ments Qf the Wisconsin State Barber Law-and the Bacbcr Division. of the State Board-ot He.:~:ltll. Sludents.:r.'e gfvc.n patron r.a~'-ork au<l Of! tjre--joh in:o;tmction lo develop the: ne:ces~ry :skin::; ~.Barber 'fech~lque:s t ~..::red its A continua.t\on of B:.rber Techniqu~s l, the emphas.is in lhjs:.cqursc 15 on.hg.in~u.thrtg1!ibsving, sb:unpooing-a,li:t to11ic appucatloru. Tonic treatment, hot oil treatments and advan~ed faci.als are: addt:d. Stude:nts are gh en instruction ;;md patron work to further develop ncce:ssilry skiu!ii Barbering l, Tbeo,.Y of credits This coo.r.;e COVC"t5 h.aitcuuing, :shallb:tg,!iha.mpoohlg, mas-sage. tonk:s, f011cials ap.d pac~s. hot oil treatment, and :!iimple tonic treat tneqt. RC!il facial, rejuvena-ting fn.ciaj.. ;md dny pack.ate_ir.clud!!d. 'fhc collrsc kiilurcs lccture, demonf:iitratjon ~nd supervjscd pmcticc. 501 LZ BarberlDg U, Theory ol ctedils Thin:;9urse covers th~ theory. of advanced hair.styling ~uber Sc1ence : credll5 This course CD'Vf"rS instruments and eq~ipmenl necessnry tlr desirable in the practice or barb~lng. Empba.si~ is plac~d on non1cnclatute, usage, carl! ilnd ptop-er sdcc.uon Barber Sclienu 11. crcm!us Thls caune r;:ovl!!!r$. battf!ric;ilogy, s.'lni1alion ;u~d hygi!de, barber history al)lj ~aw, o:ltld.:~ppre.ntlceship-problems. Botrber s.1les and bu &~ness re~auocs are discus5cd. 50 FRE PROTECTON TECHNCAN 50-JOS Chcmi try ol Haurdou Mat.rlals ctcduo Thll5 couue b dbdded into_:a. le[.ture and lab. During the lecture petlodi thost"'dent ~dcntihe l\ and leatn~ bij:r.a.rdou:l.pro~"tia, both <hemical and. physical. Tho lob p<riod provides an oppor!unity (or.the student t-o ron dud experiment:;.. and dernon5llllljon.s which reinforce the m;~lerin l covcre:d in the h:cture session!. The. mqking aod handling of~aza:rdous material~ arc examined Chcmhtry ot Hazaruous Materiols.ll crcdllo S &J1datd~ ilnd Jirefightins ~e.:ht~lql.le.'l a~oc-io~~:t~d wjlh cht.:mic.:~b~.8 15-CS, no.mmablc JiqUid:~o, C::fJ rfo!iolvcs pol50jl51 CxpJo~i VC:ii, JOC:kel mo.tcr~als, toxic fumea and health hazards are covcjcd n thl~ CCUJ5l!, 50 l08 Bulldlng C(]n1tructJon and Dc1dgn. t:rtldltl T~ basic prjnclples of structural design, 115 t r<:!i: 111!5 to fire pr<:vcnlion and 5:l!!!Y 1 &re: ~overed in thjs cour,e, The i,ulicnt become~ iutliliar with variotts lypc!: o oottsltuc:l~on lll well a& building codes and fire prev~ntion ordina.ii<:el tejdled ln conatroc lion. Blueprint re.adjng is ii'jduded"in lhe course ~ontent. 5D ll0 Fl.re Hsz~rd.s nd Causc5 ~;rt'dll Thls cdu.rsd _coven; the fundamelilah of fire investigation.a.nd _practic:t:s. The student examines th.e ro)e Df Lh.e modern nr~ lnvestis:&tor!lind lhe,techr.liquc..s used~ dd:ermin<: the -c«use and origiti of ilarious fire shj:~ntion:s., lnduding!lr!>on fl!c Prevention credits n this course, th~ sh.tdetlt'"f:xfl.tnl11et» a n.d elep'lnres the t'teed for. a r:omp~etc ru1d tl1or-ougb lite pnw~ntion progmut h~ 1l areas ol!o<::ie!y :Firepreven~io:o orseulitatlons, both private and publlc, n spection;ps:ychology, haurds n:cognition, ~nterpn:talion and en fat-cement of -codes and t:~rd\nl!.n<:es,.u well as- teporls an~ recotd.s,.rtrr ecv.ered; ~bite relallontjllnd educations! progr,.ms are a~o empba:~iz~e.d, 5()~1 1- Fin: PrQh:dlon Sy~tc1nS ctedli.s n thi5 -c:ourse:, ~tude~ls.su_r\fe'j ond e:xcmine Vdriaus auppreasion ~w detc.'ciian systems pres!;:nlly i:n ~o~!oe. The dc,!iigr.z and!rper.. liofl of sprinkler syslielilsj parta"l)lo fire oxtingui::;h~r~. foam!iiy,tems, r:ltrbctn ~ioxide syst<!ms, dry chemical systems, haloren~ted.agent s.ys1ems, 6p[osionsf suppres!licn sy5tems and vtjrious o(her fire detection sy.$tems are. studied Equipment and Apparatus : ~redtts This counje inyolv~s: a com.pletc study of conventional.,nd up trr date firefighlirig l':quiprnt!nt. The fheory of opejotio n and pro.. blems- of malnf ~;r.~.aq.:=e :i!m.11ls-o s:hjdjed,.u well ss thl! Con.sideration.s for apphc::a.tion of n~w equipment and new!.quipment purcba&l!, 50-1 Flr l Resp;mder ~redlt This couns_e.is de.sigruid.to provide: 1 current.study of U'l~ praqlleal and legal e.spects of emergency t~atment and the re1cue o{ per so.ns involve~ ih ntl sotls of ~iluatioru.where lc5s of Ufe i!i a prj.me 1-':onslde.tetion. SOS-lZS Fire Suppression credhs n tb)s ~;gurse, itudc:ntji lemn tb ~:: ptocedur:ee. involved in, the task and tfictkalleveh of fire supprc~ion. B~:'!iiiC company function:j are ~tudled in conjunchon '?'lilh their roh: in!ln lnl:idr:nl mbnage: ment.sysjem, Prlnclpl.. of Flto Contf1>1 credits Thh Cour!!e presents.the principh:s and pu.c:liccsu&ed. in flte Sll(h prc~s\or,. and control. Studcntsleam the chemi~t~y anq.phys~cs.cf fire, exlingul.shlng agents 111nd the diflcrl:nt techniques empjoy~ in the prevention nnd cjdinglli!htnent. or fir!;!.!0 1 lnttodiictlon to Plre Organlultlon cr<d!t Thi:;. r;:aur~c provid.cl ;m Qvetview of lhe public and privates~ ion. Specific :mbjl!c(a lnclud~:: hi::~lory gf fir~ protection. fir~ _pro lctuon.:~erviooa, fire sdence termlno1og.y and c.arl!.~rs in the fire: servi<::c flc\d-bolh publi<: and priv!ltl!. 50 is Water Supply Hydraulic.,credlto. Thh. cdun prov,tfus a blllfc knowiedg~ of hydraulics, in th~ory 11lld prncucijm, Thr.ltu,hmt ~1culates. nnd computes w-t~t:ern o.w prqblems for tnunh;lpp.l, \ndu!!.tti:al and fire service situatl_ons. t is rec:o mmcndcll thn1 student& with 11 weakne!l!l in m Lh complete lndulllttlll Math J and Oelore enrauing jr:z ~h.is co utjfj~!0-su Slondordo lhd Lol& Control nrodlto rn lh~s co.urae-, Ah1dents survey and examh\e tlte methods lnd. pro cedu!t!ll m~d Ln ~rcvcntlng and conlrolung lasses in the industdal envlronm~nt. 'fhls co~r e also <:O"~rs OSHA standirds and pnc: llci:s il vlr:u.j ).;w and cod~s govern~ indufilry.!!0 1 Slr l~il;. Opcnll~onJt. nd DlstUh:r l'lonnlng credits lu lh\~ ccjuru, M\ult:nts learn the ptoc~cdures involvc:d in!h.e!ll('nlegfc levej ol Jric~dent YDJ1"Sen:t~nl. T)le lncldmt commqnd!lylilem studied n depth n rceltlon to various local, stnte nnd fodorol send 5tl l60 llnord ol\nduotrl\01 Pr1><<05< credits Thi! tolltfll:! invctlfgii.cc the hazards encounl~re!d by {trc service pcrjonn.e) ln cl)jbb.alin& lrc8 and other _emergency siluatiol1 n lnd'lu,trl"l opcr tlon.a. Envlronmenlol, chemical; radiologkai nd mcehanft:al ha:u~rds ore c011err:~d. 50 POLCE SCENCE TECHNOLOGY ~0 Ql Hlolory and l'hllcsophy of Low.. Enroreement. crtd~ts Thi5 course oi{crs!iitudents tbe oppot"ll.mity 10 explore and critical ly an.jyzc the police ;ole jn _il f~tl.c otn~ ~ettlocr~tic ro<::i~ty.. Development! or poucing iqciety from tbc per~pe Uve_of the pa5t 1 pre~ent and future are studied. T~e com:sc culiniilate.s. Willi stn, dent group.s activejy debating a cvntemporary po)jce j.ss.ut> -u.siri~ the "advocates 1 ' forrria.t. ' JCpnJ-,..UOJl and Adtri~Jl~! tttion.. a ~:;"l'edits This course _is desi'~ned as..;m iotroductl~n. to n'llln;;tgerialthli!o:ry_!lnd <Ji-gan.iw:tio~l beftavipr. Univer~l,con.ceJ?fS whicb ap~y!"o''" Zlll work situah~ &te_prese:nte~l 'tbe.coutse u; inten-ded to be a pt~::requisih: t" aj.t other :aian~g<=meut _courses. Tht objective_ ts ta providt students w"ith khawledge and insight ab911t org~tlons in Drder improve.studcnt."~r::c ~ ~:;; later Uii u org;u:iiz.a.lional member. ~dditiort1l1y,!\tudemts rc!seitrch il:rid desigil, 115 group memben, a &t:reenjng and sei~tlon program s!rnihtr 1o p'ublic.saf~ly Wring pro&iams presently in p~utite ' CrinUnoljusticeAdJlllDi&lr Uon Credlh This.cou~sc is a. survey of lbe critninalju&uee.system, from English Comf!on Law heritage to the present. Major ~~pha5is is on presenting.5tudents ~j!h an Ol'enicw _of.!~e -')'Stem,.ib organiza.uo:ri ~nd opeutiori Criminal Law Proce;dur~s credils This cout':ie_ provide:s students with a_n ln depth vii;nv Of criminil'r h.w. beginnu&:. witll a study of ptocedu ra! law and tcnnin&til1g wlth a11 anal}'si~ of :!iubstantive criril.it:.!lllaw 1 its 5Cttpe, defmiti.an, d!l5..<iifitiltion, and the e:leru.ents.co.l'..s(ituu.ng some of the mc:i'r~... common c d.m~$ ' CrlndnaJ Evfdcnce Credit$ ln. thi!. conp.:ie,. ShJdeJ~b. are i:ilroduced to the ba:.ic principio o cvidepce, iri.dilding tb.e ~:On!5tltulloanl Hrullatlohs imposect, -on law enforcement illlthorities with rl"'!.p ~d to tbe fouo\v[ng areas: Pre:-' b9ble C.iluse /pr ~rrest. arrest; search Bn.d. n!i~ut,&,.interj(l_g.ll.tlcr.i, iilld eonfe~ions. The course also covers evid~nc "' _ftom. he penpeci:i.ve. of the pr:a..;:tical problcm s of evideru;e g~he:ing oul.d cqu:rttoorn p~~n~alion. 50 i1 Ps:tMl Procedure~ J. cr.ed.jt5 This cour.se deals With the _patrol o~rj.1io111ls it ~ists.in the. modern pollee deparlment. t aria.l~es the Y11rled mel bods o! pil(tof, ac(ivlti-:s, responsibilities and dep-loymcn! :J:P~. dlstribulion problems. The course will ajso explore the tole of.tlw p111r0l unit in police and community relations.and crime prevention ~ Crimib Jivestlgatlon... credlti 'rhis oours~ is de.signed t~ scquaint. studen(s wi:hl thf":.ba:o~it: tl!l:'!hniques.ofinves.tlg~uon prot!!dures whicl> jn~ude: Cdme 5:en~ procedures, oolletuon an(\ pre~atiml of l!videp.ce, evaluohon and compari:on or evldcn<::e. Students will also le.vn'1q develop sau:r~ of in!ormdtion!llld fiuiy'etlla:nr;f! technique:~. Laboratory e-k<!rci!!le5 ena.ble $tuclent!i t.o oblilin, hands-on. training i.n tlie use o evldence c:ollcctilln t~~::hniques and procedlltes. Se)e~::toed C:ri"rr~e ;.nus are reviewed in on!cr to learn iniresliga:dve teclmique.s employed in cleating with thos(: situaticns ndd al!!o preventive procedures Tl'afflc Control CJcdit.s This collne cncomp.;:~sses il study ()[ tu.ffie lllws, their basis, d~~opm~n! atid ntegr.aled rdatiori.ship with Wj!iCOnsin Moler Vf!hkle Laws, A cou r~ e objective is to enable students to un«ims Ul.nd human tilling!. :.md tea.ctlons ns operators of motor vehtdelii. The use o1 discretlcmary powet,.11d n~ce!s9r}r coordination with tt;iffic:.engin(!ersr stotislicl;;ms l!.nd. ~u~alor.&, by enforcement reprl!~lmla li\'~s On loca.l, st~te and ruki.nrlsllevels- for the :welf11re and safely octm public -is al$o covered. 511!5 Juvenile Procedures <redlt This cour.se is a basic study a juvenile dcunc]uency.. Emphasi5ls pl11ced on fac1or5 nnd cause;.s that result iri. delinquent beha.vior. The juvi:nhe (adoinccn H L!l examined from 1 contemporary tjtand polnl rel.11hve td soci~bl changes. 50 }LtvenJle Pr.m:;duru li ~rf"dlt! Th~ ~;outse: deals with the Juve:nile judic<e: system. The phllooop"hy of the juvenile court s exam1tled. Wisconsin's Children'sCod G: i:s sludi:ed, t~ nd the juvenile ~;~s.a vi t::~im is dbcuss ed. Pcerequislte: 51'1 15 Juvenile Proccdur~.

77 r 18 Co'U"se Descriptions Course Descrlptions Juvenile Pr.,..duru ll <r''!h This oounr: ~en lndepe.nc.ltnl semhtgr r:ulmlnil1ing in the pre$en ration and defense o{ t1 seminar poq~u wbleb eddrel5 Juvenile rc:loted topic. A -'lroilj emphasis s plt«d on the otwlent obtain lng lnfotf!l.ltion n t~ Odd Tcclmlcul Report Wrldng. credits &:ii~ w riting sjd,lls arc reylewed tt prrpar~don (or leaminj to document, tn 11. clear, p)nclsc and accurate: Jasb.tcn, the essential elements 'Of ipformation contained in Police repor1s lnve.stigatlvc Photosn phy <:r~d\t! Thil. coursc js.a b,easic introduction to pholog""jjhy, the use of rhl! camcr01o undetmnding!jim cktt&aufftic.s nd J'CU'PO.SC', dalkroom procr<lures. problclftt of fum contrail. photo enlutcnents and bulc proceduret ln por(roll, S<en«y. crime S<:al< and evidence photosraphy. An o~]«tlve of the course s to enobir the student to uodesltnc!,,,., and coumoomn! Quiluteot>,.., weu uthe problems of prejudicial ood.probctiv~ value of photos Cor court C\'ldence. 50-1~ For.,.!< Phot"l!r phy ccedlt This course is an advanced follow-up to eg. 1 51nve.5Ugall~ Photography. t coven: use of che p.mera foe crime scene photosraphy, maccoirapby and mic{og11phy. Forensic appllca lion~ of ultrilvjo!~t ~d hifrnrcd phdloartphy for com.pbrison analy5i:s and preparatjon of culftrgemezlli for courtroom p:r~.1en!a tied are.:~lso covered. 50-.l~D First Re-Jpoa dtr credjl ~ This cout$e deals with the immedloate oo.d temporary Cilre given ln ~e..ol ou:cident. illness ot emc raen~ cblldblt1b. 11lis cou~ q...ufie> studeotj; for the Slandord or tc!vana!d Rod Cloos llr.t old ce..-licicate. 50 JS Ad Olleed Cl'imlN>t lnyot{&atlon aoodlto Th counc; makes iu in-d.epch study of sclec:tcd c:rune area:& mch., as a:r~o.. carcot ~. horrtidde, e\c. c.liscu.sjh the~ of rhe. problem as it pertains lo llw enforcftnf:nl l nve.m:jsati e pro-. ccdure~ unique m dt:alms with those sped fie crlmln.:jllnve.stiga tion areas are explored ConslitutloaaJ ProtccUon Attd. Jatcrro& don Proce.dutta -' credlts The objcclives of this course are two-rold: First, 1o.acqw:.inl ~lldents with t~ coruliwfionallimitatlolb Unposed an law.en forceraent pcn.onoel with re~pect to lnkrrcpdan nd confe" &iat!s; secondly, to lamiwu:e studtntj wlth the gener~l tbeories go\'ernillg theintcnajatlon procas and lht tec!lniq~ for ac:hle'f' ing d'fr:cllve pasuuiod. Spoclflully, to ll break dow., deliru: and ezpwn mc:pbology of formed questioos cod ts inn= on r~ lzl leatj~and <Kplain the tesal requircm<nts ~led witb questiooin& whnc*s' and speces as valid in Ruo:ntjal ~id e.-ce in <nurt; 11 ddloe the phyaioloslco_l,.. _po,... lo $1ructured question and whot ther mply: and 1) <(bserve ancj.participat~ in i.nterrophoa o.-:er,lets.. ~ ' 175, SPc<.;;.l Probienu J il ctcdito Thi~ Ls a ip.~cidllr:t:d and Jiisblr. indsviduallzed co"r.se hi crlpl.ibsl justice problems that m:.y cov r molil ny technjcal a&pec:t$ of criminal justia~n aareed between be lnsltuctor add the atu dent. Th~ c:rt!:df~ s.ne boloed <Jn Che type oc atudy a.nignm1nt, Cie(d training or ej~rienc:e. &llm:d Practia(('ollco Problenn 's~ credits. Thio program pre-. lho stuent wltb on opporl\lolty to in legntelitmed clawoom theory lind sklllo with real-life ex, puiento )lllder the dlrep supervision ol potice prutilioaon1 The student b p!tteed within a po!ict egcaey ro igte.ract, obs:er..-. cl0$e ly and pctliapatc-to a limited dogree-wlth practiliocetl duriog tho porror...,.. of their ngular dulles. Pu rthenn<>re, lhe s\udenl willrea:ive jntc't)seote-oo-one.jntructlcn ln deve!opiug u.sduj pollee re~tg based on field experience. Prete:qvisite: Completion of two semesteu in the Polite Science ptovam. 508 DENTAL Cllnl<ol Dcnlol llntme lboralory l t aedlto The empb.sls ofthls course is oo ppllca~ton ol the theory, principle and (ur!m< iludy of dentallnstrudleotatlon, indudias prac. tice on f.b partners and ctlltntuaj ln:llmllflt ar prophyjaxi.s pta tients ;n.o~ dinfcal &e1tina Cllnlral D<:nlol llfllene Tlleory aoodltt This course encompeuc' abe study of patlen1 u.sessmcnt procedwes, in~hading trdllnenl planning, ph&jc microscopy. oral io dicic1 'rita) signs. patient counteung and nulriti~naj assusment Dental HYJ!k!ne Thoory and Loboratory «edtla Thls course;, designed to provide s<uctcr>u wjtb knowledge and undcrmndlng of the prlndpl.. of cllolcol det1tal hygjeoe. Em pbasis is pla<:ed on th< dcv<lopoent of alllls uaed in proven!i011, ucopi.tioa.and initial tre1tment of d~t.l.l lks periodontal ~ase. 508-JS Tooth lltorpbolaar 1 cr<dtt This course lnvol~ a study of deutal nomencl1ture, anatgmic fotm1.11nplion runction, (unc:tional relatiaolhipl nd ~Upp<lrting slructures ol human prlrt\u)' and uc:ood:uy teeth. SOS 117 Clinical Dental Hyalen e Th,ory l1 credit A conl!nualion o! Cllnlc l Denlol Hygiene Theory 1, this cour"' studje, adva~ced ;n,~runlen!atlon pr()cedurc tnd.f\lrther ash~i ment procedures, ir.dud!t~s it r&y illterpret&uan; pain control, four h.mded dentistry,. nulritla.nj ccunsnling nd po5.sible ex putded fuactm:jns. soa-118 cuntc!lll)entol Hnlone 1.boratory u c.-.dtta A continuation of Cl\nlcol Oe,atll Hygiene Lahorttory, lhit eout$t puu apecial emphasit oa advanced lastrumentation tec.hnlqu~ ud.tn in..d~th.ttljdy of.1 prevrmtive tllm pr car ~ploy. ing all ~ot on.d prophylacttc trchniqvu lnrned thus ftr; Clinical D<:ntal Hy&Jeae l'mwy lll 1 cr<tltl This. continuation of Ctin1ell D ~: ntal Hnierte Theocy U ua pho.u.s job...j<eticn, lhe dmtal hnienljt in pri.. te prac:tlce. apeciaj needa: patient.~, a&d an t.n.c:frpth revkw or previous~ for national euminat~n CJJil<oi Dent. Kyaltae tabor01ooy ll credlts This <oo\inu.tion o! Ctlni<:al Dental Hygiino Lobou tory of!ers further practiceo/ technlqu11n.d procedures JJru dy lf'.uned. 50.S 18 Dental Ma.terlols :i <:rcdlll This~ s.u. ntroduction to tho nature, q1w..!jjn and seae&j chalocteris.tla o( modem deataj material hd den~ opentive procedures. Source., proportl<a,"'" nd ~hni<jues' of Dlllnipmtion for materials commonly u1ed lo denthtry ltte c-overed. Labm:atory prxticc ts-~kied lot preparction of 'ra. teriab used for rr5torations. hnpressiom and nkn11. 50i 11 O..nt.al E..,.rpndh i C:roodll This course-is a eombiaerton af both the dldactlcllnd predlci!j oonleni o! the Ameriron fle:~rt Anoclatio~' baslo lile support course. t pmvlde5o tr;.1nlng 1rllhore.,d~c0d mtersency tare techniques for cmergenclel mote Jfkely!) b1 tdcountcred by ~ tal profcs&~.onall in a~ o fiea.. tting. Succ:cu!.u~ compl.ellon or t~e ooune enlltll!s tbe: studal'\t to be '1:ert}fled tn, bajlc Ufe suppor1. The course: al50 surveys and. provlttea ways ol managing emergen ~ that r dent lin nature, Lc. ~ ntung. 1bscess, ~uma l~ in~~ to.che mouth, etc Perlodootlct lll cndlll Tbio CQUNC invalo<s stody, of ~~ perloclontlwn~tlology, dusilicalion and obaroclori6t!q of periodontal dlseue, a >ludy cl lhe.,..,., preveution ud uealonent ol periodontal clije>< with dlnloaiii!'ptica!ioll eud role c lthe dent.l hy&icnl o-tal Hytlefte llodiojf'lplly J.. edlla Th.iJ cuuru! lnvolve.s a study of tb,naturt, t!l~cta, JeAerattoa and use of Roentgen rey1. Dba.tssion and practice with equ1pmcal. malerltv,, salety measutca end techolque:slouowed in mskm1 deotaj roeotaenograms ate atyerect. 11te CO\irte realurea lectures and d monohotioc,..of the lj>l>llcallon o! RCentaen rays lor denl1 diogj!ostie p rposes. Electroi>f>~~cs o( tbe equlpid<o~ pooklon of Rims, angulollon of U.e >Mebl c.ood proce$1lna lllld mounlillg ol denial nrdi-ho aruuo difcuued, 5Q8-19 Hhtology.1:roodlb n~is course enco:np.s.s.e.s en overview of embryolog!tal proc"essn especiui!y thase iovolved in the formotion of foe<, oral ud dontoi' stn1c1urcs. A slt!dy of cells and tluue~ s prestnled, alans wi1h study of the composjuon odd mlnoaeopi< onotomy ol the eeth a1k1 1hclr s.upporti.flg st.ruc:ture PbannacoJosy.:l croodl!t This arurse involves a study of the pr1nclplt s of photrnkqiogy aud the pharmacology of repre~anve d ruas whlch an: in current lise and auec< Pental prtchoe. Special contkietlllon Ls,&iven to ;mtithcjtlcs, ~lives, pain rt:lklvlng drup11nd anesthetics Dt!oral MMe.rieb tr.. Z.qedUt TM c[mn;,.j and pnysicll composiuon,!unctions and limitations o{ tl\e mat~: rials used in dentistry 1re d lscu.u.ed n this couue. t..boratorye ercioes ar< provided to aequolnt the atudeot with \'a:dous iaboraj.ory procechuu u ~td in dedti.jlry O.ntal Theory <tedill TOP.ic.s oo vu~d ln thi.s course tnd ude: Mlc:roblolcgy. stcrllizatioo, orod hygiene, deot01l decay, nutriuon s:nd p~~dil~ denli~try D<nl~l Theory 1 credit This cou rs~ in valves study o/ he e tiology nd pathology of di5enses of the oral c;,.vity. An ovetv)ew of d!!r'ital office.practice, ;ts it relates to drugs and 'hc. nssl~tant 1 s rcle Jn diapensfng the-m,.la lso eovcrcd. ' SOi q8. O~ntal M.ateri.aiJ.J..creditJ This coursr provides a discussion of varions iyfl!l or restorative, materlol.s usod n donll$1ry. The uses o{ pluter of Pori$ and $lone lllodcls io dentisij'} arc = cd. l.obor wry <.rercis., arc required ~o &<:qutint the student with.. riou1 Dlltedalt OraJAn t..;,y. aoodlt1 Thls course consists of a study of 11\e hutnin dentition, dentq let minology, ond growl!\ ond devdopm<ot ol'thcoral C<lvlty. t:oplc:; such as de:ntal ;.il.d <>cal a~ all-e., bonej of the b.cact. n~e aod_ blood supply h> lh~ head. a.ocl nedc:, muac:jel ol mas\lation and ui1j expres~ion, llio~n. tods.ib and a..jiv.ry s)and.s an t ho CO\'crltd. Students l&o dra.w U'le var\ouj eeth hom ditfertot aspect$ to better acquaint thtmsclve& with the anatomy ~f.:::.c~ tooth. 'rur.cjs oloo "'"'nt <lodylng hum on &1<\l!~. an<l moc!el>. 508-(/' O...tal rroctke Admlolttrotlo a> 1 credit Thls COU.t.!le deals with the bullnes.i ~~do( dtolal offices.. TopM:s.s.tudi1d include confidentiality, othie..s and jurbp(u<lenl:. Sludent also tec:eivcjmitu<tio lo ppoiptrneot J<beduli>lg, r...u r l...,, telephone t<chnlqu6. alfloe lotmo, llborotory. cna:, milt fma.m::w a.. nngemeota nd bookk.tepjos aystems. ln :Jddition, topics sucll as inte:rvlc-wlns (or 1 job, job ppllcation and persoqnel polici.. ore covered. n zenerol, lhll course ho!ps prep.:otc U>e dental assi&llt>g itu'denl lot employment as reeop tioni~t or business.am~ tant ln. denl l ornce. l!08 1S ~~lo,u.. ',credit This course l~ ;~.ri at~empt io understand oral disease 10 that it.. can be pro~tlydiagnos!!d ~nd adequately treated. t presents a.:or rolatloil of f m n biology with tho c!lnlc.lolr; nnd symptpms of ~ru l di $(:~ Where pos~ible1 lhe prognos~u () ~.nch d.isco.s.e is ~on &de.n::d us.a reflect} on of. unde.tlying tlssue nlterallon 8;1\d c ' oojl., tomporary therapeutic tnetiuf'c.j Emphub is plkcd Oil the pllyoiologlcaltnd cltemlq.l aoptcl of oral dl.leose Ocel Abetomy and PloyololottY cr<dlta This cou""' involv<1 study of the Witorny and phytiology df tho hc:ad aud neck. De!.all<d atudy of otteo(asy, royology,...,.rology nnd the circutatory oyl!lem s ollered. Sluolcots oho ouver the et l"b of ncmjol or.d obnorm.tl mplr tlon, awou.wlf\j and mas1ic..uon. en teeth. ' Peraonaloncl Community Ht<~lth -credlu Thl course isdeslg ed to help the student do'jclop an appnci& U.n oil he origin tnd de\'d.,meat or the pllbllc health..... mentt the scope of cuirenl public health concerns and tjte. rorc of J."OVc rruncnt ia Lbe. formation of policy and ln the orgaolzat.ion nd plovlalon of health aemoea. An objcctl c n! the course 1> to ;. develop ~mdcr&tandlna of public health ro<thods and oa uwartoeu of the dental bnitnist's role ln tbe p:omotioll of d.rfj 1 to! h.. Oh wltkin the coutell ol the total health ol tfl<= community. The course s also designed D crute awarece~l o! some of the current l»ues penajnjttk lo he provlalon, delivery aod fin011ci.tzg of hc.jitb Cllre servkn.!!08 1 Choirs!de Theory a-edict Thls coorselnvolv.. s<ody ol the theory related to the kills rn>od ed in chairs.idc dental usisti"s Some: or the topk:15 which are included ate equipment use and malnlen&m:e, lht lunctioo cf jn.strujneots. properti61nd utej of ane.sthllftic., cavity da.nification and props.toticn, operative dtotls<ry ond don tat prophyloxb. J;OS :1 Cboirw~ l'ecbn)f!u lboralory J c:redlls 'Tbb,:owsc cncomp»ises lnsttuction and pnttice in c:lt&inide de:nw assiu:ing ~kills. These tkills include. un and mainterwu:e of rqaipment-, o:;,;jevaeuadoo, recelvfns and di.srnit>sing patients. prep:uing ~St<lr auvt; ""'terlals, \mlrume.11.t ide.ntiflcritioo, lnst.ru mont tn>~~sfcr, looa! Mes\beaia, dental pl'<l,9hyloxb oud lluotldo opplicalion Rawosraphy a odltt tn thit CO\r&e. sttlden.ts become famillar with the oatur~ of ROU tg.m rays, the pb~cs of x ray maehlnn t nd radiatioa proll!dion. l.ahoratory cmp~ is on ptoc:e.. ln, oud mo nting ndjosropa$ :tnd developing intr.t-oral rad\or,raphlc techniques. S<l8- Cb<llf>idq Theory ir i.. oc~u 'Otis ~une ooc.tlnuert study of th~ ~h~ry nd 1kill1 needed in chair_tide dental aesi.' lillg. Sl'l)_phasls is placc.;d ~u\.!~u1 handed den lis try acd. exp~ded d\llill. E;lc:lutltd.an: oral. inlpac:tio~. or.... t.hodontlcs, p1dodcntics, oral suraafy, p fio~onti~a, enijo~ontics, prosthodontics, public bealthl gtrl.atrjc:. dentlrtry,: and aentistry for the dir.:1b~ ed p<~:tienl CltDlulde TecbnlquCJ t..lborolor r ll 1 ccedlt 'b.ilcourseolfers i.nrruction and practice in cl~nbdc dental ani5ting skills- boib lrtd.itioaal 1nd i.o 'f1cptnde<l functions. D cluded.ue oral in.spedions. orthodcmua, onl nrsecy. pe~ntiu, eod.odon1ict, instrument sh.o:rpenins and revie.w of x tected llr~~erit.e-:ns Cliniral Afr.Jiatlonl 1 <tt<llt Aff..&.~oru vetcheduj.d in geaeral pra<tke off~cu, specialty offict.s, lhe-citylcounty clinic, and tbt dlr:atlll hysitua clinic:, on '1Ue$days and Thlllsdays for se.ve:l l w ft~ The student assists :~nd ob!.erves in these orfices. under the. supervls.\on of a licl!:ns~ dentist OWJd the <nnptqycd dent:'d as5\stant. St!Jdwts are vwled by ;n>~ructor pprotl""tely every flve cloys. 501,6 -Clia.lal Alfillation1 U crediu ThJsis 8 oontmvatim o/508 5 Clinical AfflliAtiaru. At the: f!dd of tbe course, the student will have afbllated a minimum o!.00 hours, 509 MEDCAL ASSSTANT Med.icidflecO'do cr..t!u Thls<oune is desianod to help students become acquainted wlth tnedicat rt'«)rd.$ ;~ndstttll.stlc::d rtparts as hey are prepued, w~:d lind stored in a clinie, nuc lj\g borne: or hogpit.ll, to become!atniiar With th~ wrlous types of tnedk;:.llosur;tnce, to ~~;ue ~:i:t~~:~e~;~-~ ~:~:~:r::1~ 0 ~~~,~/!:rl~t ~~l~~c: ::'inror tn.ltionpollcies. ~reregulslt e.s : 509 L!O Medic'' ~tm\nolo~ 1 nnd Modlcol Terminology H. ' 1)9-l'll Mc.dlc~;~J Terminol{)gy oncl Records. credits This course: s dt:slgncc.l.to ben COil llau.:~l~n of 609 i80 Mcdicill Termmology. 11 includ.. tho study ol m dlcollns~ronoc:,. ~r u51!!'" medicljp rf'c'ol'dl,.tnd (?O!Jdes d procedures rdated.to lhe preparati_on, use nd 5'or-.ge of medical records. Prer<Qulsilc; !0 Medie<l Twninolosy Med;c,lTermlnolo&r Z credifl Thiscoune is designtd to help the ttudent become fqmifiar wilh mcdlc:jitermino)ogy, to undtraland how medlt:~lterm s arc form od, to bocome f<millar with the rn<onln of rnony word roots, prelikes aod lflle<, to b able to.sptll, defiae L d pi'ollouilce m.ny m.dicallemos by understanding word components, and to b=oe skiu.d in the> use of mcdlcol dlcticno.ry. 509-)81 Medkal Te r m lnolcay Z crcdtl$ This OOillinu.alkln c:aurse.. pond> ~ lnfnrmalloplo M.dictl Terminology L li i<.r ;

78 -~ ; !>-Cuurse D!SCriptlons Coune Descrtptions l :1 Body Strur:::turc and function for Mcdlc'!i A &ston! =din This course s desi&ntd to provkk o concls~ lnitqduction to hun1an body structure 01nd function. The cour$c co\'ci"s normal 11.nd abnormal.sta1c!> or 1he body, bo1sic concepts of body hygiene, human pat hology as t affects. each body system, nu.trilion, phy$.icat Htnes.s llad human sexutlity. Common problcn1s en countered in the medial offttc a..nd clinh: o.re empfwb.<:d PeaoaoUVocatloual ReloUonshlpo 1 <rcclit This course explore.\ the person llbd voc.liooa( rth1.tioo1bips af the >n<di<al..sistantln the.medical of lice. t irx:ludcs the od ju.stm~:nts ot the ptofusional in the mc:dicol office in rd tioo to oth~r discipune:a l!nd covers : rooming and hygiene, ctiq u,cttc ;.md beh&~ior, ethical concepts., hbtoriea. foundations o( mc.-didn!!. nursjn~ and medlcal.:assisling, pro(essionat organi-zations, prifl c::iple.s an.d.currel'l.t concepts of health insurance, Md relati<jw.h.ips between patients and profe~lonab Pen()n~/VocaUanal. Reklllo-..sblpa Jl 1 c:redlt This 1 wee_k caur&e is de&j,gn~ to provlde begiivling: knowledge and U!1d~rs~and1ng jn three lmporta n ~ and related >Jspecb gf medical pt:ae~i<:'!. The ~nter relationship of medical ethics, m~dical Jaw lltld patietlt" telationsh!ps l!.t~ studi~ to Jcat.rrl tht: err~ct$ of each in reg_ard to the pradi~e e>f medlcine and the role of the medic:alasslstant. n addition, the principles of small. business and t:orporille law, ethical and' leg'! oon.sldersuo"ns of patient "f~18tion ships aod ~eath and dying ere uplored..prerequisite: Succc.!lsful complelion or m..j 1. f'ersonal/vocadoo:st Rellltionships r. 509 M~~~';:'::;~."f~<lice ancl <l<!dil$ This ttrun;i!: pre~nts ~ bbsic understanding of Ute: c:llnlcllt aspt:c1i of :rphystcian's ofnt:c ~dhow the medietlj1lssi.stant funr;,jons in it. The cfl'lphas.i& of thls course is to offer the knowlc.dge Dnd ex pericnce required to-auist the phy&idon ih the c:ere or patients. PrincipJe.s. and tcchniqu.es."()f.tbc following arees tre ttrem:ed; Ci!.re of equipm~n!, urglc llnstrumentallon. &teri.jiulidn proccdu,:es and.eta.mlning.room tec~lquel~ $0iJ-:jJ8 Heollh Concept& Z crcdl!s Tnij 1-week co.r.se is desipted to oover t broad survey ol hum&jo gepetks, pregnancy, grmvlh CK1 <le.vclopme.nt, aging. : meutal h~alth oud current cancerns in &bused d.tup. Prtrequilite; SuccesduJ ccmpldion of SQ!l-0 Body Sfnrdwt' ~nd PunctioR far~ Medical.As:siitants Mer;l.lc.J LabDratory Procedure J ctedjt.s This introductoty ooutse f~ d. tigned (O atquain1 student5 wi~. slmpl~ labo,.tory lt<hniquestbal <nay b< perlor:ined by a mt:d;<.1l a.s~tan{ in a docto/ s ofrjce. Tbrouah de.tcoa s i~atfon dlld. practice; st~de.nts le:arn to perform commoo tests used in the medical of. lice. SimpJe micinbiojwjy ;Jnd'uri.Dit)ysis testirjs receh.e emphnla Medlcoll.aboratory Procedures credits Thisl week courae builds upllll ooneq>ts and sjiu>l troduced t.~.5.d:9 55 Medic&l taboratory Procedures. The cou{se is designe;;f to.. extend lhe student~~ learning to pe1'form slmple'hc.tnatology and ejectrocardlography tecbn)ques. f'rercquisftc: SuCcesSful com plelion o! sog:6!j Medful < rmlnoi<jsy credfto This is a basie introduction to the use of medinl fermlnolozy. Bmphasi:~ ~s placed em rccognuion, division, dehnhlon and.mean!ng of wor.d paru; More complex terms will be builtliom these word pari> and spe!lln1 nd pronunclallon. ore slressod. Media>-\ terms are discussed in each U.i1it as Chey pe:tfl.in lo ;u)~tlomy and phy~olet&y in koohb nd di.scose: Medico! '1\!rmlnology z oredlta This 1 ~ee.k cour$c lndud~s spetlallanguage for di.agnosis and treatment ncludmg equipment: pnx.edure:s and drup wed Ln on co!ogy, radjology, cardlology,l!n'l, ophtholmo!off, ~~e~~rology, Oll!Gyi'l, otlhopedics, dermatology, urology, pediatri<::land ioteraal med"u:lne.. Prerequislle! Succes.Cul completion ol Medkal T<Jminology. 50!1-6Z Medical Office Precllce.. d. 1'1-octd.,.... ll credlto This 1 wcck cour5e focusea on assisfias tht ph)'5iciao with sjl<clal dlogoostlc procedures and minor rsery and the odmlnlstr Lion cr mcdltstlon.s. Pre requis~e: S cceu!ul complttion ol 509 Medical Ollicc Pra«<ice and Procedures!. soy-~6 Medlcol Oflicc Prt><:cilur...cr~dlls ThlJ 1 week cours~ develop skill' for ej(ect\ve: medical omc:e jn-b requlreme~t.ts. Pundamcntal~ \u Lhe rotlow~nglleas are covered: Patient. rec~ptkln, appointment schedullnj, rc<oordkceplng. fiung. enterina: daily U njodtonl, bill ina and collecfina, banldng proctd ues, preparins payroll, prep rius nec:aj&ry government f9rms such os withholding tox. FfCA, unemployment omd :~hne diubility, bandina roultne fxuineaw::orrtsponclence. keeping an i:r:wentory of supplies, 'l.lld operlltl;tf: &eneral busines.s equipmenl ~uch as ~kuhtor.s. adt.jing m chwe.s, tlilthode B 'J ter mituab: and eopylng nuachiftes. Pre«quisite: 0 wpm typina speed. 50!1-70 Modicsl AosWing lnlernohlp Z <M<ilt This four week. tfio.hour a~signme:nt i.s in a local phy.sician's of fice, cl(nk or bcspitaj and ls scheduled during the last four w~s o the second s.cm~er. Tbls c:ov.rse ptovides. educatlonal ex perlerice jn rhe dinjcaj.arid d;ninjst r~ti"ye Bttas of medit"el $Sbtin-g. Prerequisite: S01tbiDctory completion of all. medical assbtant currlcul~..~..tn a('ld r~commcndatlcu\ of the f~ult y. 510 NJRSNG sto~to Body Structure a cr~lts Tht.&. counc is d~signed to provide o ba5ic and concise int'roduc tion lo the struel!lre llnd function or the.humlln body induding in formation on.nor!llal and. ttbnomud co~dhipns of each body system, and fundamenh l knowledge to maintain body efficiency ElrJcf prevent disease. The cou~ includes the proper utub:aticm of medieal terminology, spelling and pronunciahoo as it reletes: to tbe!>ody Y ems NuraiDJl Fundunenlall. 6'c:redlt& Nursing Fundamentals i$ a. foundation. course d.esianed to assist.;ttld~::nts in-th:e.dn-elap~t o! their rolu as~a~~i.te dtgrec nurses. nclude~ we cogn!livc, :afrective,and psyc:ttomotor beh Viors b~sic to the practke o! na'rllns. The oaur.5e ntroduce~ tbe four curricwulll ccacept~ ol bn le hptnan needs,.jl{e cycle cboilges, common w.u-delined ~ealtll problem. and the r..;. rq!c:s of the associate degree nurse. U.s.ina basic bunum needs according to Maslow, students arelntroduce<lto tile physiologic needs of oxygen. K livity, re.d, nutrido~ eumintuoa a.nd comfcrt. The t~fety and xcuruy Mecit ol1kln ptoledion. protection {rom phyok.->1-injury, freedom!rom ht(edion, nd freodom!tom emotlo~>~~l j<c1p' rdy ore lntrodij'ed, as w llu the love and belooglng nc:tcb or tceptonce ~ d apirltuality. The conccpl o! common well-delined b<altb problem tnd ts rel<llo.,ldp <o the client's abilit:t to aw:d. ~c:: needs is praenteq to students. Empbui:s is phn::-:d oo fbe oll9wing roles. of the, P,5SOt '-ttc, debtee nu c~: 11 J Prov~ of cai~ U t~ey implement b1sic nuulpg,ce.te for cllen,ts i,n the d inieal setting: (1 com:rnun\cator as they. l?egin to usc dt Z:':(!!tic comrn ul"'tc.-t io~ ~,~~ues when infeia:ctin.s,.-ith c:lientsj and 1~ member w\thln 1he profes.slon focusing On the ro1e olthe stud""t in this p,.gram, Sludenta lc~rn abo<>t llfe eycle Chl!-n&n.~nd how the y.8ffect' Jiuman.needs. Whei1 p}fmn;ng C.are for " rious.ag~ gi'ol.lps, c::onalden.ilon is lven to developmental tasks, co.~fnitive abuity, vulnei&ibility, JJJd strc"s.t tcl1tcd to hospjtaliznlion. l~a9: 'and cuttuce; Studenis iue hitrbduccd to the n_u:r.slng pmtess whh e m.phasls em.client assessment.'nd the im pjeiti.~ntatlon Of baste skuh. OpporlQnlty for simulation of these skill& is provided \Jl, o. le.borntory. Concutrent dinic l expt'rm!nce.s.with ad~ll clients are praqlded in gtnctal hospll l snd nursing homes. Prt rcqulsite: Atceptance nto lh~ A '-'Gelate Degree N.urs idg prograja () Nunlna Bthl<a and Trend l credit T,hls oouue emphisi:r:es the co)e: of the associete drsree n~rse u A member o t~e pro!euion oi nursiag as wen u transition to thi levet of a registered nurse. Lave!$ of pracliee, the role of the.wociale degtee nur.., and legol responr.ibllltles related to nuro. ing prapicc are explored, n odd ilion, the otn<:ore ond purpose of Jb, State Board of Nursi.ns. process!or lic:c:m\lrc, ud employ~ -ment respcmsibilities bqd oppoe1unit)cs ace ioc:judcd. The cour:;e.il.so iotrodu= the >tudent to current ethiat! and bealtb care if~e5 ~ weu os trend& in. nur.sina. The (unction of nursing orgqqiu.tions l1 also pruel\ted. PrrrequJsitt:~ Nursing F\Jndamenlal, 5 JD- l~o Nwsins Procus J, SO lj N ur-stns Pro..., 11, Nurolng Proces lll Nu11in8 Process V. 510~10 Nursing Procen t (8 9 week cnurse). 5 credlj 'l'his course ls desisr1cd to kelp dlc 1tud.en1 devetop n unde:nlan.ding of the role or lh~ nun;t! f weu R lectt>d llum.n ntf'dsajtd how they arc allected by lilc cycle evcnu and common well dcfml>d ~ulth proble.ms. Tbe lift cycle concepts of the narinlll a.g ing proccss6, induciins physiological chan&c:j, psycho.sotiaj. ~henge.s, eulntral aspects llod loss~ uc e_.:p}ored. Needs!or acttvl ty 11nd mobility, safety and seet~rhy, nd selfof~eem 11e em pba'i:.~:ec:hpecifically as they rtiltt to ccmmon neurou\usc:uwr. orthopedic and ><nsofy health problem$. The provider 1nd com municator.ro!e.s of the nurse ale emphasized wuh focus on the assessment. plilnnint and implementeuon steps of the nursing,pfocess wbcn cerln~ fo1 on inlii'-'idud ellen~. CHnlcal expcrie.dccj ure proyided in ilructured heallh care settlh&s with dull d lt:llli. Prer~ 9ui.site: Nursing f unden;entl ll, S0 1t NursiPif'Proe(!sSJ. 18.~ wecbj 5 credit ThSs courst: i& d-;stgned to help!he student develop ' " understan din~ or th~ role of the nurst: as wejl ae selected human heeds and how'thc'f arc acceded by life cycle. eve'nu and tommon 'well dcfine.d h~allh problems. Physiotogl ccil~ s.ofcly und Scciuity, JoVe: and belonging a'.!i9, to a limited extent, self~leem n.c~ds. o( clients ar_e elef!lnred. The Ufe cycte. co.r:~ctp1s o( fri)ily dynam!cs during tjmes Qf change and loss are ~ev! loped. The e:f ~cts oftbe individu~l' s il1riess, hospital\zation; or dis.ibilit)r on",the: family unil ore cxplor'ed,:appucatlon of growth.&r\d d'e.velopn\~n~ ~d: famhr: concepts is ma9,e to'lhc h'eitllh cr.re o~ presc~ ~o.d scbool ;~s~ chi~dren. Client netds o! nutrition, {'~imin&t lon, so{~ty &ecl~jity,..!lnd ~clbelonxin~ a.n: emph~tsiz.ed specifk:any as they relate to ca r..: cc, Sostrointestinal heehti problems o.od,b;a.si.c uroloslc.u ht:lllth problems. The provider iillnd communicator roles of the norse llt!!-cil1p~!ii-r.ed with!oetl& on lhe assessment. planniog and impk-mt!nhdion st~ps ri! t~ nqu.ing proce~!hen carj~g (or iq. _ di vfd~al clients throughout.lhilif.e cycle. Clink::at experrences:are : pr<widtd in structured he1th cart selunwf~rr~tian, the role of the studenl lls o member n the profession d. nursing i.$ ft~ rt~ dt:'t'eloped, aod lh~ role tts client advocate wlll be ntroduced. Prerequisite: 510-1D5 Nurs&nc f undameotsl$. S10 l.. N iniftt! Proceullj, (8-9 weol< """'-"1! credit "nis course is. d..tgned to help the $ludept de, elop ~ undcnt.,. dins c the rol'e of the :i_urse end selected hwuan nee~ nd bow the:te arc oflccted by life cycle cventa and common wdl-defined bell!th prohle!l1-'-the course wju look at the pby.iologi<lii. ;al<ty and security, love.&ud bi!!longlng And. (().tt Hndcfd extent, 'ell ' esteem and self.actualiu.tion nt!ed's o the clien!s. ctrenb 1 needs :for safety and-security &rld.nutrition ond elimination are em phsiled ;1s lhey relate :~peci fi_t:1uy in n u.ro\ogiea)., Duld and ck~lr'o1ytes; reproduetive endocrine, and urinary hultti p(o~je~ns. Tile ie1.1cber and evalustor ro1c-s o( the "«r&le cue cn'lplta. dred.with fcc:us on ~ll fou(,st!7.ps ot the nursing proces., when cftrin'g f~r individual ~ti c nts throughout the ~f~ cycle. CU:Ucal experl~nces 11re provfdt::d ip slruct..:n:d healt~ ~c seu~~~~ n additi~n, the r~.l.c.5 of th(t ~tudent as a member tn the profe~s100 ofnursu~ acd as 1 diont advoeate are further devtlopcd.. Pretequl ltcs: ~10oi~H~t!1- slng Fundaq"~eo al~ Nuraing Procet.s J, 510 1) ~urstpg Ptoe{'sS. sfo-ti$ Nirr.O.s ProceuiV 18-9 week.) 5 <r<!llts TJW. Cour:n~ is lks.igned to help 5tudcnts jncrcase their und,r.stnn din!; Of the role of the nurs~ i~d how human needs lltc ahectrd by me: cycle events..nd common w~u-deltn ed ht-altb ptobleml. Ufe cyde events and concepts c:onoemlng lhe infa.n1, toddler, adole.-t, youn& dull, i nd ehildb<arlng family ore'explbred. While the pbyslolngle and saloty oeeds wio cbnt!nue lo be tre58 ed.i the needs of love a'o;d belon&lng And sel.f-atnm are einpbasit ~d. The providen1nd tornmunicltor roles of the nurse l'oontinlle lo be developed. ohd the evaluotiort... oltbe ~ursillg p11> <Ss struscd. Tbe role of client teothu is t n ai:lded foc\lt of deuroobl nud ctitiltaj expc::rlcr.ce', CUnical C%J)ericr.tcs -rt pro idcd jn structured heallfl care H \linp wllh 1 focw on cbl!dbearing f milicndd p<diatrlcs. Licoii&d p<acllulnot'l<l admlt ed'l_o the program Wlifi ndvariced stoadlllr may hsvt lhe CpPortunlty to challenge selected espect$ of the course. Ptrrequislte:~ : Nursing Fundum~ntals, Nur&h\l ProccJS, &io il Nur.s ing Prcce.'i.S 11. J10~1 Nurliln1 Pr«aa V (8 9 week course) s crodlto "111.la c:ourse. l! desisnl!d to help the litudent lntegrate thr fin: rol.es af the a5soclalf! dq~.n.urje when mrrtinj selectrd needs of c:li.ebts th&t ma.v be dlected by lif~ eycle events an&or common wtll_.drfined heatth problenu. APJ)katton for tift cycle amcepts to middle Cldulrhood if a focus o/ ~i~ eovrae, '1'he phy&iolo~j need for oxygem.llon is emphasized specifielly os it relates to Ccm\!Tlon well-deoned health problem$ of lhc c:ardlovascuj.a;r, hel'\'lat01ogi<; and rcspholry.systems. Other nee<l&- phy iologic, 5fcty :sccutity, kwe nd l>c!klnging, seu eateem a ad, to a limited elrtent, ><11-actualization- art integ<~ted. Tkell"' rolea o/ <he asso;i~~.te dcstee mjtse are intq"jrated in d~:~sroom and clinical ex p t:ricpca.. Managing client care. will be a p.:utieuhu emphasis of the di.nico:~l experieoc:c. Clinical c&pcri,ericc's w"ith odult chcnl:s om: provided in st_ructurc:d acute c-1-re seutngs. An observational ex perir:mce in a modical-surgical intensive cs.re setting will be pro:- vide:d.. Ptarequisite : Nursing F\;lndamentela, , ~ursing Proccn, 51Q,S1 Nuu.ing Procds H, Sl0-1 Nuniing Processlll, Nun;ing Process V l5 Nurti'na: Pt:oce&s V l8 9 week coutsej 5 ~recjjt r; Tbe focus oc t_hb cour.e is op iiltegrfltlon'o(.the,io\.lr unifying con ceprs of the: cllrricufum: Hwruut need$j Ute cycle:, common weu defined health problems, and roles of the nwse. Emphasis is,plac ed on the role of the nurse:.as communicator, man:ager and mern~r of tl1e profes$lon. Addition P ej)lphasls will be on: evalu o~ Hon Qf ~f tn,_ht~i ~ve lopmcnt a nd.. l~t.egr&tlon of all five roles of the nurse. Oinical.experj~ntea are provided with adult clients in s\ructure:d h~eauh n r C!. $el:tings. Ell:periet'lee. with adult psychiatric clients will 1>e provirl«l. Lkenud practical r.uues w ill be provkicd 1m opportunity to eh:lllene;e!he tht:ory pottiorr of psychiatric nursing. PrcreqUisit~: Nursln& J:uridarnental~ SJCJ.J0 Not>ing Procc.,l, 51()-11 Nursing Proccs.sll, Nunlng Proces ll, Nuning Process V N r.sjns Adult P ti~nts' 6 tl'edjts ThJi coune cnoie.rstbe phpiologi c and psyc:bolo&k fatjqf's rctate<l. to iuness. nte focui" o.n the nursln& care ol odults with commonly-oa:uring medlcll-ourgltll beolth ptalllems and the d lont need!taflected by tkete problem$. Credit l or tbiscoursc is obt.ainm throu&b ch! llenge ~ m lnation. 5l 0 g ~ rslng Transition (1wk~) s tredl~s 'f'.hjs transitioo course.js de!ignec to rm.iuuile tht first stage of the role_ change: fro..dl tl'm! dependent funct!on or the. LPN to the in dep ndent Tundion of the assqciate defree :u.u$c. T ~is co~ne ~;!d, ond ~nfotees body of knowledgt tjlal wul provide a framework. for the ptactke or nun)ng. Concurrent clinical ~X Jl(!rience-h jncludcd. 5.19~1~ Ps_yc:hl 1ric Nunli1g ( 8Wkl). s. ~'rcdits Thi$ coutse pcovldes content wh icll l~m~s the ~heo.rctic:el basisfgr al;'plii:ation.of the nursing ptocem to the care. o( d~ents with com mon mental.ll!cdlth problems. Content focuses on. he client cjc p~rie ncing., roen~al health problems releted.co b!opsyeho-.rodai~ S(tx:ual funetiotung and fulotiolent of lndiviqual.needs. ConC\lr rent dini~al ejt~rience s. included Patent/Newborn Nublng l-6wksj credits This coor se provide:; r::o ntt:nt whic:h!orm the theorctica\ bu.$!& {or lhe appucation of tht.n.urslng process to th.e. cera of the cldldbear ing fdlmily. t focuses on normal chlldbearid$ and tnterferenc: s with childbearin.~; during the prc birtb, blrtb AAd p ().H birth tirne ~riod,, Cultural, hi!toricaj, soclt) ~~om lo, dcvelopmentt~ end ltj,al influcncc:s arc incorporated. Related cunk:al experlencea are: concurrent Nanln Adull and Cb!ld(8-17 wkr) 8 tredlu 'i'his. course covers the appltcation of lhe nurslng prooeu to the care ol clients hom ill age groups wllh oommon well-defined heakh, problems. Tire courte "foe.._. o" chanses n cl;.nrs health status which lntedere With their abidty to meet their hwnlln and/or deveicpmcnta.l nrtds. CoOC\Jrre.t1l clln\c:al experience is ncluded.

79 l SZ Coursc Descriptions Course Dcscriptlons l5 G Comprm.n.., ~ l)lutlllna 6 crodlto This antrse fadlitates tho U mae of the role d111nlll' from L'N!o usodolf! Mpee nun~.,,e- course provides the oppotlu.:nhy to ntqralc the nuntng coneepts and akills into the five lnler rel.tlld roles de«ned by he N1tlonul J.eosue o( Nursing. CntliJO nelos o( the Msoci1lc Dea,ree Nune on Entry tnto Practice. '11\e delivery ol e11re to a &coup of clients utinzin1 nil et tu of tjie nursing pro cc~ is emph!uilcd. Concurrent d lnkal experience.s are provided Home H.. llh 1 credit This coune wu enable litudents to recognize the PCCd for CPR ~tnd to COlfetd y perform the te:e:hnique t~uhtd in VariouS' situ doos, to recosnm. tbo need for emergency llnl aid, the type ol aid needed. and lo know and an1y out required eme.r&mcy care. 51<1 Elcmen'-rr N nu..: credllo Th!s...,e b dulaned to hooch basic oucsi<k skuts and the UJtderl)'ins princlplu,...ded by lbo student to..suroe,bislhet responslblllllu as 1 pradlcol nuroe. Thi knowledge.md >kill will enable tbe 5ludtal to fullcuan in ulatively.simple.situatiominci to asslst the re1litered nur as n infegra.f part of the ouuln& ttem n the ('re of mor acutely m patient.s. Lectures ttnd d~mojujtra tiom, an upplernented by laborn.,ory and cllnlc1l ex P ri ~nces in ho.spltals nnd nursing. homt$. Sch:cted te.crl\h~x ex per!met~ n thc&e o:llnl~l area ~ are under direct ~upervhion or tnstructot& from. he c:olltgt. C~n!iiderlltion i.s!pvcn to the role o( tho pca~ucal nurse Wilhio the fumewor\ or v111rlous methods of nur$lng care delivery symems and the use of ~hu problem *olvlng a~pro11ch to nurllng carc.llulc skuls a.r.e stre&sed to develop ""->lthy and d(ectl"" relatlon5blps with other members of the health team Body Structure credits 'Otis course pcovfdes an Jnsight htto basic huo:an dnatomy and physlolot!y lncludlos fuoo.m.ntab needed for lh undenlanding and c~uaiiof'l of \O.tllh pnctitts rrlated ro ueh.syskm alld the body S who0f Nurotnc the Adult Potlentl credlb Thio n> rrse, lolel)ded C>Utldolipn foe SJ.7ond Sttl-8, Nursing the Adult P Uent U and lll, COVers basic concepts of bcahh, Jllness nd ptlrsing care 1pp1iabl<: to M adtdt. The ato dent is introd\lced to the nunins procc$5 and to new medical tet ~ i nology. The nitial foc\s i.s on normal hotneosl&sll! add pteven bve aspects or huhh cafe, and then ind udes imbalance.s common tq many Ulne~.~t.~ 'nd he patient needs created by l.hc!;c c::ondi rion.1. J?ni:ph~.s J.s pjaud.oo nuninl inl.ul ll'~f}t in lotd patlenl CUfe. ~ inc.j~ed ~ on _iatr~uctory.un1l lo phaunacology. A Sl.l~n a~cd chmml o:penc.ncc m a ~;:enentl hospital onlunins borne fi.ciuty tlllil incorporal~ theory with c:brect patient c:lfe s o componc:nl ollhlt course. 5~0.7 N'urolng the Adult Pmte t n (ncluding ~rlatrie. Nut&iagl 1 cndltt Thls cour.se BhltS tjtv stude-nt fhe cppotiij~hy to sludr, in s ru ter depth, tha ~ore conunon. cond.hi~ru affeding each body ay&tem. Eln.phatiJ is on nur~i1:1g care and i!'llt~rvenlion el)efapy W'!.thln he practical nuujng role.. Al50 ncluded is nn Overvit.w of drt~ thera.py. The 1tudcnl.sfudi e11 the general chs.racleri~tics, u1~. side effects and nurtj,qglmpjicadon! ~f drug therapy acwrd;ng to.cta.uulc:atlon and JYstem usa.g~. n' oddition to a supervised general hospstaj expc.rience,.the dudent h.as f:xpcric:nce in 1 nurs lng hom<> link with cmpltosis on the developmeniol need$ o! ~older oduli. A unit on cardlopulmot>ary rt...otal!on (CPR) is Dduded. 5{0~11 Nar5ln& the Aduh.t'<ltlont lu and uw creclts A continuotl011 ol S!0-7, 1M course <ludics the les.j.,.,.,,. oj 'lurslns ln relation to the roles of the pudical nune. SJo.:ws Nttniria Mtl t.,. '5 lycdiilf This class will r«... re the student fer employmenl (n health cor f;cllilit&. The nuuing ossl&caftt, under direct sv.ptrvisibn of tl1e /fccnud nurse, provides cfired patient care add performs sdccttl t.,.., 511pportlvc to oulolns prac:lices Growlh and o.,.elopmmt crcdlta This courk s d 01lsned lo help tbc ttll<lcnl sain an uodel!tinclinb of the developlns pt~r>n /1001 l<tn! development throush ad lire. indudos no11n11l growth and development and 1ppropriote dcvelopmenl to>ks. Oernntology s dlscusscd with on emphooi D prennlfvc mmln1 and care of he okf~r adult in the. r.ursina lutme and hn pilol. The t.ults ol f clns ok th ore aplored. The Sludy ol ntllrlllon and nutritional requlremeats durins the lifo cy cjc re included. A.rus CQftf cd tt Vitamlaa._ minerajs., 1ts protein, carbohydrates, rdluloae and water. UndeT51:andina coiaurtl and rehgt<~us (ood prttfrrcnces, ccnsum~ information ted safe rood hand.llng t re incorporcted. AlteraUons of nutrients to meet the needs ol allered phywologicol function is discussed Nunlng Mentally ll credllo t his coa.rso provtdes.tudenls witb 8 basic. under.atij\digb of the dyntmies cf human behavior o tbey rt'tllr be tier \.fr.dcrat nd thcrnac.lves and P rienls. The undemandidj is built OJ\ recocni o( h.. lthy ond unbe&lt/ly NplnJ m«hn1ams with eropltasis O!l lhe oymptomolort o( beba>io<5- The Nurse ncludes" wpet vlled uperi nr:e n cor< of tb< menially ill in 1 pqchiatric foc:ility Home Health Traaoltlon 1 <lull Tbis courso s deoilltltd to aid!he """in& ass!!t&nt with th tran siuol'\ and the &ppucatlon of knowledge and lkills homt ce.re setting Paront Chlld Nurolng cre!to Thls C<:lUrJe-.11 dtclgned tc aui11r lhe.!litudent pr~:ciieat nur in dev~jopln_g a btelld pct p ctive of the ~e11ning of familr cenhred parent cb.ild nunlns. B sic in ormatlon. about normal devflopment:al cbanze and healll!, main!~ancc pto.v'ldes the framework for meeting the nteds or the normal family.nd"the ;u child. Cllolcel experience-!o enhance Ute student practic l nurse's und~rst.anding of hislher role an tile heallh tc11m arc provtded Wt structured n tljn.gs inchxliag a ho5pi.tl!lll, fc.rnily pr etice 1nd pediatric: c:lu,ic: RESTAURANT AND HOTEL CO~Y 5 11 ~ 10 lotroduccjon to Gourmet food Preparotlon.<redlto. Uds CO.rk proy\dea the studtnl with bulc sowmet kitchen techniques and functions. t preparu the student l or ~king v r!out stocb (or tm p reparailon of basic G&ucet. Dnd provt~ basic howledg of variety of gourmtj &oups ahd g:mtlshu. The foods ~ 1rved Jn these cl..ssei are o~~yo1ijahje fo tbe ~iludent bod;. f~cully and tal f. 511-Ofi Food Stkllcc Theory Lab. 1 credit The basic m<lboch of food prtporatlon, staoduds. principies &Dd lc:chniquca used ln the p~paration a fruit~ vegctabl~1me&t, pou(try, flab, gelatin, eass. mtll. ~~Ca ts and oi~. sow.p.s and sauces, sa.lad:s,and.w1dwh:bes., and.bakery product& one studied. Sanilollon n food 5etv1Gel alsoinclu<!e~ Food SclenceThtory Ub 1 credit Clus dlsc.usalon 11nd Jaborntory experim~ntatlon a.re combjned!o pr esentlh ~:Ofy nnd expcrh!nco n the production of ltema \lung vegel.ablu, litoc::ks,. ments insl poultry. BB,tc kno~ ledae of cutlery. ~~::~~{~~!d~cety and 11nfhtJon. and weight! nd mea,u.rt>a 11r 51 HO B kory 't <rtdlt n lhll touse, ilu<icnla oblam understandini o! the!lindament.r principles el bakln,~~. 5\arcby foods, brearb, pies, cakes, Doni>b putty, puff pa>tc, brhds end doushnw are e>rpwned n theory and preporcd ln theloborototy by aludelili Food.Prepanotlon 'taborah>ry 6uedlto Food preporauod lor the coll<j" alelerio p'!'vide> experie~!o ~rqrarill' food n quontily. Sludeat ire "olgced tbrouglt 1 rm. bonaj system to ell a1allons o( tbu.kilt:heft. Btllic m ttuls f6r au en lrtt5.ar,&ucd, wtth mphul qn the S<:~e!lon of!tern< wbie~ itlve the llll.llenilhc Wid..r e~perience in p epapng 1 vll!'l<\y o( popular..,,..,, Tke cq11r.. lnclll<lel!1'ep..alion of all types ol lood-moat, floh ot~d fowl. lreolt, can~ed aod ftozen ~~t, f~rtn.at80u5 products and ~e:role ~~- ft 6lso iodudes prin apk& ollblokcl\lns i nto. lccltniques nod prep~~ rot ion of bosl< otor:lu 111 sou..,._ me t... tlina, bonlna. tylna fll1d portl011ins, r:lemut.ory storeroom operouons 1nd proc:eduru. loter relaled lo ll otcas rc Uu: eajentliiij ol hnienr, :sdety 111Dd mn.iimion. 51 H 1 Food PrtpareUtcll"'"""'tory U 6 ucd.lla A amtiltuollen o( SH09, 1blt <OrK ncludes wor~ ocbeclllln. form.t.. lll<l oost needed to 1ciU1Uy luli!b the menu beins of fered in the lacuhy and st dent dinln& room. job ans!ysb &Dd wori<5betts-contpleled for e1dl r.uk ta be perlwl'!jed. Super~f. sion is p rovided or ll Cood prcp11ral\oll and ttrvice atefl:l Mnt Scleneo credll This.course coven the hlst6ry and e..:ooomics of the meat packing indoatry. Me11 illopectlon and lde11llf>eation of wholesale and retail cuts o( beef, porlt, lamb, vw t ncl v;~riety me-ts is co~ed. Proper (COking methods Cor u.ch cut o meat. together with the castltld yleljl, 11e incl ded. l?tth stude.!! nperimee meat cui ling prooeduru 1nd proctlcu U5td in qu&diity food preporation. 51! 118 Food S.noh:eln fl!otltudan credlto Bmpboslrin!l tb< >ervlce ldlnij!g room) plwe o! rcttoannl cpa tlon&, this c:ourh aamint) lreditiontl.setvic:e ttdxuq11ea u well as tmtent ser.k:e trends, tjcp1ores dining room organization and it&frfng for rffective tervlce, devel op~ in ho11sc Ci)Od and beverase sedi"'"strlt<gfes. Scudenl& oon<urr<ntly enrolled in Qourmel Foods will tpply kte.u developed n tbi~ ~us u well as analyu thelr actual experiences ln tht! dinins room. butrucoonal mdhoa.s include team teacblng. 51J.0 Gourawt foodo credllo A continuation of 5tl l0, lhil course lnclude~ the prep tot\on and fi~rvice ot au gourm t food&. Lectutes and demon$tfa.tions are given on the use of herbs and wim.s if) ioter.hltioj)ql--fty)e cook ing. The. COUr.JC! coven. the!unda m~ntoj.l priociplea o r~ prep ration and cookery as it re1ates to c~al cuisines. AU va'r!.etics of MU.CC.S 1rc ptc.1enled eloag with the artt.stic arunsemt nt aad dhpl1y of ondo. The d assicol menu. are Sloditd with empb..u pl1ced o pei:lll foods w~icb <quire exl a core &Dd art in their prepetation. The foods servc:d are: avat!ab~ to the studc!s, stoff and focully of the college. $11.-1 lte Sctdptorlm&anrl Decoratl~ Foo<ls z'c:mllto Usi!ts lhe appropriate tools al)d teehnlq... ice oculptur<s Cor >how plete:.,.._ <ompl<ted by atudcnls. Decorflllve shew p!eces u~d 10 occent b flet tl ble.,.. <"""'eli ChoU<! Ftqid work :md glaus are also ncluded. Tb dusltal!lrf of pulled s.usor work is t uahl demoo frated and applied by tb< studeou for OT tblic: dbpl p. how piecos oncl cu~no,ry e><ltibiis. ~11 10 Culloary Laopop. Z ~ts lbis count Jotroucn atudenll to tbe sounds anq structures o( scvc:ral forti&<> languo~q mportant to the culiciry wittfd. Sludems asc c.opged ln producina correctly wriuen menus and pronoundni culli>ory terms acup!ably. Jjo$ed o!r.unonisllc approlth lb learnin&,: thls coun.c: auows atwient' to enjoy inctused selt-confid.enca and 10 apprecitlle the learning &iluatioo P<x>d ~nd e.- 1 1'1orcbasl111 Zcrectits Tllia eourst deals with all foodslbtt at< purchi>sed fn qbllrltily. Emplwil. is' placed OP the sefectio!i and. 11-p~a. '(lcauon re... - q~.jirem t~t& for m111jor foods ptucha$t:d by food..s~'vloe.s..,... Sll-15'8" Food.Co. t nd Porccnlall"'.-i.~c rcdlts This o:n.rne oovef& thft calcule.tiol\ of food c::o;u and thew! Of: focld CClS iecordj. J'robltms are pr~&ented that ~re.re!nted to Co!t fac.tors. Pticins of menu Ue:m and a s.tud.y or labnr cbsts.ond tl\e dfect th.cy have on the overall openuorw cos.ts i.d ru:h1ded. s l 1-9 Pood!llonepmotnt z ttedlts This course covers the 'principles Olld technique& in food prepare.!!on r... the student prcpulnj for botclaod r<stouronl nwtose. me.nt Students "'a:...runy completing the ca n< bould have an UJEdrrsJandhlJ of kow to pxepare btsk: mcnu it~usins variely o! methods ond tqulpmtnt. n oddilion. student& ohould know basic prlndples of plato pr...rvatlon, >rilll!lflontion to limlntt nd cootdidtuoa foe atlual ~rvfce. fastntctiooal ~tbod.s include fn structr>< df!fborlltr&tlon &nd studofll p.ortlr:ipotlon. 51 HU..f'~ Sorvl<e ~fi!u and Deslp. 'crediu Tbla coun~ i>ovon t~ plannlna qc!ood 5ttvlcelayou' to meet the '"''ulrements olspedfac types of food..per6uon. Student! compld plans thollnclud~ he us entia! <quiptlent required lor the various types ol food ""'tees. Stonge.and""'ilatlon r.. quiremcnls 1rt st,...d fo lit nto ncb opecif<e pl.on Job Orlenlatlon credit Job Orieolotlon lnletmut dcnls ab011t 6pedfte oe<:upollonal.in fonullon which rrcpuc.tlberr> for s<eki g employment. Pe< ool>ll det1 sb.. r., job interviews; l<llcrsol lzttloducuonand t«ommt.ndatjonlte conred. F.ormer gr.ad~tt's are invited to dist...s needs o! lhe tt denl before employment. R<:pr...nteUv., of labor, m&n11tdttnl, bu &ln~n u.d the profojiom are ln\ited to dbcuu pa\nla of lntereit towlc'd b«omlng an. employee. 51 OPERATNG ROOM ASSSTANt lntraductlon io the Opesatlna Room <r~!_ :.!',' This"'"'"" io ao ntroduction to the pmp010 oj the Operalln1 - Roam iusb:lant pro,ram, the aludent'a func:tkc. bospitul.! orgenltllion 1111ines nlauutorily. A brlel hl&lory ol"''!crf is pr.. ented. Str... ls stfed to de.. lopid& on undentandiog ol the munida &nd eontotlllt&c of mtdieal sursical.tormllll!!ogy, "'~JhtS and me,.surea., lnuoduction to metrlc ~em.md pharmt.w~ogy. and moral and legal tesponaibilities Operatlns ltoom i\ollotanl Al>otomy oredlto This courac it de1lr;ned to provide atudenb with. a concls.e: n troductl<ln to human body strudute :and func.tiott, ':J'he normal,stq.te' of the body{:~~ prtsented to etl'!ble!he student to more ~((ec#' lively ay,st' n the Juralc:lll proced\l.re. The studtmt should acquire kno.w)edse of the locatloon of bp~y.j:!arti, thei' structure aod mail). (unction. Pmited reference l:s made to abpormil.luies ant;l what happens when body part del nat faaclion tox~thcr.d.ue to d~ase,. ibjwy or mtlfotjo.tlon OperaUn1 1\oOm Aoolmnt Cornruunklllloru credit This courae is dcsiaeled to.ssbt the siude:nt in ck:vdopia,s and. understanding hllsk: communigltion. BmphMis is placed on ver b J. non vorbaland U01ening slullato 005isttb< student!n using these sku\s tn tht Ofleratlng room c:nvironmej!t.. ~ Opetodna Room Theory ODd t.abor tory 8 cre<!lll Ja thu ~uru, ledut~ and dtuj1dnjtt81ions are suppll:.(llatttd by dinial.. perl<ncciq the opentung r-... Empbisis is plnced on the.evolurion o( \n'81c8\ asepsis. th!! prot:us o{ prevention and codjol of infection, core and sl,rety ofthe.rrurgicitl.,.tic:nt, prin dpi.. ol operotlox (ochuiqucs, spedf"' ""rgfr:al.proc<duj~s. and nlatcd ho$phal lnd nurajns ilt:livltt~. Devtl~fll.ent o( the rate of the GCtu.b tedm\clao am.l th.e assbung ~culo: t'?l is stressor! Punctloaal MlcroblolocY.. credit This coll!se \s dellzned to inttod\lee 5tuden1s to ti.e 11udy or mor pi.olc&y ;wd ctassillcatao.n of mi:c'f'o-otpnisms aad their e!ted on hwnan body tlssuoe. t lnr:ludu st dy ollhelnfedi<>u& process.tiui tlte trtnsm1.ssjol:l oj Jnle<:tiolndi~ lmm uno~qg)', noscori'li.tl inftct\on ;ad common djs.caa::s are studied. Methods of.control by m'e111j oc packaging. a,jerj.~1d t!on a~d pr~ s:iing are st r~sed. 51 SQ.Opcratlnc Room Tltcory z ~r<dits T~i cou~sc b designed tu give stude nj~ a. workl"'g ~nowletls~ of surgical proc~dutef, anatomy of lhe. areas jnvolved, positioning, "urg;cq) prepfl:r'!uon, dr plng. inl.trulhents lllld acce~ory or ~pecial equipment neede\f for a sp~::cillt surgitii l.pr~dure. A unit qn CJir~lopulmof11')' rcouoclulioo (CPR) is included.. 51i Z1 Operotl"'l RoOm Au lotont Anotomr ll!credit 'l'bis course U dlre.c:uy related lo the ~rglc al procm..te:s seminar. t s de5iane<lso thot the w<icrri wkl rtview, exp.ond d o!soeiale >j><dr,. body llructurcs with rcla\ed surgical pt'dc' 'dun a. SJ..Z <>i~ort~tu..ltoom ubontta<y U 1 a:edlls Owto.a thb cour~e, cuntcal t J.pcrience 1$ provided. in bo~ it al ope:z:atfna rooms. SCutknu practice ~ ~ect opcratlns._roo~ kill$ undl:r ' lrlct ouporvblon employi~ odaptalif>\.<dnf<1sttnl With indivldual"ho'l'll l procedures. Student. learn t<)junction in ambulatory aur&ct'y 1 recovery room and central supply, Ward confen:ncd.,.. conducted dally to clarify learhin1 c periencetln each clinical arat..f... i.

80 15 Course Descriptions Course Descriptions MEDCAL LABORATORY TECHNCAN lnlrod~llon lo Medlrul Laborulor y CareeJS crcdu.s n1is t'ojfk providt: an introduction to the profcs.skx\ of mc.:dic.1l ~e<"hnotogy omi the tasks ~( the ma::dical lrtbm;:~tory technician. t. ncfudts the. study of rn ed ea,lt ~rmlnofogy, patient Cart ns tt. relates to the collecdon of li1borato- y spe('imens and basic hematoltjsy pracedures..;:1 101 Clinical Microscopy c:re:ditt T~s course cov.ers the ph.rsital, c:bemical :md mlcrom:opit: ejcilmmati?jt of un~1, some s~cloal procecturu p1dormcd On urine, und un 1ntroductton to ga~tric n:jlysi~. stool :~na:lysls, semc11 aq;;~~/y.sis <1nd pr-t'gq;mcy te&tlns. 5l-10 Hematology 5 credits This oourhe Covl:!u tlje s.tud> of blood, hernatopoicsis, principles And proct:du.rtu.for routme hematology tests in the dinlcal lubor<~tory, principles.1nd proceduresior &etected spet:llll h~mato!usy tn ts!n the ~inic~l l :tb or;.tory, ccx~.gu Jnt ion and b~. ~::::: Prerequ,5ite:. 51 JOO lntro to J\otediec~l Lel>oratot)' 51~107 lnstr:um~ntation crcdlls Thi.s course involves study of the lund.:tmc!nl.1l.t of c!infc:tl laboratory instrumentation 'which includes the principlt-$ or eli!c triclty, t~ principles oc operation, routine cfc<~l\ing m\d_ maintenance of dinicullabon1tory 'instruments Cllaica l lmmuno logy 5 credit Thi!!l course pro\'~.5 theoretical backgrlltlnd and pr.:tctical.1pplication of imnmnolo&lc<ll p'rfnclplcs n serology, lm munochemlstry antl bnmun(lhcrrnllology,.emphaihi.is on the serodiagnostic method.! used for identification o{ ce:rt.ain dise:.se state$ and co~patibi lity teslins with rels1ed testing progra ms. Prerequisite: Hematology..., Clinlcol Chemistry 5 cre!lils Tf:is. c:o~rsc c:ovcrt f.he study of gravintettic, tittemctric, cot." onme~r1 e:j. s~ec.~roph_o~omc!rl"e, ~1cetrophore_lic, polenjiottielrii:,.und a ut omall~ ~ loo.d ~h tmjsir)' ptocedur.es whlch 1r'lclude glucose, BUN, proteins, cn~bohydrates, livi!r function le:sts, prcparouion or stand_aro cu.rv.e~, quality control and oiher body fluids speciaj 1~ Prer~s1tes: 806-~1 Gener.11 Cftemi!otry or Generol ond l!iq!ogical CbeMimy l and Gcnoml and.bio!<>sl..,l Cl l!!i>iry ,111 Cll.niul MicrobloJoiy... S c redlu This <:ount invdl.ves in-d_tpth. 5tudy and.i!.ppucallon of labor;:~tnl)' m~thods used in tin: isoliltion Qnd ide:nti icati011 of pathologic mlcro organl~s e~p Cclslly Cor bilc:teri.o, parasites and uns,us, amt.s ::nsh~vity ff1st!ns: ~( anli-mit::robia!.ttenls. Thfs roune also _provides an o, ervtew of the cllnkat ba~s ofinfed.ion a'nd the specimen c.dec-lion procedure.s lor vi1l nnd ri~etl.sial dl~scs. l'rerr qulslirs: M6 7 Cienerol Mictobiology ond St 10t Clinical Ml~toscapy Z Seminar crod!u Thi.\ J)rogr~m js divided into two po1rl.s: The Pre P101ctlcum Seminar ond the Poot~Practicum Scmiont.. Th'e.Prc p'rac(jcutn Seminar l.s held prior to the praclicun Qssignment. Jt U ~es!snrd to prepare medical laboralory lectu\lcian!ludrnta for the.pme: litum and Jntlud~_ practh:al examinatiotueview tectur~ and : disc:usions. Prerequisite: Completion of all pl'qgram coutscs ex. ce:pl ~1 11 ftae;clc.um,:~nt{ Post Pra:ciicum.Seinln.ar. 'The P:ost Procticum Sem.ln&r- is -Composed oj.examinations giv~ at ho'ipital laboratories following each rot th;m rmd a~ MATC al thc.r.:ond"u. ~io n or lh~ practicum. The txamlnatio~s~r~ destbn.ed 10 p.rep:tfe. Sh1deols for national ~ertificntion exemiqauons. n addition, t1l the moe!uslcn of UJ:e: pt.a.~heum, there. ure -cvaluolfons and a: l!.hon seml~a~ -o"! tl.$~~ttnf c~p ~C?}'men i. ~rerequisiies: ~n pros i-~m coor~es _tncli.khng Pre-ProcUcum S~tninar_and ~1 i, l..p~c1jcunl : Pra.ctlcurn. lclcredlts Stu~ent s: are osslgne:d an 11-wo:k e:xtemshlp {f(:lurth icntcs~"r) at on offili)jtlug hospllollaboralory, So01c of he fill ling kl,boralotl~ or~ oy.fside Mndlson. Therefore. students can an llclpalc b<[c& placed {or tho praeilcum in lloruboo, Fori Atkinson Green Day, Mar.shfield or Stoughlon, as well as n Madison. ' Prerequisites: All program courses '"~cepl Po.st-Prc.cllcum Seminar. 51 OCCUPATONAL THERAPY TECHNCAN Sl-J-191 Occupallonol The-ropy Qrleatotion credits ncluding orlenu.tion.sessklns tjrior tn first semester clasm!s' the.s.tudl.!l\t is inarodured lo OCCU)lOlionnl thtr.apy and the oc~up:~ l!onaj thcnjp)' nssi~wnt c:m~er. Medical lern1inology.and abbr~viahom; ilrc: nisq covl.!red. SJ. 10S J.'ic-Jd.Ob~nDHun 1 credit A ~ne wf\!k p hi~cehlcnt j0hrs] 1nd i1fl extendc.-d, fi~ld ossigncnt!nt!-5 0hrsl pr~vnlc: opportu n l ~y (of ~!''1Uion and panicipation m t~ wmk SJiuat on and m:.1vities v.'hidl on occupational lhcr'ap~ assbtnnl 1nily encounter. Objeclives emphar.ile Cimher orienuuton 10 OC"t'llpation.:~llh trapy scn ic~-!1 n lrsdl!lomd mcma! health ond phy:si~al P!habilitution :h:ttings w.:; well as pr.1ctlce n newer comtnuuity b u=d interve-ntion programs. A ptt! practicum wt:t:kly.s=mina:r is held to coordiuatc third sen'lesler fieldwork and provid ~ trnn!lil{onol ptl.>plta(iun ror fourth ~mesle:r ektendcd ficldwof.k. fin~rcquisuesi Flr.st and sn:ond semester OCntp.DfJcmal therapy COtu-.ses. 51-J JO Scll/Gm up DynomJcs crediu This course $ din:ctcd lowsrd inctc~:sin~: sclr DWll.rem!55 :~.nd ac. ccptancc n<:cc~ary for e(/ec:tlvc dh:nt and cu;worla:r r~lction shipll, mproving inlerpttrsonal in:si&ht,and sklll$- both didactic M<i &roup. introdudns a.m.l applying group dynarnjcs a1id leade:r sl1ip principles,. and upl.or.ins usc of sell as Uu:rttpc:uUc tool, 51~~ tl5 OT: De\'efnpmentiJ P.ribcipleot; &:rcd lls; Th1s COUnt. COVer$ the.norm ttl ~"qu~dcl: ~ hr.:m~n ae ve:jopni~j.and prlncl~.le.s tjn~erjyu g OT pr.u..:_lr_ce:, Wll~. ~PF.d~! C_mph~si s on promouns aens~rl m~tor an'tl ~ogmhvc!!=~mponcnl s offltndt<ln, Course Cotllenl is applied to 01 inh::rvcntlon prrigram:s that pro mo~c he;1llhy dc..,tloprnen( ot r-:medlai( developmental problt:tni wh1d' moy occur due to phy&ica.l. emciliooul or euviroo.t»cnla) faelora.. 5J i~o Ouupa tion~fthcnipy l)rocd). ~ c-r~di ts This ~u r.s~ involve~ compa:tn~ O'CCupat_ionaJ _lherapy and.ntj.':.ng home re~u den t.a.clivlty.sfl r\'lc~~. "('.xploring t" e occ:upalional :ne~py 11!1 S'Sii1n~ ro!e n'i ea.;t1 ~ta~e of tl1e.qt pt~c es ~, i:mphasi1.. 1ng:, nill l ~ree mng,.:vl\luatlo~ an_d can: planning; dc\ elopi~g bas1c perfonm nt_c _sjulls required 1n pmclice. 11nd applying knowk:lige nnd :skills in D resident Rttiv_i.ties Ht kl pb:cemedl. 51~ 1 ~omi-n~lty ~ra C1ice '..- uedlts Th~.! cou~e. foc_u~ on way_s cto promote ~ dic:nt ~ fu il c tioriing in the.~omm:~n.~lr_ with sp~fi c 6n:~.h~t:s. _en ~o r~ sett ings. Studen'ts r~v ew prtoctplcs oc wellnc:ss, prevention <~net n orruall zatioi1~ Teaching s~ ilb are: de:velnped, 1ncludl ri~ client' ne:td.s as.sessdjert; f_dources rcscdrch- ~~~d program de:tjclopment and iinpioolentab_on.. Appro~ebcs kl working with per:;ons who re deo. eloproen, tauy dlu blcih.re Slre.ssed, i~chadinx behavjor nuuiacement. str.1tcgits. Pre~uisile: :SJ ljs.ot: De.velop~nt~ frindplcrs Phy&!cai Rcbabllllution 'Tocllcc 5 cretlhs :rbig. co~rseemphasizes common llc:altb condlllons nnd"flinct.kjh~ mg J:>.roblern.\. c~i.e:nt~.moay cxpl!rienct jn ':"'edical, sufg i~~r and phys1eal rch1b1h~ation s11uation$, lndtxhng rt-li.tej. occupiltio-nal. th~rapy',.5c'rvices; CoUrSe:Wotk str~sses skill llcvelopmrnt in chcnl lnlcndlon and tbeq:~py inletvcntiun through mk:-.to.-lhcrapy s!n_ti.ll~~ru, Mnd exposure fo various prcven ~ion.s(rllf.egie:utnd reflab.ihhltlve p;oc~du~e6 such! work s~rbplincuti<m.. lld;iptivc:. t~_chraqu~. -;>hnltng and ran&e oc motion exercises ns we~l.ai; fll hon~ld for etjc;h.lnstru.t.~1on lh.curdiopulmdndr_y rcsus"c:ihltlon. Js "!so ncluded. rr~requ sjte:s: and ~06 :08 Anatdni~ aild Pl1ysiology or lo't nd ros ond SHZO OT rr=si. 51:'-US MmloHieollh l'ta<li<e,,. ~ credllo Th.t.t co1u.se emphlf!z:e..t o:jmmon mental heald1 condilions.uoo fuotlionlng probl~ms Q.ic.nt' moy-expericnce u. weu 1" related ~ ~:U P.~t io~al t~c-ta.py.~erv~~es. Co~ rse~or k. :t~ru~; skllld(l\ltl~p m~nt.lr C)!c~t ~~lcrcctjon and lher~py intetv.entl_oo through.. 11ucro t.h c~npy ~nl)ulaltons arid cx'po:iil.ue lo vdrious rebabuitativc! p~cdures such ;.s irdervl~:wing, as.ro."ising dienls' bc,tavcor.and performance skuls,..pl.1nning lrcolment, and developing various ~octivitr lnlcrveotiom. l'rcrc:qull;ll"'!: or P')'chology, SC9'Z7 or Abnormal P ydmlogy, 5 t 111Y Self(Groop Oymunl<:s, and T Proccn llooub Cor< Sylt<ill credll1 This cowsc exp~ore:~ vatiout dp CtJ-, ssues tjnd trends in health coare delivery and bow these itnpod on th.c p_r~cllce of o~pt liontl therapy. The student explores octupatio:ii.l therapy assis~ lanl rok!s in a v;aricly of work sefcin1s. inclucgnj JnwnUgation of muny hc.:~ hh and human ~ryice community based a~ncie-s 1o identify pou:nt\al ernployt!n Ali well as to k::trn :\bdt.it community rcsnuree:s one mighl. U$C n future jobs, Concurr«!nt enroltnuml in P\eld Observ11tKm i5 recnmmerlded. S 15 Actl Media J credllo This course introd~cs the theory of reaeetlon, the mportance or pwy 11)d lcl&tare octlvitie's to he-&ltb, ic~ion ol aetivld.es ;:p~ propriate to client dc:veloprnent l l~vels, in leresis, abilities and lifel!ty)e, und orientqtion to community r~crca ti on al 'CSOU(ccs. Skills in pctfo:.ming, e5 well lis lea cling, group or i"dividu_a) recre:ouon l chvitie! are developed. Prerequis)tu: Completion of first and second semestl!r- OT count'~ is recotmntndcd Minor Media 1 credll This oourse procti<lcs studenls wllh uperience and H ill develop- ment in a vilriety of craft. media. Students a~ introduced to leaching method &ht!ttl~tive li ond dej1artme:nt m alntenan~ dut!es. Sl 19 Minor Media credll Thi:i cours( provi~es student! with experience ~nd skill develop. men\ in w. variety or cra t media. Teaching met.boda. activity analyjis and activity _acbptahon are rmph.aabed. Prerequisite:: Completion ol Sl-1li. M_inor Medialis rrcemmrndet! Media and Skills cred!u ThiJ.cours-e involves lhe refinernenl of s~ ;hs jn unaly.z.ia& on: Uvilies, selecting a eli vi ties suitable 10 the needs an.d lntcrc:;ls of clients, Je.llding or teaching act,vhies and a.daphng the!m to dient limitations, end ordering and.malntllrini~g-aupplie& and eqofp ntcnt. Activities.such as major craits- c:.:r,arnics. wqodworking ~d weavjng, muslc, drama.ti.c& and-ll~ prsc:ticill Dtts ate indudt!d. Pruequ iti~cs: Compktioo of fir&t ~nd second s.ern.:!ttcr-qt cour~ 51 l60 Menial Healill Fieldwork crcdiu 51.5 Physical RehablUtatlon Flcldwor.k cr"edits 51 17~ OT l'leldwork-s~edally a Ctedi~ These courses in't'lude fullo.time: tlejdwork placement$ i_u phy»cal. re-babilitatjon, mcnt:al btejth and DJJ illdd.itjojlal specialty practice nrtt in approved training centers throupout Wisconsin and. adjoining states. Fieldwork ec:lucation e.mp hasb.~s intqra1ion of!)cademics and practical expe:r~n.~ Coward schiev.ins.:ntry-leve! 0'1' a:5sistm1l. compete:ncies.and woe~ habits.. Prere(a~tsltc:s: Sa!i.!lfach>ry completion of first,. sec:ond and third semo:$ler co<rses. demonalration of pre: requisite wor~ habi~ <nd pe~;eonal pc~ forrua nc e 5~ilb..51 l70 Seminar on Pracllce ond M JUcmenl 1 c ret!ll This colloquium providu review anc1 feedb.ck on ac detnic and. fiejdwntk-experfences loward bddgirlg tbe gal? between f111ining and on jqb realilie.s and!:..ceptlons t<l.the: rule. Ubique JieldwQrk expc_riences are shored with cl~smat es, and fundumentt~ts of job hunting are covered. An ~ntroductlon to department manage:ment ;~.nd employee or volunt~r supervision i.s emp'haait.ed, in'c.: many gcad\latts ~,o. iu b~ ad.acli'(fues d~rtm~htt in nuralng hornes-.nd oom.rnunity sdtings. PtHequisite: Completion Or c::on~ cunent et:jrojjment in fourth il'~&t~ fieldwork cour~ Special Problenu credlls Thls elr.tlive co~:~ne allo\vs tht; s1uden1 an oppol1,unlty to further explore. a specl~lh:ed jnterest regarding occupational therapy prac li:ce. An lndlvldual\e:d!earnilij contracl i.s developed with an oc cupalionallhe... w. ra... lty-ndvisor. 515 RESPRATORY THERAPY Re plralory Therapy Fundomenlolo 5 credlli 11-lis cour:e discusses the: buic principles and leptinlqttea: of rol.ltinc respiratory thetapy procedurcs: Thc laboratory portion provides the opportunity to usc the equipment -and ipply tbeorles o{ operahon. An in(rodt~ctory clini'*j rolation provde an obscr~ vatianaj experience to in hospjtal pract.i~ of respiratory c.re: lnlr.,dutllon 10 Reoplrolory Therapy z crodlt This ooutae is designed to prov1dc an introductldn lo the anatomy nd physiology of the respiratory tthd car<llovascular-syslenu and jn.structlon in ocid ~e balance.. Pfosntnuned in.struclion in medical termhtol~y s oor.rered Jndt~ndmdy by the studeut. 5 t 5-0 P~tU~nl Car~:. ~;redlts Tbls courae ~ des\gncd to teuclt the student basic sktlla ond infer mahon tcl ted to the care of all )XllicnU with 5pl..~ill emph11sle on reapiratory palitnt care. B.ncourage1uen1 is gi.\'en for lt1e dev~lopment of a good pro[e~ionlll1 atlitudt, mproved communication techniques end an imighl nto 1ntcrpcnrul81 rcladonship:s with other membi:ts o he health Cllrt lf:am Pulmonary Phyololosy a creclili This oouue-ls de.sign.:d to give.studc~ts the depth in understan djng of phyalology of respiratjon ncce:s,lity formeaoinglul.clinlcal experiences. The lecture portion includes au baslc ereu o{ respirctory physiology, while the laboratory portion. o the course is primarily conc-r:r.ned.ith rt'f)lralory functioo testing te(:hniqves. 515~10 Re plro~~tory TherDpy PloOOd.urcs. l. 5 credits Th~ is the / (rst. of a two!iemestcr t:ourse designed O fncpnr~.student~ ~n mech Lnkal ventilation, infection Control, t irway manat~erncnt aod cardiopulmon"ry htmtilorirtg Re5piratory Therapy Procedures ll S credjis 'Otls is a continu:a:tian of 5!5-10 Respiratory 'lb!:rapy Proccdur6 and is t:~ ~en c:on~:urrently with 515- Respir<ltory Therapy CJiiJlci:!l Practice Jt. 'l'hls couu t; is designed lo prepare the student jn th~ee. prlmary areas of respir tory cllr!!- pedislrlc.s,, pulmonary fum:tj<ll.\ tesllng and pulmonory r habilitation home rtspirofory c«rc. Emphtils is placed on Jeoirnias ncw to man;pulatc:.&nd manage o variety of intensive care as wen_a.s dl~dstic equipmenl This CQUrse will involve: a nriety of com pu.ter applkatior'ls Ro plrata<y Th<!rapy Clinkal PrD<ce T 5 c:redlto Thill course tn~olv~s supto:rvised.clinic~l experience ln ~e lec..t"ed hospit~l! two da'ys per week.. The student is ptq\'.lded an 0:\)por- t_t;jtjty to dev~lop.&kills in MutlnP therapy and lhc care of pil HcntS. A weekly, three-hou.r cllnlea.l.dist"uss.ion dass i5 also included. Sl 5 R.. pinotorr'l'hirapy Cllni<:a.l P!'u<llco 5 credits A contin uatio~of."~ls--15 Re~icatory Therap~ Clinical Praclic~ J, this cou_rlle ~ mphas?-cs intensivt! mp~ r.tmy care. A w e e~fy,. three hour clinical- dis:cusslon. Class s also included. st5 1Z7 Respinolory therapy Clink! 'Tac!l<e ll. crailts 'l"hili course lnvolve.s supetvl:sed 'cllni~ experience n selected hmpitals fire days pe.r.wee}( fck tight "'eeks. The shadent is provided aa opportunity~ futtber dt elop routine, ll5 well as a""" vnqctd, respiratory therapy.s~itls Pathophysiology cred;ll This c:obrre ia taugh' by pulmotiary!pecla]ists w;a.d is desirned to provid.: the student with an undeut8ndlng ol the: diagn~is; patbophys\olcgy 1 cli!licaj manhestatio!\:1, ~ r~atmcnt.and p rdg~a s.is of a v llety of pull!'l~ ry distm:jers or disea.sea J PluonoocoiOY crodlls This coorn s desi&ncd to &ive respiratory th-a..rapy students the knowled&e.needed to sufely adminieter te.$pijatdt)' th~rapy drug$. lt is also deal ned to g ve the: student lt."nowle~gc _of impot1nnl non-resplratory drqgs whlch,are commonly given!o rcjf)i ra~or)' theupy p; titnls. 5 OPTOMETRC TECHNCAN 5! pl0111ol>lcs cr<dlu This courst: covers the htst~ of optom.e1ry, relationships bet ween optometry'; ~pthlll mology "'"d cpticianty. The cour&e aieo C(lvet'$ Jtchnfcal cmeet, &cope r>l $trvice.s ~the optometri9l,.cp tomclrie termlnology, intrc du~ljon to optometric CrviCt;$ 1 in troducflon to technic:lan ~rvice.s, ethics and CORduct.

81 Course Desl:riptioN Course Des<:riptions 157. r... \, Slli-105 G~oerol Oplla tr<'dlu 11tb course CC\t:.n the propertlc.s d. Hghl, fu:n:ttonalar.d poycholo~lcal..,..,b ol vl>lon. basic visual oplics, visual ano,tuilles, metric system, corrrcltve lenses, lhe oph1h1lrnic prescription, ;ind \l'nroductiau _lo frame $lyling and visual field screening Ocular,\ncto_n r and Physiology.. credits This course famlharizcs the student with the rorm. anrl function of Jhe hum'11n C~ e, U inc'ucks di6cusslon o( pafl'lo1og!c;al p.:mdl!ions Pl\d the use of pharm11.co1oi~al agents in be. eye. Slfi.ZO Ophthalrak credits This c.qu' se covers. use of he lensometer to i~ct and n\casur<t lens powt'rs, different types o( lensea, bue cutve:s. aod prism, rederat requii'cjj\eols, tints, lizinl ltnas. ilod Ute o( the lin> i'~ 5-ZS Oplomotrlcs trrdlls This conne covers fr.trne dennuions. parts mel typt"s ol h emcs. m9wremants.of (r;1.mes aod let1$cs, ajjgnrnent ol frames, ~ tiag and removint len~. lntrod'lct ion to dij)e'u~n& of C)'C"A'etlt, a.nd visum skill ltstinq. 511H6 Qptumct.tics ill crodlls TJ1i:s CO\lne involves study a( and prec:uc:al expeticnce in lhe in :!olrumcntation used tn ltn optometric o Hcc, tonometer, kert~lon.lct~r. b!ood prts5uu!:, vl$ual Clr:k!:s and ternu:tor OptometriulV c:rcrihii This coune uffer:s the student :m inijcpth 5ludy of the rdroctor, opblhabn~c. slit lamp~ prosressive addition k!nsesanel coo bdfensc~.; 5UHS0 C<Jotac< UJUd <roclit< ThiJ c<tuue is dwaned to Sive the.s.wdtnt in cieplh e)iposu!e to the technical.s"pftds rj dlnical co.t\u.cl k:ns prntiee. Lecture and tabon.tocy ~phui1.e tens v-erifjc&uoo and modific tion unt pl. titnt evolu.1tion md eductlion. Sl6 l5. Vision Ttalnlng. c:redi~' 'fhis cou~r: provides tlie.sfudenl wit~ e;xpe_tienc:c ~nd know.lcd~e in three a~ ae of.vi!t.inr,. Cllrc in. w~.ie h Lrnining t.<!chnlques a~ utllb.ed: p~tho.ptlcs, vl~\iol p~r<::~p tu al skill:s and.lqw vision. l'q. tlcnt il\slntction ind llssislance an: emphusl7,ed in pr.actlcal ~sion~. 5 f6-j0 Dptumclrk PrDctke M-!in~CUC c:r«<its 'J'h!s course P.fDVk!cs a stud) of front office tn.,nagetnt'nlleduti qua fncfudlng telephone tnd appolntmeot book trtall.oigcnlc.nt. ll lnc. rc<:ntl sy-stems, business ~ltcr writing, and computer mon.itsc rn~ut "f.1l('uj>, Thr cowsc also covets writinsa-job ap~ictdon letter a.nd roume '"'d lnlctvi.ewlnj techniques. 5t6-15 Pr<:tlink:al. crelu 11>1 c.'llurisc prepar.,. students lor ciij!lco >flillalion by ollowlng lhem lo pcrromi complete. vision scteeiung on fld.lip ns from he colleit:. Ctass. distu$51ons are held :~nalytlng lhe rcsujts of the screenings a$ well a.s the st~:~,dcnt's [H~rf9h\1Dn~. : ' 5 1SD Ciilllcol ~~perlerif"l.,... cri>dltf Stud~nt~ pail,icip~te haurs per ~~ek. ror elghl w'*ks o.( ~'i&n ~ tlin ic::~ cxp.eri.encc n' the off~ -pr n Oplometri.sf. They 1~e ex~ P.ecled to achieve spe.clflc OduQt\pr~nl objectives dclctminod for bis expcr l~nre. 518 FOOD PREPARATON ASSSTANT. S Ul lo Fo<>d Pr~nt.llcn Theory credlls TW course tut!1a the buk nttthods cl food prep<>rotidu, <1111 <lords, principles and techniques U5td n loods lot recip<$ u.cd n q!ftlnli!y Cood ptod'«ctlon. 5<11111 quanllly lab produc<ion ol <ggs a.nd q;g p,roducb, ml:.ilfs, Cisb, poultry, c.hc:e:je products, 'Jnl!ll qu.antity bakins and dessert pn:.por11tion s pmeticcd h>trod~ctlon to Pood.S'orvlce 1 credit Thh tourae i5 "" otlcnh tlon lor studetll! Prep bring for c11reer&. hl road se:ryicc:. Spe.cirlc ur~1b lobe: covect:d ate: 'Safety and sanlta tlorl, settlnt;. up and serving a Cilfelerio. line:, wcrk simplification, plannins a.fctcria menus, convcrtlng rcc)_pa, food cos11, cu)lnary. langu sc und the un of mla-ownvo ove.l\!. 51~ 1 lntruduclur)' t-'onc:l8 1 nedlt Tbit ooltrv!nvolvcs n 1tudy of...: phylicaj properlih, the lc:r minolgsy nnd ll:c flrlnc:pli!'\ lnvolved n lhc prepnnulon of~. mil~. ment, pg\d1ry, fish, fn )(1, vegttob!cs.. soops. uu~s. C\.'teal product,, b1utcrs 1liM doug,s. snl~d dreulngj, checie, &elttin nd b~werflgcj, 5l8 Fuod Prcpnr~;~.Uon Lub 1 9 cn~dlls Tlli~ cou'l'sc ntroduces quo.ntlty fnl)d.prepll'l'llhon fot C:\{ctcrl~o~$, 6hott order fnc l lltlc ~, b.1kc. 'hops 1111d Cl<:r.lng. dcpurtnumts. Students urc AS$lgn~.:U ou u rotutlon ~~ ~tcm to all bi111tioas with\n the prooudiul\ un:a. Aftc:r ::lludcn\a.:umpklc rood prcpllrntion, hey contin\m! 'o\o\tb (cod scr\!icc:. rar their a.:tsigncd MCOJ.5, $tudc:fll..\ start wit b h.uie food prcponotlicn and,.as knowltdge is acquited. they r~ced 10 more advn.nce.d rcclpcs. lecbn\qutl and 115.5itnments. SB Sl7 Food Prepo:otlon Lab 9 credit. Foods from the prodl.'ctjon ~J!C-includia~ mcdts, 10up.s, saladi, s.~ndwicbc:s. bakery produdi and bevcragcs-ue scrltd. This coiu5c empb.ls.izes u r.mgc.mcnt o( food. portion control, (ltsposi lioq of lc[tover rood frorn iervlt.c line, -propt't storase. nr..tintemtnre ol tquipmenl cukf S«njlntion. 'l'ltf! college food ser Viro opetaticjn provides rnlist\c h;mds~n f!xperif!'mce ror,s\udcilli,.short order pcepnration ;1nd servlee, ca(elerig pr~par~llou n~~o$1 ~.~r vice,.and food c;~t e r it1g Ol.re pact or dally Cood s.crvicei OH<ltCd Q the fncul!y and shtda11ls ol (h~ cou(gc. 5 1&-:"18 Food'.Senlcv Sun\hllion 1 credit The: objective of this coutn is an undonnondlng Qf the b.uit Coctt of food &.u.ilation and how to prtwc:jit food-borne i1ln~. Special areas covered nclude: San Hatton and hea!lh..5i!rving s.uitlry load. food purdl<lsills and slor~ge, Knitary racilitics a!..."\d cq,uipmem, pest control. attd the rquliuiaos.:lnd standards JOYCrnlng f-ood es l ilb~l!nb. ' 518 & Bulc Bakery t\ssbtaol credit Sludenl enrolled n lhi.j progrom mist wllh l;.tkcry produ<~ioo i\nd service to the caretttl.l ~ Duties include DC~Urinx lngfcdh:nb, plllutlng rolls, l>t'tlcb. Co11.CS "nd many ~her de~1et1 1. Rtffl'ltVW of products Cront oven 10 bc1\cb, nm rl(l\sh~ng of hosliu~~ llt\rl pjzj~cment of trt~y.s n D unl(qrm munner fo~ atlraclive.~ervlce Me olso cmered Spcc)al tlllkety 1 dny/ credlis:-5.dnyoito credllo ln this course-, &tudents obl.lin pr<lc:tleat txperi~~e in~~~ iht: (ul\: dzlmentill prioelpk:s of baking in e controlled labonstory for &mall shops, ro:<l>ur.. lsond bolcll. All typn o(y...,t doughs, br<><ls, ples, t"d.~, cookitt, pudd.ing.s, Dooish pastries, puff p.1-\tt and doug bouts arc prepartd, incivdlng lcing,s.lnd Crastinp and cili d~ra.ting for a11 o:allions j7o Job Relations cnodlr 'J1)ls course. ~overs pc1'10lmll development, t uitudcs and job sccl<ing rcqoir...,lt. SludeniJ'>h>dy iol>> ond con<:pu of'per SOo.} skills needed to fulfill job pe.rformaaces.. Tbey bec:o~ ~are of what employ~s cxpec:l of employee,. 50 HUMAN SERVCE ASSOCATE lnttod.ction to t!u.raon Sttvite!' c.tedltl This course prennts an iutrodue\\ot to.hunuln s.::~lccs.work..by enminlna t~ sa>pe, l""s lind principles cl tl>e huonon s..'t'yice pro!<sslcn. 51\Jd:nls will be iolroduce.clto tbe ~ rol01, dulio. and job dncriptio.ns cl human.~e rvke: wo:"'.ers 1nd w~1.-ss their ow11 motl\'etioosi ~ttitqdos ortd interat.s. 5.0-tOG Ori,..toUon lo ttuma!l 5<>~>. Populallonr t ' 'croc1ho This course is desi.gntcll.o intn:bl\lcc: l~ ;\~dent to Cl~ array o! social pro&!cms fhat caneribu!c ~o tbc; ~Yiift~~cdon o ( fnd iv.d1.lals 1 stoup:~,.nmuics o.nct conurrl)nl\\e.s. Th,. colltsc!~~ciclcally.all drcs.1cs thos\! prnt>jem, conduious'. e\t~nts 11.nd tjccds thdt brinj some peoplt!: to hum.a~ St:r,.ke or~plzlihun~ Group Work Skllb S cr..utl This CO!H< t. desigl><d to teach >1\ldmlJ tbe okll~ 1bey... m need 10 perticip.\e ir'l 1 orp.ai!e and facwtatt troupt id ~etvkc won. 'rbe ccunt eumintt tho app~iale UseS oe vori!kls type> oc ~oups lnchuhn.&luk. muiu-discf_phruuy teams, toeio\iutlon, sdf belp, oupportond th~upcutl o &JOU'S ThtOUA demonlllra lion> &nd e perientlol '""'""'es,.otodenl> arelomlllorll<d wltb group pr~ce:~. ~hl&e-5 of aroup d~vel.apmtnt Je~dct_shl,P. styles. ~nd th'c.indi.viduo.l stad.tnt's &roup bchlvlor ll!lonlewlnj!}ad-ilolnl orocllr ihe purpost of this course lslo d'e:velop:skljjs h\ CClmmuJJktllng with cllonu. Spocialemph.,!a i ploced oo the princlplu and 1echnJq1111es es.semialto..conducdiij n efftc:ti"ye interview-~ T'ime is $d. aside duriag class for stoder.b to pcac:tk:c: lrxetview skuls end r=ivo lffilbadt "" 1bdr progress. s.0-10 Cott>mllllllr smk:e Apod., s cr~lto This c:oune s desigded to braada tbe bose of llllclatlmowledge reprdms the chtractfl'istk:s and fuocth~m or h'1l\en tt.rvlct orgal\bltions tnd tbe roles of bum.an H'tY.ice worke:n in the «garizationel context. Tbe course o.jio edd ts$es issues re& rdlog power and aut.flotily, rtso'lfcc auoeation 1 c:ontrot,1nd cccountability:t; Soda Cliaaec Skliro.. <rodlu Students ftrc ln1roduccd to potcnll l roles.of hunicm service wo~ kera as soda) cban&e agents.nd'to che prin.ciph:s ~nd. stratq ie& ol planned chonse. Students dev<:lop ol<llls by plonnlns and c:rmductin& a cha.n,e dfort. Community ecttvlalt ~~~ u..sed u n=;ourccs to ctucum current chau&c ejcorts n the areaa o! ad:, vor::acy, community c:duce.tion, lobbying a.n<l c:om.mudity oigjtni%dg. 5).15 lssueolli Alcoholoncl D"'' Abuoc.!:!cdll This course Lt deslgn d to provirk. the srudent with 1!>oSJc uoderst.. di~g oltt,. usc and abo.. ol alcohol ud olher dn.p. t c:mp}ias~ ltistodctl11d soclaj perspt:ctfv~ on dru' se. tr~ads of \lh, and.legtl nd JOC.ial res.poq,jcs to Ulic.h drug we. Add lionauy, thi~ CDW'&e Wi.Jt provide ao tc:tu_ll(e. dcscrlpt{on 9f t6e tf. loci ol p&ychoocti"" drug. l~ity ltietho<lo ol oubstlll\ce abuse, (n!almtmt, ond ntroduce th~ student (o loco:l.tr'e&btt-etlt 1ervlec.s.! 0 C~uas<llnl ~lcohollcoand Oil>er.... DruJ Abuaen. end Us The purpose of thlt OOQrsc b tc troia studehts in \lui<: listening and rcspcnding.tdlls, to lomi6arlzc olude~ls vl(!h thetw.elve.;?r~ l'lllldio<>s per(oim~ by AOOA cc\mdoa {.Crunlng, J»take, orieo\atiou, elstl!medl, treatment pi.&d)~&. ~. c..se W'Q&ement, a &:sis ioleneat.soll. diem tduetji;?n; n:rec-rul, rqx>rts end recoidkcepina. ood consultalio i>d ro pr~e a &lruelured loo!o\1>5 ~lionmertijn which students can praclioo, demonstrate, aod develop sltills b1 these core l'llnctio..:. This course is lnte.ni~d as a skill b ildin& e:xperien«ror persons new to the AODA ~ns.e.une fidd Or' tbo5c!: who art considering e.nte:r ing thelield Humon Servlc Asener hr><rl'!"'<el crecllt Shad nts become (amuiar wit~.a b~;'l ~ human.seryice a&e~cy'l, formal.,ructurc. l'~rpn$alr fun<;~ions,. clicllol population:,. :me:lho~h ol oper~cio~ ~nd rolts nd.rerponribllilleo ol BeQ<y.sCall by,par 'l!dpa!ina in the ogen.qy trolooej hours per week. Jhem J<>r!oet.~.t al th~ apetieac"e is (o, the stud.ent!o dc ~lop sjdjll u kuman t crvh;c pnc:ut.ronei by working directly witt\ clients Gnd by corrrlns out other fllpporlh-c ~y ftlll<o:l"- sz'o-10 -Hutnot~ Stnice ~<Y EoporlcAte D S t redlts StudeQtJ co~~ M traioen ld localajcncie:t or Z:O bouts ptt week, warlo.ir>j 1o bccadm ood reline lhelr mow~ and skills. Pre~isite: Huma Sezvlce Agmet BJP"f'<""' f, 51).151 AODA Spm.l Popvlotlloou/Atioluceao J. ct~lt This eour.., wu enminethe.o~l needs and coacema or ldolescents Wll~ chem)c.tl problems. Ct...!'O!'<rll will includ.e;. Adole centi dcvolopmenl ''normar' v~ts,.as_ cheml~;alabur.'j"' dol ~< ~ overview or olcoholand orh., Urus abuse AOD. n o:dolesce~t s., curten.t lrends and rete'!reh, relationship l~.. odoleicentsfuuoo,!amljy p111cn>5 ond lbelr relollonohlpo!o '. adolesc nto AODA. m overview ol lhejuvenwojuilice 'Y'"'" co rldentlalfty suldeunes, pr vr ntkm or cbemlcol prol>lom>, n tcrvc:ntlon, treatment and eftetarc. ol odolesctnlt 50 1S AODit Spc<lal fopulathi MWomm aodll This a)unt (O<Uid on the sp<.d>fized \"ue> which bolh.mjbs'wtce abu.sini women.find AODA lrutml!llt p!r~dnc~l face:. Tbe CO\tse topics i.nch&de the n:ture of the pf(i)h~m- n Wl.SCOO..Wt, $0CJil att11udcs acd financial rt> lille5 imp:tdid$ M womtn.. the effect o( m~:dij JT'C$UC 1 sb role differtn!lauoa, Ufe. tllgi.s o( womtrt h~allh phd sexuality concc, ns, r111pe, i.n.c. est -an~ dqtne&tlc abuse ~rid a "how to g;et hc:)p' 1 5«tion. cta.~sroom formdl wiu il'l elude 'l'e'dutcs.. JuJndl')tJS, uta ned readings, smnll groljp wof k~ # SC)(.{Qic inventory, expedtntlnt exe'rd sc.~~ dy~d.r~t plays,_leam presc.ntat:xuu, lajge'jroup rtpart outa t~nd fun wh1l~.lcarnu\j. 5~0.1'5 AODA Spo:ciOt Populotlon>/Oidcr Aclull l cccdlt TbiJ c:oune will locu" on pccvcntioo and in(c!:r'vot:.!ltion strot~esks for dealins.,;ll acljustmcnt prublems or aging hrooit society' wiu """"'older adult demtl&' t>ldcs ood Gles!yle.> in rciiotionship to oleo hoi and drup. Methoda o( ideniuyinfptoblems. Clnttnl tre.dds. research.ud res.ourcii!'s foil' fntej'\"cclticd and trnlmer.t wtu also be addressed AODA S~dol Popodatlons/l)thnlc. Minorities 1 credit This course {oculcs an. exploring ~nd understandinh cuuura\ di ftrerices. lt addtcisc cultur.al -.il~\oles and fl.omi.s wlth _t~pbas!s on Black Hispanh: ~nd NttlVe: An~etlcn groups. This irdormfltlon ls lhcn' r~ltlted to cuhuralty specific atcoho\. M"td drug abll!e n tervtntlo'n. :tlhd trntm nt trat<:glcs AODA Special PoPuhillon>/Qthor., Minorltiu.. ~ cr.f:dlt This course locuse1 em ~lcchol pet drua a~n11e and nteraj ~ pop1.1.ll.tlons. The?.: popu1a\ion.s are.~ys ;md!ubians. cri.ulin~l justice dients and "tkt'lllj ol mllft.uy M.c:t. The- courae c:- aznine-s eeck populiltion and k!entiou spe.cbl need$ and. tl!oroc;jeristi<> aod rhe relation>blp o{ soodol nomu. nw:onty slalus and lcohol ood drug u>tlobosc. Fr=. this infomwion. puticif1anrs ~elop 6p~dolized.Jir.<Si<S.'or AOt>A prevontlon, \nt~~tio~ an~ ~e~t~.ent.., 5Qo!S6 J\OQA Spetial ropl>lollonsl~hcr,.. Dl>obUltio~,..... crc<i l ThJs couue!ocust.oo tih:.'re!v,_tlojship DC alcoho:j and dru~ a~~.tsc ~nd oth!!r di!llbiiiuc&.~'fhc cou~sc ej.omlnes ~e Apec\al. nce.~s.of : developr!)ental\y disabled, me a~ taj!y- iij: hearinif'v.i~ion nnpotrcd and p'hy!jeal\y impaired. AHcr c~ m\rung.euch popu1atlon. c:ffec tiv~ ttral~gi~ for AOOA prevention tu~ U~;wntnl are d~~lope.d. SZO.57 Hwmao Serv.l<e.J:ouoaeii c.skllls. ~cedlta Thil COU1'M is cfdi&a.ed t.o provkte the W dta.t.wlth a.buic over view emp.\a..sijing ~c: oantcnl, process a.itd prac:tl_cc of~~nxlinj. CoQrse topics iothlde llw: phllosc!>hy lll\d tlw!oc.tical coruider lions or cooose&s,...,d tbe nfuc o( CORS<ln skills ~d. Cdlftl ques ill lho helptnb relolionohip.. 50-!88 Jtuman S'enolce \ll"'ky expeti... oc Coa:fefence credits The con{erc:m:c Courst: ~~a. s~ttau group seminar dalgned.1s #. CQ mpllnlon s\lpportive oourst to th~ DS,tnty experiencu ~ l1!i P.tlf pose ia: JO h~lp students rcld.t~ tflcory t~nj:l prindples or Pf~Cticc. ro their o~t:nty Held $tudy cxpcri~j,lte:. $1\ldC:ilt$ practlc. ~~~:: help h:i&.skilllli includins c:mptlkcttc li~tcn.jng. BS,C'fi~!ft.ent and faci\ijw.tina problem sojv\ng ~hh clients. Ol._.e! toptcs include ~p plying principles of con(idenlidljty, 0COUJit bj1ily.tnd.a~.u nos' of perscnalllt.d hum.u semc:~ values ln the ~,~~cy tellul& Mlat be t&ktn concurren(ly wlrh 5JCH9 Hum on Scryroe Al;~cy ~ p<t~l H"""'" ~ryicc Asm<Y B.xp<rlence Ccmlent>"" aedlu This cour>els 1 continu.otion ol Humon Suvlco -" ncy Ex pericnca Con crcoco. Studet~!Op.acllro applyillg more adv111crd kills induding adv10c<!<\ occu,.r,e. ~mpathy, ~1!-"iins and C'Jaluolins ~-~lor ckonge. D~>tvlllon lop\cs tnd de doollng wittl &lt~$.s C!lth~e job.a.rul vs1ng s.ociol syjtem! tfteory U> undtrs land'humsn litrvicc obcneics and clients. ~iust belnken concur rently With."5ZO~l 1 H.~ma..n. Senic:e Agency Experlm~:c ((. Prcre quloite: flu men Scrvke Ag ncy BKJicrlenoe Conference... ~ : ; :~;. ' ' ).,,. ~

82 158-Course DeS<:rlptlons 56 RADOGRAPHY.5:.!6 101 lntroduc.llo n ta Radiolotk Tedt.nolosl! 5 credll~ 1'hisocour.sr: i.s an ntroduction to the <:i!rt:er fheld of r:tdiolocic technology, redlotiqn protectioa. professionol ethl<s, medicoll-legol ~\lcs, prime exposllre factors. nnd kchnlcal factors ol flhn quoli ty, ~ operatioti or energiled x.ray unlts wir be demonslrj:tcd. Students pmorm ejcpcrhr.,nts to cmpbmiu ~ow AKVP, MA,, Tune a.nd. Sourc~ i~e distanc:-e affect radiographic film quality. ; Stud~nl5 >~rc also introdured to t be d inieal aspects of radiolog,ie technology. Tber observe and auilt radiologic techn alogi~ with various procedures. Prertquisite: Acceplence and entolift)ef't i.u program. szc;. lladiogropblc Proccdurt 5 "cdlto FundamentiJJs of radk>grophlc' posilioujn&.aod the Jcrminolosy us ed fo desaibc r<~diog,raph i c positioning ~re.studied. Stand.a.rd.projtcl)ons are: discu:sed, demdjjslraled, pradicrd on fellow students no expdsuru), p~rfor~ed on phantoms, and then QU polt\ents r with the clinic.al jnstructar pres~n1. Jmmtdl~le pto~d urf!o corree tions!!ld. film critiqu ~s :u~ done Ori o1,ch proj~ction. Body i reu ccwl!~ re: Chest, ilbdomen. urlnaty and gltlfro intt.slinaj trad. PteTeqtllsitc: SZG lollntrb to Racl!ogr phy, Anatomy, or concurrently with enroumtmt. ~Z6pll.Z Madlographlc Pr o.::cdurcs n ~credits Fulldam~ nlals.o( radiographic: positioning 11nd tlje' l hlllinofo~w us t!d ~o dl'~ribe! ra.dia~taphic posuionins or~ studied. S tand~rd pro jections are.diseussect d~mon.slrated, pra<:ticcd on C!!Uow 1tudents (no_e:cposufcsj, pcffonned 9n phantoms, t nd lhl!n on pau~nli "" ith cjini~! insttu(!cqt pre.st!~l. rnmedi~(e procl!du.re c oi' r~t ions. and film tritiquu ate dqoe on eac.,.prcljecuon. Body :~reas cav~red are: Upper an<flower extremuies. "&houlder and ptivie gi.rdles, skull and m.ammocraphy. PrerequlsUe: S6 l11 ltadiograpbic ProcedureS l. 5;!6 1.1 Appilcd c u.t<all credht Studen~s. ~~fonn.st ndtird racfiogcaphic examination of piltients ; ()[ cp.esl, a~domet~, wioll')' and gastro-inteslin:jl tr~el, extremities, stuu, mammoo.;raphy and $boulder end pelvic girdle under.-()cf visioa ofa qualified t:~diclo&ie technok>gist. Studct~ls usist tedmolcglst Nil h. the ex:~rus Stl&dled in Rttdtographic-TechniqueS lj pt~ special p~ltions or ea:arniualions for above standard, tests. T'lffiely filtrt.critiqu~ are held. r rerequi.sirc: R.ldiogn~.pli.ie firoeedur_c:a: U. 5.~ 1. Applied Clinical Rotllography ll. <rodits Thill is a CoOtP,u.1tioo of Appl~ Clinicoil RadlogrQpby J. StiiCfer:sts mby perform ;til slo.ridard proj~cliot1s or tht:st, AbdOmen, ~inary.;and giutro-inle.stinsj tract, exucmi!ks, skull, m.tm.mograpky. and 1.0houlder and pdvie girdles with limited superviaion as clinical compcler;tcr jndic.ltes. Srvdenls may -perform sptdill txcuttlntl tians and ~pcciali:r.cd projection under quollfled superviaion, Stud~nt-5' may be rotated to v~riou.e shifts to tnsu r~. optimal dinical experlencee as clinkal compc~:lency indicc.tes. Timely fitrn ctiuque~ art- held. Pt.erequi.site:!6~ l J Applied CHnlca.l! Applied Clinical ll lcrtdll... This course i.$ a contlnuntio!l o examination perf(lrmances in all radiographic maging areas wl\h limited Sllpervision o.s clinical. competency indicates. Ania:nmcntsto -va.riou:uhlfts may be made' to pro\' ide n iln:reasc:d examination base a$ nec;ded. to gatn clinical compc;tem:y: Ti"mcly film crttlquea are held. Pre requlsite: 576 1ZZ Applied Clinical. 56 tz AppUO<CUnluiiV :tcrodll This course hi t<liltinuatjoo of examinatjcn perfcrmonces ;11 ajl radjoarapbic imuging ~ltir.t wilh Ji.mitcd aupctyiiion a.s tllnical coinpelency jndjc.~jes..aslgnmcllts to various hlfb may ho mad!' 1o.p:ovide: sn increased examlnadon btle to gain cli ka1 c~ ' peteo<y.. n.eedtd. l'rortqulslt~: 56-1 AppHed Cli nical ll. 5ZH1 Rad~phlt Technique 5 creel a -o~- Tfli.5 course iavofvea a discuuion of the cbaracte:ristiet oc radiog(ll!'i* fll!'l. Consiruction and tloslgn of radi<>grnphit d~rk rooms, m&nual and aototnatk: ptotes5lnz technlques-includ'na the proce ing c~mlstry needed lor nth-are Lso drsctlbed in radiographic principles w.flh emphasis on radietloo proloctlon &DU r;tdi<>gmphlc film qu1r1y. Mclllods of reduclns petit at oxpo$uro to io.qiung radiation through the selection of proper e1ep0sure:!ac tars ugd tha use: of acea;oty devico ore demonstrated. Prere qui it.: SZ6-1011ntro a Rodiologic Technology, 5Z Radlograph\c Procedures (, 56 1 lludiogra phic.tochnlques credit A continu tion of.56 \1 ~udlogrnj>i'ic Techniques f, this course conc:entratu on m ethad ~( spechal radklgr_phk: tcchtliquea for st~reoradio~aphy.,cannsrephy, to~raphy, tht:nnosrapby, xerogr01phy,:pelvimd ry 111!lhoc:b, photaouoro~raphy, and 0llOTOKopy. Thcorirs and principles :tre discu~. demonstrated Md practiq;:d. Prercquilhe: Rndlogr.1phir Techoii\UCS l Radloloslc Sde-c.. ttedhs This course lwure.t a di~euuiafl u( X ray prodt!ctlon, jntetadion d x:rays wil b matter, olher x ray proptrlic:s, buic singlt!: and' three-phase x-ray clreu.u.s, eonstrudio:t of Jl riy tum.1nd methods of radlotion, detectiojl, ;nd musure.ments.. Stude"ts. ~r form lab experiments ~o demonslrotte ilffed of KV)>, MAS~ di~snce and collimation upon p.1ticnt expos\lre. RadiatiOn dosimetry, biology, ptfienl end peraot~ncl profcction and health: pcys.ic!. an.studied. X ray pcctra,. HVL. dept~ dose. strucbnd shief&]nc.-~nd t.1diallon PJdes :~.re discu.s.sad. Prerequisite: Phy&i-~ ~adiographi c Procedure 1. 5Z6 151 Spcciellladlogra phlc Procedures!. crodlb. Students are introduced to lh ~ spt:el(tiized and highly tec:hnico!.l pface:durc:s )n.. rndiogrilphy, the: use of peuaurc: injectors,' rapid film cht~ngr::rs ond or her speclali1.r:d radiographic cqu\pmcnt t.u;~d.. The mc_dk.:~l indications ;md anatomy t;lemonstratcd f9t.e:u:h exmnirintiqu ar~.surycyed in an lntc.~'ojtcd A pprq~ch O.'include 8 study (){ Rlcdical ~nd ~~rgicul dls~asc&. Students.tssisl with com puled tomogr~phy iro.~aging 1 interventiunal angi ogre~phy, und cur dlac cuthe~erizo.ticm 'ludi~.s,w\d t: r close.supervision. Prcrequisile: 55" 11 Applied Clinicai! 1ndlor concurrenit}' eni-<1it~d i" S.s)c Coll)puler Math. 5Z6-1SZ Spedol Procedur o <rt<h> Tbi.s ~ urse includes lhcoty pnd procticeanislir\g i!l nutlc:ar medjcin;e nn d u!lr~ ~ und jma,ging at o super!i aj level to pre par~ he shjdi:nt. for,po.ssibl~ erri.plo~t \n small de:part~nts 11nd el.inics where su~ cron-tnlni"$ b acupteble.'f'hlt t.ulobi~ Js pot. sufficie.nt fer; cettif~ct:tion n these h:nasing modalltits: Emphasis Ls pke-d m lhe theory d Qualitt as~wa)cc jn an'.i.ray tnvironltleot.after detailed.stv.dy. ~udcnls \KiuaUr pt:rl()frn u Q'A surv.cy o( a radiology &pn tme.nl. The tcsts are perf~amcd under ~ted supervision ofter training o{ 11R of testtools, and 1ht: r~ults are-intensely reviewed with reporll subtn.hted to radlolo&y depajbnent managtrs foe corrective ection. Pttrequlsite: Speclal l'rocedurd EMERGENCY MEDCAL SEflll.lCES _ Medical Ellleraenelet.. _ t:to<i Tills coucse ls-a CombLnatlua o{ bollt tht didactic tmd pnidk:af COt\lent of the Americ.om l\ed Crms' "sirndllld fiisl aid'' course tnd the Am ~ncan Hcerc A iso~latfon's _ 1 'basle li(e SU{)POrt" roa~. The t:ourse pro" ldes"lrf.lnlng ln mere ldvanced emergency c~tr~ techniques lor emer~ades mo~ likely ~.be encountered by rnedic:aj profe:ssimiolsln lin Office lettina. SucCtissfid c;ori1pletlon of the cour.se tntltj~s the: stude:nc co be certlf~d n Standatd Flrsi Ald ond Basic LiCe Support. 51 ~0 J;i\oiT Bo l< ~credits Tbi~ couro. will follow"lbe revised 1 ~8 BMT )nsic US DOT lixjur.lc. Ho~i) l ~ency room expcriert(:e w:lll be. inc)udc~ a~ well.as ri~e slong ~ertence.with Madlsan fire paramedic!! or & Mtldison lne& BMT 'Ba!\c arribulant~. Wi!lr:oMiri Ambu,6ncr: At te;ndant Llcerl.&ure Bleam Win be provided. 5J-Z EMS.Vebld Operailon..,.,ocilt This coul' wili"collcw lh'e US DOT Eil)ergcncy Vclliclc Oper tor.-;:oiltsc:jor ambularite opora\klhs. tfwtlllncl\lde de(enli'le.drlv log,!""li!n8c' drjvin;, dzjve: ev&justidn.s and Vehicle ~~_taintenan.cell:roublesttoanns. 51 EMS Ri!lcue Tecblli<Na ' 1 <redli Th~ course wll_j tevtew eldrication te.:hnlguts for auto ~ents c.nd ~~ ext rication and re!cue techniques tct lndudr agricultural haurda and industrial problt-ms. ~S wt11 M water """"' Hands-<><>: >periencc will bo provided i n fl ld llinfl$. ~1-6 EMS Systenu Atan1111emenl J crcdj This~ wlu include radio oomjuuhk:ations, medieal records Rml-.reporb. hitroduclion ro sy$t~s mdntgtm<'nt, lrllning. n!cotdk~ing. P.t:rson~l ~nage mer\t, aupplyllnventory Contra~ D.nd other daily ad.mmbb.tive rejpon.slbi)iliu. E:xperi~nce will be provided lhrough ield trips to dispotchct cenletls) a.nd am bulo.n.ct strvjc~ marnaser/sj. 51!18 EMS Ycrsona l Cutnmunicati.)ns 1 cr(l!dh This wt~p;c will i n~:l~jde tl~ dynomiq o( oommuni~a tion, prlu cipfes of!pe~h. s«rcs.s management, ond rclicnt interview lec:hniqucs. 60 AUTOMOTVE TECHNCAN Service Repair Proccdu,... c.-cdlts This. ~unc \flu U1l"tod\tce tbe student to the uutojoobile engine in lhooty. design aod operation. Olber studies induded arc the diagnosis and rcpeir pro::edures of the cnsine cooling, 1UbricaUng nd e:~o haust sy$le:tft$. Satterii!S; sfa.rfin'g and chargin(: C)'Sicms "r'c cn ered in dl!!ta11.1oog with tbe proper usc c{ m tcrs ahd the l~tlest test equipment. Shop ~fefy proper t~se ol hand tools is cmph ~ e f SO lntcro11l Combu!!lnn Ena;incs crtd.l'11 The. intr:rnill comb'"-stion l lltom()tl:ve en&lnc is atudicd in detail by disc~nlon 1 dcmonstratkm and laboratory cxrerlmeril!. The latest machining eq11ipment s used t o &C\:Ur~te)y dtgnose, disasse:mbl~. repair, lind ulllssemblt an au lome bile engine. Ojagnosls of engln.c: rel01.tt:d mechani~al ptoblt:ms ~ :; S.lresscd. 'Prerequisite: 60-tOZ Service Repair Prc;x:e~ Urcs, 60!5 Computerh:td Bngint" Conuob t_redih This. course encornpwsses the study of automobile tle-<:trotjics. An phases of complj!er~ontioll«j.syderru ate studied. to indt.tde jn~ stru~en1aticn, engine:, transmissions ~d chassis SY,stems.. "Com puler. l.rl1lgua~gc as wcjj OJ... digiud and..;mslo8 $Cnsor input b ~:overed in detail. 01ffll0n~trat\on. and cxpcrimenl using the latest mbnufacwrers tes t't)uipment wj en11ble!he lludertt to diagnose and. repair automobi~ pr<jblems1nvolvini on boa.rd comput~rs. Pte rc:q~isilc; 60 6 Dth tability and Fud Sy.$letns P~wer Trpnsm s.ston Sy-'ttMS ~edits n this <Xursc, the oeerotion and theory of clutch.,, swndord transmls.$ioo~. drin lims 11n<l di ferentials.ire coveted. Areas c( emplwis include diagoosis, repair, tnlilli, eod peflodl< mainteoai\~e OlS reeommedded by major manuracturers. Classroom and!.bop time s utllltod to develop kijls in dioguosi$ and reptir of clutches, drive lines llj\d diffcrentiols Fluid PowttTransmhsion credits The operotitin aod theory of hydroulictlly and electronically' controlled ilutomodc tn.n.srnlnions arc studied. Atus of tmphnis in:-: elude: Piag:nosi~, repair, tc~tins dllll periodic ~olintenante as recommende-d by majo.- manufactwer.s. C1aJSrOOn1 ana shop-lime js utilized to deve.lop skjfuj in diagnosi& and repak.o( &\llorrulic tn.nsmissicns. 60Zp1.56 Comfort Control Systems credk"s Stud) indude_s basic prindples o r:efrige!rot\on aud a.it c.~ndi tioning induding th~ compoucnt.parts that mate \lp the dir oondi(ioning units on pa!»engtr cars and light trucks. Heo.tlng and automuc ternpef(l!ure conh:oll.s a.l5o studied Tec.hlllcal arakt-stcerlnj Syllcml <!'Cdlls Thi.s tourse is "'atudy of the pr;nciplcs of drum ond d~sc: btake designs,,_nspec:il<ir and di11snasis. All dtl$lsna af steerins.syttems :-rc ncluded. L:~b experiences nclude inspecting. troubl1lhcoting t~nd the reptdr and ieplacernent of defective or worn parts: o thci: complete. bcak c and Eotecring &ystcm. The use of corr ct prtlciduri and toob is!lltessed. 60:Z JSY Service Mat:~ aement ~ crtdiu Jn this cout$c, var'l<k15 type; of ~us l ness Dtga.ni&a(iofiS are covered. an. applied to aulo loliv.c wh otes)e and reta.n. llntlly converging to the atjton~ire ~rvicc d-eparcment. The scrvfcc depsrtment aperution i ooy!ted in dd~il rom the. lacgc organt~on to the small ohe; The c:onventiomalfine method of nllt'l gerru:n t is s1reased. 60Z:l6 A~ tornolive AccesMlrieS crtdjt Thts cou~ coverseq\jipmtnt supplied by both the major mmti.ufnct\n cr of aato~i1cu a.nd aitermatkc:t!-\jppliers.. <;iaooroom~nd leb aclt'lltleo help lotlenl lo undc:n..,d bdc electricity. declric circuit& aqd u~ of tc. equipment to troubleshoot problems in cirtuils such 1$ lighting, wlrttllhlold wipcr~1 pol er windawj, instruments and sound systema c Course Destriptlollli-15~' 60 (6 V~hk:f.e 5U1pcnal0n and T1.S course involve$ lhc st\ldy of LAe principles or $U$peniiop d~~n~ whecl alijnrnc.ot angles, l}eadtlaht oll&n.ment, inspection proc:a.lura 1 pw-t~ replacement, -.cctins scart. shock absorbers and sway &Jts.. h arnc dcagns 1 Ure design and opcrat!<jn1 nd wheel bolaoclna. On lh lob experlenceslll<lude lnopecuo$ aad correcilnj ""!' ion nglu patio roplecemrnt, acljustlna steer log geon, augnin& hcodllghls, end bolenclna wheels. Four-wheel aiicnment is incl~ed. 6!1-6.Dtlvublllty..,,i Fuel Sylllem.s credit.< ObgnosU and repeir of dectrfcal a.nc1 fuel systtms are Shad~d n thls ccurse.!be u'e ol compultdz(jj tel! tqujpme.nt to prc.,eily tune a vehicle ror.aood dri'weability i& stressed. Carbureted systeins are.studied in detosl with 1n lntrodu;tlon to compuleri. t:d ~gine c~ntrols. 60lH 75 Special Probloml cr.cdlls l'ermisslon or the lnstruc, e>r and division dean/chairperson h te qulred td ~nro lt in this t:oarse, The 'tudent eursue! a oour:se of tnstruction based on hl!. or her nt!!ed! fer 11dvanccd tt!c:hnical know!edz_e nr.!kill iit. the aulornotlvt se.rvtce area. The a(e! of concf'!ntratlon i~ dttermined by the.\tudent and bh or h~ c :~dvisor. 605 Et.ECTRONCs TECHNCAN Allcrnotlilg o~d Direct Current. Fi.Jrid me-ntah - tt.edils l'hi~ course cover.s the-basic prlnclph:s or AC and DC circ~h~_. l~ additiqn, thes~:: principles arc used lo Jtl.ld y the nperatia~ of elec,. tric il.rc w~ldlng equipment. Emph&Jh is also plaeed on lhe. lroubieshoolin~ of comm~ rclal ere welding cq~p rnent. The stu dent participalu in classroom and J.aboratory execci.!es 1n!he ~ tudy of ' h.e basic tonccpur and taws o( alternating anti direct cui ren"t c.ircvit.s-. The course incl\oe:l Mndy of Ohm's Law, half.. fu~l~ wuve and bridge: reccifier furreilt,. The effects of hiah and low. freguencics are g(so studied. & i>c fundantcnt l.s ac~il~ BaSk DC concepti and theories arc coveted including: Ohm's law. Kirchoff's voltage and cunent Jaws. 1'heve.njn's. NortoJJ,'Sv Millm:m's ;md rnui[dul'n bander of powft theories. 1\C ti.tne coil.slant cinult~.:md OC voltngt mr.asurtmenu in troduce the ~:of the oscilloscope am the &qua~t wave generator. Proper t«h'ni~ Que$ with digital.. mwt!.met.en Jor the me:~.sutement c1 curn JJt. Voltilge nd (Ciista~ are emptwiw:f ( Solid 5!o.(e Oevk:es. Z'ctiidlio Orientation. re~arch and lab wtftt-op procedures are i ntrod,u c;~d..basic.w[dering s C9Yt re!d. The in.struc1or wiu utifiue the curve Lracer to dc.:m~n S.trolte the behavior p~tte:rns of certain devict.s. Lab proceduru introduce the pr.x tito~:luse of solid state de:vic~s l AC Fund11mentats credlt_s This oourse emp.ms:ius the study oi AC roltagu, curre.nt a11d. power. by _use of phosou :md pol&r and rectangu_lo_r eoordina.te t.e~hnjqucs. t covers the use: of rntstors, capacitors, i.ndur:.:tor!, and tran&fofmcrs.ln AC clrcuit.s. The course "featur,s'ncrea!ed use of thtl osc:illascupe ln. rp.eaaurlng phuc lltljies ond ~v"l u~ tlon ol resonant conditions fl.lld high and low pass filters by use of dual tj a~;e and time ~ -.e function.l. 605-S AnokiJ SoiJ< Stale Dnle<s AC Anoly;lo Z.t<edi!B AC principles are rtpp.jl~d to recnner and ~ner diodes. Loiding effects upon llirm1nal vollage end ripple component& 't~ oh.snved in <:apacitot: filtcred, half WV~, u.u W\'e and brldl t :rcctifierdr.. cuffs. Voltag~ regu l~torl arc i.rdtoduced. The CE. C_B at~d CC :md he common source FET confisuiations valkh1tc ln 1;bo:atory PfO~ tcdu"'~ lh< P''" and lo""'r helf power poinll, b itdwl<hh, voltage ond <: r.rtnl gain, stgnol phase in.vertlon, and input and c:jtrlpl~.impedance. NOrton snd Thcv-enin tmorems te appli~ to ~Jl'lplifim. FBT corulanl current sourct.is covered -lons with ltd vanccd wjdalns t~iguts Advanced Analoz Solid Slolo Cl!wlt <:rcdlls. noi CO<iru ncludes o review of unallslsnal ampli~ aod o!ludy of lhe basics of MOS field d focttronslslors, multijtage_. atnp!ifi~s, pawc'r amplifiers, duferentfqj.-m.plif~rs., intesr ted cir cullund fccdbod melhods. a odditlon, thi ""'"elncludes lnboralory work wuh MQS field-died lr nshlors, multlologe omplilioro, power amp!lflcf, dilfcrentlol Amplifiers, inlcgratcd circuits, fc~k drc\llts, O!cnlalou. and regu.l, ted powtr sup plies. Pm-.qui~l..; AC Fundement ls nd 60S S AnaiO& Sol.ld Stale De'(ice:s AC Anoly,ls.!r " ~.f

83 0 Course De5 :ripllons Course Dest:.riptlons llS D.&ftal CfrcuU" Pondamcnt ll c:redlt~o Thl!!i r:otu.se deals with basic digital fundamentflli!ii as applied to number systems, Boo[e~~on logic l!tui Karnaugh mappi~g principles. GP.te theory -b validated i.n lt~~b proced~:arcs which abo include e:n. codlng, decoding, "fli:p flop5, fakb and clock a ppli.:litio~u Al!v nced Olglllll Clttull credlls Ba:sic digital fun!i'-men1ab M~ continued with sh.ifl rcslstcts, counter$, trl-:stat-t! lcgi-c devices, muluvibrators,.h.~d! nhd full t~ddcts, tllbf!r!ll! Od compa.rntors. A logic probe proj e~t ill ind1.1ded. 605-U6 lndustri1 ~C!!ctron~S credihl This ~ounae wil_l_.revlew ~hree -pha~c p-ower, Wiring dillgratns,lod dcr djisrilms and ~ysle!lj dl~g.ntms will be introduced. An over~ vi<!w of switches <~nd. electrom.agneti~ devices {servos, motors, relays ad starters) will be lnduded~ Sel)sou used for c.ontro~ will be prc:iente.d. ~o that the student can identify types and uses. S~ctents wm be lil~illarb:ed wlth the operation.of elem~t11ry control systems and prograrntnabl~ wntr<juers. Oscilloscope wdvefurrns in TRt.AC snd SCR. sysc~m.s wijj be an!dyzed C!rcult.Anolysls JAdvanccd EJectronl< ~on.cephl credits: Thi!i cours7 ~stablishes the re1~tl0nship 9( c!l~r,ge.to current, the sources. of mduced ~oltage ~c.d t;ompares e::vc:r'llge and in stan taneous current, voltag~ and power. Filt~r and attenua.lior, net Works, transmission line losses, audio j>tinclpl~!l at~d anterma di.striblltion factors ate verificd.. Phasors:, Logarithmic and ex~ ponentiill functions intnxh.ice topi~ beyond Ohm 1 s LJW and basic theorems. A 1echitl:cal languagf!: of rnmmuo.lc:ltion s developed in thf! cour.se. Ptirtdples are demonstrated or held in ab :seltings. Prereqn:i!'lile: Credit orconc:\lrfeo.l rejj;istration ih 60S-ll6.Advi1n~ed An11lag Solid..State CircUits. 605~1 Am:J!og Sy~te,m:s and Measurement tredi«s Tbts co.ur~c addn:s-es.analog Signal procr::s$!.ng SJ.S well as prln clple5 ~nd applications of te:;t equipment, t"mphas[:s is plact:d on <:Qnooplu~l undt:rstanding of e.nwlog systetns as well as hand:i on experience wi~h me.uurlng instrument~' and siinple tlrudog syste~s. The use:.o( in~tntme n"t manuals is stressed. 605~t5o..Electronic: Data Transmission credits ~ this co:utse, the student gains. lllnrough un.dentanding of the sequen-ce or events fequired ror the tr.ansmission and reception of d:ua. Atteraliol1 is focusep, on the receiver.llnd tmn.sm!.ttcr, in chlding R.F ;u1d lf amplifiers, synch~onlzation c~rcuhs, &Wt;!cp syslt!n'li 1 mixing.rircuits and antennas. The laboratory et(!rciscs Work with commercial receiver!; and transmittl: rs~ Pr~requisi"t~: Adven ced Analog Sotid State Circuits or concurrent registrahon in Gf:S llg.ao.d 605."10 Cil cuit AnOJlysi.s, o.r El~trouk n~~~menls. 605~ 151 Truubll::sh~~;~gling P.nd M~intenance: cre:dlts Stud ems: will. ~'!quire handa:<.m experh~nce"at u~!ng clrcu1~. "diagrams llnd te.s equipment to iocate problems in rthllrun-ctl.on. jns equlpmenl The "ad' of speedy, loglcsl djagno!iis u:~ini lhe proper mix of theory and lest instrornents will be emphasiz.::d. A variety of mdd~ rn elt:drcriic equipment jn \"OJ:rying'.stales o[ improp~r operation w.ill be examined ond Tepaircd. Extensive exp er~ence wh be gwined in u sin~ and interpteling COiJlpcllen~ 5peciflCillions from spec sheets, data book~ 11nd catl'llog~. P rior~ qulsiies:..musl. be-enrojjed in second ~me.;-~r Or n~b.s equcnt elcc- tw nics collr!!e.!i. Since ~tudl"'nl!'rwill work on d~cuils co rrespon. ding lo th~ir- r:oncmrpnt ~nrojjrncnl, theccurse cdn-be repeated for.addllioq~ ej~cperi e nce ~l c:rop rocc5oson a nd Digital Control. Sy~tems trtdits This oo ur_s ~ s 11 study ofm~cr<jproccssor s and djg.ltlll control ystems. 'Topics~ lnclu~e mlcropro~:e!sots, inlerrupt:s, DMA, pe taue[ f!nd senal rio, peripherals alld :~ oft ware appucaticns..nboratory!.ix~rd!! l'l!l und ~ h~tdwt"jrels~ftware project proyide pn,dir:al ~)[peri~nce With digltrtlsystems. Prcre quisi.tcs: lnt~ oduc lion to Olgltal Systems, E!c::ctranic Computers and Assembly Languuge. 605~11 ElutronJc Coinplltc.r and A1lerilbJy Languase. crtdjts The studenl will be introduced lo lbc fundoinent.ls or eloclnmic computet systems. The basic &truclure and functlon cf compuier.hardworll:! wju be covered lrdm.a :;y5tem lcv~j perspective. Prognunming ln th~ BASC language with examples related lo conlrolllns equipment on mn leee bu5s and.use01bly J,..ngullgo pro gramming a( mlcrcprocenors wilt be ~::ova red EJ~dronii!Utd(Ung,ohd Ot!!lilgn r:redjis Thi!!. mut!!~ covers theory nnd praclicnl dmfting a:nd.d~slgn np p!k~lions of ejcc1ronic ~q\lipmen( wh[~/1 ln<lludt! llolh specirica~ tions nnd sketches into {ormlll documents. All areas of dcdmniq; M~ coycted inl!ludlng.c{)mpulcrs, instnmlent<.~liun ilzld cmn munlc!!.lions.. Prerequisilc!l: 605-l LG AUvmct:d Annlag Solid St11tc: Cir<;:uits, Circuit Anal_y::;is or r:'luivalcnl lntrudutliun ta Dl~Ltal Systems crcdjl!!l This c:ourt;e i!l!!..o>t~dy or hi"' electronics iisp~cts of digilul ~ystt:nls, Topie.!i include a review of basic dig.llal componelhs, Dsi~ f;~.mllles, prjntcd circuli fabrication, me: mot.)' compom:nls and digua~-lo-analt:ls urad tltu1lo lc digital c~mvt:r~>ion. 1..1bnmtor.y CJ~:c:-rcist:j and projc::c:t providf! prilc:ti<:al cxpcric::m:c wilh di&uat S)'Stl!tnS. Preieq \li~itc:s: Digital Cir.:~1it Pl.lndamentab, Adv.lnc~.d Oigitnl Circui1=1, GD pc!dal Ptoblecns--EJectrottics Z credits Students may sdect a project or _projects following prc~ ious or cur.rent courses o{ sludr which str~ugth~n llr'e!ls of ejt!c(ronic ir:t terest. Projecls m\jsl be in keeping with lime. a!l(lu"'d. Projll!cts m~st be in cancer( whitl.lzld undt:r- the superv:isi<:m of the instruc tor (or credit 606 MECHANCAL DESGN TECHNCAN () Technknl Drafting l credlts Thi.s C:OH.5~ ili em jntroduclion to he ba..~ic theory o"f. engineerirlg dt<lwin&, its content and the instruments ond skills n~c;~~sa ry to make ucceplable dnz.winss. 1'opic::s covered in1:;iud~ g,eumetric con str.~cli~ns, h::ttc.rinc tll'ld the lheoty aud pra~lice oc orlhogr01phk pr<>j~clloil Tc:chnical DraftlnK 11 credit~ A conlinuahon of 606 l00 Technic~J-Dr!'lftjng. the atudenl Js given lll"l opportunity to -t~ppty the basi a:: skills and lheory tr.. o~reas of SptcioJ, ycl ba:iic, con.!iidt!ration. The range of wor~ cavers pictorial rcpre&m1ati-ori, se.:liol"l5, iluxilhuy \'le.~o,lfi a11d illlroducliou td dimensioojng. This course.is.1l:io <~ n lntrdduc~ion to.:urnpuleruided draftlng. Pr erequi~ile~ '~cbnic11l Drilhiny, (. 60& 0 Technlcal Dri1fling Hr credit Thts ;:curse is the final drafting l:{lvrse that is prlmnrily lh~ory~ oriented. Tln1e: is :;p~nf irl the nrc& of dinlensi.oning and tolernnc in~ with.c;pecific <::~llphasl$ On.. geomt:trie and true position toler.:.n.cing. other topics mdude gear a~d c:am design, ami.th.c course emphnsi'zes production of a simple'cad drf)wlng, Pre:requjiitc: Technico1! Dromng J!, Tcc.hnh~.a.J Dmlting V crcd1t5 This S u final course i11 th~ sh.u.ly of dr~:~flil~g. the purpooc of wbich is La apply the: theory ll5pz:c:ts pf the irst lhrcc. course:s. Em phn.::lis is en th~ prcparatlon of n c~mpleh:: d~laill,.-d working dr.:lw ing, T~c dimens.ionjng of rjr;~wjogs to include c.:~jclj.1ho.r) t>f ullowaih:e und tolcrnnc:e: from standards t.1bles s c~ver<xt Addi t~c:.nal prachce. using Cf\D o.r design drawings is offered. Pr~rl! quisite: Techni~al Orarting li Des.cdPii\'t!. Gca:l~CtTy credits This course. cove~ in detail the. rund~mer1tai th.eory or or lho~raphic pmjec~)on using the c;onccpl of paints, Jines and plane!i. The co ur::;e apvlie.s tbe thc::orctical a5pects 1o practiel pro bkm:o invcllving such Ching!i os bca.ring, :;lope, 1rue length, strlke djp and in lc,seclion~. Probleml'i are limited to Oal and curved sy.rfaccs-no wozrped sur(pces or compound c\jrvd.ure.s nre studied. All prohlcms ure solvt.-d grnphlcally. Prer'tqtlislle: 606.[0 Ti!Cbnitlll Drafting [L. fill6 11 Toot D~lgn,rcd.ff.s Jn hill cou~e~ 1hc fu~damcntdls of Lool design il rc presented to ~c:qu~:~~:ol students ~ith be hmgu~c ~od methods used Jn.des i~jl me jigs and fi.xlure:o~. At the s~m(! tlme 1 they can further develop their skills in drarhtig. Prcrequlsit~:: Tcc:llrucoL Dr.artiiiJ;J ll. 600-t Madllnc DeslRn. Z credlh Thi.s C:Om!!le i!i designed to npply lh!! bn!it: prim:lp)c!! or m~::chat~ic. ; and.rlrcngth a{ matl!t1als (Q the design o! machine pout~. Typh:ar el~rnl!!lts studtcd lnclude bt:jit!, 5crews shof~ ~hl.1cbcs 1 bells, dudns, gears and bearing,. Prcrequlsitc:-606 [70 Strcnglh.o( Materiels,, 606-S J JnduslrloHfydraullc Z credit Thi::1 course consi.!ils c{ l~ture demonstrations, out of-dass rci1ding a.sslgnnwntnmd labo.re~tory e xpc.rienc~l. 'l'ht! u:ni~ ot. in!itr\lction are arratlsqd in otc.jer to best ll.ct!wlifll students wilh the fil!ld o{ power ttdnstn:i.ssion by (juld~. li Mcchunlcs credil11 1'hh. c6ur!;iic s flrl lntrodudio ~ t9 the lield of rnechanics 1 and study is Hntiled to ~Latk forces. The so1\jii9n of problems is timh.::d to the muthcmatkal approach, ulthuugh graphic solutions are occa ~onully used as' 'checks.'' Arees of study include resull.!mt and cquilibrant of forces, moments, noneurrt!nl-oop1anar for~::~!!, l'l'russc.~~ and con~urrt!nl-c:oplbmtt me~~. Pr~requi.'litr:: Tt:t:hni1!1.l.Muthematie5. \ Manufacturing PrOCeS!e:1 c~dlt$ A knowledge of pres~nt :manufa.cturlng proc~sses i.s of ~xtremc impotl<ulc;c t.o h!'chnidans.<:"ngllged in ndustry~ fns~n.jtt"ion in thi;s ~oursc deals with he t(!chnie<!l fundanwntals of importunt mur.zuf~lllring processesj engineering maleria1s :md the madern molli:hine tools nccess;~ry [or pr9ce:ising these materials. 6U6- Mllnufncturlng Proc.C!\SC6 u z credtta This course ide:ntiues manufacturing processes and materia.ls as to d!!"!'iigrl, specilir::alions-, facilities and ~anomies. This is done lhrough. visitation nt v11riou~; manufacturing eot1ce:rns, classroom exercises. and atssigncd reading. 506~170,Str~ngth Of Mater.lzds credil.!l Thi~ cours.a pre5tmls nn ;~.nalysl!'i. of the fundllmenta] c:uncepls of me.chanic~.{s they epply t.o be.t~s. rivr:ts, wejdcd joints,.sh.wfts ar).d various f 15teners. Topics covered include simple ~lie~, methatill".!! ptap"ettie.s of malc::rlals, ce-nler of gravity, moments Of lnertin, :~hem force and hendinh moment 'di"ag(uitls, zu:jd tocsion. PrcrequisHe! 6o5 l55 MecJ~.o~nits Manu'fndutlng CostS ctedltrt This is a bask course which :rm~sl!nts. information conc~rni:ng the \'~rlo\ls phe~ses of ft produotlon.~ost es~iinating program, Th~ first' pozn or!he instruction cover~ economy anarysis which consists or d~'vdopment und promotion t:o.st, conslruc.tlon an~ depreciation co.sl, e:slirn"tih& ficst c::d!l.li, estimatlng opcrati9n colts and dt:lej: mhiing a. minimum.r;:o!i~ from. Ezrtaly.c;i!>. This i:s uuawed by il Study of lhe fant~.odaj an~(ysis whkh d"clcrmiu~ fir:l.luic ~a( rc:l\l!"l' ~nd yteld.. Sped.alt!mphasis b plnct!d on th~ appl,lcatibn of the llre,,keven. Ch:~.rt. Consideration is given also to the problems of rcplac:em~nu\nd some ~spect.s of public projecl!.. Prerequisite: 601}-0 Mt~rtur.acturing Processes and 606 Ma~uf:lctulirig Pro~:t:s5es Vnluc Ana.Jy11ls credils n lhls o;ot~rse, the fllnd~tm.entu.ls o( v,aluc: Rill)SU! 11re presented to CamiHariz~.:~ludents with lhe latest tcchn~qucs avail~tblc:: to ob JiJin optimum vajuc lrt a product. Through 11 se:dcs <"f le~tm sgjylng pmjccl~. ns well os indlvidu<jl projects, the student Js taugh( to an~)ytt. evcr}r pbnsc Df manufaclurlng,. material ~le!ction, and dcsisn c:ri1eri.a so lui to ob!nln!). value product nt the lowest cosllo reliably ;,ccomplish lh[' function, PrcreQshc: 60&-!60 Man ufac. turins Pt oc ~!~ se!j. J Spcc:\ 1 Prohlem!5 credits 't'his course oricrs an opportunity for ~dv<~n<:cd study on a h i11~ dividuaj lla~ls wht:ccin lhc sluden( select& 11 prob!cm, c!'llc:c:cs dnt11 through rcse,prch proccdufes, tabulales the datal drnws -conclu siot1s 11nd m.11kcs rccomrnendpti(]h!i. The mi:lterisl is presented Cl the form of a bound tech ~i~al r~ port!lnd is us~:::d at lhe: time of job lntcrvtc.ws. PrereqtJillitt!: fiourlh scmesc~r 5(S.nding Job Orlontaliml credit 'J11is course is designed to "cqunlnt studl!nls with!!orl1. 1!': of the slep::l in the ptoce:1s of ~curing ga.~nf'ql employrnent jn their" l~ t:hniclll!!ip~;: r;:ia lly wilh cmpkasls en lhe sturlents' r~spon!5ibility, Some so1ir~~s include the MATC Plu.cc::ment Oflice1 professlon11l n~encl<!sj trnde Journals 1 newspaper~ p,nd Ctic!:nd!i. Re111ource people ure jnvite!d to discuss vurl<lus o:;pc~llii or the p~ s. St!Jdenls will prepnre 11 resume-, o. leller ur introd\jctlon ~Sn~,p llumk -y ou lett~!. 607 PUBUC WCRKS TCHN(CAN 6()7; l Civil llnslncorlnk E JlmatlnJ <rcdu n thl li course, cstlrn11ling for gencrnl civil engineering work s :>(res sed. Tltc 11reparnBon o{ dett~ued csji nt.:z~cs, 1111 prcpat.ed by C011trudorS rclr bt<.jdln~ purp05c~1 thu gi.!j1t!ra1!stimo~, OS prcputcd hy cc:zgfnc-en, 1md llpptakimlltc esllm~fe!i.dte cbt(l!'red. Highways, w~:~,ter and sewer llaes, bridges, culvt'(15, ~areets.llnd general con&truction grading are:i:overed Slrcngth o! Moter!o!~. credllo (n this ~ollrse, the basic prindples of the sttength o( enginnring materials are pre.sen.ted. Simp!~:- stress, p roperties of materials, welded and. rive led joints, beams, eambined ~lresses, colum ns and relnfcreed concrete a r~ covered Clyil ~&h!cenng Draltlng i c.redll This course ~troduces students to ~nginee p.ng d:r;awi!1g and.tbc required..skiu.s.and il'i:!itruj1lel:lt.5 nl:"edc::d to rna!i:e ~o~ccep!abje draw ings; T,he c::ontent ~ouz;hc: s Pll many area of dvil engim:crins with ~mph~:;i5 on the theory af dr-alliijg, Pruh!ofl-ms urc ~di;!!ed Q tho~ that occur n ~hq work of a civil technicl,t~h. Jsometric~ ptjspeo-. tjve 1 geomelrjc 1 orthograpruc and de11criptive drawings Bre Covered. Vl'!~tor ana l~sis, slope, gra_de be~il)g 1 indinu69n, planes in orthographic, true 1eZJgfh, classifzcauon,!ine~ in :;pace. land m.easuremetlt and dimens1onsj and plat drawing ate some cf.the tdpic.s co-veted. 6!)7~19 Sutveyini ' {Arch.)...credits Thf:s c::-oursc inttoducelj the tc:chniciil:d. to the l~daruental5 of surveying as they ~ppl}'tl) archuceture. m:ludea" is the u,se o! surveying equipment apd instruments. Types ~f Jilrvey:s 09vcred ih.clude boundary, topograpblcmd ~:onslrncliori.. Prerequisite; S0 151 Technicll.t' Mathi!matics or" con currer'lt eilrourrient SuneyJflg.. r:tffiits The emphasis of this course s on the use or bask sluveyirtg eq_ujpment: TJJe tape, the level and the tt_ansh.:the: student develops on Pl»"fciati.on of the SQUrces ()( errors and mistakes n.m.c::a$ilrement.lll.end tbe melhod5.of reducing.or elimipatiilg them. THlVerse oomputaticms arc pn::s ~ nted. ti07-i56 su.. eylng J[. trcdils This course primarily covers.c0n:5tfuction.qr s~e ()Ut :rurva::ys. 11 includes both -computations.and fil::'ldyrot~ for,&~king vertical and hori:r:ontal curves Pndslcpe ~takes. Stud~ls: Producf':.a f!jpo~rsphic m~p. using.$-tbdia rilelfia.ds. ' Sw"eyiog_l credjts The prindples.of.advanced 6Urveying are preaen.t e~ n this. course. Topics lndude.lrhzngutalion, trigono.melric J~v~ litjg, celestial observations, photogrnmmetry, stale plane coordine~o.\e~, f.lnd plan(: ta.hle mapping. Tbc use of the. theodolite h emph!lsi:r.ed L<&Oi fllemenh o! L8nd Surveylog :i.,...d;h This ~:cutse oovc::cs the legal plindples of how 8Uri'eyors!oco::~te hmd bouj~di!-rics. from!,he ~'ittea wo~;(l~.-~:9:eed: These.prfn ciple~ ll~ d~wn up /rott1 the many prec~de.rhs set by t~ oourls Ci~ll Engineering Dre!tlna 11.. c:redils This c:cufse: is a continuation of CivH Engineering Dcofling (and cov~~ bound~:~ry layout and draftitlg, vertical and harizontitl curve5, c::rcl!!o;'l Sl!dions, volumes, Dhd.lllopes and con'tours, 607-1"71 ChU Sngln erlng Dra!tln& ll.crcdhs This course p~esenr~:du~ prlijciple.s involved jn de!.ajling dr01wing.o;.. of hi~hway Structures in~luding «mcrete 1 stt:eland pre!-str c~ed concrete members Boilndq,ry Location c:rcdlts The prlncip,fes and practices of bound~:~ry calllrol ore p r~seilt ed in this r::ourse. Lnws flnd customs relating lo baund01ry, wrilina; pro perty des;criptlons and field practice ln_(ocaling.. propr:rty nrc:: covered WolorSupply and Sewngo t redlts Th.i$ ~oor.~~e ill orlented to.glvc an und~rstand{ng of th~ principle.~; involv-e:ti in the: design concepts o hydroullcs and hydrology, wiltcr resourtc$ and di!tribuli.on!1)'.5c!fl15) se:wog~ lrel!llment tmd dls lrlb\l~l on s.y5tcms i' L<!gallllemen1 oc CMJ Engineering orcjts Thi5 course presents the Jtg l princlpl~ s involved in a civil techni dan 1 s work. il etnpha5ir:es conlntct Jaw 8:8 it r ej~tc::s to. eng ineer~ ins imd conslrucuon project's. Contra~ doct menu and speclnc.1- li:(lfl511rll! 91:rt~liniozcd as arc rypes o{tlldsl:ind mdhods of pnymf!nts.

84 1&-Course Descriptions Course Uescrlptioris l6 ' H Medu1.11.lcs credihi The bc.s.ic j)rindj)les of enginl!cring mechanics llrl!: prtt:.t!nlt!d in his Col..lr!'il!, t im:lude~ p11roucl forces, concurrenl rorce.s, nm\ conctjrrent forccsj noth:cplancr forcl!s, friclion c~nl!!r or gravity and cenlrcids Field lnspe:c:tlonand Ma1erlals. Tcsflns: credit~ This course covers the fundmlu.':llt:ll:. o( c:ons1ru~tion p{oject ~nspccti6n. Majer.rJivision5 of the colltse include iilspecllon of nr thwork, pavr.:rnt:nll', pipel_lnes, nnd_ ateej and wncrete structures in ardcr to dc1crrnlnc tompli.. nce with lht ptojecl drawings and spccwcations. The materjajs te-.slins phuse -of this cout:;c includes field tcstil)g; cf soils to t.h::lerlhim: their t:nginccring properties and laboratory testing ofs6i.l!l~ conc:r.cte, aggrcg;j.1es ;Jnd mc:t;ll~ Special Problem!!i credits. This section pro\'jd~ opporluniti!!!i (or <.~dvanc cd sludy, boih group a.nd- indi:'o'idual, in lhe prof;c!ises e~nd recording of project de,-dopment from inception to completio~l. Stud.l!nt:~ sodc:ct a lupic Jproblem), collf!cl do:~ :~ thrdu,gh rcscarcb, ltlbulah: the dillu, Llr.aw o::indusio~s and moke reoommendations. 607 J9. JntroducliDil to Cjvil Engineerlng J trcdjt A series of lecture-discussions: with (alle-ge {l)cuily and resource persons, and Held l:rips to l"epresr:n1ativc bus inc~~ or lnt.lustry, this colmu: is d~::signc:d to 01cquaint sludi!nts with the ~itlds of jobs a ~ :sociated with their related fields. 6D7 i9 job Orid~tation l credit Thi~ (:Out5e r.:ovet1i sp~cific occupiilional inform:.lion lo prepilre stude~ls foe Se(lking employment. Personal dll.t:l. sheet:; 1 job inter views, letters o( introchn:tion omd tecomr:ncndotion are..::ovc~!:!d. Fotmer graduate::., repn::sentalivcs of labqr, lluli:ulgement, bu:sin~ss ilnd ihr: profc.ssions. arc invited to discuss -uie process o( bc::t"oming =m employee. 61 METALLURGY 61-JOO Principles or Mt-taUurgy crcdlls This sunrcy course inlrcquce.!i ~tude:nl:s t{') the field of mct<~llurgy. t covers the loc-aliun of ort:: deposits, condition$ found in tl1~. earth, derivation of metal.s from!heir ores, refineme-nt and purification, admixture and nlloylng, and manu tl.<:turt! into various :sh01pes and forms for industry. The clas~ifir:ulion of fer' rous and non ferrous metals, the tf!~tin1; o metijls- for mechaolcal properties, and common metal pro}:llem:s, such.ils fatigue and cor roslon, a.r-(! illcltk:f('d, 61 ARCHTECTURAL TECHNCAN Fundamcntn.ls of Buildlng C~nstrudlon t:;:rcdll!i This c:ou.rse stildies the fund<tm~nl11! r.:oncrpb l)f gocid construe tian and their appu<:ation lo nc:w conslntction, existing oon~truc lion and remodeling Archite:ctur.a.l Thcnty and Drafting i credits This cour.se is S.l:nlctured to c~vc th~ student a gnod b11ckgraund in e llgine~:riog drawing and th e theory of drafllng. Good lettering nnd line quality sre emphasi-zed. Ll:tletihg, U5l: of drnfting tools, line work, orthographic prcj~:di.un, axonomctric dr'~wl n,lls,. )~JJd m ea&urcment, vl!cldr lalysis, gr:u:jmetrh: shapes, per.spe(:tivt: d"rawidgs. sh 11r:.ling and re fjfl ct~ons are covered in the fit::.t M!rnesh'!f An:hltecturall'hcory and Drafting ete:dlbi Working from codes and. speclfitillicms, studc:nt!i devciqp a com plele set o( workirig drawing~ fo:r a mtall (:omrnerci.oi bu~lding.or residence. Ar1s of phmning. ar~ : l:xcllv<ltion and.backfhl, found a Hom:, 1oor phm~, windows and doors, structural components, ej tflrior charnclerlstics, electrical wiring, S.lllirway.s and firepliilcf'-'i, jol.sc (rnming.t!nd ra(let framing, interior built-iru, p[ot plans., beat loss and h~atlng, plumbing!oy!llclit!l,.antl pidori.11l projection-s Architectund Tbeo(y und DcafHng ll credl(s Sludcnts ore lru.. ghllhr:::: bo:~si.c; use of c:ornpuientlded drafting and di!!!'lign systl!n,, T hc:y iho 'lequi re ntroductory.skl!ls in 0 11n<.l D draf1ing as il OJppllc fi. to CADD 5)'Sicms. 6l 11 r\rchllcctu.ru.l 'fhcory,and D.ru.hlnMV cred~b Jn lh}~ coui'5c, the prindplcs of dcsi&nr as.dppu.cd lo ltrchllcclurc:, arc. sludicd. Students select projects w~tlt:h they compjde: under the dimetion of th~ in&tn.:u;:1or. 0-cosign~ must mcel pnn::licuf, cr:onomi(:, lcgd.anll Ucsthclic rcquircm~nts. Empho1Si5 is given to profc6s)onul quttlity lettering Knd line w~ight tr!chniques. 61-J 18 i\n:fl.icedurul Render[ng ~ crcdlt!i This is u t;,it:iic course in the i!ppliciition o( ~rspec\ive princlple:s ta architectural presentations. Duwjngs and renderings are mnde (or prcscnlauon. 111pha~is s on pencll lech~iiqu~s, wa:o;h t!nd li!mper., colors Constrlldion Materials cr~dlts This C'Qur.ie inyolve:s JJ h::cturl! di!it::u:s~ion appro<l"i:h, combined wieh praclicul (idd experiments, in t:kploring he broo.d field ol buihling construction. Study centers on milterinls t.js~d in con slruction, Lhcir milnufacture ond application in vatir:uls construe lion system!\ from waod frame to masonry, lltef!lllnd pie-cost con crete. Solsk. properties af m.at~rials are di~ctls~ il~ well a5 how,,.. hen and ~vju~re to usc (hem. 61 l. Eledri~ol and MechomicW c cdlts. n- this course,!he stu.i:lenl is given suf(ideut knowledge to understand the wjring principles for electri<;al in!itilllllllou as t plied to a.rchilechmtl design. State, city and local utulty c{)dcs rc studir-i i!nd fcllowcd. The desig11 o~nd. insti'lllation o( (:0 1nple~e air candh.~ming systcms-indudirt& llcating, _CQO)ing, humidifi<:ation ~nd d.ir dcllning- a.n~ litlltlied. Privalc ami pub1ic water and sewera~e systems are discu5sed and designed. N.:w trends in mechanicill!i)':stc.rn:i are n:searcht:d. :Construction scqut.:ncc, prc built hom'.! dc.sign, <~.ml con:.truetion lradc: duties.:m:: tovc:rtd.' Computc Aided Oraftlng-0 credit!i ntrcductory Cnd ZD Basic) i~ a CO\usc de :~igned to nlt"lke lh~ :audcw.tllware Qf lhc basic capt~blliti~s of 1wo-<limensional ~oft ware used in il oompulcr ~!decl drllwing c:nvil\:mmcnt..an in troduction lo c<jmputer l!quipmcnt and_ industry usage t.s 'over~ d. Major emphasis i~ spent un lcamin~ tbc nl!ces.!iilfy comtnand:s.11nd inp\1~ required to mako: a dra\ying:. Emph.uis i.s on learning the hnics of 1he 5yst~:m and not ne-;;e.o;:sarily h ~oomint; n prnflclent opera! or of the-l';jlslem (this could come- wi!h direct usilge of {he equipment and haods:roit lab lirnet. Prercqt.Jisilc: Tv:o sorncsten of dr.aflins. eguiva.jenl-,work e):perictlct::, ur consent of ih. tructor luildlng E,tim.aling crt:dit.s; This cou:r~ acquilints :"1\\ldenl.:; wilh the problem:"~ and respon sibililie:s of the estimator, Student$ work whh plms. sp~cifka ti'on!i.1nd published construction cost dilta. :Emphasis is on underslilndiug e.5timil:tins tccjjjliqucs.tmd.nu:!hods o p~a:r-ing cslimatcs and take-o(fs. 6J l5 Building Codes crediu Thi.s r.:ourse: cover:~;.ojt:ot:t:pt ~:d fcrm:~; of conlrpr;:ls. SpcdficaliQll!i are di~uss~. and a study is mu.de o them for such construction rn::jteri01ls as lumber, brkk 1 steel and glass. Primary ~mphasis is givan to the study of lo~alr..<ming regulalioils, builciing code"s 1 the SJo:~tc Uniform OwcJUng Code, llnd othet cod~ dc::umenu. H 1Z Concrete Dc1ailing cr~dlts Basic:- com;cpts of de.sj&n, tis applit::d o corlr.::rei ~ bc.um5,.5-la~, ern umn.~ lntd fou m.lution!i, or1re 'de., doped in his course. Emphasis t:s pku::cd on thr::: understanding of ftmclionn\ dcsi_gn. Practke:~ related to lhc pl<ccmenl of rehtforcfng rods and lo contrete mix lures, as lndicated in. speclfications tlr phtn!l, a1e -;JL!a!litudicd Slcef Detoi((ng. crcdlts The student gain~ a basi~ und ~rstandinc of orthollrnphlc pr oj~c fion, b;mnr.:trk projection, and perl'lpcchvc view:; lis r.ej~t.ed to st ruct ure! Steel s:hop d rawings.. He or she makes detailed draw jncs or r;tructurn( s-teel asscmbji<:5 and Sl.lb a::scmbiies Steel Dotnlllng credit l'he slud!:!nt gains a basic under~ta.nding of structurnl scc tla%1$, terms and conventlonnj obhrevhulons llnd symbols \lsed by the :s.tru ch.n~ l fabrications ~mj erectors. He or she niakca delaile;d d raw ing~ ol bcam.s lmd colum n~ u~e of he.aj.s.c. Jlt.mdbook and the tllbles o( squares, Logarithms and ~he _tri.gonomctdc um: tions arc i nlrot.luc~:d For maklng cakulalions for various members qnd rive led connactioh de:tails Special Problem crc:dll Students wor.k on jndividuaj rese,jrc:h projects within tbt! fallow ing limits: 7M.c lts:!lignmcnt l:j a rcs~dence: wilh complete on-site energy dependence whhout!acru~cing modern con~cnien<:c: Limited. to 5,000 BTU makim\lm Jo.ss.and lol':ated nurfh of Madison, Wi:>con!ill\: The student i~ expost!~.lo sohlt, wind, ~aler1 methane a.nd wood as.sources Of. eneigy, alor)g with ~nergy efficlent b~ilding desi~n. {;1 19 jqb Oricntntlon 1 credit This course cover& speciri.t oc:cupalionat i~formalion. to-prepare!itudent~ for _seeking empl~yment. Per.son.el dnta s.be~ts, job int~i" views,.li::ll~rs of introduction and reconun~i1da:hon are covc~d. Pormcr crhthte.tes, repres.:nlatives o. htbor, tnan-11gr;:-menl,.businc~ Hnd the pmfcs:sic.n.s are invited to discuss fispe~:;. of bt::comltls an emp1o~el!..61 NDUSTRAL WELDNG 6~1 1il Robotic WchJinlf, Sys,crn.:i t::redih Thrs c:ot,~r.!it:" c:vodua\~ ~HJiomalic \"iclding prjn-ciple:s-, including material h~tndling, positioning, jigs and (ixtq:in_g. Studen1!) will hc obl~ to programs. weldin_g robol to prcnll.lcc sound wddments Fund~menlal,of Arc Welding credits This.coursl! involves a sll.ldy of the electric au: and ils application to welding, the power suppucs, chan1cteristics am~.u!ic:.s of. w~lding electrodes, and the 'de.m:e of fusion ar1d penetration. A study ofjoinl ~cs.lgn am! welding symbcl.s J.saJ.so made Shielded Mebd Arc Techniques cn:dih Thi.!" c.ourse emphasizes 1veldlng _t.cch1ilque.s_ }n.:ju ~mons an :a variety or mqldis.the welding techniques u~ed Cor structun~l. pipe, pressute vessel and mainlenam:e weldmg ace dt:veloped. Structural steel que.li{icalion skills are also deve:lop~d. s:i G os Welding Te<hnlquc z acdlls n thi~ c_our.se, e study is ma..je of ilic oxyncetylcr!e.weldins pro tes! at1tl it_s ~pplication.-students ar(; als~i provided. wit~ an oppor 'lunity!t>-de\'e1op tc~hniqucs used in welding, brazing, surj.a<:lng and soldering C'" Sh;ieldJng Pnn:css Tecluliq~e.s ctedil:s This co\lr5e provittes aj~ urlent01tion lo lhe cpenlion o{ gfts shielding welding pa:ocesses ornt equipment. The tec~niquc: o{ ap plying gas.shielding procr::ssc~ to fetrou s. and non fendus metals is developed on.she~t. plate and pipe rnal.erlal:s. 6.1~1.5 Survey of welding Pruc~se! crcctits This <:otltse involves a sun ey and study of all "\VeldiDg processes, their fauul annmlal~ npplicolion 11nd economic value to the metitl fabr.ic-aliqn indu ~tri es. 61-UO. Welding Codes, AuaJy.s.i$ oti~_te~ung:. r::tedlb ~n this course, students dt.:.velop piocedures in.~ccord11n~e with tb.e Wisconsin Adminislrati'o'e Cudefor ~uildings.bridges and recognized welding codes :wrltlen by ln~slrial standards commit te t:;lj such DS AWS Qnd ASME. Non deslructi:ve ~~Lin& precti.::e..s are developed Klang will1 other methods of analyzing Wf:ldmt nts for ~oundness, compo~ ltjqn, strength and servi.ce lnt r::grity. 6l 5 We1d~l:!nt Aru~ly si s ~Dd Testing credits This eout!l ~ involvl"'s a.survey nnd sludy o,rion~dc structive testing processes. The u~ of non dfll'itructive testing for a quillity controlled prochu:t is- develope-d. The COU"()e incll..ltks tc.!;tlng of w~::lded ptajects fram 6.:1 10 Welt.ling Codes,. An.uly6i~ and "Testing, in a-ccdrdano;:e with the codes. 6 l 10 Wdda.bllily of Malcrlals c:r~dil s This course ls d e.$~gned tl).sb.1dy the ~apadly of a metal to be welded under th~ fabrkntion tdnditions ilnpost:d and the ability to p(!r orm sat i.sfactorlly in service. The ~imil ati ti e~ and dic~ fr-n!tu:f:'! 1unong: the various- welding p.roasses, a$ lh<:y pcctain lo!he Weldnbility or metlll:!, arc-n1so shidled. 6Z l5 Mcht:J Wcrh: ~:~~d Foundry Technfques. : crt~dhs This is n md als cour~ de.slgnc::d lo provide sludents w_ith thl'! theory and Practice needed to succcsfully prepare weld tesl..specimens ~nd weld joints lhrougb th.e us~ of h!lbd 11nd mach~ne tools. 6Zl-18 Weldlnz Melailu<KY <r<dltl Tlli :s.survey rouclle intmduce:s sludent.s!a lh,: field of nretallurs:y. Jt includes the locatioo of <Jre deposit'i, condltioos found n the carlh, deriv11tion of metals frcm thdr ores, rdinei;"jlenl and purification, adm,h:lure :~nd alioying, and the manutacture lnlo v.arlous shapes and rorms for in(tustry. The classificallon of fer. rou$ ilnd DM ferrous met.llls, the Jestjng-of me~j)s 101 m~:duln~crl ptcljt!llles, nnd cornrrtql"\ metal problems, -such 11$ (atlgue a.nd ~or i"osiun, arc ncluded Sl)'!~hd Pr-oble~s :l.- trcdits Advanced students inl<~re&ted in furlher.ing their knowl~dge pnd skjj!s in a.re11.s such. as robe-tic welding, metauography or weld l'l')ent nnalysi:; may be.a~gned ~peci.al pr_oblems through c:onsullolion wilh the departmi.ml'5lead teacbl!r and/or division deun/chairp!::r:son. 61~19 Job Odentation 1 crcdh This course covers sp~cific m:cupaticnal information to prepare sludt nts for seeking em.ploymenl. Personal data sheel!l, job inter views 1 let!c'r~ of introd~j.. ctlon illld reoommendat[on pre- ~overed. Forrntlr gra~uat~ s. rc:pre~.:nt.:jli.ve ~ of labot, mamjgemenl, bu:~iness and t~l."; pro~es.sion:,. arc invilc:d a di:o.or:::uss iispecl.s of be~ming.an employe<:. 801 ENGLSH Journalbm for the Vll'i'-'al Artist.. credhs On~ and one m.u.es three. V)sual Rrt and good Writint. Jaken. together, add up to qu ality and thoroughness in communics.tiou that s\lrpa&scs wotds cr art presented alone. Born of this oonct!pl and operating in-workshop fashlan. thi$: class gives visual [Om~ munications students basic news.wdh~g *il~ and style, an intc:n.sive dose: O!!r.Jm~ar a.tjd mechmks, persona! int~rvi-.::wing skills, ond other ba!iic wr.itwg tools so they <~&D. p~l words and visual milte:ia.b. 'ogdh~r in printed p11ges, Slide.tap~.P~ti\ li'?l'\s. rodlo TV spo1~. b-no and thrf':e: dimt!nsional disp!ays and in bnx:hu'res and ors:ml~o.tional newsjetil:"rs C9mmunlcntion Skills <:red(t.s This course hils two curril::u1um_track:~;~om:. or general p~;ogrsms, m1d one f~t business office progrmns. Th~,gl:.lleJ"il course _(!mph.a!lizes expository ready, writing and speakil:jg wilh pr~ctice in td~ntlf)'ihg at).d.::ottjposing tbeses :md support!!. Thf'! bmln~"" traok concentrates on :5enlence.striJc(ure, speuirig. bu~illl'!!l!l t~ minology and C:O"l."rt'!!oponder:a~::e. Both tracks int~uce m:_d jmple mt!llt Ubrary research skills.and eru::ourage..clanty, cooe1seness md concreteness i CPmmualc:aliOb. Skllh1 r::redit1 This course b~h~s on l.:mguagf! skills (roq'l 'Communlc~ lion Sltills 1. The general prqgram track includes persuasive writing and sped~dng, witb some focus on bu5iness cor. r~s.pondencl'!, lh<'! job interview, om,d other speech.&trategie.s useful in the workplace. The business tnck emphasi~s 1he.developrlient of 11kill in using rhetorical modes r~r bllsiness writiflc including a tc:chnical report. Bu5ines::t &t'c_ak}ng situations, or parliamentary proctdute, abo receiv1. altcnti<m Techniul Report Writing Credilll Thts ootjrse covers the writlniof tccbn i<;el rcporls of V.:Jclous types and forms:, lncluding the ~siting,or a re~t;a~ch pnpcr en a tcehnical su,bject related lo the student s occupat1on a~ field.o interest, 8J)l l5 TeQbnical R ep()rt.ng cr~diu n-depth.invcslig.ation inlo lht! teq_uircrnents or prepo-iilg ll.od pre!senting oral and WJitten technical reports is s;rc:s~. E~. plt::~s i.o;: 1s pla.ced on five 5t~tges a( teport prep11ratwn:!nveshgo;tmg, planning, organiz.ing, writing and revising. n ftddltion, p01tions o the course de.ul witb business correspondence a5 well as lhe. usc n( vlsuals, presenting inrormation to diherenl audiences, ond ptoblern-solving. The studc:nt.cn Bages in tl"'c:hnic:al rcpo1'1lng nc tivlties directly related a llis/hcr program. Pr.ereq u~iles ; 80l l5l CommuniCation. Skills land second scmcte1 s.tandmg,. - ; ' -:!

85 ; -Course Descriptions OL-158 TcchnKal Communication croouti Thi5 cour.s~ is de~jg11cd for Mudet!ts w.ho need to communfcstehighly technil:ul informal-on to pctsons o~lsidc fb(!ir OWtl ar.eas of experlise. The. emphasis is ~>n spc~king and wtltiilg clearly :~.bout technical proce!s!>es, procedures an,d equipment in terms comprchensib~c to a lay person. Prenquisltes: Cornmunka tion Skills!"aod Comn1unic.:~Uan_ Sktl!s ll.or cons<;!nt o( instructor. ~Ol-1 75 ndividurd Projects in New& aftd Mag~:r.lnc Work Z c:r~dils Sfudents write-their own thought!>,.. taries and lht! stories of others for the stud~nt new.smagjrine, SLANT. o:r far fr~l"la:nce markets, ro::dine phologrophy, story illustr.ation ar cartooning skills, platt!mh1iled magll:tfne,.brochure or-advertising page designs. ThrDUgh independeht study and t:jractlce, students. build cinlllcir skills wlth w~ekly _help and advice rnjn1 pro(e.!!sionals in joutmijism, art, adv~rtislng-nn\f phqtography. Students must ob tain can.sent of lhe instructcr.lp enroll. 801-ZOl English Composition _ credits Thi:~ bnsic c:ourse in expcslto"ry writing. also includes a rc~carch. prper. The te.1dings, which provide materials for djscl.llisidn and models!cji" study, are intended to ald the st\ld-ent in acquiring the. skill of underst11nding relnt1v-dy complete ide.u in written rorm. The course assum~s a basic knowledge of English gram-mar EngUsh Com.pos.itipn li ~.:rcdil:i This course is a continuati-on of En~lish. Compositlon r. rt is ihtenqed lo extend lhc;. skills o{ critic-~tl reading ;and apository writing U5ing essays, fiction, d~.:jmil.iujd poeliy lo pro\' ide further pr~cticc in ~,.:ptcssing thought through effective written En_glish. 80l 0 Ad,r~Jnted_Compo5if1on j crcldits Tbi5 tourse contitme:!i the-stud)' or exposittn:y writli1s fot stqdents who.whih to atlain o:~dvan~ed skills-in managinc the Written language. Prerequislt'!: 'J'wo seme:it-~":r S. -(1[ c:ollegt English in.du"ding 80t 01 CompcSition lor oon!!iient of insttudor folroduclidn:1o MMorn LitetaCure r ~tcdirs 'fbis in"trodudory lih:ratur~ COUT-5~ emphasi~cs- mo.jor British. and AmerjcO!\h ~ riter~ cf be 19th t:entury with sonle ~ltention to the origir1s Of modt:?rn dr~nlp. ' 8CU -.15 Survey of British Ut~rotul-(! l credit:t This survey colirse e.'<<jminc:s the major authon, worl-;s and periods_ of British litc:r.atwe,_ from its earliest fouodations to the end of the Restorndon/N!!a Cia~it: period, irf the L'OUt~xl.o{ hi:;.tmi~::lll, cultural and philosop~ic;~l b;:u~kgto\lhd!ri. 8() -1ti Special TOpkg n Brili:sh Utcrature credits 'fbi.s..:outse: is the study o! a limited topic in BtitiSh lit~rature. Se_ic:cted. readil'lgs. class discu5sion and ~riting Ssignmenls will focus on a p_artic:ular liletary theme, rorm, period or personal;ty. Coratcnt varies. 801 li' SUrvey or American Llt~ature.. ~;r~dlt5 Tbts is a survey course cov!ring major Writers of the 18th nnd 19ib i:l!nturies in American p~ snd ~t) Sp~cia\Topic~ ln. A~crlcon Litc[ature uedlts TillS course is thoe study of a limited topic ln Am~rkan liternhire. selected rcading5, class discussions, nnd wrttlng assicnmen ls will focus on a pprtic:u1.n Henry: theme, fonn, period cr Jlt:lrsonallty. Content varies Sulvt!y_o(\Vorld LU~_a,lure r crcdus This course involvl!! 5ludy of the oulslandi.ng Utc:cory master pieces of We5lern literaturl!, from tl1e Old Te_stoment nnd Hornet lo i~ etid al Hrc R~n.:ziSJsnce fjblh century). T.hc fir.sl s:emesler i..s noll'l pr~rt:[j\lislte-of the Second. PrereqUisite: 801-ZQl Eng,llr.h Compo!ijfjon Su:rVey ofworld Uteralure U cr~dlts. 1'hi5 rou.rsc ln<~olves study o( thc:_outst~mdlng luerury mus1cr plr:ces of Weslern literature rem th.e end of be ltena(ssem:e (l~th century} to the lost quarter of the 0th l;:t:nlury. The fir_st semeatcr j~ nat a prerequllile of the.tecvnd, Pre-tcqu;sih: ;.!DJ Pl Englbh Composition. ~ ln!rodu ~ tlon to Mod rn lllerllturoll credit ihjs 1:ou~ is a!urlw'ey of n10dr:m literature (mainly Briti6h nd Arnericnn) ln relation to ecmtcmporary 1ocidy and io mojor dev~lopmenl s n the oris o! tict{qn. drama and p<jr:lry. R~a.drnas cover Jtlll1l'tlal rom he 19&0'slo lhi! )g0 1 15, 80l 9 Contem.porP.ry Literature. cn:d.sts This ecurse s a survey Dl conlcmporar)' litetature lmalnly BrJtiab and Amcrlcanl in relation 1~ oontcmporory.sm:iety and to major developments in the arts of fiction, drama and poetry. Re1.ding!i covet m<jterial from lhe 190's to the 1910'11, Croatlve Writing crcdlio This course covet.$ tht: wi-lling of" short :stori~s, p(l!:try and the short plby or film s.:ripl. Di:!c:uss!.on focuses on.stud~nt mariu. cripts NewS! Wrlti.ilg.a.nd Reporting aedlts This intensive introd_uct'?-fy co\lrse in jo.urnulism has been:de~ign ed to give :studr!nt:!i a better understa.l)ding.a the t.mique role and.responsibility ar the joura~list working \n a ''free press" democntil: socjety. The.:uur-5e coven t!"le ~::oncems, prabjem' and techniques of the TClll.'!!ii rcpat~er, 1:1.nd piovldes pr"c:tical fx pt!rience.in news gntherl~,.edjting, i~lerviewh:i.g and c:apywriting. Prerequislle: En~U:!ih C~mp<:~sitlon Fcatq.rc: w.,iting. credlta Operating as n wrile.r's work~hop, w}\ere students read. db:::uss and crillci!e one another's work, th.ia class civts asplripg free_lance writl':rs of non.-(lctlon, and thos~ who might ~ he.tded for joumel1ism school;o. first chanc~ to be publi~he<i"wtlten. ClaSs membeu 1earn lo meet deadlines, conduct intetvii!w, ch005e lively story mil.terlal rom inside 11-td outsi<tt th.i! college, Write quer)r Ldters, do" rigorous editing and rew:i'iting o{ 1h~ir own arid\ otju~ r male-riail. lea ttl res ranging from person~lity protues, per. sonal expeticnce$ and historical features to column,&_iuld c5sllys are _chosen for pnblica.!lon each month in the.student newsmilgazine, SL.ANr.. ~rer~quisll e s.: News Wrlting and Rcpqrting.or English Comptl~tion l or equivalent ex, perienc:e and r:onscnt of i~slructor Visunl Communication in PqbJic.aUon8 CU!dils Thr9ugh.(e 11.di:ng 1 d~cussion and h.iboratory e.ll:pe'rjena1 sludi!ml.s: \urn." page. dl!_&ign.::ctlcepts.. copyfittlng.1nd hepdjine wr)tjng_, pic tute ~}l!clion ar.l':patial rr:lati.onsbips leading to visuall~p.~ct on the prlnt~d.pagl!, St\ldl!nt.s plll.n, dt:sign.and -edit pages forth~ stu~ dent ncwsmilgojzinef SLANT. Studl!nts abo lt!l1111 the new-est spc<:i~~ ef(l!~ts technique~. ade possible- by tb:l'!' technologic~j c:hattgl!5 in publi"shing 0\lt:il' the past 0 years. BOl-1 English Fundanlei:ttals'.. c::reditf Thhi course is designed to prepare student! to handle the run~ dn!llenl<~l~ of English cotrectly and.effe.:tively thtough an in_len sivc itudy c( sttucltjtl':, granitnnr, punctuation, mecnanic!!ii, diction omdwege Composition Fund.amtntal~ credhr. This course is d~ slgned 1o. m~_t_ th~ need!!ii of '>tudenu who hllvi! psssed Eng!ish Pundament.1ls, but Who l~k ~e skub n~ary or suct:e.s!> in Ccmmunitation Skms r o r English Cpmposltlon. t is for student!!ii Whfl getj~_r.ally lack thro: a kill!! required r:ontrol s~nlence tompieten~~!!.rid su-uchire m who-need prbtti.ce to attain fluency an clarity n fr~tming senl~nces Comm.unlr:allo.-.a.i tr:s!dits This course is designed to jmprove!!iitude_nl readln~, wrillng 1.spesklng and r~son_ing Skills throus h tbei ~eview :~nd appucz.uon cr lc1ngunge a,s r:ommunlc:.a.ti<:m~ n s~r:_retftna l end: stenographic &Cctlons, empltasi$ is given to the fundonu:nt11ls of grammar and spt:!uing Communication U."credlu This se~;ond semester course build.s upon ma~eriel covered in the fir.sl semester. t further explores.skills in job cetated tammunica don, ijlc~udjng ~njilys J,Df the technjqucs of pei.su.sjon oild Jogic,. and or the relatlonshlp of humon'lties and th media to the stu dent's Work ConununloathH\o l c.-.dlt Thla course ~ ~"sign r:d to improve studc:nt rensonlnsj!ijieoking, lf tenlng. wr[!lng and studying skills. Where P"' lble, the eo..,,; b tailored to work sltu llcu. t differs from primoruy lri deplb Communlcotlcm credli Thb """"" b de>igll d to llllptov< ofudenl r<oolng, writing, speaking e.nd tell.sonihg 5kllls through the re\lie!w and appllc:11uon c( language 15 communh::otion. t differs from pr marily n depth, 80 FOREGN LANGUAGE Occup~Uomd Spanish credlts 'this course is designed for people in law enf<lrcemenl and. criminal juslitt: fields. U e:mphasl:h:s corumunicaliq"l through se qm:ntial denlopment of linguislic: :skill!>_ applied directly to the oc ~11p11tiomd field. Li!itening l!jtd:sl)cllking arc: :~(r:c.. u ~: d. Reuding and \nihng excrci~es.complcment the learning procos!!ii. ln addltion;to the textbook tmd workbooks,-there Ls e.. coordin~tted aet of laborntory tapes. (or indivib'usl practic:c. 'l'hls course i5 designed or beginning. :!itudents. 80Z U Spanish credits Thi.!> Course, designed for the beginning.studenl,!!mphosi1es se QUcn1ial.dcvclopinent or Hng.ulstj sklllfi----:;frorn listening and speak in~ through re.ildin~ ttnd. writing. Oral a\lnd ptaclice is avatlable tc the student--vi<j inte1uivt:.ch1ssroom exercises and the ilccomponying t<jpes.for labore.tory and individua:j drill Z Spanish 11 ~r~dlts Tills course fs a: conunu i1tion of Spanish wlth th S<m~ primort ~rnphasls.o.n'listening, speiking, re<~din.s :m writins. 8{) 1 Spanish Ul ~red it& n thls comse, an intense grammatical review-js undf!rtak!!n to oon.solidale the: shident's general knowledge. Contin11ed emphas)s is phu;;ed on ur11l skills. Cultural aspects cf Spllni$h are presented through various literary stlccli6ri:a. Ptercqui.sitc: Spani.5b 11 or twa years o[ high schaol Spanish, BOZ Z1" Spnnh;h V ctedih 'fltis is a: conlirw<~tion.of.s0 7-lJ Spanish m ~Hh _spedal..1tt,...ntkln lfl ptobh:.tnati~ nuances be.tw-ee~ Spanlsh an~ En.glish. -More in fen ~iv:' -readingis undtilrtn.ken, lnclij.ding an intr~duction to ouls.tan. ding wrhe,rs. Prerl!quisilc: S0 1 at thrl'!e ~l!urs or high schonl Spanish, ~.1 Fre~c.h-1 credits Th.is coursj! is d~si~neq fo. the beginniqg studenl. BmphP::!ii:!i ~ p1.;zced on_sf!quentia~ devejopmi!'dl of lln{:ul.suc!kiu.s!toq) Jjstc.o ing ond speaklng through reading and writing~ Ore:l aural practice is prcvided via intensive classrcam.e~ercise.s and. the Hccompany' ing tapes fol;" lnborntnry and im.livid.ual.drill. 80Z.Z Fr,..nch U _....,._a edits 'This is a continuation Qf S0 Zl Frene.h l an.d is design~ for the studcnl who ~s compleh:d one semester o( college Fr'cnchj two yenrs of h)gh ~chodl Frent'h-.c( the equjv~lenl. A$ jn _Ft-euc.h, the silrne primary emph11s.is. is.placecl an a sequential development q[ lingl.ji:~ti-c skills.frorn llsten,ng <;l.nd speak ids tbrough reading anc.l writin11.. Orul-aur.aJ practice i$ prov~dtd Via intensive classroom exercises and the accompanying tape!! for Lt~,borat«:>ry and \n rlividlldl drill. 80 ~~ French lll credits Thj:s cour5e is desjgncd for he studcn1 who h:;.c:ompl~ted t~o. 5crnestcn of collegt: Frer1ch, three year!. o{ high school Frc:nch or the cqllivaletll. A tbarough tt!ltiew of various structures presented in _80.1 French J a.nd 80 French _are ausrnentc..od by re<.~dings from French n ewsp ~tper& and m11gazines. Brnph'usis "is pl:u::e.d.cn und~rsi.:j.ndiri~ the c:ullural refer ~nt s in the rcj~dings nth. on devclopingth~ Drat aut~skills.begun ln.previou.9 c:oprs~: s. SOZ- French iy c"'dlis. This.OOur~c: is designed!or the student who has completed three scmestej5 or college Fre nch, four yent~ of high schim1 Frr:rtch or the. equivalent. t is a t:ontinul1ticn of 80 Z:l Fnmc!\ rh.and jn, dudes arl inti:nse. review of Struc:lures with spcclnl nttentioll dcl!otcd to ptoblcmatic nuances b~:tween French and BngiiSh. Readings indijde a mod~rn novel, an excmpiary.shorlfitoryr rt oth century ploy, poems reptesentfl!lve c{ the Negritude, MoVe me rat. rmd artich::s and readjngs rejated lo the. F!re~~h spel!-kinb world outside France, 80 HSTORY 80 0 Ma~lng DE Modern l!uropo cr dlt& 1'h l.s inlrcduclory!'furvr:y t:nu{se b::ln~:e:ntrntes on exnmlning the m1..1j~ r pontical 1 ~hlelle<jt~a!, social and ~conotnic trends whkh thamcll;!ri"te Eutn~clrt & OtiC~\' n the period front the Rl!rt'sissilltc through lhc Frl:!:nt:h Revolution. The prlmnry for::us i".11n exani.i.na lion or tke chrmgcs which n'l<lrk the ttansition from medlevnl ~!Jt"h:ty to n1odem European ~oclety. ' Course Desetiptiuns-l!P" B0 05 Europe and the Mbd_e~'n World t:rcdit!l Thls {:O"iJne i.an hllroducho~l to Bllr6pelln Hjstory thilt sun ~:ys: the major ~ccial, economic and poltttcal ~rends aod cv-t:nt!i or-the 19th.ll.nd.Qt:hS!;_~-urles. Orte emphasis is-on Uie econo.mic 1 paliticul ilnd soda! c:flanges--wbic:h Jed to tht::devt:~opment of modern industrial society hi EU.rop~, Tht: fm:us is on Eutope lis a whoje, b~t e:jhlrnple:; c:omr:: pdmarily frorn V. 1 e.:5te:rn European C.QUntdes, e.g. Br.itain, "France, Germany. Material rdzj,tins La cultural <'.lld io~elle.;:tual dev~loprn<:nt~ 1 C.!.. Dilrwinisin, prflvidcs ot.ncltht:r ll:liljcr.(tjc:us. l"ijlally,.lhe connections ~ctweenau th<:se 'clll.cgori!:$ ar~ explored Amerlcnn Htstorv 07 1&65 "S credits.(n this cour s ~. the orlgln and "growth of thi! United States i:i &hldicd. 'l'bc c:ourse surveys American po!ui~al, ec:flnomic: and :~o~:i~l dcveloprncnl rrom the CouncUns of the Colonii.:!s through the Civil War American H :t~oty 186S Ptesllnt..credits This cou~se oovers.a survtty Of Ami!zic:ilrt politic:al,_ economic and!cc"iill dl!"velopmenr ftcm the l!!nd af!h:e Ci'r'il wa r!o the _ptescnl. 80~1 Hls~oey of the Ameri~au West _ credlt!!i> This_ CQllt~ rovers. tll.c e?lpa:nslon, se!uement a~d economic. dcvelvpmenl of thc.a;m:tic:w W~t. e.sp~i.1lly that region west o( the Mis:iissippi River. Empbasi:~ is placed on developing i.n5ti1u Hans, ulilizatiqn of resources, and ~ontribu"tiona of ~bi.lic groups linc:ludjng [ndi.ansl to thi!!ii.h~st~ry. P~rtic_u1ar alt~ntion is givcn tfl t.he ~!tl.~rnent oi Wjscoru!.n. Prerequisite: ~0 1 1 Amed.f!'HJ? History l607 ll)~.or 80-~l.~ericau History.B65 Pre_~enl NativeAmedczmJJs.tory. rredit,~; This..is. a survey cour5c covering Native Ani~rican t:l.lkw:-es Jlnd hi~torie5 from early times hj tb~ presert~. Particu~!lr ultcntioil.is place~ on the variety o( life ~tyfes of n~llve peoples, tbcir early tcuclibn..'i to white men, qu.tstomding.native leader1l, a~si.milatiof:teffotts and rdauon.i w.ilh- the U.S. gover.mnent. Prei"equislt:e:: 80 :nt Ainericaa History 07 1S65 o~ a0-.1.an:let:itll-n: History 1865 Pre~ l"! r1t U.S. lli:s,ory Since i 9-? ~;tedits 'This ~muse: trac e:~ th.c: Uevelopmenl6 in pq,litil::$,_ :mcic::ty nnd culture o( th.e U.S. :!ince 195. rt, focuses 011 new so dill moverp.e:nts ~ffio:ng Blacks ;md athe.r eth.~ic groujls, ypu~h a.nd wom~, ellvlropmcntp;jism i!nd the: r~l;l~vta loe rcligl9n.in... Amerl<:iln 5oc~e~y ln recent dcc:adc:$. lt_~ ill al~ ~:;entepon ~be cin 1:1f the U.S. to global power and the: ~mnestic co_n~l!.qu.ences and rc.spon:ic-'i to thi.:~ n~w Slalus History t~f Wcstern Civilb: ~nou 1 credits This c-ourse is an introduction to, the deyelopi11eltl of Western dvili~tion (.rom the inception of human society through the erid of th~ medieval petiod of European-society. T~i~ COUt$C ern~ phasizes the_ primnry.socl:il 1 economic, political and inteu~ct\ud dements or a c:lvhi...ntio.tl l\nd. th.eit interou:.tion wlth physic.;~l_erl vi1onment and technology. The course 111Jso ex.-1mines the n.1lur~ of change n civilizations of he an~ient ~md mr:dlevat periods of Wes~crn historical developmi!nland the ljnks bclwecn the mjor civililoiions whos'! history Constitutes lh.e bl~s.i! for tl~~ c:ot\tept o Western ctviliz<~l~on. The pdmary civlliz!!licms e~ffiin-cd Dr!! Mesopot.1mja, E"gypt, qreec ~, RO irtt! and MOOi ev.1j Europe ww1 tcfer~nc es to other relevant. i oc:ielics, ~:!,g.. Hebrews,. Phoenici;ms. Persians and Arobs History.pf.W~tern CiviJiUJUon 11.crcdlls This-l:Qurse off.e(s a btic[ survey.ofw~-5 1er-l civilization which pro;>vides c~ne ral k.~:~owlcdge to be \l ~ed ln 8 ej[amin.ation or a sedcs of topi-cs nr i~ut:s thai have been and.c::ontinul! tu be slghirl (!aral.in the; deveiqpmenl of Wes!r-(tl CiYiliZCJ:tlon 5ince }600. The topics, which inc1~;;de inrlu:stri<jlimlion, revolution ond im peiia li~>m, art! traced in his~orictt l c:ontl'xt that provides D. rfame.work for an in-depth anblysis of their odgiri!!nd dcvt:llop ment QS well QS tbeir.curr~nt statljs. 80 Z History or the. Thlrd. \Yorld: A!ila credlts 'This course a. nn nt roduction to d vuh.atiqn ln A:!iiQ. [t explore-5 the diffeo.renllile!uy!e.s a:nd way.! Dl t.hlnking_;:,j_gdlfkant lo historicol deve lopm~nt in lndl:~, Ch1n.a. and Japan frcrq. early. times to lhe prescrlt. The course. orrer$ per.spective.s on how ond why tht!se Asian sar;ieti~ developed heir dil!tinc1hte approeichcs to dviliz.ation, wh~t hqppened to these societies; as they ccrne into conlac;t with the. Wesl 1!Jld-finaJiy, how these socit"jic~ bziv.r: up pron.ched modcrn1zntion. Prere(lulsitc: One courlit: n European Hisloty or History o Western CiYiUQt1oCl.. ' 11 r '.,. r

86 loo..course Descriptions 80_ Hlst:1ry of lhe Third World: Afrk:a credit:t This is an introduction to the dvlllt'1ons of Africa from l!arly n~ throu.ah ~he present. TM: course material foeu~ on Africom society before ~em penetration, the basic uature of A({icun in stltutloos, lhe.coloqlol e>perle!)ce o/ Africa, and tkdcl'clopmcnl of Afl'ica since i11tkpendcnce n J960. PrereqW,lte: One <O\r&e n European History or tlls\ory o( Western Civilization. 80~ 01" u~s. Hi1tory credits This course c_overs U.S. history from Ul65 to pras1nt day, ~m phasiz.ing major political. eco1omle.lnd socl l trends in Amt!rjt:an society such as l_ndu$trialltation, continentol ~nsion, problems of social. chang~. Rational politics, and the emergence of the.u.s. as a world power. 80 MATHEMATCS ndustrial Malhcmatks 1 credils this.course bf!gins wlth the arithme:t_h: operations of fractions, -dec::ima.l5 and percent,-the use of lhe-c.olc:ul:ator in these romputalioos, as wcj as with po~cr., and.roots. 1'he,o1etrlo and British systems of measure Arc oompa~d, along with the use or enct and approllimate numbers. The ba.sic concepts of alg.ebr11 are revil!w!d so tbat the.studlnt can solve applied problems llu t usc linec:jr equa1ions and 1n~q~aUUe5 ln one unknown, a:~ well u gcomelrk formulns ol perimeter. ~:~rea and volume. Tbis Cour.se is broadly.ccu re1ated wilh Tec:hnica.l Science 11nd is preparatory to 80 1 lndustiial Mathometlcs T. Use of the hand beld, full function calculiltor!& etrongly recommended. Pren:quisite: A passil:ig grade. in hig.h school algcb~a ludust.-ial M tb..:n.ucs credits This cours"e"ts., continuation o( lndust'l'lai Mathema1icsl. t surveys the follow!:ag topics: Foctotlna polynomials, algebraic: fractions, exponeats, radicals, logarithms, quadratic equations, graphs, liri~r t!quatioas in two unknown.s 1 trigonometry and the solution o r :l var:jety ol word proble:nu. Pnrequlslte:.A pa~sing grade in 8();Jl lndus.tri1 Mathematics Technical Mntbe.mnUcs r;n:d.it5 This course covers he blslc Jews of alsebra in, olving fundamcn tal operations, laws of exponents, and gtouplng symbols. The solution of lim:sr equations in one. two and three unknown& is stwii~. induding- grapbiul reprueotauon and Cramer's rule. Formula rearrang~tmect, va.riatidil and word problems are ajso covered. Trigonom~ry is studied from the. point of view of nuruetlci'll solution of righ1and obuque lriangles, aswellns vectors. indudlng 1he d'efinitloru; W l~w.s necess.1ry. The h11nd~held calculator ts used throughout the course \'iith speclal emphasis in the lrigqno netry unijs. Prerequisllc: The required.score on the placeml!nt te5t iuid a plls!ng grade.ln.hl&h 1d1ool11.lgebra ~hnical Motbcmotlcsll crcdll This cour:se covers the analytic geometry of the strtilgbt line, lac: tor~ng, ra~tions in :algebn, Ji.near e9uation containing fraction&, qua.dra.tlc equ:1tions, exponents, radtcab, complex numbers, law.$ o loga.rhhms, exponenllal od logarithmic: equations, and ine qualities. Prerequisite: A p.lsslng smde n Technic::J Matht!mt~tit:sl BJcc:ttonl., Mathemottco 5 credlis i'his ~oursc offers a ruiew of stsned nun1be1'1, algebraic expres slons, exponents, algebraic: operations, ra.chcllls and complex numbers. 'This leads into he study of linear equntiom: in one:, twa or more unknowns,!lnd detennlnants. Functions and the: unlytic' geometry o the stn.ight line le1d lrl.to rlghtlrbngle trigonometry. vcc.ton, rcetan&:ulor, polar and ~mplex form. Logarithm$ and exponentials with various h ~ then studied~ Ptetequisite: The required score on tbe pi:. cement te.u and.a pusina grade in hisb achcol algebra Eleclronlts Malhtmallcs ll <rcdiis ThJs course contains the following toplcj~ Phasor alge:bnland furlh!r lot>ics io iogorllhrnlc and uponential equations wilb spe<if~e eleetron"= applkations. soluhon o sec:orid degrtt ond higher equations using the quadralie formula and other n11:thods, deter min1t1l.s a.od matrix algebra, binary arithmetic and boolan algo:bro method end lbeir rel<ltionsltlp lo electronic gating clr cuits, trigonometric identities and &OluUon of trig cquntlons, Lbc aml)itkol seomctry of a Jlraight Hne, coadudins with usin slope and Umi(s to lricroduce araphie~.l u lculus, fouo\ftd. by an over- view ol dlfferenllll and ntegral calcol s with some oppli<:otlorn. Pie:tequisttc: A p;ls:!ling grad!) in 80 1 lilectrpnks. Mathematics w equivalent Competency level. 80- M leroprocusor Sofl,.ort <rcclles This is an assembly languqge c:our5e lholls an ntroduction to computers 1111d prcjkramming taug.ht oo the lfj.m PC. The course covers mkn:u~omputt!r organlwtkm ond f~damenw programm ing con«:pts. iri addition lo the techntques of creatin& prosram.s. in an inler;u:tive pr9gramrniog environment. Studmts write. assembly language programs that move dela, communicate with lermin.tl and other pcriplw:rals, perforru.artthmetic open.tiou a d u.sc: interrupts. No prerequisite:.. a.o.a-171 &sjc Computer Ma thcru.tk5 ~ c.recljts. This eoune covers problem..alving and soll'a 1 &re polclagtsin the teduua~j <Htil using the BM PC. Emphuis is placed on applicatio!l problems thai stur:rnts. may meet in their ~e cializetior\.5. Goncepts p[ p~ogramlll;lng nclude input-output of data, dtcisions, inl~-radive techniques, data stor,:,ge and.tlphanumeric da~a handl ing. This course is norm lly taken coucurrt:ntly with Te.c:hriical Mathematics 11. However, the CO\.r&oe may be taken.by any.technical or vo1:tlomd student who wlshea to become familiar with what computc:r.s are or what they cart be ustd for. &0-17 Computer M thcmollc:s. crecuts lhis course covers technical problem &olving using Twrbo P!s~. on. the BM PC ptogrammlng language. The cour.se c::over'.s.1he hmdarnentals of pr.ogram deilgn and cmphoslzes tt:le lmplem~n tol: tion of algorithms for solving mathematical p;oblerns. Students willlesrn to crt. ate working eomputer prograrru in an in l ~rac:tjve prognmming environmcol. No prerequisite lntermedl te Alcebra. (meets limr5 pe,. week) l credlia 'This is a 5tudy Qf the rcilland complex nuj!')ber$-lhelr ccmstruc lion ~md resuhjng properties, how to ~~plify and loctoc algebraic expressions uslng fundamental Jaws and order of operations, hdw to solve fir$1.. and secood-degree equations and lnequalities in one variable, how to gn~ph fint degtee equ.uonl' aod lnequ Jttle& to: two v_afiabtes, bow to.sc)ve lfslezn:s Of equati.ods 1 &od how \Q deel wjth fraet(od.ll expol'l~ts and r::adi.cals. Prer~quilitc: Higb school algebra and gto~tr'y,:,nd the required score on the plaa!rner.t lest Computer Sdence t:'l'cd.jt.s This is an introduction to th!! tbeory and use ol computing.machine:;.. t covets tkc: con~1ruction of algorithms a.nd usc oi either lhc procc:dure-oriented Wngw.ase f ORTRAN or the struc; tured language PASCAL to solve problems from lhe malhemdics, phytie.l or social ~ie nces.. Students write.approximately seven programs.usin,; rt'ntotc lcrminols. The cou(loe consist.s of 1h.ree, 50-minute; lectures and two hours of'1el>oralory per week. Prere quisite: '.i'themalit:al tompctt:ncc: in college algebra or oonscnt of instructor Callege Alaebra jnl~e:ts 1lmes per week) credlu Th\s course includes the (undpmcntals of topics covered in 80-~0 1 lnlormedi te Algebro w il~ more.. lomalic "'"dy of the setofreal numbers and cmphas!s on the "{\lncllon" ~oncept lineluding exponentiill rune:! ons und logotithmic functlonsl along wjth lgebra of polynomial and raliorlol functl~ns. t tlso covers the. -theory of polynomial equations, jncjudlng the rcmtinder n~ {actor theorems., sequence and &erles., m:~thcmntics induction and the binomial theorem, matrices and dclermlnnls, Prcre~ishes: TWc:l ye;~rs of high tchoolul~ebra lnd one year or hlsh school geometry er lntermediate Algebra and satisfactory score on m:11th pl.o.oement ex.nm. 80-Z TriJOnOmelry l~tt.& limes per week) S crcdlt5 This coune covers the sludy of the six trlaonometr1c functk>ns, thrir invcne f11nclions, the: solution of right and oblique tri&nal6i basic identilics, graphs of the trigonometric (unctions, logarithms, trlsonometrlc <quallons. ond l ncllans ala composite om&le. Prercqui.ilc: 80-ZZ College Algcbro. 1'ronslcrobllily: '111ose people p)onn.ing to cdtcr the mathcroolics, L'11&tnccrins or sc:lrqce fields should check lhc.tcltocl to which thoy plan lo pply os lo whether the credit or thl$ course b lr&nsl<':r&ble. R0r9 Mathematical Anu.l)'sls [~t:ct.s 5 tlmt:.s per week} 5 credits 11iis course involves an integrated treatment of topics /r"'n'l col le&e algebra Blld trlgonometey aqd is d<':$ignc:d to Jay a sound foundalion for hit;her cour~s ld mdlhemallcs. The topics c:o'l~red indudc: Wnear ond quodrntic func;tlons, olhcr polyooll}iol func lions, exponential und lugiirithm'c fu.n<:tions, lhe trigonometric func:hans, 'and some analytic g.:omctry in the: plunc. Prerequl$lta: 'J\, o yeo!n!i of 7ie AJ~brn anti o ulisfadory mafhtmatic"s place-. mcnl 1~. seore: A0"-1 CHicuJus H~ Analytic Cco.-.c rr {nuel.!i 5 iim PS per weeki '.5'uetl.ts This course is dl'si ned for students of mnthcrml!cs, science and enginc ~ring.ll provides":jrrintrocluctjon to plane. nalylic geometry, bnsic propcrtics or limits, role oc ch;angc of Junctions, rontlnuily,.simple_ deriy111ives of olscbraic runction.s, curve:!lkcl c:!jin~ maxima lind minima, ndefinite lrltcgratton with applicil liens, ttppto,.,imutiag Dn 1nlegrati0n an(:t 11pplltatlons Of definite in lcgraiion, suc::h a!l ur~~ between two curves, volumes, smfacc tttc.:t of re:volulions, centroids, hynlo~hi.tic ' preisure end \vork. Dif. fcrentlntloi1.1nd integmtlon ef'inver.sa trigonom.tbic: fwnc:licns ~~nd.n11luntl logt1rith'ms l!re covered. Prereqlli!ite:.A,p assin.l:.grade. in 80 1.Tdgonomctry, 80-9 MntfteTnalk An a1ysi~ or con sent of.in!llruc,or, 80 Calculus and AnolyUc Geometry (mc:cb 5 tim~s pet week) 5 Crt!dll8 '!'his cour:;.c is de.ygm:d for st\.ldt:nl:s of matl)emali<:s,.~cic':hce nnq engineering. t cover~ the integral' nvolving tht: method.of pllr liill rrttctions, intecralloo by pan ~. n'umerit,:,l metbod5 to ~ppro:t imu.te definite int~jg,rals, goom:c'try or coner.~nd conics. N1wton's mel hod of opproximtlilioa 6( roots, polnr cun e;. ::are:js end in legnls'iovolvir~s. po1ar coordinlltt:i, p1ratneirlc cquatlons in kinematics and oru~.tytic geometry and vector diherenu.. uon src rovered: Sc:alntnd vi!ctor product of twu vec1ors, di fc.rcnuatioo of --.eclots, space curves, infinite series and conve:rs;ence are covered.. Ptereq1.\WJe: A pass,ing grode in 0 1 C~lculus and Analyiic Gl!!omt!Uf 1 or conse!lt of instructor Basic.StatliUcs acdlu This course covers appropriate tcchni:que..s for collecting, analya ing. rtpocting and inr:erp.,eti.llg data lo reduce the uncertainty in herent n inferen~.1nd decisions based on ub:strvations Sllbject tu tandom varioliop. H.a&ic prob:lbijitx. rilndom v~w.bles, the blnumi.u.l and notmal distributions, and the method o lcut.squilre.s.a'l'e PeveJoped io ju1ti ~ the {oonu:~s. ~fld procedures. Poi.n_t.and interval esti!f1.1es of the: mean, proporlioos, and otber statistics ilte OOU:intd for data from experimenls tmd other &ources. Comparisons, correli'ltkln nd regr~s~io o Jtnttlyses; ond hypothe.st!.s tests.ai'c carried out ilnd jus.lified. Basic expt"rhncntal dl!'!!:~gn 'i'!: introcfuced. Tllis ls a basic college statist.its counc satisfying college requirements fi>r persons w'lch o mlnimum knowledge p( il1gebra Mathematlcnl Fua.damentuJ:.;: Z credits This course begin~ with A review of Lhe fundamentals of arithmetic :md mov~ on to bcgil)nit\8 ::.lgebru. Thct ~ut<: ri ala luicd arc those which mak~ mathemolic$ r~ nli:;t i c to an A,varage.adult or high school s1udent. 80-!>~ Prc.Cqllcge AJcbra. credits 'J'his busic: ti.jj;cbtjl COUrSe COVetS the four ruaumcnig( fjpcra~ ions with signl!d nurnber1, fraetil?ns and polynomiui~ n a<iditlon to graphing. solving Jlncur cqultions and inequalities, factorin&o solving.quadra,lc equa.lions by f~ctorj ng. and $Olving system:s oi. linear equations in two variables. rrcrequi&l1e: AdcqUDit.kill in basic arithmetic P c-coll g Gco,.elry <redlls,,is cours.e covers the m1jor concepts of geometry ~nd is an ac C'cler.ued version or tbc t'fpic l oue-}'ctr-<oursc. Emphouil ~ pj.ac. td1m ~he UGC' nnd undcrwlnd.ins of the inl("9rl.lnt f~ts a~ul llln~llinci, congruent trbngh!s, circles :md right triangles. Prerequisit.e:. Adequate sku 'n basic arithmt'lic~ H0-78 M<ilh.-tla l lfor Pood Sc<vke oad FOOd Prcporollon Asalslanl l <rcdu Shu.leot objectfvc5 ror this 't:ouuc are: To becomi: prolici~nt ia ' lx sic oper11tions u&1n& whole number.s, conunon hnc:lions aod dc:cimlil rraction:&: to understand pcrccr,~ t and be able to &Oivc problcmslnvolving it; to be able to solve vcrh;:~l problctns os a ccn Course DeS:rlptions 7- sum.er and as one prepering {or an occupation.; ~~obtain ~n in trodudion._to the m!!lric aystem, pulicularly the volume me:.tsures used in food pr1!paration.. 80 ~79 M~lhe.~o.ttcs U 1 credit Thi~ course in7o1v~ a review of frox:tiaru, d«imals and perceril&ge including the metrlcsyste.m, measurement, &eometry, in-. strumtnt&lioo and 1n lntroductkln to caleultors. 1'be CO!.Use is modtftcd ~o meet the needs. of a particular vocation Malllematlco ll i credit 'l'his counc 1::0vers timple algebra!signed nurnbcrsl a1gebnlic m.mip'!laiions, equations), ratio And proportion, JCOlphs,.nd ricflt tri.nngle 1rigvnometry. nie oourse ia modlfled to meet he Deeds of a pe.rtieul r vocation. Prerequisite: Mat hematic~ nor ils equivalent. 80,81 Mallromiotk V credit Thi!i coucse is Jor niathine tool studenu only. The tr~onometry t:onsisb cf olutions or riht and obli9u,e trionsle!l$ with sp~::~ciric: applicati~>n, the: o:~ ritluij,etic of whi ~lt is done on the hjnd hel.d calculator. The binary syltem ii c.:ompered with the decimal numctal r.ystem,.!lnd application to.numeti~at co~tcol ls. PJ;tde. Gr.ap_lling,.,ith rectangular.coordinates is also t~~pplle d.10.. numerical control. n OOdit:l!)n, formula~ with appli'c:atlon to lhc trade are studied. Prcrequhite: P01sslng gr~:~de. in Mathl!matics 111 or: Hs equivalent. 8Cr9~l Computer Prep Math l.uedit This'.cour.:;~ is:auipltoduct{on to Jhe.JBM PC~ E.ach cli1. ho\jr starts wilh a chassroom.otientd.tion and <:.otjij~ue s in. 'the r;omp1:1te~ htb. The course ccntecs ;~round ~ uslgdm~nls, l~ of Which n: quire one-or more f"'!e.s of printout. Students are famuiaf~~ ; \-tith lh.c oomp~ter ceyboard. They are ahown how to USe the. ptinter aml how to save files to t~ elr ~~ di!.ke.tjes. S:tude~::us ~ r! introduced t~ t)le )l.a$1c prosri1rrimlns1an1uvge. Th~ tmph~&~ rs on crmtioo o{bi&h tf:solulion gr pbics screeru: and printou~:. St.udepts are irltioduced td da.1a base manag~menl usin.&; dba.se TJ. Each Sludentl::r'eales a $0-record nune 1nd addtts:s data base (or fur1j)ci-'.du10ii:ralalion. Microcomputer tcmurtoloy U lntroduo!d asappro~iate1hroughoul the course MUSC 80.~ 01 New College Sint.ers. l credit A $wing/show chorel e~mbk that p~lorms the mo$l ~vrnmt popul:1r music Ylith.in~s 8nd danccrs and Jia.ht sound-directing pcrsoonel,:this course gives.th~ partldpanls uc oppot(uqity JQ work within the serious pr9(1u<:lion of popular.music et lhe c;ol lo!!ce lt;~ej. Students il.fc o:ncourased.to audillon the first.week or each sem'csler j azz E~semble.1 crodlt A twenty-piece big band reheo\u\ng and perlonning jatz literature, thi ihoujs~ emph11sius jdu style and improvjs$1\o.n. Auditions.sf.e necti!~t}' ConlemPorary Music History credits Tbls course lokt:s a look at contemporary c!usical, pop a.nd jazz music slyles beginning wi"th the tutn of the century. 805~.7 Music A.pprcdDtlon. t:ndlt~ This i.5 a sen-era survey cou~e i~ muaic lor those nterested in le~rnin s through listenij1g to performnces. of music recordlnas. The-thrust is lc l1arn how to properly lis len td ~ujic (mtrumea.tal En sambj~s credit This OOursc. invo.lves rehe11rsaj aod performance or mu~1c lroro. wind 6Rmble Jiteral\.J'C. h Ls open to.au MATC stl.idcnls Bask Music Theory Z credits 'l'hfs is il:course ir. developing bask mu'ic concepl$ln rbtotion, lnlervah, sroles, ~hords and rhythm through JiQht singing and elementary dic1otion. No previous musiul knowjecjse il required, M tul!: Theory ~ rediis ThiS course rcqu\rt's basic reading kno\-iledgc of mu.slc. Exleuivc Work- is dont= with ear tralnlng, melodic 11nd hat monic dktution, sccre reodlnz. and th and l7th century co nterpolat. 11()5.00 9!1slc Mu:sic Tt~oiy s not l' prcrequiiilc to this course if lht: ilud~~t's ntuslc badtjround ls Alfons. il :1.

87 8-Course Descriptions Muolc Theory credits This is a continuation of l Music nu:ory 1 ead offers con~ linued WC?fk in ear train inc, melodic and harmonic dictaliont s.c:.ar~ reading and 1St~ and 19Ut century harmodie and am lrapuntal techniques with analysis of period worlt.a. 805 Z65 General HlaiOJy of Mu1ic credit 11\i.s C?~r&e im olve.s a survey of music: styles in Europe thro\lgh exteo.uvt record.listening ~nd biographlcal studies of composers durlng the Baroque. Classic. and Romanlic per~ Spec:ialsuest ~~:.~:!!.att endooce o..t s~ conotrt& ate an mportant part SdS-70 M usic in Pe.rfonnanoe 1 credit This i$ a rou~ in music appte<:lauon which presents diverse aspects of musk literature with a. concentration on seticus music. etas~ discussion is an ntegral part of. lhe cour~. 806 NATURAl.. SCENCE Chembitry credlls This tqur.se is de.sisfled.to expo!tt student.s to the fundamental concepts of-inorganic chemistry. nmphasis is placed on learning lhe basic principles and quanltltntive measuremrrnta. uied in ~hemi.slry. This (owldation course con$l&t& o( three hours of Jecltuc. a.nd one,. two-hour labor1toty ptriod per week ChtmUtry-1!. credits This is a C<Jntln~aUon of Chcmlstryl. f offers further sl~dy_.pf basic che~ical principles and the application of.thes.e pnncjl>les. Students.arc intcoduced1lo tbe propertie.:s, "'tru.ctuics and rea_ctions of organic compounds. Elementary aepecls of bidch~mi.stry are ctin~dered j Te-chDicaf Sdence l.s c:ttd!te n this ~urse, th.e basic con~pts of c.bemiotry Mld ph~ics are st~died. "Syste~ of unhs are tint introduced, followed by. eletnmf.s, compounds, at()fnk.struct\lre, ~mica) symbols, the ~i~ wi and quanlilauvc chemtc:d relauarubip5. Chem.istry also indud!!s: propertid ol. acids. bases ond $lts and acid-ba.se indicators and selected rus of pn>c!icat or applied cbemlstry. Phy~cs topics include fluidj, elasticity aod Jaws of ~r.and gas. E~pttas~ is plic"td on qlja1itativc. pbenome~ with a de empbnsls en matbeawical ilbilitles for &tude.nt$. Tfteco~e is broadly correlated with 80~ 1 1lnd.ust.ria1 Mathematics: Stude.a..~ enrolled-in tht Wtial communicaticns progran1. wul recelvf e:xp ndtd $tudy in t ~e~t"e.t~ ot.llgh t, vision. color-, optics and optktl lnslruments. l'r~requisite: One. year of high school Kience, Technical Sdonce li-s aedl! Tbis_..survey.coune: introd.ucu students to the rlc:nientary con cepts o( physics a~d how' these. concepts are apprted Co.be:.l~;: t-echnofogy~ The C9UfSC ncludes vector meieh~nlcs,. ste.tlcs, dynamics at~d introductory rot~tlonal mechanicj." St&Hca andd} nrunies Of fluids an b~iefly introd.uctd. He!tt.snd tefnperatur~. iu!it,d.~~llion and geometric opli.c:a, e1ejncntary elec~ticlty. and magpcusro are presented. This course includes apprqximc.tejy hour-' o( integtaled. ~tudent lab:o.r.r.~tory exercisf!l. H s mo.re ~roblem-ori~::nte:<j than TechnicaJ Science. The cour&;e s bror~ly correlatcd ~ilh 80-1 Jodu st rl:ll,maihemah~ JJ. Preiequisite: TeChnical Scicnc~ -S or equivalent TechniCal Scl~nc'.t.- <redlls 1n thilli cour:st, th.e b~src concepts of chemistry and ph:t"!ucs Me stud led. Chemical symbc>ls 1 lormulu; equesoos; atomit s-tructure and chemical bonding are introduced. Tho: kinetic molecular theory,.awes of mattcr 1.1olutions, sci.ds, bnes, nits and th&: coan pounds of carbon ar~ prc$ctltc:d. The course lncludes thcrmlll properti.~s of m:~tter ~ ~et~ods of hea.t trtnlfer, iujd the.6u.idy of etutic~y ond fluids. Emphuis ls plfetd upon the. eppli~;ation of ~ntific,pri~ples to the solution of Ptobltms encountered in rnodtm technology.. Corequlsite:80 LS Tethl\ic l Mathematics or 80-l6i Electrooics Mal~emattcs t Z. T<cb'liul Scle~ce aedi!jo This course begtm with tho.t dy of vector onaiy~ oncl pr<><oeds tbrf>dkb statics and dyn~~mlu. Both tunollttionancl rotottonot me~anl cs arc.studied. After work, energy and power l r!! in troduced, thermo-dyoomi.. is studied. A briof inl oducticc to wave motion follow1. CeOrnetric and phy, lcd 9Ptits prec;:reda an ntroduction to eledridly And rns1neusm, Atln 80EH!51 Technical Science, emphu is is placed upon th... pplkatlon of bbstc sdenlific prlnclptc.s to he soluuon of pro~ucal problems en countered in modern technology. Prerequisites.: 81)6.15l Technical Science tor equiv~tlent, Technlnl Jl.bthcmatics or 80 1 Electronics Mothematlcs l. Cortqutslte: Teclm.ic&l Mathem11tics ll or 80. Electronics Mathem&tlcs Beollh Tc:chnlcot Science credtto n thls counie,lecture, demonstr:auon aod flilbot"atory e.xpuie~ are desi$ned to rjv.e &n undustandin& of the scope and limitations o( th~ fundamep.~ principles and ~periment.al laws that describe the behavior o! tbe physic:al universe ancllhe application of these to an underst.anding of hum:~n behavior Radiogrllphy Techuolosy PbyJi<S cnnllto Thl!' m&n objective~ of this eoucse tre to develop a conteptq.aj foundation of the basic pro_perties of pbyalc:.s nd pro ide pracucal lab expedence ("()ncerning dae ~asicj11ws a nd prii\cipl~s of. physics as rdated to tbe field of tadiatjon technology. Topic' covered include. mechanics, structure of matter, electrostath:s, magnetism, eiectric: circuits, electrornag_nctlsm. and rt<:ufje~tion. Thcrc: is a ~lose c:orrelation between m terial pre$cnteclln lecture and laboratory experiment.s and upe:rltoce.. 'Prerequis,ite: High school algebra and physics or their e,qulvalent are ~$dul G~ner~.Cbemlstry 5 crodl!t Thls course is piirn.uily designed for students who nc:"ed a mooeml relevant themlatry. course Cor one of th lied health fields. This Js a survey course covcrin& a bro cans. of topic. Lectures and leborllto')' experien ce.:~ cov.er the fund1m~t l aspects of lnorganlc.chemistry followed by the e&sentials of Ofg&Wc chemistry and an introduction to biological ~he01lstry. Topic.s CO~er~d in dude elementary problem solying. atomic Gtruct"cr-e, petiodicl_ty and boodin" re:.clions and. ~n~r gy chtmge:s, nuclear" chemistry,.solutions, colloids, ors11d.ic (\JneUonalgrpups and th:eli' reactton1, lipkls, carbohyd~teq., proteins. hormojje5, :_ DNA and irrinlroduc:tlon 1o melaboijsm. Prerequisite;. One yeu o! high school'cbomialry e< pre couege chemistry Anlm l Biology tfedlla This cowx covers general biolo&ical principles and c:hlphol$izes e_dl.s~nu:tvre aad funclloo, comptratlvc morphology of i.n Yerieb~~~.e:rtc:brate anatomy, phy,io!ogy anji gendics. ~neral-:con~ration of bi()glcll proces5e5, ~~they relate to burn;m ecolcjt:y, t1 py<n. Animal BlolosY, to~eu with ZooiOSY Con_ctpts"~ equills live a-edits in Ani.z:nal BioiQSY ,~losY Coc>cepto.1 cr<11\t 'J'bis coui'ee dlscwscs _current la,ues ln zoology and l' ~pported by fi_lras; read_ings.and stude.at projtcts. Tile: major p!rj of tbc!=ouise ls student-directed on topl~ of current bioiogict~l irilpor tan~~pl:crequisile: Concurrent eprollment.or previou$ creqjt ln. 806 ZQ ~imal PioiOJ!i. 8(19-0&:. Aaatotny :and Pbylto.l~.., _ credlta This cour~ featu.res lc~ur es ~nd l&bora~ory,6ea1jn& wlth, tb~ hu.m.an body a$ an integrated stru;turaj and funcuonal unit i.nduding t~e circulatory, re,pirbtory, djgestive, e.xcr~to,ry. rc:prcdu.ctive, ncrvow, e11docrine, twuscular ind skelc,taj systems in 11dditio~ _to ~e ll structure and phyilplogy. Prerequisite: One year of high school chembtry. This course & not,.ccep\able n programs i'"eq\liring two seme. tcr5 of AMtomy and Physiolog)'. So6-07 ~ lomy and Pbyslol<>iY". credit Thi.lii t ()urse (eat urea lecture~ and. Jeboratory dt.uns witb t_he h uman body as an integrated,,ruduit~l and -funttion l uriit n duding blilsic biochemistry, cell structure and phyllo!ojy, h;..,tolog"y~ integue.ment, nervous, eddocrine, skeletal.and mu~lar Byat~m~. Laborr.tory exercl.et lndude S\Udent dbsecuc of v.;trions rrtsb edd.prese:rved materlajs u We:U 11 e:umination ol a h man cadaver. Pr<requlstle: One ydr of hlsh ~<hoot chemillry or onel{~ter ol couoge ieve! thc:mlotry. Tblo cx>ar!< b the f!rll.semester o( a.two-semntu ~e and lj not ccept.a.blc ~re oae,ocme:sler Anol<>my and Phy.tlolosY coune!o required Anotomy uod Phy lojoiy J( credtlt 'l'bis c:outoe featwes locturu ll>d ~ tory exercioel d.,jiag witli the humo6 body u on iotesrated stt, cturai ond (unctlonal uoh iududlng Ut.e eircw&tory, rupiratory, dlgnuw, fjcretory ltlld reprodl>cttve systeme. Labortlo~ eaercdel tnclod.todent dw.ctloo o! cat u well~ ""'dation of humao <.~dover. Pretequl lte: Anatomy 011d PhyaloiO(Y lor con><nl of tostru.:tor. Thls criurse a the RCOnd semester o( two-tc:mestcr ~e quence encl is not Jet:eptable where a one-semester 1\.n tomy.,.q Phy1WioS)' course i1 required. 80_6 09 ntroductory Coii K Chornlotry 5 i:redllo Tb_L5 1S lh~ first 5e.matc:r o. a h <> 5Crnel:ter scquenc~ in gener l ~lt:ge ch~~'y Bmph_a~ s is p~ed on developlngan in depb un~e~llnd!n& <lf_ c.hem~cat prfric1plea and.co"ooept.s. Labora,ory work J! de!rgntd fo.!.'1i..st students in under.standing chemlclll conct':pls and to develop their probltm-solvins skills The course u. &!:signl!d f~r- those students expecflna to take mor~ ~one semester ~f collegf! level r.bemlstry. Ttu: stu~ent may complete tbe )'ea.r of &ener~-coll-ege chemilby with tlt.her oc Pr"""!ws tes: Two ye:us ol hlsh"xhool mathematics or equivalent omd one yeu of hith.school ehemb.try or 80&-71 Pre- College Chcmmry General and BloJoslrel Cbemlstry S c.-.:di!s Thbo course cohtinucs the quantitative tnorgank t mphasis. steblishtd n latroductory Calles Chemistry and ln dude5 the topics of kinetics, equulbrium, thermochemistry and electrochemistry. n ~diuo[l,.the major portion of. the semts1r:r Js devoted to an il)troductlon or organic ehemlstty and bioch~mi.s_try '"troij~ctory College Chefllll\ry 5 credllo Th1s 1s a conh_nualiof\ of 8Q_6 ~~~ ntroductory College:.OteoiiStry, The cour:se.mc:ludu applteat1on of-principles to cmmit al reac. lions,.the!"n'lo dlemjstry, electro-chemistry-1 q\lalltatlve t!naly.sls, coorcunauon con1pounrls and OfganJc. structure&. Matotlalis pr~~nted ~lecture, disc'j~~on and laboratory" seuinss. Pterequl:SJ~: ~06-09 ~ntrodu c:toey- coms c: cnemistry". 806,1. ~rs rucchemlstry s.crcdlts Thi~ ~o~rse 1s an muod~cllo ~ to the subj~ct of o~gsnlc ch.e~;s.lrr. -Top~e lii mc:ludc th~:.dauifia&hon of orpruc compounds ilnd th ~ types <lf reactjons they undergo.- as well, as the minncr in which. t~y pr_oce:d. The relationship of organic compounds to the en VLr~nme~t llli empha:~b:ed lhrou,hout the.qourse.. Laboratory" expenments ~l~>w for the actuol pw"ormaa.ce of reactioms discussed theoretically i111 ct~~.. Prerequisite: One..se:mellle.r college chcmjsuy or eonsent o{ instructor Botany u dilii Plant 5Clence deals wj(h e wide variety of or&&ni.sms that tre of. gre:at i11terest and are buic to 9ur sur lvel. 11H!se orsanisms wiu be v_iewed from varlouto pet$pectlvu-t:~~xonorpic, physiological, <t<>logical, et~-:-ln bopf' ofdcvcloplng on over ll uncle<sjj>n<ilag ana appteaouon of lhe11 value aod beauty. This will "hopefully!e.ad.to whc:r use ~nd rv.ller_life. Arcu'of emph.s.sis iccjude: l' :t <lnomy ~nd evolutio~~ phystology, ann«omy and ecology. A ;,u:rvcy 0 planlo and plant-lake ocgahloma will be premnted.. 80~ 17 ~uion~col Concepts. :. l cr"edlt T~1s ~0:0'~ 1s anj.nfo(m&l di:scussion period lnten~d fo provide students. wuh n forum for di~ussin g topics of thei( choice. Thf! collecuon and free lnterch hge of lilform&uon and idcn ifi "ncouraged. Analysi5 Rnd evaluation pf studej)t Opics. will ~kl ~!~ ~~~=~i~~~~utaadins al)d fu~uonlng,ln iodtf'!l highly 806 lu Geocrai.C~tllege PhYlltU S credits n lhi.s cour.se, tbe propertle o( matter 1 mccpanlcs:, -beat and.snund are.$tudi~td through lecture~ df:l'lionatr"a,ltln and laboratory work, Z...boratory prac.tic:e tenc:he.!! the t~~pplh:ltion of lheae con- cepts and &trene:s: the disclpune or._s:::ientiftc study. Pre,equisite.s~ Two years of hish school<lgobra ond one yeor high.cb<iol grornttry or tqulvalent. 806 Genoral Col lese Physico. 5 credits BlectriciJy, n~nc tism, opuca and ttomjc phy&ics arc. ~tu.died iji this course through lectij.re, demonjtratl011s 11nd Jaboroloc:y!ft'Ofk. Prerequisite: 806-Z1 General College Pby61ct or equtvolcnt. 806!1 Hum! Anatomy cr«<m Tlais COU'6e b" rigorouslntr~uctlon to the:. Mructure or Uae. bumao body lor 5tudentl n elled health or collesc transfeq>o grcms. A""'aUed coverage of human developmeal, hlstolorr and gtosnnatomy of coch system will be given. Na<mal functlonbt& ood.. lected dy functlo115 will be dlsc.uoed n ordor to provide clear undersl ndtr.s o! the roto o! each ty l<m. Det lted obserta tlon and dissection of h~m an anatomical material (cedaver, 6tlcttod organs, etc. will be used to dnelop a sound throe dim~onal peup«11v.e: 9f\ body ~trudure. Course Descriptions Eorth Scleuce.. credlia This." CO\Ue: "introduces students to the physical nsture of the ~rth.!he: a~osphere, hydrosphere and. Jit Bo~hcrc: arc stu.d.led tn detail. Pb.ys.tcetl proccssc$ and an undctst nding of their cauics an effee15 are inve&tigated St~TVey of Mtrooomr credits This is: an. introductory course mvering the observations, thl!ories and pnnc1ple.s of :~stronomy. Are:.s oovend include the hlslory of onqq:ty, tdescope.s. thc.r rlh and ~solar syucm, stars and their: evol~~on, gajnl.es aisd th~ evo!utlon of lbe Universc. Tfte course coos1sl.i of led.ure-di~eussion aes.sioas With some even.iog meeting~ for a~r vie\vina. with tht: achool~ 8-inch telescope. Pr~tNq_ulsile:: H1&h achcol algebr useful. 806 :7~ Mlcro!>lolosr ilts This s ~m Jn t rodu_ct~ry oou.ru lo "mlcrobf.otogy. General topics and specific microbial pathogens arc discusaed. Ms.lerlalls coor illnal.ed in 6ut h a w r J~at the se.me lopiq arc cov.crcd 1n lectu.r~ and l~bort1tory at the sarne time. Tepi.Cs d.iscu~d incluoe: MOt- phology of mit:r:o org.mi.sm:s, :sterilizntioa o.nd disl.nfecti ~~ methods, ~alhogc~s cau~i.ug disease lo variou.s body"systc~,, udr mal A ora of the body; drug scn ltlvtly testtng, complete blood oou. nt~. dcntll microbiology, funga.l lnlection s ; eucaryoti~:.. par~stte:s and seroloilc testing for ~ ral lnfe c tlo~ n~. pre~cv tes.tmg... : Gcm~ral Mlcroblplogy S credits This_ syr.vey oourse. includes the structure1 (unction, ecology, n~tnhaa., :phy:~iology &l:ld gepetiea Of ft)lc.rq orgall.lsms as wcu.as q discussion of medical, industrial, agricultural and food " mi~ology. The.coursl! will atsa include arl introduction ~.. standard techniques and prooedure.s t~sed tn the mlc:robiot'ogy :!aooratorr. : Applied Pbyil<al Science credit; '!hts ~e covers the fvnd~me:ntal p:inciplu of physic l scieric:e whicll ~ve p.~ct:~a! ~~~J~tions for people in tha printin_g iii~ Jlustry. EttlJlliaslo s plited on the-physical ond chemical i>ropcrtte~ of~tler as well a.s itt composition, Pre-college Physics u.dits ~ _c~ U de:sialned to givt students a better t~n&rwmdini bf_ =Jij."fu.nt ~to de:morutrote the imporl_ance of ~~}'~cs. in' ~ Scie.ace 1 z credits Th~ ct>uise iuvoiy<s st dr of thote buic prlndpl" ol'physics wbtch ha-ve fr~uc:nt an? common pracli"c_a.l ~wllc-ations (Of' students purswng vocatl01\5 id trade and ndustry. 6mplla~ls i.s On rcj11ting applic lions 10 ~tudent \'OCDt:ioaol fi eld.~. TopicS inclu~ m~sur~~nt1 _cnerzy ~tnd power, mac:hloes. properties of matter. flwd pnn<:jp!es and hefl.t. The Course;- Ccatures lectur~. discussion -!."d 1a~rntory Scieft<eJl., ' , aedits Tills ~sa conli.nw1ti01\ of Seience-1 and includes th!'!!tudy o he.at, wave motiqn, c:lcctiicity a net ltlt~gnetls ni ~ Pre-CoUege Chemlatry crfdtu Th.is <me..seme!.te-r course: is dt!sig;rtd lor at1,1de~ts who have. not been exposed lo chemistry at the high 11chcol or polt-lugh school levels. Lccl\ln!S nnd lnbotlii"qry ejcperiena&s cover.some of the fun ~am~nlal aspects of inorganic chcmistry. ~~l~va.nt m:~the'mati.:al m.anjpu lat ion:~ ~_rc: ~troduced as rc_qulred. The: CoutU'~ is an ex.ccj~~t prepar:ahon or college-leyel chemistry cour.s:es. Tapics covered include the metric liiystem, -denlifk notnlion l l;)d signific.s.nt (lgt~res, properties or marler, oltomic theory,!kimencleture o( simple inorganic.compoundj, per-iodic: properties or the elements. writing of chemica) eqtuttion&, use of lhc mole com:e:pt, calculll llon.s from bdlonced eqt.11rtiont1 and,;tudle. of. the HquK u.nd gas~q-us states or matter; 807 PHYSCAl.. ~C~ TON Phy lca!educa!lon lqr Public Safety credit ~hl.s _course imvojvcs ~lioning ltclmques, strchgth tr.~ining and usess.:nent ol phy.s~cvl fitnc.ss toolt. Apprehension holds aitd.$cl!-defense lire also coyered. 807 <17 ntroduction lo Ttlttholoo credit This ooun~: i.s d ~:siijned to deyetop an undentanding of the prjn- dples of cood ~!ionins and exercise with ep«ulc application to triutha.lon lra\nlng. :" 1 f. l :;.i ;, :. r: J t

88 ~ Descrlpttons~ l BoaebaiiiCondUionlng l crodlt T~is is an introductory cout!e dtsigned to cover baslc base ban skills. roles, strategy and ptay. Fitness methods utd conoe:pt~ w\1\ b.: applied to lhe octlvtty of ba,.bal!. 807.UO Condltlonlng/Welgbl Training credit This course coven techniques and roetbods for body,develop merd,.:ondit~onlng. nutrition a_nd sa.fety. lt i6 a personal program tailored lo individua1 objectives. 807-~J Condltlonlng/Ooskotballll t redll 'this.adv.omced course 15 set up lor tndivldtud need'!n.:ond.it.ion in g. basketball kill development and teom concept Advanced Weiabl Tralaing J credit This oarltinutna COW'.$e incrcues st\tdent khow led~ of curren1 weight h&iniqg: precticu ;md trends. Aimed at jndi'llidt.~w in tcrests, the cour~ offers a rev iew o! begir:ming prac:tlcts and terminology followed by an infensi, e program or physical de\ cfop ment utilit.ing variou.s lechniqum and equipment. PreYHlU9 {tee weight work is sqggested: 807 ZZ c~ndujoning/baskotball tt dit This cqur.sfds or\eoted to iddividual needs in conditioning. Basic :$kills, game phi)' :md sl.rategies ate taught. aor-zz Volloyball 1 cr<dit Fo r beginner& and ~ntermed illlc5, lhl5._course ~:mp}wji es power volley.balltechnique.s, rul e~.and st~a1egy of game play. 807 Z5" Softball. l credit Softball. incorporates individual ~kill5 ol the ga:ne Wlto team. strategy and competitlon Swlnl l 1 crodit Tbi& C'OUDt covers ba.mc s~illa of wa\r:r adju.s,mcnt, propubl.o~ personal sa.fety lkul! and water entry leadinj to Red Cross oertilicadon, Swim. <rodlt Tbhi ~ r~ coven adv;1nces sk[us in propulsion, water eotry, water s&!t!ty" ~Wd elcmaot&ty.r~~~e techniq~es leading to Red Cross c~e~ifu:a.ti<»n. 807~~:1. Walor Aerobl<.. f"cr~d lt 'fhis COut't.e.eoVeis prlpclpl~ o! <lnd experiences ln CClbdiUoDing t~ougl,\ water 'exercise. Stud'cnl:$ of all.ability l evel5 l ~~so non swimjuer$) cnay participitc. 807'l. Adv~n<ed uc.. s:..ving.. "1 cr dlt Thb courie covers thc principles of.w.:1_ler ~cty.and te5eue l~adill& to Red Ci-QSs cenio~atioq Bo.cudballll!"<dlt "Thi5 c.ouoc revjevt~s 1M-basics of racq~jetbau, wntinlting o" nto adv&l#d skills and sttotesit> of ga<= ploy. s07 Zl6 Tennl& ljll<glnner. Advanced Jl<:abooerl l '<redll 'lbls course cove:rs ~ic t itckt!l.skills and c.ourt.strslq!ie!. Jt 10 1 eludes sttok:lng pji~ipjes _and developmentrgeme rule!l arld play oild oondlllonlng. ' Te.unl U.... credit This c:ourift CO\e'rs lntetmedbte and advan c~d sttokius and ~ot making pluo racket ' rips, cootrol, footwork. Gail\e play includes ad.vanted strategies m.sin!,les end dcjubles. 807,~!18 RO<quetbolll.. creclk This intfoduct()ry course coyerstie f~~nt.s of racq~tl~u to nclude slillls and strat<gy lot t!)e begmner and ln~edlol e plijer. 807-Z0 Goll lbealnner, A<lvanceol Jlc&lp,..r} cw lk This wur,. covm& bul< goli.oldllo and strolej!y.ll.tr...es b'!ildfog.on lndlviduolswlng. ohotmakli>g, rules snd play :1. Bowlll>fll 1 trecilt This.o::n.r:th covtr& bade bowli'!j.t~hniquttfqf ~Bifm~cs 'and advanced. beginaers. t include!l t.he ~~clple$ and dcv~lq p,men t Q( the apprmc:h: qd deliyeryt rale:a and competition. 807 ~ Dance. J cr-.111 Thil c:ourn cove:'r.t 1he ba~lc tc''=hnlque$' and-creiiuve el(peritnces h\ dance movement Dance 11 credit This co\lrsc covers iatermcdia t~ and advilllc~ techniques, creative ac livitl~ and eomp::wihlon l.n den«dtuamics. 1 perienc:c~ in..}itclal dcmce forms such.u bul)cj, jan. Wld mocjctn are offered Social D nce.1 credu Th~s course de v~lops knowjedt,oe and slews Jn thp -'Jand.lrd boalli'1)om dance ~lyles. 807 ContetnpOQ.ry. Dance cre~h Thi.s s a.summllry course ~mpha:sizing contf!'rrtpqrflty d.;,aceo~ wjth prac:tlcal~~opplieali,on Bodmlnton crdit FQr bqinncn: and intermediate p[aye~. _thi$ couue coversarok. ing ba»c to lhe ga1j1e, eourt position, rules and gurne r.trote&y Arcloory credl.t Archt:ry str~&hootin& techniques, equipment.md safct)', com ~Uions and their rules. Par au ability Levell '1 T e:ndl!lfablc Tennis 1 credit For the beginner and lnlerme1.uate student, tcllllis providts bu~ knowledge :md.skjs in ' troking, grme ptay. str;1tegy and storinj. Tl.blc tennis devolops skil)s and undetlmandin& of ~trall.jng and.spins, rul sand i(retegi~ of$ff}gles a..nd doubletl pl«y. 801 ~59 Tennli/S.dmlulon. l ~redli For the beginner and ~nt trrn di~lf! student, tcnl\ls provid~,~asic koowjedg:t 1\nd 1kfU1ln stroki~g, game p!~y~ rutes and S~f'Jng. Badminton empba~ltu Atroklng, court po$lhoh,.same M.ratesy.and rules Socwr l.uedlt Soccer.incorporates besic playinx. :.~Hb.and f~ame:nt.als loto l 't eamgqme \1 Croso Country Slilin& crerl.lt Tbls pfacjlc.al course: entphasitrs t~niqties and ufely in sklins. ttail.s.elcctio~ and planning. selection, care end mblntenance of equipment Ae-roblc Da.aca 1 ntdlt This CG.lr&e \lies OJ\ 1erobic:appro01ch to fitneaa UtilWng move~ ment activltie~ termed a~r'ob,1c dilnee ".Poii:Spoii Ofrlcl.otlog... ct«<it This course is'dc:si&ncd to deyelqp 6k_i111i ln offjciallng volley~ ll and booketbau jmen oncl,ii>rne\!j, Tl><!ic skill may lead to WAA cetuiloj\llon. ' $or-86 sprid& Spora Otflc!atln' t a edu Th1S C9ur:51: is dc:si&ned to devet<jp &kills in officiatina softb.ll ~d l:w~. ')'fu:"' skills may lead lo WAA cerlification Aer~blc o..q.jwclpt Tr.. 11h;& u':"lt This fitneas cou.rst combttlea tht aerobk ~ch to corubtio<un& wllh lighter Welghl( tia;~ opproadl Special ;hyoleru EducaiiQn.. 1 <!edit Thio course emphoolze! ~eglnniog l ad p kills ond stre n~t~ '.. devo!opmenl b... d oo indlyidu.ol nted5, Bocb otud~t)> pro.vided with opportlinhles for. J~ developm.nt of mu cularotrt~gth,. orgjj\\~ vlgort joint:fun<;,t~n. nd c:ndutance. Socia( interaction.v.1~ recr.. tioo.l pii\cilla. C~qur.age~. ll di, id""lprogram abd objec :.o ti.v!=s.!lre scl up by, a. commltle_e; ~ocorporatlng 'herapy, temora tlon: -.nd:conectioo ol.tuoctjonfsj.: 8(18 RfADNG 8""10 llftdln1!lwf~.,.it,:eoji* mdllo Tbi> OQ.u..;. for!hooc wbo WVll lo!<am to read lntrodi>clory couesihevelcouues n Gci.eJal Studl.,. '1'1>~ coune buu<b a. ge~eral aciuh vocabulary uoed n r"'dlng textbook. T)uough, djscus!ion and detnonstr ati~n.!1\uderits leun conc:enttallon. study strat~gjes a,nd ~t ~kinlf in,a variety of 5Ubjutfl:. BOS l05 R.. dlnslmp.,emont: :.. TcchnlcoVSclcntlllc ~ credtto Thill cowse i:s la'r ~tiud~.nts who wztn( (o- read (!!cholcolhcieatlllc:: textbook&. Word ' 0011 of tl\c oclentlfic voc bulary ilre!ought u baola!oi: leo ruins. r<lll<m.berlng ancl thinking with.tb longuogc of Jejenc:to tzo Speed Reading ~ crodka 'lbh coqr~e is (or averaa;e n:.udes'.s who Wlll'lt to motivate tj.ctme:jves to-ltlld bstes than they pre k>usly ~~. Through demonstrd.tion.ond discuss.ioq twilh ~e pacing de \lites], students lurn to use sp~d of thihkir1g u tht! ~ey 1D bttler undctstan d~n g. Vocabulary is incidrntruy" t;~ught Jntrodu<tory l!endlnslllevelopl\ient.oll credit< l'hls mtine is designed for s.tudenis reading. at an introductory level tfifltl to 'eighth gro.dc teve1). ndividual and group ln$tnicuqil is given with ernph~l s on J c~rn in strotegic.s nc.ede.d to dev~lop v.ocabu.jary.and comprehension :tldlls. This in$truction ~ ~ed.on readiog tasks.encountert'!d.ln daily life. S~ud y ~ill:i_, eaabling the st~.,tdertl to {unctlon indq)cndently in COJ(ent of ptolram COW'lieS, at~ aha cmpbasitcd. Other pr~at reading skill$ ~ rc ;ijs,c s.trc.ss td. Pu:ccqutsite: Readin& at tbe rlfth grade levcl. WS-0 Ho,. to Study. 1 $redlt This is.a short CDUrsc oo stu.dy-type reading. This course ts of {erect thr~e hours a wee.~ for alne ~eks with o~ enrournen.t twice -e~l;h semester: The sttldent.is ~.ntrod~~ tq and gl~n lhc opportlulify. to. apply efficient s_tudy tuhniques needed (or cf{e.c live textbook re-ading. Managing time, preparing to wt!tc. Q research paper.and bullding' ejam eampetenc~ are dhcus$ed. 808,07 Ooc:upaUqnol Reodlng.... Z crcpllo Thl6_ course is designed or va!=alio.nal-tedmic<j students who wju be requ.ir~cl to t~{ld techrilcal reading_maitel- in t~eir iqtboo~ oi on-t~job tnailuals. This CO\.C'!e.witl.focus on. vocatlonsl,, voubl.llo1t)', interpretation ol il1u$trafi<m.11nd graphics found in. t ~tbooks, and comprehension of tethntcal r~ading D<>mledlate'Rcadiag. cr<dlu This course ls d.,fgnocl. (a< iiodents readq ;at Jlle hi~b school levd wb~ need to develo!! and imp(l)ve b.. i< ri.idjng s~illo need ed fo< ccj)ego lettbook re.iding. The emphasis is 001~0<abulary buildi»s ondcomp:eh.,sion.skills.. Spino stpdy t<!;hniqu~.which are nqded io ~ti studetiis (n reading ront~nl E:nat.eriaf oje i'tlclu.d ed. CriUceJ. rudlng and. the. ability to draw correct idfcrencu are ali» discussed. Pnnqui~t~: 'Re(ldins at 'the: ei$hth g'l"''!idc: lcver; i so8:ts Reodlaa V~buwy: lntcr,;,.odl~ lio.. 1 cl-.!ciu Thlscout:le.is lor the 5tudettt '.\'.ho W~V~l~,o_learp a. gf!pcral a,dult YOtdblJlary. The words are ~?m.monly used~ soci~ l 1 r;.~.e r8cuon, ~he mass z;a~!:a a n~ College &tudy,. ye_t.a~e frequ~uuy unko~~:f\ to bos.innlng post econdory ludeolo. 808 R.. dlf!s Voaalo\llary: Advanced. credit 'J'bis wurac l$ for th05e wi hir'l -'n od~1 y~bu}a~ to express complex ideas, Through demonst,.tion aod disctu.5ioil, studeota learn l'm?w the bask meaning of Vt-orcb can. be ~~ lo.dearly u press kfea~. X'Kf wh('f'l 'Q~e.-yJ ~S ed to cover up rmantoa. Slud.eat5learn dij'letench b:tw~:en synoaymits. a atiditioj\o c{udy b made of how 1 b tt~r wojd can expre.$s a le:s!.raditj'accep ' ta.blr idol!'. 809 SOCAL SCENCE 809 Ui llco~rnk:i... "cre~llo This is an iritrodkctary cqurn ~~ ~ ejcaminl!!s the ehlln!.dt"j"istics of a market eool1omy and survey a the f'!lctors whic.h inouctlce the fotm\dation o'f pauan ) economic potic:y. ~upply &J:Jd demsn<:t b~iness otganiuti'on, labor ota. njtation, natio:lal tnoome. analyli' 1 iisc l and monetary policy, and iote~q tiocal economic policies are ducus.srd. Basic concepts and nnuly5cs ere ij\us.tr, tr:fl by rdetc:ncc to 11 varlety o{ oonccmporary problem& and1ssufs, Leaderohlp Altltude.. md illou allod c:udll Th\$ o-"haur c:o\rae \a dhtlde"d into modules wliicb are pruented, 'ide-ally, in tfn seaslons Of tll.ree bours eac.t). A q~jif)ed ca9r <ti olor BUicl<> ond lim<'~!he parti<jp!uits (lifdilih lhc 7projecl$ with the.h 1p of prlh!<>d work!heelo, ptin.led s pplettlentar( resdlng materia.jst nd ten ~ ~p cd {t!ln(orc~me~~.t mes.sagei.. 80Q.J.S ~Velnputntl ProteP nd P.r.ttctl~ rtft:jt This course is duisned to help students undcntand: Amcrlc:an govc:mment a& a. a.yatem of tnstitutlons for "od.af controt a.t three levels-rtatlonal,ltate and local. EmphO!is placed on decl lon Milking, behavioro1l chacacteristicj and dtiien partitipatlon. Puc tkel -.vays to work with Wisconsin.state OllldJocalsoveJnmtol$ ond inn~e~e on career ~:bolces will be; pn:.sentcd. sog.t:z7 Human 0e esopment S C"tedit This couhie is concerned with the pb.y$ic'll, mo\or, cog.nitive und soqai deve:jopmanf of the hums.n acroas th~ llfesptu\. EmphuJs is on r~ecosnitiof) of and adjt.astmcnt to normal develo:jlment stqges ;md typicilf tjf~ problems. '11te role elf p11t~nts, fleers and C::D vi ron menta) f eton on d~ velopment ubd ~havior is bishjight~d Fonilly n America S <rcdlts This c:our:~c tmphasizes problenu fadng the family 1n con tom porary AmerJ''".S9clety inc.llldlng m&dtal COJlflkt and a~jusl ment, parem-chlld rolatlonehip,s~ snd $ocietal pres,ures Urban ond Rural Coinrnunillo.s ~ ~rcdllt Thb.co ~r~e i.:1 an introduction to the ~cwnnuqjty assn environ mont in which human <1'vicu ore pr oyid ~d. The social, political and economic functi()ns and pr~ems. o( diffe.rent1ited com munlties are dlstussed 1 aod the rc!sources and servica cf urba.n ~n~ rural communities are considered. OlmmWlity rdources, ii:eld research, al)d llf'ld obieivation ire utilized in addition to the t~sl.l a) text n}ateritls t Pqchology o ( Hunu n Rei~Hons. credllo Thi"' cour$e cov~rs theories oll:earnlng. percep-tion, motivation~ emotion, ~dj u&tment nnd crh.otionaj weij.being. tu applied lo hurnan rda«ions.al hom~.afld On the job. n addition to cognitive a.chievementl cl<l!nroom lnte~ac lia n ac.d dis:cu:ision ore emplnul:ted AmerkaD n51ituti'o0. crcdil& ln this ctju.rk:, 'students exa~frlc"th.c web_bf.inierd.epehdem soc:ial sy.stern:s thitt ha.$ becl'l created'lo aeq~re. and enric~ thelr live!..&ude_n_ts st_udy public pojicy l!l'!lie': w~~ _ilhz!!totte how tr.1dl tional institu1ions. sucb as la.mvy. ~a. ttfe'w011cp1ace omd govern~t. are betng changed by PQi.ltfcaJ o~ technological tr ads. Sy tlll'lorlng tbese Js.ues, student$ expo.nd!heir skills in evalu<lung lnformation. makidb decisiojl.s and advocating a pruiliot" Aains ancl its Socbl P,oble.;,s.. cre~ll This tout~ Scrva as a- g"encr l introductioq ~o lhc: fi~(l of e.gj_ng, The ortc of l!"fon~ology to "'' ndcd' rapidly sl~ce World War J, aod. sf>f(lfi~ Uy J.n tccent yei!rs. lp part, this e_x~nsio tl ha$ been due to ihcr~a!t.d [ntereat in the polihca1 potentiitl o! oldec voters. the ~Utk11l awa~ss of th:e needs of older people, and the burgeoning (e$ucch activ,ucs rel.at_~d to.asing. in the biologlc1 and beh.!vforai.sod.tj.scltnce.s:. r~i~ddjiion, tb ~ unmet needs o ( Older lieople il:rc becoming of mor~ lnlert"st tc sodety, 809;0i Social Oloorvoi.otlon credit ThiS"ci:a.urSe is an introduction fo socihl disorgmittition. t U.,nun_e~ tt)e major bsu«conlcf?dting A~~i~ ~ty oo various levels: RaCial tnd ethnic: c.oalllct. sexisn\, agism. family, reli&lon. edu~:.atkm.._ env'..rcnment, drug ahus~. me.n.ta~ ~u~1b.aild crim, Pirodqctlon to.s<t~iology. credits This cour~ QeOnFJ,Qild txa.m.l~.s the concepts!!nd n:-alitieti or. 0Cialstruc=ljJre-, c.wt.ure, socidzauo,n 1 "0DP1*".P.f&tlnlzsllons,. s~dalsro~ps ;md so clnl ch:mgt.. ft~titutions s_!l~h.-a~ the f~mlly rcllgio~.~nd cducalior;j dn'exdrriined in depth Marrl,agc,i~d th e F~m_ily, tredit, This cour.$c is deslgn.ccl to u~"t students to obta in' ~"' undt:nlon ding of dadng, love. mate: sdeeuon, SCX\ality, marital oc.ljusu:ncnt nd parenting in American society; to gain _pcrsonel lnsj&hl i.nto how to grow and de.'t'dop a.e lm:uvicluals, partnen and parents within tho lnslltulloo or lbe laniily; :Om! to achieve m<«nin&ful and ~ti!dyiog marriage end famuy-life. ii09 Z05 Cont Qlpr>rary Socl<!y credits This~ &nalrzes tj:nd lntttprtu pattern~ of conl~mpor;ry American culture. euminjng tbe rclat\anship betw~n ~bese p1~ terns and sd(:iaj chao& Coura content ~.topical. lind is bt~~$'t~ on areas of. c:urrc:pl lntlte$1, relevance.and. imporj,!mce.., \Yom en ln. Soc:lety; Soc;J ) ln5titutjons and :Soc(at Chanle c:radlt1 Women's.stalu$ artd tol~6 \n cantemporary O.S. society will be in ve.stigated by analyzing Vl'iGUS discipilnes and ' nstltul\ons such as tli.e (omily,!1w, medjcihe, p.sychojogy, education~. reugjon ~J.d the mcdia.ps \hey lmpacl upon the sociuliz.alioo proce.ss ~nd the <loasiflcallon Q( people by bio!o~ical

89 17-Coutse Descrlpt!ons Course Descriptlons Criminology credits Thls course C!xAmiries th..: relationship ~wt:en crlrne and socit ty..t t;kscr~es and adalylu the social nature end cau1es of crime, the fonnlllutk>n, a.dmini,trgtion ond enforcement ol"triruinal lawst tbc: pr($011 sys((!'rn and 1reatmet'll And rehabilftadou pro ~rtlllu n Amerle~.n eociety C ntemponuy Afro-Amcricub Society credits ~.major theme ol thia wursc: i:s tha.t the Block community is u h ighly<livu1 ied, inh:r n:loled Agtcgatc. of people who unite ift to rt:)ati.vcly tobc.sive structures io reapome 10 opprejsk)n, rnc::bm too pat~ed repreufon. The foc:ua is on diversit y whhin the 8lack-com:uunily, ecoi1clmk: life, OCCU)JilCion!l putsuilt, f!rned income and busiaess ventures. (n addition, ~daj atltntkm i' ~iven to pcobh:m~ in cduco1lion_, family structure, politica1 behavior and the diversity of llfcsiylc:s Won1en'a Work/Women s u... es ' crcdlte tn tbis couue,.thr: [ole of paid iuld non peld work in 1h"e lives of womr:n is examined. Uslng an lntc:r dlsciplinory appr~ch; s~ificaccupatklns1 w:e~s wh be a:nalyzed.(rom n:u histo~ical, e<xjrtomic and ~~.iologlcal p ~~s~_tive. Cut rent la.sttes that impocl on the women s!abo~ f~rce,.md ~ or~pcrformt:d by womentraditional and!lan tnlditi?nt\1-ytill be presented and discu~ed Macro-Economics credit Thi:; is an introductory course that describes ond analy7.cs,actors which influence 'til~ overall p~rfori'nauco of the economic system. S~pfdy~e~~nd amdy#l!j, na!lona r Jnco111e eter(l'llnauoa modeb, n sc_at potiey, moru!!y, financial ins.ututions, monetary. policy, lnfla tion, uni!rnployrnent, Uuerna.tlon:at ltolde, econom\c growth, and pubjic se~:tpr parhdpntlon \n economtc efr<llrs ate.lmotlg the topics. coiuidcred. Description, an.1lysis tthd crldque o{ tht ec.anomy's perlormsnce are included ttmong variou,s B()ptoachei to course ccntenl Mb~.ro-Ecfmotn1ct uedl~ This-is ~n introductory c.our se_ lhi1t examines t:conotjtle roncepls irifluencing-j.he ~lloc:ation of re$0urcu, production and dijlribution.of final p~u<;t in the U.S. cconojl' Y Supply"cmand.aaalysis, lim implications of "Varioua m8lkd structures, de_lermi!l<afjbn of p.aymmt to K'Ono~ ic nsourc;u. income d l.str.ib1jtion 1 :uid.govunmenl p:~rticipati on ln economic activity are among the topi~ considered. Oei~ription. a n~ly sis and p crijjque of ibe econo~ny' s p_erfonn!jnce pre ioclud.!d ame>ug Vt'tious npj?r~cbe~ to oaune content., ~09-1 Compa ra~ve Econolnic: Systems credi~s This course dlffi':ribe$ ~ an :~.iyz.es variou ~ :tppro~che:& to reso-j.u. lion of he basio eoon6mfcproblcd of producll<>n nd dislribuliqo or e~onotni~ goo-ds-arid services. Cl,asslcal capilnllsm, ~anaged capib1li_sm,. socitali:nn ~n.d~mocratic- soci:~lism are Qiscuned. The.sy.stems ii.re contrasted and evohuatcd in h:rm~ of such critcri'a a.'! growih, dficlene)r,.stodihty.and cquify. Varlou~ systems his.torical de-velopment",.bu;tituuonlij clsar:~cleri$ucs,.1nd flppjica lion ~o contemporary functioning t CononUes ote conslderl.!d Amerh:ali Nmtlonal Govcrnm.cot credit' ThiAi 1 genera! 5urvey couuc utilitins ll. systems opp~oach to eniph11~te the re1~lion&hips between it"ructurc and behavior.. Po:litita( lh.eory and methodology are atre;a ed. Students are en -co~,~ raged to improve tcseirc:h and analylica1kilb. 'l'he fqllowing oue:e;t~:umined: U.S. ConSitiluliori, ejecuons~ interest grqup5, pr ties, mp~ media, congrc:>s, judici8ry presldejicy,and bute&ucnic:y. 809 State and Loc.._l Covetnment credits Artu:.rlt:t~n go~etnment can be llddentoo<i as '.t&ystem of imtitu lions for socia1 tonlrolon.jy j{ it is eumined at au thn:e teve!snation 1, state MJd Joe~). 1'bjs (OUriC uddre5scsltself tq the rullc' llojjiri8 of!bi le and loetilgo\ emments t~nd suks to relate them and llleir activities to.1hose of tbe (ederal government: Strea s pla_ce~ upon bebo lorol cbar~tlerb lks of state and local govern n-.ents in tke total decl.s.fon mdtna process. The importance and functioning of poiiikld portks, >pcdo\ lnter<st groupo, electiqos. legisla,ures, courts_and excc:utlyes arc covered. 809 lnterdlllloaal Rolatk>Df crl!dll This course focwes on thr metbod.s emp!oyrd by natioh states in interncting with each otber as well tis the fo rce!> nfluencing the nature of inteuclion. Attention h also g\ven to tnslltudons that have been erected in nation &!t~ tc.s. que~ for. power, ~ace and tec.urity. Nuliot~uBsm, KlcoWgy, r!!glonol lntegration nnd lnut.: ore mpha>il<ed. 809 Z Guveramcat Prac:U~um crechts This course invo~ ca poli flct~ l eq>e.rlence for student.s cnrolll:d "in State and LOc-aJ Government. SCudcnts are n.s.signcd "' voiwltcers to.stote or ~tal offidab for tel\ hours ptr W\..-ek. DiS U.1S!On.'" wiijl imlruclor,. Shldenl prepared sunun8f)" r~poct ~ luld jownals d.fe required. Prercqul.sltcs.: Concurrel\t cmollment ln S09 U State arkl Loc:al Government and con5enl of insu &tctor Saclal Poycholosy credits 'This; coursj: jnvolves )ludy uf the individ\.tal in the soclftl selling. TGpfcti lnclude inferperson:d auracffon, aggrcjsion 1nd V'lotence. affiliation, perceptlon, allf\lism, obedience, oonformlty, attitude change and others. rrereqolslle: 609-Ztlntroducllon to Psychoiogy or lntroduclion O Sociology. SO!Hll lntrod,.cllon to PaycholOJY cr<!dlts This course lnvolv~s stu~y of i.ndlvidu ~l ~ nd social behavior in eluding i_ls p.sychojogicul bases, de:\'elopment, maliv::1tion, ~mo lion; peraption, lurnir1g and behavior disorders. 'rhi.'i course is ( prerequisit! to se.veral college transfer coune.s in psychology Deve:fopmenlal Psychology.~:tedit.li n lhl'-i cour!cr the principles af h.um:tn. growth nnd beh;n:iorol.development, JJom couceplion to de nth, Rte stud\ed. The course ;ncludes ~ethods of-studying hum~n behavtor, t~eoret ical op pr:aachc!i, individual diflefenct.!ll, p1th:ras and sequen~s of devclopment 1 and rcfn~ionship s with peers a.nd othc_n..frere qulsltc: 809 Z1 ntroduction ta Psyeho1o~y. 809~Z5 Psychology of J>craona l.1\djushn~nl. crcdlls This course: is an in deplh-.\tud}' of (ac:tars contributing? l~lc evc1opmcjit o_f ~rson.uy an'd odj u~hvc.and mlllndj ustivc: bell.aviorl.. PsychOlogical thc:ocics nnd concepts, $\lt h i1' :;:tro s ond $elf, re explor~d. Tadics and t lrfltq,tu of 1djus!ment, non-verbal be~yi"jrs, adjustitlenc to changing Stllj rofea- and b!!ha"viorallcarn ins techaiqu:es are covered. 809~Z6 Appllcil PsyclloiOJiy l ccedlts Thls course ii based upon " broad spectrum of content i.t\ gcn~raj p>ychoi <>&Y wub <mj>ba>ls on opplyirls estnblishedprinoipl< to lhe common problem! of normal adj\lmjneot, i.e. leernlllg, rocw5calion of behorvior, en alive problem-solvinc. decision m.akiur and sodat rdatkjnships. BmphDsis is given lu the w1ys people can learn to adjutt to a.n almost c:on$lan!ly chong\ng pby:sica), social and economlc ~nvi ronmen l Abnormal PfJ'cholozy trodits.tn this wur$c, e:motiuo.al.and.bchayjornl di s.orde rr;~their t:tius ~s and effect,-on the: lndlvld\li:l'. (amlly and society-are studi"~ 'r)le &tudent is e.xposed t[) typl.!s or dt11order 1 therapy and, theories of ptev_i!nuon."pren qu_lsfl!': 1109 ~ lnrroduction to PsychblOgJ: l~troductlon to Lli"1ln.Amerlc crtdlls Tht: purpwe of this course s to p,rov.idc.an il'lterdisciplin.:zty i.ll: troduction fq Latin Ant(!rica. n lt:rm!' 6l aubjed re'a'i) we wiu focus r;m history, potllks. econom\cs, society -an~ tulture, '~be. coujse 1 "t-aken -!111 a WholE:, will provide a broad ~~ multt.facl!!te~. ekj?os..ur~_ to se.veral tl\emes in par!lc\j}\r! l-listqr1c:~j.legacies which sh:apc ts.tl~ AmerJcan life-; th~ ex~r.ienoc of rcvolutl{)n and counter-re:vol\ltl.on; the cl.itfe'renl eco~op11~ de:v~lopr.lcn"t. strategles being fojiowed; c~ntempor~ry _social ~hange a;td c~ltu:-al e.xpres sion. All ~f these theme& wu be dis.eui:s.ed frqm a variet:c c:f dlsclp)l11_11iy perspe ~livts, aod'.willlnj:lude.e~dfl<: c ~se s1\idies as wen ~s g~neral ovetvlew. ' lntroductk>n t Pbilot ophy S ~rodils ln lou fi r.ot COUfH m the l ludy.of porsist nl phijo50pbla1 pr<>. bteml, the studeat"b introduet:d to the various fields o(". phila"'f>!!y, pltllouiphit!ll Dlt lhodolasy'and the olstory of. p~hy. The student..,..min<j some philosophical" issue<. in depth ar~d develop! the ability to think, speak and Writ"e critically ab~t these problem.! t&ct btve conc-erned bumlln be.in"g.t!of' cc:ntwies.. K09 ~Z&l.UJ< ond.crltkal Thtnki<>z a credits This cqur.sc presents he lows of kl~il:. anvernlng \nd~c llan and Ucductlon, a1id ofth<: common fauucles in f'cij$01\l~. knowtctl~c whkh is ustful in all a reds of work, stlldy 1Kl llf~ <lxperiem:r.. ArUllrsil of argumcut, 1Dnyll11ge, bitk.lcn u dum(hions, ronce led ptc:di5e..!ri, it impu,tonl to tku c:onsu m~.:r ond the ciht.en. Defining ill\d cla$...ilying c:oncr.pu. (:Valunting uvklcnce, draw\ns sound lnferen~:e, and problem-s:olvlng lecbniqttcs ~re 6otne or the olhcr un::a' 1o be explored Elhl<S! Theory snd Apjllk llon S credit Votlac-syML"ll\s, tx~h tr.1dijiorul and current, wltl M enmi~d :t theories and m; they ijif~ct d,.ci:sion~ Tf:&ardlns sta'qi.ll relations. pon:ogmphy, ;abort\on, euthanorjn, eoplla.j punishment, and social mtd economic jumicc l>horgy und Sucl<ly cn!dlts :Mlis t:oursc ~mphnii7.r: s tj1a c:u1npi\.x intor-relationship ~tween cnerg}', the economy and he polltlc-al process,.a.nd the ~n vlronn1entnl conseqt!e:ncc& or energy production and use. tt ex plotcs,5.c>.fc('$ and avalbl>jllly of fuels,.onalyz($ 1bc subslllnuve choices,.mong energy alternatl\i'cs and thetr so.c\al, poutica\ :md coonomic ran1icieillions, and 5c:rutlnlzl!s the slnictli.re of power in the socio-politicuf system that constrdin energy pollcymaking and imph:mc:nhltlojl dl!cisltms. 8U9 9 Survey of economia c-redits 111is h. a b>~sic co~rsc th:!l oud! LJ~.S Q Hmlled number or eccnomle principles :uri common economic JnstiluUon~. Sup ply d-tmand ot1111:ly$is, lhc banking system, fiscol pquc')'r moueta.ry policy, and t h ~: role. c f the public $CCtor dr C am0 11g the l~plcs considc.rt d. S09 5 llumdn Rclatlon:t c~ll~ ~~~\!::~~~~::::~ ~:%ce~!t~~~~~ r:':~~~e:~!5a~~~~ ;~QC tiooins,. P actical applk lions ace stressed with ;a.n cmph i.s on elilssroom inlerciion t'ltd discussion fjuman Rclqtlons Sunoq 1 credit n this course, practical human r~la t~ns problems ore J?resente!l with an emphasis on c~&$toofl) interaction. 'Excrci.&es are discu!l& ed in terms of basic psyc.bologkal prluciples. 810 SPEECH 8l0 101 SP<ech ' u..tlt This ccur5-e s.t.rcms the most ~sie of effe ctiv~ public: speaking and limening techniqa~ for students. in degree o: diploma pro. g ~om~. Students can work to improve their oral comniu.nleotio t~ s~ilts lhrct'ugh analy_sis.of pu::posi\'.: Uslentns. pre"p rijjg cjld ' presenting lnfonn_.tuye.ltlld per.su.ulvc spe-cchr:s end usjns the ~roup proct!ss to di.scun. is Uel. nd Solve pfobltf11s; Ei:n.phllis" is pl0.1ced upon aojdit:nce aualysla, audlo vl!>ual techniqucs;;.speoker ~valuat ion OJ.nd gl'lj.ap work. 810-ZOl F~nd~menluls of Speech credtts This couuc includes 6 thcqrcucat. cuminatfon o( the process ()( comljtuuicalion, the role of &pt!ech n aelf dcvclopmcnlt tbe r.ullvre'of me,;ming; and bn Art of per.suasl. Prncticc in selecting speech -topics, anoly~illr 11udienee~, organ lung speech c ont~nt, improving speech delivery aad critiquing s~hts l& _provided.via presl!nl"tion o( lnformuuvc ~nd pen unsive speeches. St=veral ~raded and non graded.sroi.ll &roup dlscw $lons sltarpen'=l.ddi tionaj comrnunit:alive! kills. 810 % ll Fundamentals of Oral nterpretation cr~d lts This courie J:s 11n intfoduc:tmln to the concepts en~ techniques a oral r~adlna vir selected project$ in the remdit1g pf children's 1 1Uer~ure. pro~. poetry, dram& and reader a' lhcqlfe. Slt).%0 Jntroduetioa. to DrANl crt;dus This ls a beginning progrqm of ~1 --developmenl in the techniqve:s nece!sary to become a vcr~urc ond sensjhve actor-phytfcd e:dd vocal r.xpre~ ivene.u, analytical insfght 1.ud.the creative.syothe&la of tb<se-sltilb in roleplayill$ and thtllric:al p<od~c:tlon. Tbe ted:ulical elerpepts of production are. t.mphaslu<l or both theotrr. ood televijion as the course Analelo SBfl<d for t levlslon. SlG- Pubik Sp.. klnl <Nedllo This eonr!t: mlllt.uy &eelts to shtrpcn student nworcne.ss ol sped.er alldlence relationships. From U11t theoretfcal bpsr:, tbc student s famllitrlted with the acarive process of speech construction Dnd. organitllion whkh is opplled to kltetprelive. infor malive at1d peuu11sive s.peech projects. Special emphisis is pticcd on &ztge f~ight, uut.licllte: unulysis, aelcc:lion cf topic, prcparstinn Wld orgonij".l.lion of contenl, and delivery or he spudt lntru!ucllon to Film :j cr<>dlt This course exnmlncs the techniques or fum produetrot1 Olnd ~X ptor_es the rclati<:msfllp between film ft>rm and CUin mean ins. Students view mms hat rcpr~scnt si&nlfiennt M()vcmcnls in the evolution of the mcdjwn and learn bow lo rescan:b 1100 lffii(l MliYJiall ess!}' about theoc!ilma B Bask Diarnn i'rodudlon J credit 'J'b.\s.iS :a_p{llctic::um which messes $t!:lr-development tn the t~bni q~ necess.uy_"lo.\>f!come sensitive to DU aspcct of die tfteolnic:al. pnxf~t(on, fl;lerc ts a Jh{n(mum Of Z0 hours fequircd in COfP: tnunity thealric&l production during pract.icum. No prior ctiilc 6f producti~ expt'j'j~n c:c. is nr c~ssary. 8t0.(H_ Gcneral. Sp ~rch cr-~tll~' ln this c~ ui-se, groop discussion and infor~1 1ve :u)(!_perswlsive. spealting :~reused 10 develop student ~<t\dn_g s kill~. L~arning to. listen, '.ln~ re::1dlng ajld. reporllng On mat_e.rlci tn ndividual fields nrt cmj)lliisited,!'fhls ~pprse is (fequenuy.subsutule:.~ o~ aps. :JS6 Co~~~~ntc_atiO()s ~ ART lntrodocllon to Art History credlls ThU. courx itw oiv(' a Chron9log.i.cal suf\!ey o( u (front early cave paintings lo cutn:nt trends~ Empha:sls \S"plced on aesthdic "and technkod ~~ovat i on.s d'-lc lo ch.o~nj l ng ~Jigjcus, sccjaj', et-onqmic nnd politica~ trad~tion~ n Vildou.s c:"ountrics and cplht.r~, 815-0J D_esign aild color "crcdits Throuc.h the.use.9f_des1zn and color. 11tu<lents n tbis~.:our!c.leai'n to ue the elernmts of d'w~n aod. to d tv~1op. an apprccio.~ori or the principles of '!-Pity, barmuoy add the use o( color :t Dcslpl odd Color ll <redlls -This is.a coolinuatidrtof Su:.~t Ocsi&D aod Color J. t c:over$ #d vanc:ed QeslgD and color works lo rurthe-r develop the. aesthetics oi d.,ign, stuctio work in three.-dhoenoiooal dcalgn is of!c:n:d. Prm quisite: 81S-0i o..lgn.and Color. 815-ZOS _Diawin Ppndameatab ~editj; Tbls j.s an introdqctory druwjdg class emphuilins SO\md craft linu!nsbip and tbe swdy ol basic frccbaod, drawiag kills,.(lin-'. clud"' tile.tu<iy o( Jlo:<'Ccllyc, proportion, construction.oh alid fcrms, 11g:ht aod shme, l nd tendering n llpe and tone wilh a. variety n[ ~edia itO Ad Hist«y: The ~odern Bra tredit5. This COQrsc rurveys the ilevclopmea~ ol Eucopean and Americ n art and architecture from th ~ Umo of hopressioalsni in"tbe.l870's to the ce>nlemporart pe.riod l.ife Drlllwin'.. credits Traditionally, the tntining of the artist h~~os ln clu_ded extensive drawing from sthi life und the human fieur.e, a aton1y tnd fj(:nr.c compositi"on. J\.~m~stwy of ~t fi&:ure"p&ves the way for othe~!l r~ expression. This course Views Laedrawlns as a.means, not at\ end. 8HH' Photog.r phy ~red it This c-ourse fe:atu~.s i n~tr~r;;u.on n C:am<:rfl! ope~t fon, bosic darkroom develqplng and prlntlni tech!ilques.. AS$li!Jimcnlsln elude: Portrt!Ure, spot new~ photos, sroup 11nd At:tlo.n photos, he photo C$8BY at1d feature photos. Students provide thtir 0"";" Cam-erM l\j)d (ilm Po(n llng etedils. ThJ!!i cour~e h an introduction to bat lc palntlns fcchniqucs. t co~crs: How to lily out the pafe(le, J"epare polnling backzr<iund5, and the us-e of on~ acryli<: me dis. 8f5-ZU J>alntlns credits El]1ph!SU i n th_ili cotitse \son plctujer:u*-ins. composition. per..sona1 e.xpfes$!on in _stiu Uf~. landscape. fi.sure polntiog. etc. tt is an inlermedlele-jevd_coum!. PtenquiS\te: 81'5-1 Paintlng %5 Jewelry crcdlta This ca.me s buk ntroduction in desisnlns ami!abrlcotins jewelry. The core o the. C()Ut"$C is flot work in copper. brass, sijver and CO$ling. Somt! of the varlou' pr~ses covered 11re piercing, repousse, costing! bt~' settll'l~ enarnehng, etc. i

90 17-Course Descriptions Orgonlzotlonol Structure-175 "'" Kl5-5 Jc:w lry «cdua 1l1i1 ij an odvwnced coursa!or s&udcnls with pr~viollil uperit:ncr: in bow: proceu.es who de.sint tn develop ~h in des"n and aactsmansmp. Jnstruction \s of.fered n the c.uliog of s.ll tr.and RO«t, fabrlcafit'd ln a varjel)' or mntrri.1js such 01s copper, br!»...sil\'et 1 wood tod. plastics. Tht maldnj ol settb:lp ii aba covered. Prcr<quishe: 81~ 5 jewelry Z55 l'rlnlmllkljs <r<dlls Thi1 la o.n iolroducuny coune tn tbe Ylrious ~aphir: media. tjto:innin' witb a brief Ustory o( de dopn1cnc of lh~ print n1cdia ;mel continuinz with dtmo:ulration" ud studio work in the relief print medla and M lntmducllon n sjlkserten printing. Smpha.sis is on the develcpmcnt or he atngle-c::olor print. Pre.r~qui~te: Bask dellsn or drawing is 1\\gguted Cera10i<t l etedils This cau.rse ;a an introd\jclion to clay 11 an art medium through MmonatratJon of ""d e.cpe:riment tlon ~A it.lt b.jslc hand huizdlng melhods. lndlvktuo..l hwolvernent wlth he media Olrad.perscmol i!x pre1sion is eocour scd from the beginning, ExploratiOn of tew.ture tllld!orm i~ t:mph siv:d. A brief introduction to the tcclmiclll oupcc:ts o'f c:aramia at:companiu: i tudio work. During the. final ~-.eeks o( the cour.se. the technique of wheelthrowing is ntroduced. 8l Z9Z CeturrtfC8 U. l.credits 'fhh cotlr.se t OYers the devt:lopment o baaic sku hi in \Vheelthrowln,. A!ter the student s abje to throw.six. to eight lnch cylinders, rorrn becomes the prlnlli'y COUk:5en licd. After the techh.lcal ospcds o! w.hcclthrowlng hgvc ~em m;:tlercd, the :ritudent i!i int:oduced to melllods of fotmlng pltch!ts, botl!es, bowls, pwuers and covered (Qrnu. Student' are encourajt(i to iatroduc.e dicir own variations. Prertoquisite: Ce:t.1mics (. Organizational Structure FACUTES.MADSON FACLTES-AREA GEOGRAPHC AREA OF DSTRCT TAX-SUPPORTNG TOWNS, VLLAGES AND CTES SPONSORNG SCHOOL DSTRCTs GOVERNNG BOARD. STAFF.i,. TRUAX CAMPUS DOWNTOWN CENTER COMMERCAL AVENUE CENTER

91 \ 1 76-Qrganil:atlona.l Structure WATBRTOWN CAMPUS FORT ATKNSON CAMPUS U!EDSBURG CAMPUS FACUTES Madi5on Three locations n Madison currently house the post-secondary programs offered by Madison Area Ttthnlcal College. Those locations are: Truax Airpark Campus at 550 Anderson St. Downtown Educational Center Campus at 11 No. Carroll St. Commerciol Avenue Campus at!5 Cammer cia! Ave. Area FaciHties Are~ Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No. satellite campuses are located Jn Fort Atkinson, PQrtage, Reedsburg and Watertown. '(heir primary focus is on flexibility. Based upen input from advisory committees and through visits and communications with local community ll!aders, satellite campuses attempt to 111eet the special needs of local business, industry and agriculture. The satellite campus~s offer a limited number of degr.e programs.!refer to listinss for each campus.') Geographic Area Qt District The Area VocatlonaJ,. Technical an\! Adult Educa lion, District No. includes: Co!umbia Cc?unty less the portion of the School District of Markesan; Dane County less the pertion of the Barneveld School District and the Pecatonica Area School Dislrict; Jef ferson County l~ss the portion of the 09onomowoc Area School District, the Polmyra Eagle Area School District and the School District of Kettle Moraine; Marquette County less the portion of the School District of Princeton and the School District of Markesan; Sauk County les, the portion of the School District of Hillsboro, the School District of llhac.1 and the School District of We ton; plus the portion of the School District of Wisconsin Dells in Adams Co11nty; the Columbus School District, the Randolph School Dlsttlct, the Waterloo School District and the Watertown Unified School District in Dodge County; the School District of Belleville, the School District of New Glarus and the Oregon School District in Green County; the Wisconsin Heights School District, the Mount Horeb Area SchoolOistrict and the River Valley School District in owa County; the School Dlstrlct of Reedsburg, the School District of Wisconsin Dells nod tlie School District of Wonewoc and Union Center in.jumau County; the River Volley School District and the School District of Wonewoc ond Union Center in Richland County: an<! (he Oregon School District and the Stoughton Area School District in Rock County. Tax Supporting Towns, Vllmflesand Cities in Distrtct The following towns, villages nnd cities (in whole or in part) financially support the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and Adutt Education, District No.: ADAMS COUNTY TGWM Doll Pr irlo jacl<on Ntw Haven Spr'.ngville COWMBli\ COUNTY To"'ftS Atltn;ton c.je<lonla Columbus Courtland Dekona. Fot1 Wi:lllcb.lso P~ntaln Prairie Hi.mpd n U:cds Lcw i :~ton l.odi Lowville Maroc11r.m Nt!wpott ~~~~A~ Randolph Scott.Spcin~alc West Po~>l Wyocena Vlllozos Arlington Cam brio. Ooyle>lown fall River l'rie>land Pard.. v~lc PoyocUe llondolph llio Wyocena cox. Colutnbus l.odi PortiiJC W"consin Odls DANE COUNTY Towns Albion.l!Crry Slock Earth llloomin Grove llluemoimd> Bristol Burlu: Cbrbtll!lllD Cottttge OrDve Cros~ Plains D~n~:: Occrflcld Dunkirk Dunn Filchbuq; Ma<lllon J.~ tomonie ~1ed il1 1 M;d<Jloton Mcntrose Orc~Qll Perr, l'tcasaot Spfl"" Prlnlrooe!lnsbul"/ RuLia"d Spring.W. Sprllljlflcld SUn Prairie Organizational Struchu~-1 77 Ve:rmonl Verona vt.,... Weslport Windsor Yo k Vl:.ey. Bltk l!rth BkaeMouods Brooldyn Cambtidgo Cotta,ge Gro e Cro$8 Plbtl Dine O..rfield Del'oreol Map!< Bluff Morob ll Mszomenlt! McParl.ond Mount Horeb Or~g o n Rockdale Shorewood Hills VctOl'ls WtunAkcc Cities fl.'ladison Middleton Monon:~. Slough on SW Prtlrie DODGE COU!'TY To-'D& Cllamus 0ym;LQ Elb> Emmel Fo11Ake l..!:b&doo!.d<ell Portl>od Shlclch l'l'utford VU"'e Rtndolpb City WatertOVW"n GRtl~N COUNTY Towns Adams Brooklya Bxefer New Glarus wa, hln&lon York v~~r:uc Brooklyn New G!!.Ns OWA COUNTY Towno... Clyde Dodsnitte MOJoCOW R~eway \'fyomiliq VUose... JEFTERSON COUNTY Towns Alitlan Cold Sptblg l!.. ' i a t E 1' '

92 i 78 0rganb:ational Struct~rc Com:ord FLJrminglon H~bmn bonia Jefferson Ko~bkonon8 l.llkemills Milford O~k1and PALmyra Sulli.van.Sumner W;~terioo Watertown Vilfa.g.cs. Cambridge Johnson Creek Sullivan Citietii Fort Atkir1son Jclfer50n Lake Mills Waterloo Waterto:wn Whitewater JUNEAU COUNTY Towns LindiDO} J,.yndon Seven Mile Creek sumffiit WcntM'Oc: Vilhl.sQS UniQD~J'ltet Wonewoc. 111/RQJilTT.l COVN)'Y Towns Buffolo Cry~tal Lake Douglw.s Harr.i.Y M<:<>on MonteJJo Motindvillc Ncshi:oro NewtQn Oxfmrt P u.kwa1.1kee Shields Springfield Wes!fieJd Villa go Endeavor Ncdlkoro Oxford Wesifleld City Montello RCHLAND COUNTY TlJWil:i Buena Vi.~tP lthucf'l We.sl(ord \'mage Lone Rock ROCK COUNTY r()wns Pmler l,jnion SAUK COUNl'Y Tov. ns &.-<.~boo Bca:r Cn:ek Ocllcnt~ Ddt on Bxceisior FlllrficW F'rauklin Ft~edam Gret'!nfidd Honey Creek lro.nton LaValle Mertimac: Prairie du Sa<: Ree<lr.butg. Sprlbg Green S!lnipler Troy Wilshioglon Westfield Winf.itdd. Wof)(Uand Vllloge :lronlon Lakt! Delton l..avall~e Loganville Mcuimac North Freedom f[ajn Pralric du Sac Rock Springs S..ukCi1y Spring.Grec:n West B<l.riilobQO Cit)., Baraboa Reedsburg WisooMin Oclls School Districts Within District Bnroboo B~llcvm~ Cambr.f.1 Comb ridge Colun1b1.1s De~rficld DeForest FaJJ RJver Port AtkinSion Jcffl!t&on John::;~ Cre:l!k Lokc MH!.001 r.hdi5b.n 1\obr:iihnU McFarlnnd Middltlon Mooon~ Gro~e.MonteUo Mounl f{orcb N~w~ale.ru~ Ore&oD P".ardocviJh: 'P<Jrt.. gc Poyneue Rnndolpb Reedsburg Ria River Valley Sauk.fl'rairic Stou,ghton Sun Ptdirie Vr:n;ww Waterloo. Watt!rlown Wa1U1akee Westfield Wisromin Dtlb Wi5con&in Heights. : Wonewoc Governing.Board Madison Area Technical College (unctions witllin the system of Voc tional, Technical and Adult Education in tbe stale of Wisconsin. The college i~ operated under the direction of the,area Board.of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No.. The board consists of nine members-three employers, three employees, two "memb~rs 'at large," and a school district administrator. The members of the board are appointed by a board ap pointmeitt comitlittee composed of the county ooard chairpersofis of the counties included, all or in part, in District. The chairperson of the mostpopulous coufity serves as chairperson of the appointment committee. Representation on 't!ie board is appor tioned throughout the district as set forth in section 8. HiS, par~graph of Wisconsin statutes, 198. Current board members are: Employer Members James B, Hasler, O:D Carole McGuire Gerald E. Thomas, Ph.D, Employee Members Genevieve R. Bancroft Donald W. Fry Frances A. Johnson Members-At Lar&e ], Robert Curtis, D.V.M. William G. Lunney School Dlstric:.t Administrator Allen K. Rosenthal Waun ~ke e Community School District ~TC-FO~T ATKNSON The fallowing degree programs.are offered at MATG's satellite campus in Fort Atkinson: Associate Dei!fee (two-year) Marketing (1st ye~;r only) Nursing Supervisory Management Technician VOcational Diploma tone yearl Clerk Typist Dairy Herd Management l'ractical Nuuins Stenographer Vocational Diploma (Jess than one year) Farm Training Homemaker/Home Health Aide Pre Service Nursifls Assistant For more information abou.f. these program.s and otner courses, call or write: MATC FortAtltinson, 8Z7 Banker Rd., Fort Atkinson, Wt 558; 1/56 &611. MATC-PORTAGE The following.degree programs are offered at MATC's satellite campus in Portage: Associate Degree jtwo year) Accounting (1st year only) Marketing (1st year onlyl Supervisory-,Mana~ement Technician Administrative 1\&sil!!Jmt..Secretar!.al (l&t year only) Vocatloiial Olploma (one year) Clerk Typist Crop Production Stj!Jlographer Vocational Diploma (less than ODe ye.u:) Farm Training Farm Training Sheep Production Homemaker/Home Health Aide Pre-Service Nursing Asll(stant T!Xidermy For more information about these programs and othet courses, call or write: MATC Portage, 0 Col lins St, Portage, W 5901; 608/7 15!. MATC AEEDSBUAG Organizational Structure-! 79 The following degree programs are offued at MATC's satellite ~ainpus in Reedsburg: Associate Degree (two year) Nursing Supervisory- Management Technician Vocational Diploma (orie-yli!arj Clerk Typist Stenographer Vocational Diploma (less than one year) Farm Training Apprenticesblp Maintenance Mechanic Plumbing TooL.and Die For more information about.the~>e programs and other courses, cau or write; MATC,Reedsburg, 00 Alexander Ave., Reedsburg, W 5959; 608/5 86. MATC-WA TEA TOWN The following degree programs!''" c;>ffered at MATe's satellite campus in' Watertown: ~soclate Degree {two yearj Accounting Eleotronics Technician.(1st year only) Marketing {ht y~ar only).. Mechanical Design Technician 1 ~.st year ohly) Nursing Supervisory- Management Technician Vocational Diploma (ol)e year) Account Clerk Clerk Typist Vocational Diploma 'less than one year) Fatm Training Apprenticeship Plumbing Tool and Die For mere information abo.ut these programs and other courses, call or write: MATC Watertown, 100 W. Main St., Watertown, W 509; ~/~ MATC..OOWNT9WN CENTER The following d~gjee programs <Ue offered at MATC's Downtown Center in Madison: Associate Degree (two-year) Dental Hygienist Occupational Therapy n addition, sel~ted associate degree courses in other programs will be offered at!be Downtown Center.. For more information, call or write: MATC Student Services, 5S'O Ander&on St., Madison, W 570; 608/6-MATC. " r

93 180-Sta(f and Faculty Staff aod F~~tulty 181 ADMNSTRATVE OFRC.ER$ NORMAN 1'. MrTBY ~lctdir ecto. R.Ed., University or Wisconsla WhJtcwa.ter M.S Ul1lvc.-.ity ol V!oconsln.Stout Graduate Sludy, University of W!ocon ln Malll""' CAU. R. RJCE Aul&tAnt Director.. SAudeot Se,...,-ic:u B.S.. Unh er<ily of WC'lNin-PialleviUe_ M.S., Un\ve:n ity of Wl.scon.s.J'\ M:tdison Gtllduale Study. Uolver>ily ol Wloc:onsin Mdl&oo FKBDERJCK E. MTCHELl. ~t D!re<Jor ln.uudlonol ~nlces B.S., Unin n ky of Wl6oonolc StOCJt M.S., Unlven!ty of W"JSCDsin Siout Gcaduatc Study, UnivcrJ~Y of Wiaconoin Madioon. Marlj<rotte Unive~ity _FREDERCK R. ll lls f:ju.treacb $crv1cei/adult Bhd Co11tinulng Education AdiUiDistralor B.A..Unlve,.llf of.wiaconsio M dison M.S., V~tiv erslty o.wisconsln Milwl!lu.kei Post-Gcod.Mic Study, Unlv~cslty of Wlsct>J! Milwoukoe, University of Wlseonsin Mdlscu1, U.nfvt:rsUy or WlJCOnsin Stout KENNETH P. N!EM!)'ER. Pcrs9l'Dol om-. :Q.S., Unive.ralty oc Wisconain LaCccsse.M.S., Uoivqslty of Wi=~sln Modl6on l'h..q.. Uoive,olty of Wl""iisfn Modloon DARYUSJ M. NQWRASTE~ Plafl1'ht.J o.nd ~onotaic D~~lopment Admindtrator. B.A., Colorodo Stole CoU.go M.A., Uoiversity?f WiscQf'siQ;~son PbD., Univerlity of Wlscaruln "Madlson HOW~ B. ltpm. Dopuly l);rectotoperotiorli Admin.iotr lor.b.~. Univer$ily of Wl"""'lln M dl6otl M.S.. Un!vonilty of W!occns!o-Madl6on. :, \V=~~~:.:~ tv,.-jlly pf!unsos, Univ~<fl!~ of "" CLP'ORD V. A.NDREOU RecJstror B.S.. Northern Michigan UiliY<!tlity M.S~ Univtrsity of Wiscons.in M di.son Graduo!e Study, UnlveMiity of Wisconsln-M dison.:.. OO)lRJ. VAN B.RA>!ER ~issio~!< Ad mlnlstralqr B.S.., Na1jhwcst Misaouri State.., M.S. Univt!rslty o( Wisoon!lin-Plttt(eville. Graduate Sludy, Un{ve ~ dly ~t wjsco.risln-macils'6n; Unlverstiy of Wlscnnsln.Stout, U~lv erslty of New Hampshire Gllit,o\LD LNPAS. Ploondo{ Admlnletrotor.B.S., University pf Wiscoruin Whitewater B.B.A., Univeraity of WU ct:~ ruln Mad~n. '.,... Grodo>te St01jy, Univ.roltyol 1\'Uconsln Medison AREA COORDNATOR AND CAMPUS ADMNSTRATORS. JOHN~LOR Wutern Dan~ Couaty A.A., Modoon Ar T«<lnkel CoHos B.S, Unlveuity of Wi.-.sln Stoul N.S., University of W1s<oolln-S1ou1 Ph.D., Univecaily of Wlacouin Mi dilon HAYD6NGROY MATC Rccdobara "B.S., Unlvecs!ty or!uinols M.s.. Ualvers~f of llinois ol %~~~~!~ ~ Unlvero!ty cl \Visconsin Midison. Jo~si ty LYll'M'J!. HEtf f EL MA'fC Wnte rto""'-' B.S., U11lvorsity of WS«>nsln Stout M.S., Unl\"crsily ol Wllconsln-Sioot }ERV C. "ElSER MATC Tr\tl~.U.S., Purdue Un\\l~rslty M.S Purdue University Ed.O. W;uhington SUite: Unh er~ly JAMES t. LUESSMAN MATC 'ortage B.S., UniversUy of \Yl5tonsin PlBLovi~ M.S., Unkoersily of WJScoo11n M.. Ji~an or~~=:~.~~~ t Univ.:n hy u! \"iisconsin ~h d.i~n, Univcu ity MELVN S AMANS MATC Fort Atkltuon B.S., University o( Wtacon in Stout M.S.. Universi1y of Wisconsin-S1ou1 DVSON Dt/NS/CHARPERSONS AND COORQNATORS.. RO.BET V. ~HENS Ch Jrperscn-1\Ja.rkelin& 'B.A., University of Nosthern ln\'10 M.A., Univcu ity of Northern owa Gr>duot Study, Unlver$11y ol M lnnc.sot~. ~li>hl8an.state Unlvecsity, UniversitY of Wtscousln-Msdr.bn <. ' J. ROBER'!: Ji!URULL Tl!Jc:communlcaUaas,::OOrdiuator B.S. Univenity or \'Yisccnsin.. M.S.. Unlvccslty of Yilsconslo..\ : Pb.O. Univer>ity of Wisconsin..PATRC~ CARTWRGHT CurrlculUJl CooadlqllOf.. B.A., Mllw~_y.kcc l;lo)'focr Co~Jcic ll.a'l'reoc:c Jlpjv~>ftyj. M.A.T., Uolverslty of \Viaconsln-S.~ CloUt. Pb.O., University ol Wllcon.<in M <&o<.., CrA<Nole Study, Uplvenity ol Loodon, UniVO<~y.of \Visoon=io EAu Oairc DORQTJtY DT'tMBR Cbat rpet~on. N n!j1s LN., St Mary'.SCheel of )'1\ar.U.g. Rodl01tcc, l,{inne- B.S.N., UJ!ivenlcy or Dubuq. M.S., Univer5ity ol Wio<;Q~p-Madi~Cn, CLliTUSJ. J'ONTAN! OeaQ, Aptc~l)urt AJ! lbu thl'f~ B.S., Unlvenlty of Wlaco1uln RlYer Fills M.S.. Unlverslly ql Wlsconsln-Mad)son ' Gladu~lf,.$t\ldy,.Qp~v~ritY-A>f Wj~o~,~in:M\fJi~pn, Upiv~uHy o( WJsronsm St~u~.,.., " JUmi~W f. ')!YMJj.~l!ll -'"lllllll lklip, G~n<rol S(udl.,. B.S., University or Wlocxmoin-Madisnn M.S.T.. St. Louio Unlver$1ty Grado ate Study, Unlver$1ty 01 \vts<ooasln-modison CHARL!!S HAYCOCK Choirporooo. GHphlc Arts B.A., Unive>-.sily o( Wlsccnoln MdiSoa M.S., University ofw&c<jn ln Modison Gradoote Study, University of W!COntin-Madi.an MilRJA Ht!NAND!!Z 0cal'l. Alttmallve L.,.rnlnJ B.A.. Unlvctslty ol \Yisc:on>ha Milwaukcc M.S., tlnlvenily of Wlscou!n Mllwlllli<ee Gcoduole Study, Unlvenlly ol Whconsln-~lctl oon G. ARV HLl. Ci>W pe<son, lndutt'rt.l J'oods B.S., Uniy.rlity ol WbcomlooSlotll M.S., Univonlly of Wisc o nsin-sla ~t Grad oto Study, Uolveuily of WU<-on>in-Modi11011 JAMES A Cloalrpen on, public W oty Strvlcca A.B., Woyne Slltc Unlvec&lty M.S., Mlc:hlion Stole UoiYfCsily Doeiocal C..didole, MidliJ&n Stole Univeroity ROLAND JOHNSON Clulrponon- ~tusle B.M. College.of Mus!(. Onclonott M.M.. ColleJe of Mulc:,Cancinnotl D<x:tor-of 'll k:. Jn hor.orltc.olfll, Milton CoDes< DON~ G. LNSTROTH Campus Admln!Jira!O</CiaallpuaoJJ-Appt..,u..:.hlp A.A., Gatc.,ay Tecbolea! Uiltute Mast.-c Ccufumau Appren~ ic:eshi p a.s.f University of Wi~eOMl.n..Stout Add.itional Study, Un!ver.tty ol Wisconsin -~ MERUN J. MAl RS De ~. Trade add lod.. try B.S., low State U11lver,Jity M.S., Unlvec&lty ~~ Wlo(l)psln SOU G.coduote Study. Unlvec.tty of Wl$t>nsln-Stou.t JUDTH OLSON SU'!TON Asaltlant Dt!ln Boslneas.B. B. A., University of Wiscon1in Madboo M.S., Univc ~lty o( Wi' con-sin Mildlson.GrAdu lc Sf\ldy, Unln tjh)'.of WJscon&» Mt di!lon, Uni.venity of Wi oco~sln.stout, UnlvcrlllY or W0<:9P n Milwauket, Morquetle Unlvcro.ily JOHNS. ROBNSON Dean, Bu.sine:st B.B.A., UnJo,~~ r.sity o! Wiscon.sln Mdi.son M-.s., University of Wl.toOnsin Mc.dis.on Graduote Study, Univerolty of Wlsc:ooslo M dl6otl, Urlivenity of Minnesota MRASHERKOW o.... Genu a! Studies B.S., Northv.oe:.aern UniYeRlly. _M.S., Unl... rslty of V(lrconstn-Mllwoukoe l'b.d.. Uolverslty ol Wloconsha-Modtoon RCHARD SROLD.Pub He Su.f't'!ty Coocdiaator ll.a. University of 1\'isa>nsin-Modloon M.S., Jnlveulty ol Wlseonsln-Modi$00 Ed.S., Universky ol Wilcon$in Stout ABDULCADR StDO Ctio\rperfOn. Dtntal AuxUiarks B.A., Un~verot ry of New Mexloo-A)buquorque }.S., \lpivec Y ol New Mexico-Albuquerque Graduate Study, Unlverally o Wificon&in Midison D.D.S:, Marquelte. Unlvct51ty, School of Dentlltry ALUN C.1'JOMM ""lstont D.. n. rrado and ln,!uitry a.s., Monk ate Stote College M.s.. U11i~rolty cl WJsronsin Stou~ Gr du-'11 ~ Study, Unlversily of Wisconstn Mdison 1\tAUAN TM.BRAN Qeora, JOitle Eoonoml<o B.S., UplvenUy ol Wiaeonoln-SO(t M.S., University ol Connecticut GEORG! WATSON fico Strvk o/dt Coordinator, Public S.fety Sen-las Cer1ifaed Pitt Sen>lcc lns1r ctor WiJcll<lsln C.rUed 8MT Special Sludy, NaUonol Fire Academy ROBJlR1' WUCHT Deoa, Health Ocnpotlono D.D.S., Marq-Jetle Uoi,m hy, ~ool or OentWcy Ccodvetc Study, UniVttslty ol Wlseonslu Siout STUDENT SERVCES STAFF UCHARD C. BADGER Coun""lor.S.. Uni mlly of \Y!aconsln M dloon M.S., Uciver<ity ol Whconoin Modloon LYNN BUSS Collotl< H..zth B.s..N., Lou-.n ~ tte Univetsity New Otidlu Gradu te Stcdy~ Univtrsity of Wisconsin-White"''lln- JOHN W. BRENEGAN Ath.Jc:tk tmrcctor B.S University of Wlacona!n-Pbtttvtll< M.S., Whton StAte College, Mlnt~taott Grod «le SU<iy, Vol..,r<ity of Wlscon>in M dloon lli>mun.b K. BRCMSON Cow..elor!i~S'.. ~;:~~~tlt:{e~jc~~:=~~~~!~~l!e - CYNTH -' GOLOSM1Til Women' Career Cot.tnselor B.S.. Northwe ster~ Uolvml ~y 1\j.S., Northern!Ulnols Unlvecalty GtBd~ te Study, Unlv~rolty o ( Mil>ml ROBERT Jt.. OW}'NNE. -Cair:u Plonnlnj! nd A...,ntn~ HoutiD, GED E.umlnor A.B., Dartmouth College M.A., Univcr~ity of COlorado Craduate.Siudy, Loo& l1land Unlverally 1 Marshall J,Jnives:sity, Univenity of Wl>eon~u -Mad!r.on RlCHAilO HARRS Afllnnativa Adton Offku, Outrtll<b Ptojtct Coc.rdhi.ator, Eduullonal 0ppo t11111ty P>osromJ B.S., Uolvertby c:~f W1$COt\sln MMiison M.S.W., Unlvecshy of 1Wnols Doelorol Condldale, Uolvcrslty of l~lsconsln-madlsoo CARLJ. J NSEN..fU..od&l Aid, l'laeem.. t B.S.. M.>ok>to State C<>lqe M.A.. UJiive.csity ol Northern Colocodo Gtllduo\c Study, Ca6fornia Stat~ Coll<ae Lona Bead! spd Leo An&ek.s, Univeu1ty ol Ca}j(omi.D 'Nine earl Uuivcrsity of Soutlacm C.Kf<><nl> JOHN. K!LLER \'et..r M senfc11! ootce, B.B.A., Univcrdty o( WtSCOJ1n-WhiltWilet M.S., Ul'\lveralty of Wlscon5in-Wtulewater GERAL0~!\!1!~ Spe<lal. N!Cdl.S., St. Norbt rt Collcsc M.S.. Un!veroily or Wlscons!n lt... dlson Ph.D., UnlV<:r!lty of Wl<coosln-Modlson A.AN LARSON CompJ,~ter s~,c' Supervbw B.S.. Univerolty ol Wlscanoln LoCroue Groduote Study, Unl_vee~tty of Wlsc:onaln M.odlson KJMAllY PETERSON Sludent AcliY1t'e!li Advhor li.a., Unlvecstly oiwisa:onsin l!au Cla!ce H. >OUC~S R60STBN Job rr.c<modt. Fo Atlon Uld Alumni l'atiuiolot B.S., Vnivecsity or Wlaco:utn LoCro"e M.S., UnJves,jty ol W!acoooln LoCroS50 Graduate Study, Univenity ol Wiaccelln Madbon XAREN R08EBTS Studeftt Acllvlllet, St..tcnt Senate Advloor, TutiJ! B.S.. Unlveuity cc Wlsconoin Modiacn MS. Uol'iOrslty ol Wlseonlin Modison Spteiol Study, Tlllaoe Unlvenky D<>c:Ollll Condldot. Unlverolty cl Ylscon>in M dison

94 18-Staff and Fllculty Staff and ~aculty-18 W~OWE FlllAWal AJd S..~ni- 11-S-. UnlvenUy ol WiocorCiiD-LoC'O»e M.S., UDi trsjty of W'lJC~.a-Stout NSTRUCTONAL SERVCES STAFF ARTHUR P. CATURkN A.ui,taat Ubralia.n B.A., Un~veni! f of i'tonjylvan..ia M.AJ...S.. l.lni,.rslly of Wiscuooin-Modiwn RCHARD A. G\UM lnstructlot&al Media Coasul._l B.A., Nor1hland Colleg< M.S. UniYerslly of Wls<onsio-Siout Graduote Sll.ldy, Uolverllly of W~ Maditon, llninnity ~.::~~'::''lo Stout, ndiana UniYmity """ Chry!.ler Safety j.tntit J EPFCaTJ' Ubr:arian B.A., Unlv!'f lty of WSCOR$in-Modisoa fo!.a., Unlveralty of Wlscon:riQ M.Whon C i'aduate Study, Unlversity of Wisoon.sin Madiscn, Unlvet5lty uf '\\'isoonsh'l..stout PUBLC NFORMAT,ON CONSULTANT MAll\' WU DEHL B.A., Antioch Oolle8 FACLTES CONSTRUCTON ~TRATOR.. ROB!RT 1'. TOROlLSON B.S.. Unlvenllr ol \ "1SCCUrsin-~1disoa B.S., Unlvm\ty ol Dlinois C..mpoigalllrban.o M.S., Uni,..,.;ty olllllnois Cl> nij'<gn/utball& LEAD TEACHERS CLENNBODA Stlet>te B.S., Unlverslly ol Wlstonsln M '""" M.S Uolversity ol \V"sxonsin tt.'latbon GAR\'GADB GruphloAtu D!ploma l'flnlu, Modlson At.. 1'ochnkal Coil"~!" B.S., Univ~y of Wisc:onsin Siout M.S., University of W!soonsin.Sioot Groduott Study, Uulverslty of Wlsconsin-Stou~ l.jnivenity of WSC(!Jl$Ln Piottoville.. john R. GLSDORF Mothalllc l 0.,.111". B.S.,. ()nlvenity or Wbconlin.Sta'llt M.S.. Unlveralty or Wlscon in Stoul. Graduate Study; University of Wiiconsjn.-Plattc:villc: Ed.S., Ubivenlty o WJCOn:sin Sioul THURMAN D. HESSE Welcllna B.S.. Univ<rsity ol Wls<onslo P.>Ue\ille M.S.. Un!venlty or Wbconsia Stoul Gratlu.te Study, Unlveni<y of W'!$CO1$ln Mati1SQO BARBARA HUNDT 01-k Technkl B.S.. Viltrbo CoiJ.ae. LACrosse M.S., Uulversity o/ Wls<ons!n SOU Ed.S., Unlvefliily of Wlaconsin Stoul Graduate Study, University of Wisconsin-Stout. Mad~ Alee 'Tcdonical College MELVN A. JANSEN JtdtotUcs B.S., Milwaukee Stl>ool of Engineering Cnod...,c Study, Cold eo G11e Univct;ity, Alb<.no Coli<J<', Uni-.ersity of Wi»:Jrui.n ~\.adison Additlcmol Study, Uni e"ity oi Alob.ma-Hunhvillt, BM, TT No\S/ll Punk r llt.mo USN. Boeing (USAF), Four Pbm Systems. f airchild T.. t Systonos ARTHUR Xi\UTZA F~~-~~:.';:ty ofwhconsln-~sou M.S., Univenlt}' o! Wisconsin-~ison G >duale St df, Unlv..,sity of Wisoonsln Mtdisol\ /llfrl!d P. LJlH[t;N MalhetnOC<t B.S., Putdue University M.S., University o{ Wi5COnsin-Madlson Ph.D., Univcnity of \Visc::onsin-Madh.on PH UP MAUR Driver Tr.alnlna B.s.. llalverslty of Wisconoln St<Yells.l'oint Graduate Stu.dy, :san State Unive: r:~ity_,.unlv~r&ity.c>f Wi conatn Madison, Uu!wrsily flf \Visconsi.t... Whilewa~ r CARS'X>N. M<i<AY...Sotlol Stl<nto B.A.. Wulern Washington St&te Collegq B.S.. University of Wbton.$ln Madl!oo M.S.S. W., University of Wiscbnsin-Ma<fuon Ph.D.. Unl etslty ol Wbcon in-mo<llson jam 5 M.LU AQ1ol\...,..ka A.D, Modi-.V Tocl>oicol Coll(se B,S., Uatvenlty or Wlscontlu Wtrnewater M.S. Uni>et<fly ol Wbcoosin Stout ]&\NB1'1'B (1. Nl!LSON PtKikal Nuralaa Fort Alklnson R.N., jameslown College, North Dftkol'a B.S.N.. J.,.stown CoUeae M.S., Unlv~ully of Wisconsin-Whi~water Graduate Study, University cfwjsc:dd.sin-madi.son, Uoiver.sity o{ Wiscomin-Milwaukee JAMES B.OWSAM llbchlndlllotal 'l"''lmm~$ B.S., University ol Wls<oculn Sioat M.S., Unlnrslty ol Wl$<0llsln-Siout Spec;.! Study, Unlvenlty of WiJCOOO!n Madlson. Uuivenity of Min tsott, MHw~ ulc.telntiuule cl Tei:hnoi0)' THOM~ J. RYAN Aoco... u.,.. B,S., Uolvmlty of Wlsttnsln Eau Clair M.S,T., Univei'lity of Wi s«:~nain E~v. Cl irc: M.S., Unlvcn.ily of Wis~:onii n-whltew. tcr ]!ROMil SCAfllR Diesel and HH Y Equlprnmt Mtthnlrt B.S., Manklto State ColleF, Minnc l1il M.S., Mlll1ktto Slate CoO.go OONALDJ. 5Cn1Nk1!8 Aololaatlve Todooolou Diploma, Macllson Alea Tethnl<tl Coll<:ge.S., University o/ Wtsoonsin-Stout. Gracluato Sludy, Ubivenity of Ch~ Adc:litioul Tratnina, Gener l MOtors, Ford Motot Conl:pU)y, Chi)'S!er Motor ComJ'<fty A.S.S. Ctrtlllcd T. ELLA STROmER Bnallsh B.A., Unlvenhy of Northern k>yoo.cedlr Palb M.A., Unlver&lty ol Wlaconsin-Madlson Gradualo Sludy, University ol Wisconsln Modlson NANCY TANS Fa.J>oe Mrrtl>andblns B.S., Unlveulty of Wixonsin Modi$on M.S., UM-ersily of Wlsconsln Modiaoa. Croduale Study, Univenlty of \'l'..ainsin-/llodlioon Sp«<D Stlldy, New York Univr""trit)", Fuhioa lnllilate or TtcltnDloay. Un)..,'etsity of llritish Cohunbia-Vallcou.Vtf Yi\MANTAR Arclolletlu al TechnoJosyiArthlcettqral Dr_,llnt B.S.. Rqbut CoU s oflinglncer'anj lstanbul, Turkey M.S..!Can,.. Slate Univei'Sity Pos( Graduate Study, Univusity o Wisconsin Madi5on OBERTL. TAYW Ani... Todonk:lan D.V.M., town Si>t< Unlvtrsity M.S., Unlve10\ty ol WOOO!UiD Mt dison Gttduale Study, Un''/euhy of Wisconsi.n-1.h disod, U.ohet.Uty of WiJOOns.in St.out FRDERCC TUOMAC\ P11bllc; Wor~olt..ald 'Survoyl"i B.S., Unlvenlty of WiJconsin Madison M.S., Unive:rslty o! Wlsconsln Mad.ison Graduate Study, University 1 o( W'iscorisin Mtdison FACULTY l.ousji ADM'JS 0c:<up<11onol Thcnopy Tethruel " o.s. Ualvcnky oc Wis<oosla Modilon Groduetc Study, Unive:reily of Wlsc:o::lSiA~Mt~ O.T.R.. AmeriCAn OccupotioOoi 'Thuopy..Wodalion J OAN $-AGARD 15aiHsh B.A.. OUvet CoUeso:. Groduote Study, Loyolt. Urunrsity, University' a! Wl<oonsln Modlson CORTLYN N. ALMQUST D iry Herd Ahn.me:at B.S., low State Univusity M.S., University or Wiscoasin-M..mon Ph.D. Uni.. rslly ol Wlsc:onsin Modiso KBNT ANDERSON ~Medial TraiAlna B.S. Unlver.Uy ol WtlCOMln Pbtteville. M.S., Uni usity of Wlsconsin-MUwa.ukte PANC.!ON C. 1\RACNO French B.A.: Soo..them Mcthqdlot Unlvcnlty M.A.. RutJor University Sptclal Study, Laval Unlverolty-Q.ueb«:, J tltut de Tcnmalnt Fra~ Croduatt Study, Untver>lty ol Wlsoonoln Modi"'n FREOBRCK M. AKO!.D Sodoi Sclenoo B.A., Gtlnell College M.s., Northern llllnoia lln!votoily Groduole Study, Northorn lllinoll Unlversity,'V..inrsity 6( Wixomin-Madlson SPENCE\J. ARTMAN Mlctoblofoay B.S.,-Uotvetsity of Wi~n..stenos PO!.at Af.A., Droke Ualtcrsity Pooi-Maoler's, Ohio Sllla Uni cuiiy. MCHABL BARBB Music: B.M... St. Notber1 College M.M. Boll Stote Unlv nily Post Gtodu to Study, Poll Stole Uninrsity. Unlversky ol Wis(Onsio Mad-.on, Un\venUy of WK!Qnsin-Slout.ALtEN,uu:on BloiOSY B.S., Unlvorsity ollih M.A., llrown l)oiverslty Gnduole Study, Un!vtrstly of c.jifo<nia, u.u.....;t, of Wi1consln-Siout. University o! WiscCH>s&o,M!Uiison DONALD AYR!tmtE. Actounlins.. Watertowa B. Ed., Unlvcrsil)' or Wbconsin Whik:Water M.S., Unlvcnlly ol Wlsconsln.SuptrlOr LOS 8 C< Auoclate [)egret N'"''"' R.N.. 5(, JO<ph'a Stltool of Nunillj(. Manhfoc:id B.S.N., Unlv.rslty of W!CilO>in-Modi>oo M.S.. UllivUJity ol WkcollSin Madison PETER D. BRGENSKB Qphmottk: Tetlu!lclan B.A., Untvtralty of WlsconJin Modison 0.0., Unlvenlly of Callfomlo'Berl<eley WS 81!RN8 CJ ASoc ate Dc:pee Nurd~l. 8.S.N.,.P'Youv1Ue College, New York M.S.N., University of Pt nn11ylvl nla KARL BETfiJC! Stlenee B.S., Uaiv rsity of W!Wlns.ln Madlson M.S., Unlvetslty of Wllconsin Medlson Graduote Stl.ldy, Unlvtrsity ol WiS<OC>Sin.Stout, Univcmty of Wisconsin-Madison, Utt.ivenity of W1k0n5in-Wbitewater DAVD P. 'BEGEL Dlexl.nd Heavy l!qulpmcal Meduonk:o Class A SleeiwOfkcn School, U.S. Navy Unrlervoduate Stu ely, Unlvenlty or W'Scoosin Wbitewater. Unlvenlty of Wli<XlMin-Sl.. ~ Uulv<rsity of W'JOcoruin. Platteville. nd Penis Stile CoiOJe JO!N BLSE Bw)lleo Educ tlon l'ort"i" B.S. Unlvoulty of Wlscoosln Whitewoter M.S;, Unlvmltyof Wi...,..;n-Witilewater }OHN BRONC l!loctn>gics B.S.. Unlversily of Minot$01.1 M.A., Unlvenlly ol Upp<r owa Cenllicatc n the Teocbtns ol En&ioeerlca; Tethoology, u.;...,. sityollllloois Craduote Study, Oklahoma State UQ.ivasity, Unh"Cnity ol Whcoruin Stout, ljaivcuity of Upper lo-w a., Uaivetsity olllinoi.j, Univ<nlly ol Wlaconsln-Modlson T RES/l BLACK Occupotfo""l Thor py A.A.,.Modl&on Ato Technical College ArldlllonaJ Sludy, Unlv...,Uy of Whooonsln M' dlson C.O.T.A., Ar.n~rt~n Occupa tlcmal1'her ~Y Association VRGNA BLOCK Cornl)'lunlcatloas. B.A.,. Corr~<ll Cotlcao, low.!.!.,, University oi\y&consiri-madioon VCKE BOBDflR Bullr"U Ed\CatJon Watulawn B.S., Unlvculty ol W\soonsln Whitewllet Gnduolc Study, Unlnn.lty of WlS<OOsin S'"'t, Uolver Y of W'<JC<Win Pialltvillo 'AUL BO!CEL O...taJHyaJme O.D.S, Matquette Ualven.!ty, St~l of Donilatry Periodontics Cert.inctlte, U.S. Army BARBARA BORDERS Com-.:111 ArtiVbiN Commuakallons B.S., Unl 'ttolty oi \Yilconsln M dbon M.S., Unlvenlly of \Yisconsin-Madi.\on Gtoduolt Study, Unlversily cl W'ucoosln Madlson

95 18 Staff and Faculty OSAUNB.)~OUTZ Engllsh A.B., Univ~r5ity of Miami M.A., Unive[':iiily of M.hmi Ph.D., University of Pennsylvani.r: Spc:dal Graduate Stlldy and Resc:arch, Hutnboll Univer:sity Berlln and BGdl~~an Libnuy.Oxf ')rd Onlvenlty DQctoral Ca~did.ate, University of Wisconsln ~~i!>cn MARY JEANNE BOwEN Cllnical Da\tal Hniene B.S., Marquelh! University DenM.:l Hygiene Cettificate, Marquene UnlveuUy MCHAEL BRAUN D~li< 'T«hni<lan B.S., University of Wiscccsin Grten' Bay M.S., University of Wisconsin-Stout Graduate Study, Universily 6fWisoonsin Madiscn, University cif.wlsconsln~stout PEGGY BREMER As110(:iatlon Degree ~ur.,i.ag D.S.N'., Univ~l'sity_o.f Michigan M.S., University of Wiscoruln-Mndi~on JANEBR!UN Science, MalhematLc:& B.S., University of Wa.!ihinston M.S., Unl"\'ersity ofwl!iconsin~mad;s?n ROJERT BREN Erig~8h B.A~. St,--Mai'_y ~ CoHegf! M.A.,.Miar.quelte Univer.sjiy Graduate Study, Univ~r~ity.of Wi.sconsin Madison. /lent R. BRGHAM Bu9lness AdiDlnistriltioQ B.B.A.., Ul:liveni~{e>fWiscOusln.. _".ta~on M.S., Universif)r d W~coosin~Madisort ~ Gf~du.iltc and Spec::ial Study, Univer.si~y C>f Wiswnsiri Madison, Upive.rs)ty.ofWiscon.:5in Stout ~~~~i~i:!~~~ B.S._, University o! Wis~:onsin-.Madisc-n ~.S., University of \'Vi:;consin-Madison SUSAN BUBOLTZ MediCAl Msl.5tattt B.S.N. Unl"~r5ity-of Wiscoitsin-Msdison M.S~._. Onivermty of Wismnsin-Slout_ STANLEY J!Ui! 1! Jnsurauce, :. B.S., Univer!ity of Wisconsin~MAdbcm ~.S. _ U:niversity.. fil_( Wisrun!iln Madi~n MARY BURNS AqvliQ1---nC9,m.i.lj~ll V.roceMing 'B.S., Ed.R!:.W<;JOd CoUege -Grcdu.::~tc Study, Un-iver.5ity of Wjsropsih-Madi,fon, ~nivc(sj~y 6f \\li5c~msln Bilu Claire, Unive:rl!ity of Wi.sconsin..Sl~ut; _ ' ROSARO D.USALACCH Scfenc:-c s.s., Milwil ukce Sr::hool o!enginc!~ring M.S., Univcrsl.ty of. Wl5cOns1n-Mndi$0n MARLYN. CARlEN Englloh B.S., Cqrnell Un~versity. M.A., Uatver..tily-of Wl.scon5ln Mad1son Pb-.0!,.Univetsityof W~scons.in-M.adlscn JAMES CARNTZ Machine Trade& B.A., Uhiver.siiy of Wisconsin-Stout M.S University c( Wtscoostn S.,lut Graduille Study, Univcnshy of Wisconsin-MELd1son., Univccslly of Wiscarisin..Sio-ut VRGNA CASCO Medical As&S$ttmt/Me:dh:lll Ubaralory Technician -D.S., UniVersity o~ Wisctmsin M~dison M.S., University of Wisconsin-Stout PAULCHADER Atchi.tet:tural ond Clvii ''echnology A.A., Uzlivtr5ily of Minnesota ll.a., Sl. Cloud Siote College M.S., Bemidji S!~le Co!Jote GREGORY CHERMAK lll <ketlng A.D., Mlldison Area 'fedmlcal Colleg~ B.S.. Unlveteily of Wisconsin-Madison M.S.~ Unive-:rsity D WisC)JJs.in Maidi.srm MCHAE~ CHOPN Automotive B.S., Unlversily of Wiscons.in-Stc;.ul Grad\lale Stud_y, Ultivcuity of Wis~onsin-Stout Sp.:cial Study, G~nera1 Motors, Milwa.uhe SclmcJ of Enginl!!eri.lg JA_NJCE 1\. CHRST~NS!N Buslneas Ma.~lne8j, Math and Related Business,.A.D.,.University of Cincinnati B-S., University. of Cincinn,ti M.B.A., ndiana. University Gra.du&~.tt': Study, Unlvenity of Whconsin-Staut, Un_iv.cn i.ty_of Wisconsin-Madison. Univer.sity of Wisconsio Eau qalre JOAN C. CTACEK Associate Degr-ee. Nursing B.S.N. Hamline Univei!iity, St. raul Psychiatric Nursing Certificate, UniVersily ilf ~1L)nesola. M.S.E.. Uri.hrer.sity of Wisconsin-M-adison. BARBARA CLARK Assor::iate Dexn:~ NUtsibg-RecdsiJurg S.S.N. 1 Univer.$i'ty of Wis~onsln-MUwaukcc M.S.N., University of Wis.consln-Macj.ison. WLLAM COLBY History s.a., Pom~na. Ccllege. M.S., Univ~rsltY C)[ Wisconsin Madison GEORGECOOPBl\ P~ychology B.S., University of Wi.SeonSiti "M&dl-son M.A., Wfst Virgiril11 Unlvetsity- Graduale Study. Marquelte: Mie~i~al Sr;bOol ROLLECOX Offi.:e Te.::hn<tlor.y B.A., Uni~rsi\y ofwiswnsin-ma,di!o<jra. M.S., Univefslty 'Of Wi~T!'iin M di$dri ANDREA CRA(<. M rketidg A.A., Madi O!l Atu. Technicol Col leg.b.a.,. University ql WiseDn.sin Madison G[aduote Study, Pniversity ofwisconsln Msdison ClJT CRilAGilR Soclqlogy B.S.~ University of. Wlsconsin Oshk0-5h M.S., Florida State Univeraity OMBR P. CltBYDT. Blucpr1Bt fntetp:retg~tlop B.S. Un_iversity.of Wisronsin-S~oul. Gra-dtJale an~ AddWonaJ.Study, Univenity of Wj~~:!'Dsi n Madisnn, Unlve:r.sity ofwlsconsin St~ven& f'ojn1 DAVD DEA-N Data Proc.. sbi& Progr mmhig B. B.A., UniverSity o Wi5consin-WhiteWaier. Sp~cia~ Sludy, Uni.versity o( Wlsco~sii\-Madlson, Univcr!lily of Wiscon.sin~Stou l MARE-LOUSE DENYS A"'soclate Depee Nursing R-~-~ Corn!iii.University M.S.N., Univ~sity Q( Wi.scOnsin_-Mii.dison : G.tsduale.and Special Stu.dy, Unlv-ersHy Of Wj,smnSin~.Mu.dis-cm ELEANOR DERGE Mediutl_Ass.istmg R.N ~.Madison General Ho.spital B.S.. -CQll~g-c o~ St. Pranci~- M.S.-, UniVersity of Wiscomin.S)aut MLTON DEHL Accounting B_.S., Uriivenity Of WiSconsin-Madison M.B.)\., University oj low.a ' Gra.d.u~te Study, Universll'f of Wisconsh:r-Wbilewatl:r JO~ DMCK.,_, _. Dupllca,\;n; Mi cblnn. B.B.A., Un\ver-#y of Wisi:cnsin-Ma.diwn Gr-l:duate Stu~Y:t Vniv~cs.ity n(wistqnsin~m~5on Wll.lli!RTA DONOVAN PsycholOgy B.S., University of Oklahoma. M.S., owa State University Ph.D., owa Sta.te. Univ~rsity ROilER'i' D. DOYLE Respiratory Th.erapy- A.D., Madi:;on Area Tecbnic<l Collog.: THOMAS e. DOYLE Elect tonics B.S., University o{ Wjsconsin. M~U;~.. M.S. (Curriculum/ll)strucU.onl, Unlv~rslty_ pf-. Wto;comiin-Mndi:Oh,.. M.S. -~COmpu.1f!' Sti~nce J, University of Wiscons;n ~~adb~n MARY JOAN DAXLER Office Technology n.s., CoUege of St.B~tledict. St~ Jos~ph,_ MJnneota Gradua:tl!! Stt!d.y, Univeu!ty of Wj.scons.i.n Mat::Hsqn, UnJ~rersity of Wisconsin-Whi1ewater ~.. ;_; RONALD DUNHAM.. W~ldl~s B.S., Unlver~Ltr of Wiicon-stn-Stout M.S., Univcrs,lty pf Wisconsin-StCJ~~. MARKDURKB!,..- Mech nlcal De!J5in B.S:, Uni1reuity o Wiscoc!ll!l Stout - MCilABL A. DYllR Psy<hclogy A.A. Buller Ccunly }onlor Calles. KAn..., "B-. EeL, W1.1shburn Unlv etslty~ TOpeka, K.ansu M.s., U11iversity of WisconsiD-MUwauk~e-: ~ - ROBERT EASON Gt aphit.arta : Sp-ecial Stud} Drake University, ~nive nity.p{_wiscon&in M~rson, Unjver.slly of Wi~Consin.S~out BRUCE EtLNGilR Vi&unl Co'ln.munlclttlons B.S., UniVersity of Wi5COJJsin MDd..i~n Graduat~-sfudy, Unive rsity Of Wiscomain Madisoh ROBERT f;ssbr Adult!look; Ed10ootlon B.A., UriiVcr s~ty o wtsconsln MuliScn Graduate Study, Uiliv~re:l fy ~{ Wiscocs~n~Medison JOliN FAHEY. B rb~rjng -' _~ :.. D~plon111.~ "Linc tj!n &tbc:r Cc.llege, Rockford, ll~it;ois Diploma, Madlso.n Arc Ter;:hnical College... Ad dltion1 Study, UniVeJsity of Wisc:cntin-Stoul, Unlve~ty of Wbit:On!!iiib M&~dl~n , '. Staff anil Faculty l85 t WLLAM. D. F!ENY Conunercbl1 A~tN_lsu l-~mmulliadionlli Professio~. Artist and Art: Pir~ctor.AdVe-tt:ising. AgMty Vice President Pr.ofessi.on.l..l Author uld JJh.1strator B.A., Fihe Arls,.Adelphi.University, New Yo1~. M.A.. Film/T.V... Univernlr of Wioconsin,M dlson-. Specia' Study. -scr.oo1 of Visuai Atts, New Y(:lrk and San Vatley_Co1lc:Ke, CelifcrDia PATRCKG. FLANAGAN nterior DeJign B.s., UhivtJsity of Wisrons.in Madbion M.S., Univc:r.!.i.ty"of Wiscon.sin.~Madison :itobeii'l' E. FOSS AOc:o..,.ttns _.... s:s.l Uri.iv~rSit)r Of ~ine OroriD M.B.A., UD.iver.siljl'.o{ Wis-consin~Mildison M.S., UniverSity o -Wisconsin Madlsop. JACK!'RANDY Matbemadts B.S., University ofwisconsin--5up~rior M.E., Unlv:ersity of Wisc:onsin SuperiOt M.S., Univeuity o WlsCona;in-Madjson Graduate Study, U.nive.rsity.of Whcansin~Madiscm JOHN PRJTSCll... ' Commc:.rd.d-ArtiVi uid CommuoAcattom: ;. B.S.~ Unlver$ity ~f Wisco.t.si.il-Madi.&on M.A., New York- Uni~sity-.. Master of FSn_e Arts 1.Uni~rsity of Wiscoi'Uiin-Madison SAU.YPRTZ Practical Nur.1lng R.N.r Bellin Memorial Hospi'-"1, Green Bay B.S., (}niv~rstty.of W"LS-&Omin Madlsool M.5. t)nlve<slty ocw15coomn Ma.dison Vi<M G.oJUUlO Biology. B.S..~. Univ~tsity of.wjsconsin~ma.dison M.S., Univepricy-.-O(Wi~rtsin Madlscn P~.D., University-of Wi-stonaln~MadisoD ' _ RAYMOND GA.C(A Matheni1tlcs..&l:B.,_ Univer.s.ily of HaWiiJi M.A., UDiVt:rsily a( HawaJi M.A. U:itiver:sil)' (f Wls-cansin~Madi~Qn. ~, Grr;~duPte S.tu~y. Univeu.ity pf.ha~~l. {,Jciv~r~tr_of WiscoDsiD, MRdjSoll. ROBHRTA LYNN GJ\SS.lRB. SpecloLJ'! h!truu larninl c... ter B.S:-. UniverSity pf \Visoonsln-Oshkosb M.S.. _ Uutv~"rsity of Wjsconsi~~_Madison. d.s., University or W.hcoosi~-Siout. M. VRGNA GBSON E~~~bRosory Cotloge-Rlver Fo(Csl;lllina~. _. M.A., Catholic Univer5lty of Amcrlc:a, Washington, D.C. Ph.D.-, Uni Versi (y"of<:hlcp.~ GAY GOL;ST!N... PrOgram bitector/medlul Laboratory TeclmidaJl B.S., PCnnsylvania Sla_t_e- Univll!!f.sily. M.S., University. o! W.Scons\n.Stout Speaiel Study 1 Gearge--W shlllgton Ull-~vttrsity MARGA\ET M. ()REENO Acc:oWJtlftS/Ft.~CC.. B.A., Uni.Yersity of WCons~ Madl &On. M.S.. University of Wbcon in~madlson JMCRENZOW Ar<bltoclural Dl'Afllng. Q.S., Ulllver&lly ofwlsccnoin Pioltevll!. M.S., Univwllr of Whcon in Plotleville Gradu1teStudy, Univer&lly of Wi sco n~ln Madjscm, Univenily cf.wis<:onsln Pialh:ville ~. l ~. t

96 11~6-siaff t'lnd Faculty Staff and Faculty l87 ~ DOUGLAS GRESBACH MarketJng. _. B.B.A., University of WlsconsiJ) Oshkosh G:ri1d1,1a1e Study, University of.wjsc:on~n-o!ohkosh, Oniverslty of Wiscotl.Sin.. Madison ALLEN GRiffiTHS DieSel and Heavy Equipment Mecbautcs.A.A.S., GateW.!!Y Tli!dinical CoUese Special Study, Unlvetsity o( WisConsin-Stout, University o_f Wi.sedlisin-M.adi10n, University of Wiscon&in Piattev1Ue 1 Ghic11go State Unlvenily MARLYN M- GRMM Pradii:a.l Nur.sing. R.N., Columhi~ School of N.nsingr Milwau]l;ee B.A. 1 Lt.Hher College Graduate: Stu~y. Univer.si.t_y (f WiSCOlJ.Sib MacUson, Univ~raily of Wiscon$in. Stout GORDON HALE Elettroioics B.S., U~ivers:ity of WUl~nsln.Stoul NANCY HALFORD 'finct:nce And Accaanting B.B.A,, UniVersity cf Wbu::Qrisin.Ostikosh M.B.A., Univ~:rslty of'wisedlisin MidiS()Jl Graduate Study, University of WlsconSin Ma.d_i:;on ~~~:;!!HANSEN. 1 B.S., University ofwisc.onsln-madison, Guduol~ Stlldy;!)nlvet81ty o(.wlscortsln-.ltout SALLY HANSEN Elagllih B.A., Wayn~ State Uri.ivc:r~lly, "Detroit M.A., Unlver>ity ofwoc:ojisjn-madi5<jj Graduate Stu~y; University ofwlscomin Mad.ison LYLE HANSON Science B.S.E.B., Uti.iversi"ty of WiscOnsin-MadisOn Graduate Stuy. Vni etolly of WJsConoln-llfsdi.san BARBARA HARAUGHTY' Pr.aii:::Uca1 NUt.JJng ' ' ~ R.N., Ktililer Hospibi,Js, Rochcitei, Mirmesot11. ~ B.S.N.. University pf Wf&eon~n-Madli!On,.. M5Ed., University ofwbc.onsin Madisori. KAmERNE.JARD\i(;'.....,.. OtflceTe<i\nQJoly~ Meilr'""'l!i'e<te!My 1\d'l~n~lpi~rii~J n.s., Edgewood College..... M.S., University of Wjsconsin M'.r:ti.Mm JAMES a.,rper :!. ' Pollee Scion< A.S., Madiion.Are TechnicB!Cilu~ J'.S.,_ San Diegc SUite Uoivei-ait{ M.S., San Diega:~tate Univer&'ity ~ ihi. ',; ;.. El!GBNE HATZNGER.. Auto Mechlllllct.... '. Apprenth: Pros rain, Mid~~n Aten Tethni~ Gollf!Se Gener.U Motor Tocbnlclans Trolnfng SchO<>l ' H. W~.A)( H~U~Ll!R ' ' ' ~!OdCC. ' ' ". B.S., Denison Univeraily, Granyitle, Obto 1 M.S., tlnivej&ity of.wioci>n!b Modi!Orl JUDY HAYDEN GARDl!NBR. Clothing and Todlloo B:S., Monl~tna S1 1C t1niv~nj~y Bo~man JOANN J, HAYl!S CQmmen:lol Art. B.S., Unlver lty o Wi,consln MadlJ.on.. Ma.st~r cr Fine Arll; University _of WiiCcnslil MadliOn Groduate Study, l!o\venlly of Wiooortlln M~dloon, tinfvenily of Wlsconsln Sloul.. SHARON HAYES Assoc:i":lt:l! Df"gtee Nursing e.s.n.. Univenily of Utah M.S.N., Unlvei'$ity of Wlsc~n~in Madison.fcd!av~c Nurse PrClctitioner. t.!nlvers_ity of Wlsconsin Madi&on DONA.O J. HllBREN. Pnotogr~phy B.S., UnjYersity of \Visconsin M~diStJn, Special Stbdy 1 Getmaip Schwl ofphotogtapby,. Ne.w York, University of Colorado, Alamon.State CoUege, Center of the Eye, Aspm, Co%ora.do ROBERT G. HlliMERL Electronics A.D., MadisOil Atea. Tet:hnical College fljpjomll..j\cajq,uill:'tt.$. EDWARD A. HELLEGERS E<ono!Wc:siSoolol Solenu.B.A., Moritclai: Ste.t,e t;:ouege. M.A., Universit_y of P:eMsylvanla GradDBte Study, BUdDell Univer.sily, ~ew York Univeisity, Princeton University, Tufts.Univers;ty, Uoivenjty or Wiscorisin M~dlson, Univetslty of Wjscon&in-Stout JOHN 1;. HENDRCKSON Rc~piratory TherapY /t..a.s.,.milwaukee An:a Tc:chniciil CoflC:&~ B.S., Unlversily of Wist:onsjt~;-Madison M.S., Univrrsity o{ Wisoonsln Madisol) ll.oger HER AN Drama.'(:"ommunlcafions/Speecb B.S., Uni~~rsity of"wis onsin-madison M.A., UnlVt'.!r:.dty oi Wis':Dil.'arn-Madi!!iion. Graduat-e: Study. UniVt!:ni.ty ofwi!!iicarnin-mjdig:)n STE.PtJEN HLL Moohi.ne 'l'rad.o B.S., U~iversity of"wisconsin Stout M.S., Univ~ity at Wisoon.sia-Stout..... Grs,duate St\:tdy, University-at WiSConsin PiatlevUie. Univ~nity of: Wisconsin Stout ~ ; : - CHARLES HMSEL Flrlft Sdf'lfy. B~S., university or Wi!';oonsin P1Dttevllle DENNiS M. HOES!R Hl tory/p~yolcol Educatloll' B.A., Un venity CJf W'~conain~Bilu Claire M.A., Coloradq S!a!~ Colle~e :.,.. Graduat~ Study, l.lnive(slly of.wl~sln Madi~n, U:nlversl.ty ' o Utoh G~ENN HOJEM ; R01~ira1ory Tbonpy.... B.S... So~th.em!UinoloUnlvetslty. M.A.. Ce~troi Mioblgo.n Uni~ersily CAROL'HOLM~S OccupotiDJ!ol 'fh~epy ll.s. Unlvoi'Jity~l D)inoill.' ' M.S., Univeroily <>fw.~eonoin Mo!lisOii 0. T.R., American Occupational TherDpy J\Uoci.ation, LOS HO!SMt.N ' '. Praollr;ol Nuroing... R.N',, Moond Midway S<bool oi Nursing, Si. Paul, MinneiO!o B.S.N. DePa1.1l Univer!lty, :.. ~ M.S., Unlv.erllty of Wbcoo5~ M.1dl soo...,.. :,... 'Groduote Study, Unlven~lly of WACOn~n Stout, Unlyerslly.. o{ WisconsJrl MadlJOn NORA CAUL!N! HOWELL Engilah u S.coocl Loon& ao B.A.. Mor!'dlt~ College. M.A., Un!venlly of W<Oniln Madlsop JOS!PH J' HUBER, B.A.1 Un\venily of Wbconsln Milwaukee M.B.A., UnlvenJiy nf Wlsoon&ln Modl on WLLAM F. HUNTSMAN Cbemlotry B.S.. Ohlo Uolvt:rsity Graduate Study_,!Jniveuitr of Wi~nsin Madison ROBERT HURS'l' Gourmet Foods. Cltef DiploCaa, Washbume Tra.de, Ch\cago Certifit:atl! XVl Corps) Food ~rvice School fliltcm Cert.ifir::a~ of Compl~tio.n, Conrad Hilton liotel Training Progr!m. PHLLP HUTCHNSON M tb-em.~~tti:'s.b.s., O.niverslly of WisCooSin Pl.iltttoivi"Ue M.E. Pennsylvania Sute Universlty Graduate Study, University o WiSCOS!in Madlson MCHAEL D. RWN JournaU m. B.S., Ul'llv~rsity of Wi~onsln WhiteWatB M.A., Vni\l'ersit)' of WL$eonsin-M.ldis0D Ph.D. Study, UniversJiyOf_.WitconS.a-MRd!$on PAniCA VERSON Office T~~nology B.S., No1re Darite CoUf!g~i Cleveland, Ohig M.S., U.nJver&l(y ~f WiscoD~n M disoo JGANJACOB Nursing Wal~towo. B.S.N., University of WiscOnsin-Madison M.S., University of Wisconsin Medison KAllEN JAEHRLNG Psrchoi98Y15oolol Stud.leo-Water!ow~ B.Ed., Univ~1.s.i1y ol Wisconsin Whitewater Graduate Stwiy, Univer-sity o Wi~onGin Ma.dison M\RGARST L. jensen Mediad J.oborotory Teohnlcloa!Microblol98Y B.S., Uninr5ity o~ Whoonsb\.-Whitewater Graduate Study, University af Wiston~n~Wf1Uewa1er, u niversily of Wi.:lcon~iD Madison PHYLLS JENSilN Associate Degree: Nu"'ing. B.~.N., CQilege a St. Teresa, Wingna! Mirinesabi M.S.N., University of Colotod.D Grli:lqatC! StQdy, Univtrsity Qf WiscoMiD Stout, UnlYfU'Sity elf WisconMn Madlst~n R.N.C., UniveJsity ofw&e~:meln DONAW E. JOHNSON Conu-nerclal Art!V1iu111l eo.dmualcatlol'lil B.A.. UnlversHy of owa M.A.. University of owa.. Graduatc study, owa State UniverSity, Unlversity of Norll.te~n raw11, Uoiverrrit)r ot Wisconstn MdiSQn, Uni~i.ty of: Am~eroam GARY JOHNSON Anatomy ond Pby lol98y B.S.f University cf Wl.scotu;in Madlson M.S., tjniversuy of Wiscon!lin-~adison PHYLUS JOHNSON eo... munlcoilon Sklllli/Te<hnlc.ol Writing B.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison M.S., Vniversity of WjscortSin M dimn ROBERT R. JOHNSON llleerronlcr Tecbnol<>&:y B.S; ~ Bradley Univer~ily M.5'.. Srodley V~lvmJty Ed.S., Uni"t'erslly ofwlsconsfu.st.out VCTOR R. JORNSON, JR. Sdence B.s., Univenlty of Wbco~ai~~MadisOn M.S., Univerojty of Hawaii Ph.D.. Univellily of Hawoll JAMES JOHNSTON Porchol"llf B.S., Univenity of Wiscpnsin-rMdison. G0Jdua!e.St~dy, Unjversity al Wiscons.i.n Madiion Jl!DY ANN JONES 111th<>matiu B.A., So11tbcm llinois ljni~rsity M~S., University of W.l6pon~!l M~~i591'1' FRANCS JUCKEM. Weldlna Oip1oTna, Midi.son A!f!a Technical COU"ege R.S.,. University ofwiscon5in~lcu.t FLOYD JUDD Elc:dronit:s :S.S.B.E., University of Wlscoosio~Madioon Gu1duatc: Study, University of Uiilcls, Unlvlf!rs\ty of Wl5oeonsin M~d.i!on VALElU&KAMMERJR ndustrial Fo~s/COOP Program A.D., Madlscn Area Technieai ColJege_ B.S., University c Wi5t:Msin MAdlson G. LEEKAN'l'N Accpuntlng... B. B.A., University of Wi:st:onin.P.shkQsll M.S., Uuiver~ity of.wi'iconsin-madiso.n:: Graduate 5l~)l 1 Univer.s~ty ofwi:sr::on!iin-madison: ROGER KASP!R Marketing B.S.C., DePo1ut Univers.i~y M.B.A DePilul Univ~uity ROSEMARY A..!lENNY English awl CommuntC.,~a. B.S., Callege_o. St. Rose. Albany, ~.~w. Yotk M.A., Uni~~ly of Notre Delme Ph.D., Univcnity <:if Wiat:on5in-Madison MARl< KERN Sden< PhyiiCA.,... < B.S.E.J., Unlve..rsity of Wisconsin ~hitewater PATRCA KEGEL OporotmiRomnA111lstaut R.N., School <:1f Nursing, Mad.i~n B.A., College of St. Tese,. RENE KLCOYNE Business MirkeUng : B.~.. U1riv~rsity ofcittdnnati.. ~.S.,.University gf Wiscondn Madison Graduate Study, Univen.ily of Wlsc~sin-sto~t,, Univ;ers\ly of Wiscon:~in Madlson, University of /t.laska~fairbank.s~.,. WLLAM KLGOUR Amerlciln lli&jtuuonl......its., Univl!:rsily ol Wiscons!n Madi~n M. T.A., Un vc~ty oj. WiSGOMin Wbitew.atc:.r:. Graduate Study. Upiv~rsj.ty ofwiscoru;in M disob, Universlty of WiscoMin Stol.lt,.Univer~ly of W1sconsin Osbkol5h ' JOHN P. KNG, Sclenc::e!Chembtry.,. R.S;, Univcrsi.ly of Wjsconain Madison M.S., JJniversl.ty orwisr::onsin-madison Gs-.ttduste Study, Unlv~&lty of Wi:s~J1.5iD Ma di:son Speolai Study, Uoiver ll.y ol New!;! nips hire; Ook Ridge lnstlt\1te of Nuclear Sludles BEVERLY i(leln Mlcroc:ompullrlll!Did Data Entrr B."S.Ed., Uni.vers;ty of Wisccnsln WhllcW.Bh:r M.S.T., UniverSity (f WiscDn, Ut WhUewatcr Graduate Study, Univ.er.slty of Wbctmsln _WbltcW11ter, Uni-.'crsity of Wisconain MadlsQn 1 Unlvers~ty.o Wlar;o;ll.:nn Stout JRW!l\1 KL!MN!J! S(>cloloiy B.A., City College of New York M.A., Univeuity flfwl&eonsin!'t'f."b.d~:!iorl Ph.D., Unlvenlty of Wi! consln MRdlscm ;j.l l ~.!

97 188-Sta(f and Fac:lllty Staff BJJd Faqtlty 189 ~. : JAMES KNJTSON leal &tote B,S. Univetslty o( \"'i1a1culn Madisoo Addilioool Study, Cblcoao YMCA Ccnlmunil)' CaUeg<: KATHLilEN KOEGEL J\ooodote Depoe Nurolna l!.s.. Unlvor>lll)' or Wlscoosin Madison B.S.N.. UnlVffsity of Wismn.$in Moufison M.S.. Uni'lcrsity of Wisamsln MOO.i.son RODNEY KOHUfEPP Auto llody B.S.. Univ... lly or Wbcaosin Rivec Foils NOLAN' KOUJ\m Elect rollin B..S., tllinola Slot< Unlvenity LYNN KONKEL Oplo.atelrlc Tt<ltnlcian Dlp.lorc.e, L&kuh<tre Ttchniul lostilutc 1 C\evdand A.D. 1 Mlldl.on Area Tcchnieal College.:. B.S., 'Univeuity Q( Wfsr::on.s1n..Stout 1\!NN!TH L. KOWALSK Politit".Sdcnfe: B.A., University ~f.11jinoi!.ct\ampaign M.A.. Unlv~,.lly of y/boo~llp Modison Graduate Study, Univet&lt'y o WiSconsin-Madison HELEN KRUSE. Pnadkal Nuulos B.S.N., Unlve11lty of Wisconsi:o. Madison Gr..tuole Study, Unlvenily ()( Wiscbnoin-Madbon JUDTH KUHNLE Attoua.lin& A.D., ~\oclo"" Arco Technlc.ol CaJieic B.A., University of Northern low USSBLL KUMA Mathm:illiC1 B.~. lllinoi:. nstitute o( Technology M.S., UtUvcraity ol WiKonsin Mndisop MAEJ. LAATSCH. Markeling. B.A., University of NDflher'Jl low.-.; -. M.A., Unive:r.tity of Nart.hczn Corondo -. Sp<rlol Study, Unlnr.city ofwisconsia Modlson, University.()( Wlsconsln Stoul " #,,:. JOHN LAMPE Archkec:tural Ttthnolosr '.!'.s... University of WKOR5in PJ~me KATHL!EN Lj\R~N. AJsociatt- Dqree NU..abt& R.N., StJ.o~eph's School of Nursing :: ' ' B.S.~, nlver.slty of Wisc:oru~in-Madison ' ' M,S.rJ.. Ohio Slote University ' ' : Addolionol Study, University of Winton on M~dlson d.ovo o.-,#st>j..j, Commu11lcatlan B.A., S.n Francloco stole M.A., Unlverolly or Northern Colotlldo ' Graduate study, Univ<rslly ~W~n M d&on MARY LllANNM... Medic:al uboralory T«hnic:J.i.,.. B.S., University of Wl1<0ndn-Lodrosse. l\lcdicol Techolc:ianlnternship, Rod<lord Memoriol School.,r Mediul Technology PATRCK LBA!Y lnduotrlol Poodo. Dunwoody Bakers School Wilton Sc\ool.of Cake Drcotallng. Mi.dloonllu!ourlmt lnolilule w~:an:!,~~:~~~lverslly or WiKotu!n.Stoul, University!'f. SYLVA LEE Associate Dcgtte Nunlng: D.S.. Mrquelle UniveuHy M.S.. University«Wisoonain-Madiso.n SHARON LEMBKJ. AduU Basic Educalion B.A., st. Norbert CoUe&e Grduate Study, Unil(!'rsity pf WiscoMirt-Miktison NORMAN LBNDURG Ph01og.r phy/v&d81 Con,munlcat!oDs B.S., Unlvet'Sy of Wlsoonsln MadiSQD, Graduate Study, Univetsity of WisconsJn.ModJson... Sperl>! Soudy, Baalonan KO!lt EdOCOlion Ccotcrs, ~s><li0ile1 New York.1nd Oak 8root 1 luinois. Winona lnj~rnatidj' Sc~ of Photosrophy, Mount Pro!p«t, lliiooi OSA.LlND LBVN JloodiDJi Study SkiiiJ P.S.. University or Wiloconlln Modl>oo M.&., Unh,ers\ty o Wlse0nsl n-ma~of\ Gt.dua~e Study, UP1vershy of Wi5COnsin Madso"n University o Wisconsln Stout JEAN LTND BR!NKMAN English R:A., University pf Norlhe!m Jo~11. Cf!dar Falls. M.A., UnhcTSlty or owa, low Clly.Ph.D., University of lowa, row a Clty 'ELZ.\Bf;Tii.NDNBR,.. As&Odtttu Degree Nuu,ng Fort At~on. B.S,N., University or Wisconsitt ;.Jildlson ft.s N., Univn-"'lY of W'i5CO!in-Atadis0tt Ph.D., Unlverny or Wiii<:<Jmin'M<ili!oo SANDRA LOMAN tlisio'j. B.A. Wl\ttltft CoUese M.A.. U,Jiverslly ol Colorodt>.Addilion1l Stuct>t ~ Unlv'ei'sity 'o( Wrscorasin Madi.son!OCENB LOti.~ANS.... Jttflthemntla S.A., Central Calif: <', Ptlla,!own M.S. Western W.ulilnston Slate C olleg~ CHARLES MARq'URDT... n,..uahispuc:h.,..., , Millon CaUcp M.S., Unlvenll)' ol Wlsconoin M.diJon Gtadut lt study, l.laiwrshy of WLSmn-SL.,.Mcdison DOUGLAS MARSHALL......, Foron Trolnlntl B.S., Linh enlly of WLsconsin-MAdllon ~j,s,, South Dakota Slate.Uqi~e.rslly..'. AGNES MARTN Busll')ejjls Forl Atk naon n.s. l)nivtfnity of Wlscomlln-Whitewater.M,S., Ut)lverAity 01f Wlscoruin Ma~isoP MARY LOU MASK Dc.ntal Au,c.Uhtrift Dent ~ly&l ne Clploru, Maarqu.et(e Oni'ltrt~y B.S., Morqu~lle Univerflly '... M.S., Unlvcrslly o(wisconsn ~l ~ison Special Study, ~wquelle Unlvorilly, tinlmslty of. WUconsin Maduon SHBRY MAST!JS t.latllomotlu.b.s., Unlveuily of \Vheonlbo Modison M.S.. Unlu,.ity or Wl><on in M_adiooo jojn MAYPELO EngUtb B.A., Murrey St tc CoUrse, Xentuc:k.y M.A., Unlve~>lly of ~ueky. Crod\Aie Study; Unlvcr&ity of 1'/'0J!'onsin fd.!dloon,,, '... JAMES MoB RAl\ Dalo Proceeoifta B.A.. Univusty ol Wbcoosltl Madis<>n Graduote study, University Of Hawoll, Unlvc:nily of w;..,...m.madlson NANCY McCRMRY Foods ond NuUUon J.S., Univenily of \Vloooluln'-r.!aclio<in. M.S.. Un.vcrt.ity of WisconsiD-~. Dlelello lnlermhip, Univmily of ca)lfor.oii J~!SMcGONGW ~~... P.A., Manb.a\lan Co!Jes<, Bronx, New York M.A., University of W.scoruln-~ JOY' A:'McMLA.N. Sc:lenu/Mkroblol.. y/chelnhtry S.A., Cac CaiJose M.S., Univetsily of Wi.koosln-Madi.san Ph.O., Uoivenlty of Wi><Ontln-Modisoio A\PYCB C. McMLLEN A.OCQte O.Kreel'luroln& Reedobu.rs' S.S.N,, Univer.!ity o( W_l,coDsin MadiSOR M.S.N ' Northern llllllo~ pnlverolty DONALD,\~N COL lndustrjal Foodt, Wiscon~n Rulaur nt lnatitutc, M di!.on Atea Technk.ll College 5peci.!l Sludy, Unlve<oily ol Wlscoo in Stoul CH.ARL!NE MED~NWA,D Pt ctlc.al Nurtlnt JU;., University of Ylioco.Wn Modison &.S.. Untvenlly ol Wbt<Uln M dlm M.S., Univcroily of\v'osconau.stoul. o( ~,!':,~~~~t Univcni~ o( Wi ~ Modi~, Unlv~!_Siiy ' LAWRENCE P. MElCHER Aulomotlvc MuN!nJct O.S,. UnlveraHy ol Wisconsin--Stout,,._ M.S., Univtuity of Wlacoruin.stout,. ". Cutl!icd a. General o\utomobik Mcchmi<: by NauQMlulitul or Aatomotive Suvkt Bxcellence.. ' Cer~lled by Ford Motor Company as Auoo;..,.l\'e'ElcclroniC. Tcchnlclc, ' Membec!'i Board of Dtre<Ocl, Nellonal Aosncilllion or CaUqe AulofOOlivc Teacbtta... #. Evllui lioo Tcom Member. Norional Automoti.,...Tccbo.fdlnt'. Edocallott Fouodatlon PAUL.,MB:;'J'BR. AuiOmniiV< M<;choillco '..u:~., Unlvor lty o W'"conolrt Stout M.S.. Unlverelly or Wisco~Uin.Stoul... Grodualo.Siudy, lln.lvorslly of Wi.conoin Mod!oon,' Unlverolty of Wlsconsln PiaiiO'le, ' ROBBTA MEYER Cjllll.metd ll Art U.A., Alnrno Cclteae. M\1waukee: M.A., Plus Xlllruti!Uie, Plorc:n<c, taly M.F.A., Art ln.utule of Chicago Gtaduate Stl.ady, Univc.ca.ity of New Mexico JOHNS. MLLER, JR. Acc_u,.. l!.a., Yolc Calka< M.S., w.. tem Mlcloi&&D Unlv~nlty G60RGE J, MTCHELL lltoc:hl~>etratln B.S., Kan.., Stote Calleae ol Pillllb & M.S., Kon101 State Colleae of Plll lio'll GraduoteSludy, Bemidji stale College, lillnneaota JOHNMOCON flartlrullur.. Oakhlll l!.s., Unlverolty ol Wbcoaoln Madbon CUP'ORD MOLDENHAUER MatbtrDatln B.S., Unive<aity of WiJconm LaCroae JUDTHMON Opcrallna Room Assl.stant B.S., Un1verolty of Wisco.,{o-M..tlson M.S., Univer&ity of WiscoDin-MadiSOQ Ed.S., Unlverolly of Wikon in.sioul REGNALD MOODY EaaJblo A.B., Emory Univen!ty. ~rgia M.A., 11roory University, Goorslo JAMES MOORE Math--lin B.S., UnlvetSiiY or Wloa>Min M.tiuou C.aduole Study, Unlverolty of Wbooruiil llladiolia R08ERT MOUNTFORD Apic.ullure, ~.S. Univenlly or Wii5Cansin-k!ver Foll5 Gr..t~ale study, Unlveroity ()( l'iiscojj$\n ~on, Unlvcrsl\y of V(j~eon ln.sioul. :... KAKJ11'j 1\!UMFORD frflc:tie i'nunlnj. ~.S., UninrsUy of'wisconsln ~adisori ' M.S., Univer>lty of WiJlCQnsin Slo t. Cir ~uolt~ Study, UDlver&ity o( Wi ~con~in ~ison WLLAM M UNK\YJ17; Auto Parte Spedolbt '. Olplocna. General MOlO<s lnslitule, PW>t, MChlpn Olp)oooo, M.di!on Ar.o 'l'echnjc;,l ~ge Additional Stwdf, Unlvei lty or Wu«msiil-SW.~ Unlvenity o( Wfscoosln 'L>UevU!e, Hunter l!nsinccnng. St. Loo:U CRAlG NAUMAN... Social 5clenu A.A.. Santa Monka CaDqc B.A., J'looi<ln Stole Oniverslly M.A.; OiliVt$5\!y of \~i-n Madison Ph.D, Uolvorslty of Wbconsln-ModUon ERC N!SHBM CommtrdaJ Art B.S.. Ball Stale Univ roily, lodiana DON OB!RLANDER Grapblc Arl~ O.A., Bueno Vilto C.Uep M.S. Unlv.,.lty of Wboonsin stoul JOHN D. OCHAUA ~1-:U:t~':sur of Wioeonii~:J,l~dbion' '.. Graduate Stl!<ir. Unlveulty or SOn Fianoisco, CoiQCado State Uoiveultyj Unlvarilty or WJ.SC9rtsln-Madbon MAliiB OBSTNG ~U>jn.. & RlOdr.bu'l\ B.S., Morningside College, owa M.A.. Unlverolty o( Nebrn>ko Ph.O.. Uo;olvetel\Y of Oregon M.S.''.; Univenjty of Wisoon.sio Whitewot'er.,. ' CHALENJ!. OHNSTAD 0!1tt Tecbi&otoay. B.A., Unlve111ty of WiJ<On>in-Modisoo M.B.A. Caud'.date, Unlvemty of W.5C011sm-Madi>oo Gndwolc Study, University of W'OSO>r>Oin Whltewatcr, Unlv<rslly 'Of W.scoouin.Stoul OON'ALD OLSON WoodT<dmko B.S., Uolvcnily of Wlo<oruln.stoul M.A.T., Unlverslly of Wbc:oosin flallf!''iue Addillonel study, Unlverahy of W'uconsi.,Modlson JJ!AN 1\1, ORBJ.ANA Adult Btiolc Bducotlon B.A., Canha& Colleae. Kcnoslo 1>1.5.. Un\Yetsily ol Wi!COU!n.stout Gr.tu.ate study, Univcralty or W$COn:;in Moaisoo

98 lf;}o Staffan!l Faculty St!llf and F!itidty l91 \ CATHERNE PAWELSK Office Technology B.S., Edgewood College M,S., Cuth!:llic Univer~ity c[ Am.:ricB GraduE~otc Study, U r1ivcr5ily of WiscQm in Mudi!oon, University of Wisconstn-lia.u Claire. Un\ver.s1li' 6{ North. Dnkota, Univt:r:~it)' ofcolor!ldo MARLNE PEARSON Sndal Sc:ienc::e B.A., Northern llinois Uninrsity M.A.., Un[ver,Slty o! WisconsinrMndison ALANE. PENN P.sycholo.,'Y B.A.; University of Buffalo, New York M.S., University of Wi.sccnsin Stout JEFFRilY L. PE!ONTO Music B.M., Univetsity o Wisc:onsif! Madison MARTHA PETERSEN English i!nd Communics.tioos B.A.. Universi~ of Wyoming M.S., Univt":rSii.ty of Oi'egan Spr::ciol St~.:dy, UD.ivc::r!!ity of Tc:n!ii, University of OregOn, University o( Wisconsin-Stout. DAVD PETERSON. Oiesel and l:ieal'y EquipnienfMcchnni.c~ B.S., University of Wj&consin-St-ol.lt Graduate Study, UnivFrsity of Win:onsin-Stout DAVD C. PETERSON Accounting B.B.A., Unlver 11ity or \ViSconsiri Ealj Clair~ M.B.A., University-of Wi,CoP-5ln-Ma<11sorl ROBERT J. PACENZA Marketing B.S., Bradley Univ,cnity M.S., Northern Jlljnois Univenity Gtsduate Study, Univer$ity ~f Wisoonsi.n~M,::~dison. UJ1iv~r-slty of W1SCQnsin-Sfuul, Unive~ity ot Wi.scol'tSin-Wh.itewalcr~ Colorado St<~te Univer.5ity~ Fort Collins KA''LJEN WNTERS PLEHN Practicolll Nunlng B.5.N t ~arquettc University JOSEP B. POWELL Elcctrooh:s. B.A. ObeT.lin CqUege M.S., Wright Slfite University M.A., Unlvet.sily _of Wlsconsln-Madison M.S., UniveJ:SityofWisconsih-Mttdison. Doctor!. Dissutalor~ UniVer:;ity of-wi:iconsin-mildjson ROBERT L. PRESTER... Supervbor's Managemen t -Technician B.S.,.Un iversi\~ of Wisconsin-LaCrosse NEALRAGATZ AutOm otive Technology B.S. 1 Un tver.srty of Wj ~nsi r.o Stou t..... Gr.ad.\l!lle Study, Uol~~r:e ity-qf Wis.consin...Sto ul, ~ntversily <?f W'tsc:onsin-PL!lttc:ville, University of Wiscon!iiin-Mad~~O%l. SHARON.H. RAMONDO. Oeollll Auxlll~ rles.... B.S. 1 De n~.hyglcnc, Ma (quett~ UniverSity M.S., University. of Wispomin-Sl_oot. ;. G raduat~ Study, Univera:lty of Wj~oi]lsin-~Dut, Univ cr~ity of Wi~onsin- Pla l te vule KAT.fiLEEN RAsCHKE Child Core B.S., St. Peters CO llege~ ;New jersey M.Bd. Erikson!n litute of Early Childho<>~,!Uinols JAMilS J. RENNGER Borbering UniV1!t!!.rly o Whccnll n~pla.\tevtllc Eou C l~tire Techn ic:.al ln.lltitute Unlverslty of Wisconsin-Stout JAMES REYZER Accounting B.S., Universily of lllnois M.S., Nartl~em Uinois UniverSity AdditiOJ1( Study, Un.ivcrsity of Wisc_onsin-Madi!lon 'ON>EST RlCUAR[)S Duta.Proccti~ina -B.S., Univc;nity of WisconSin Madjson MARLYN RNEART A::tsod11te Dcpce N"rsirig Re:edsburs B.A., North Central Colleg-e, llinois. B.S.N. Univ~rsi t y_ of W~Nnsin M11di.son M.S., Unlv.ersity of Wisooniin-Madison LYLE A. ROll Agri~\tltm-f!.Sheep PioductionfFarm Fe mlly-tu-em_p!oyment Coo.-dlqa1or. B.S., University of N-ebr.aka M.S., Unlv~rsity or Wisconsi.n-Madison.OONELL G, ROGNilSS Associate Degree Nur~ ng B.S.N., University of Wisc:onsin ~_a;c:li so:,m M.S., Univet':lity of Wiscon&ln-MadisDn KENNBTH ROH. Small Enp~e _and ~bm!i&. Mechanics Di p1orn ~ Madison Area T~_chnical Cqllege Und ~rgraduatc Study~ University,of Wiscoasin.;Slout MARY ROOT Associate Degree Nursing.. 1\.N., Mc:thqdbt Hospitat, MAdi!>On B.S.N<, UniversitY of Wlsconsin-M ad~s6n M.S., Un..iversity of Wi~onsic M.'S.N., Medic:.\ College of Wisconsin-Milwaukee: JAMES ROSEBERRY Ecnnnmtcs. A.B., Untv~rsity ar Californ ls: -B e.rkel~y M.A., University or Wi5eonsin Ma~SoQ HLARY JEAN ROSS Eng\bh arid CommunSwlion!J B.S., owil Slate Univer~ty Grad~atc Sll.ldy, UniV"t rs.ity of- Wisconsin-Madison G\.YLRYAN. De:Oial Auxlllarlci Dental Hygien~ Diplom~, M~rqu_~tte University WLLAM H. RYAN Mechanical ~lgn Technology B.S.M.E., l)nivc r~ity of. New Hampshire L.L.B~, LaSt.Ue E:denslc.n Uni~er~ty.. _. Graduate Study, Unlv-ei.sity of Wjscoru~in-5tout, Ulii\o r$ity or Vftsconsin-PiaHeville : ~. ' JONB.$AGE Auto_Mccbanlc:..:.. B.S., UJUve rsuy Of. W S-j:"~nsin S tout M.A.Ed. Ball State U~ i vers lty Ed.S. ~ Univet~ty of Wlsoonsln.stotit LAWRSNCll 5AGER Morketlng!R<. \ B&tole. B.S., UniveriiHy of 1Uln<?is M.S., [Jniverslty. o llinois. -.. Cfrad\l"te Study,.Univeisity o! Wi.scc:msin-Medisan. WANDA L. SAwYER Practical Nursing R.N., Unjversity cf Wi scon&iu-m~dis on B.S., Unlversity of Wiscon!iiL-Madi.son ANNE W. SC HACEL BminH-!l Law. B.S., CnrroJ CuU~ge, WaukeAha J.D.! Uitlvc nt~y of Wl ~eoo sin Madi so n WLLA~i SCHt\LLER T Data Proce.. lqij. n,s., Uol ~ rshy of Wisc;Onslo-Madison M.A.~ Case Western fh:serve University, Ohio Gradualc Study, University of Wisc:titlsin-Madison DOUGLAS H. SCEWE R~ad.ng SpilldaJbl B:S.. Unhtenity of Wi.!iconsin MmUson M.S. Jour.nalism. Univenily ofwii#conli in MadiS<ln M-S". Currj[ulurn(lnstruction., Univef.sily of Wiscon5in Miidis-on CerLHlcation. lnsuranc:c: lnstilute of -Am~r11'! lll G ntdu e~le Work, Edg._,wnod College, Madison JOANN SCHLUNG 'A.'!oct.C~ Dt:!gre:e Nur~lng-W11.tertOw.ti B.S., Western Michigan UniVC!l1!1ity. Kal.ttna:z.oo, Michig11n M.S.N., W.:~yne Stnte Oninrsity. o ~ troit, Michig!tn ALLEN SCHMDT Da1a Pro~:esdng B.S.~ Unive.rsHy of Wisconsin-Whitewaler M.S., University ofwhcon5-in Oshkosh RCHARD SCHM!D Emergency MedJcoJ TralnJng B.S., Un1vcrsil~ of Wi:Sconsin-Mildison M.S., University of \_V;s<:onsln Madlson MARY SCMOLESKY hner.io_~ Dcstg_)/Ge~erpl StudlC!i B.A., University or Wiscons.tn Madison M.S., UniverSity o Wisconsin-Madison Gniduate Study, Univer-sity of Wiaoonsln-Madifl;on P.M. SCH'UDLt\C t\$50dnte D~rcc Nur$i.ng R.N., Madi:ion Ccnei"al Hospil11l School cf Nut sing B.S.N., University of Wisconstn Medison M.S., University o Wisconsin-Madtson St\LLYSCHRAG ChiJd Care B.A., Barnard College, New York M.Ed., trtc.ks;q\lnsl\t\ltc!m E-a.dy Chlldhood, 1\li.nois DONALD SCHROEDER Autumolivc Diplcma, Madi.on Ar~a Technit"al Co-ll~e B.S.,. UJtive:rsity" of Wisoonsin-Stcut Graduate. Study, University o Wisconsin..&nut, Unive:rsity af Wis~sin Whitewe.tCr, UnlvcrSity -of Wlscon,ln-MiJwauk.ee 'YLLS K. SCHWAHN Police Sclencl!. t}.s.~ UniVe~si.~y al_wiscansiri Mud\~on Gruduate Study, University ~fwisconsin-m<~dison LEO< SCHWARTZ Aulo BOOy Undergraduate Study, uruvc: rsity- o Wisoon:ilit-Stout B.S., Mankl'lto State ~ollege ; Minnesota.' SUSAN SCWBiii>TPEGBR Of!lc:e. Technology B.S., Edgewood College, Mu.dison M.S.., Unlv_erslty ~f WlsoonsiD. Madis.on Graduate S1udy, Ne>r1hern lllnols Univers lfy-dehlb. University of Hawaii-H onolulu, Unb;erslty of M/i:u:onsl n-m:~dison GARY SELL At:counllng B.S., Unlverslty of ~sconsin Whitewatc: r M.S., Univeuily of Wi.sconsln-Madison Graduale Study, University or Wi!Sc:On~ i h - MAdfso n ALLAN W. SENT\' Automati"Y' R.$. 1 Un~ven: ity ofwiscom in. Shmt M,l\,, Universlty of Michigan M.A., UniVC.f!it)' of W isqo;~sln MadisoJt Gr.adu~ll!! Study, Uninrsily of Wisc:onsln-Mad.ison ESTHER SilVERA Office Technology B.B.A., University of W~s-consln-Mad i so n M.S., University o Wi.sconaln Medison GTQdi,U:!.tc Sludy, Uni.vcrsily of Wj:ii(:Onsin-Madison, Univers\ty ot Wlsconslri-Eau Chlire, Univc:r$ity of W jj [o~n-stout DAVD B. SHAW Cheml.d.ry A.B., C<Jlum~!a M.A., C!ty University Of NeW York M.S., University of WiBCPn sin-ma di~on t'h.ll. UniVen!lty ofwblcomin Me.d~n TERR!NCE P. SHEA lmla Proceuing B.B.E,, Uni.-vc:r5ity 1 Wis.;onsln Whitewater M.S:l'., Univ<:;ts~\y of W}sc~5\n--E111~ C'alte TERRENCE SHELDON Dato Proc.. slng B.B.A. 1 University of. WiSconsin-Whitewater Graduate Study, Michlgan Stale tjtt!vl!!rsity, University e>f Wisconsin-Eau Claire, University of Wisoon~n.~Staut DOYAL H. S[[)DELL Marketing A.A., Northeast MLssissippl ]Wlior College B.BA, Unlvo tsily ofmis$lssippl.. M.S.~ University cf Wisconsin. Madison.. Graduate Study, U.niveuit"y of Wisc0niiii1..S1out. MCAEL F. SEMON. El<"ctronlcs:. A.S.E.E.,-Wlsconsin School of Eleclron~ci._. AddutOnal S~udies, General TelsPhonf O(wiscon~in. GTE Lenkurt, GTB'D t Systems, Madison Are Te ~bnica1 qpll~ge JLL SKNNER.. Auocla1e Degrc:c Nursing B.S.N., Univc::r.;;ity o-f Owa,. M.S.N U~!l(~rsjty cf Wisc:Qnsin-MadisOii MLPH A, SMlEJt\ A~counli~;~g., B.B.A., \.Jn ive1sify o! Wis.cone.ln Mt di.s~m M.S., University of W'J.S.c:cnsin 1!-diwp. Graduatl!! Study, University of Wiscoq:sin 5.tou~ PAT\CA SMTH Aasodate Degree Nursing. :, - B.S..- Seton HiJl CoUege1 Pennsylvania_. B.S.N., Cas~ Weste:rn Reserve Un.iyetsity, OJ;tiO_ M.S., University o~ Wiscorl!iin-Madi~n WALLt\CE L. SM"l'll Aot<>lle<iY. Diploma,,Madison.Aie01 Tecb.nlcal Colieze A.S,E.E., Wlscor.r.sln School of Electrqnics Undergr~duat e St.udy, U~Lvers)ly Of_.Wisc:~nsill-S!.ou_t FLORAN R. SMOcZYNSK Sotlai!Envlronmcntat Stildles B.A., Western_:State Gc.Jll~ gl!.of-colcndo M.A., Western Stote_College of Col~ado M.S., Uriiv~.rsity.Qf W~Cpn s.jj,~madison. Gradu.ite Study, Uulvcrs.i.ty of WiS('onsin ~adi_9 on Wll.JERT SNYDER Ec:on<irblcs ta., Untver.sity of M~big an M~~ UnJverstty of W ~pn :; in-m8 di son EUGBN.E SOLBERG Bled roaica B.S.E,E., Univc:nity o Wi5c()n sin M:tdison M.S.~ University of.- Wjscona in-stout SANDRA SOLBERG. Associate: Degree Nunlos: B.S.N.,. Univ!! rsi ly flf Wi sconsin Madison M.S., University of Wisconsin MildisoiJ. M. S.N.~ Univers lly of Wlsconain Madison,.;_.. CARL ST!VA Sd enc:e/mu.the.tnallc.a B.S., University o( Wl sconsin M9disl)n M.S., Unlvers lty of Wls.consin.MilwAukee: Spccinl Shidy, UnivenJ,1y.gf Wi s cor:~s in Mildison, Ohio Stale \.lnlversl\y, Nt:w Mexloo H\ghlnnds. U ni.~'flsllyi-!,, 1 '

99 19Z-Staff ahd Faculty Staff and FAculty 19 ~ DAVD G, STOKES Bullncu Law B.A., Btodlet Unh't"hy, Ptorlo, llinois J.D., }om Mmhall Low Schoo~ Chicago, llinois SANDRA S'DNE Haman Sct kc Assoddtc: B.A., Unlvorshy o( Minnc.soto-Minaupolis.. "M,S.s.w. Unlvenity of Wisconsin-Madison,.. DAVlDSTUBER Cr phic Arlt A.D., Madison Ar~a Ttthnical College Acldltkmol Study, University of Wi!COJ\.!in.stou) RCKARD \Y. SWANSON: EniJkh'.'.. B.A.. Roc:klo~d 'College ' MA, Uohecslty ol Wlsconsin-Mad!son E. LYNN SWARTZ. ~otol Auxlllarlu 1 B.S., Morque(te Un!vtr lty M.S., Unlverslly 9f \'li!<'onslnostout KAY SWTZEJl,H :.:! Clothlna nnd :TutJM/Home Pur.nlsbJri'l.s B.S.. University of Wlsconoln M dl~on Gradu!iotJ: Sludy, Un.ivcrsity of Wi:5consin-Mndison, UnlvC:rshy of Wl~nsin.S(o~l', ~.. : :,, BERNADNE TACKD\VlAK ' Pt~c tical N rslng \, ~i R..l"J., Mc.rqlld.h: Universlty ~- a.~n. M.-qutltl Unive.rsi_lf.. ~......! Graduate Study, Unlvrnlty'i>f \{'>COujg~lou~ UniversitY of Y(5CO1sin M&dison.., 11 i. ' 'LP L TARPLEY ;, AcC~tlnJ/Budou.s Milfhlrn~$ '.:... B.Bd., Unlvrnlty ot.wjsconsln-'(yhit...,.ii'tcr M.S.T. ~nlveratty of,\v"&5c:.of!sin Wbit~tler-. G111jluateS!udy, Unlvc:rsityof\l'isoorui!i Mad~;: f;.. ' NANCY TB WN<BL ;;.;,.~...,., ' Dental A.ititling.: ' : :~ - ~'"..\... Diploma, Madison AiU TecbnlC'tll 'Oi:)Uegt. ; i ~ J:S., Univc.rs$1)' of Wiaconiin-~ ~-! 1 - ' ; " ' ;_.,. _.M..S... Univeral:ty of Wisconsin-Stout. rj! ;!.'".. UNDA M. THOMPSON :1.. "~ ~q.ptratory 'Ttw!n~p)t' _.,... _~ :.:: :- - -~ ' 1',\.D., M:ul!son Arr T.Chiil'cal'Coll~;&e. ' 1 1J\(ergr.auort ~tudy, Uruve<'sify ol WisccP5i!>:i'llsdisoo (> ROBERTJ. THOMPSON. '., -.:'- - :,p McOuntb)i... '..u "D.B.A., UniverSity of M!nndpln~Mihnt:np_oliS. M.B.A. Univ.ersity orwiscbnsin-midhoon. GrodUAt~S~dfl.~.~ivu~lty.?!,;'.yto~ilsi~~Madl on THOMAS G. THOMPSON...,, Accounlina:.. ;<..D., M~!On Area Ttchnical Colle!!". B.B.A., Jnlvrrs\ty pf Wiscoooin MBdrSOi\ Graduate Study, Unlviiilty of WiUOniln:Siout, 'Unlvenity o1 Wi~nsia-MndiiOn...!, PHYLLS TOWNSWC(. Maliw111tko B.S. U!noli State Univcn.ity M.A.; Wesltrn Mlch!s n Univc,..;ty. Additionol Study, Unln{'lty.oC\YisaxuiD-Mathon MUA TRBBOLD ' '..llcensed Proctl""' N lna B.S.N., Skidmore Collego Gradual Study, University ofwisconsin-whiteweter; OONA.D B. TRUDELL Arl ;" B.S., University of Wlstonsin:i\i.'!<r Polls M.S., Unlvenlly Of \ViscoJillrt Mi!waukee M.ulcr of Pille Am, Uninulty af Wisc:ooUin-Mw ukec JAMES VAN LOBNEN Public Works Tochnklon B.S., x.... s SlAte University. M.S. Univttnily or Mlssourl-colbm.bia M.S~, UnJvenily of Wlloon"n-ModiM:Jn. Graduate Study, Unlvetaity o ( M~ari K nsa.s City, owa State University. Un1Vcr$lty of W ljc Sin (dadi.s~m CQLLF.EN VDLOCK. BusJness Open Lab... B.S., ljnivcnity of Wlsconatn-WhtteWalet Gradullte Sl~y. Unlvenity o( Wismnsin Mndioon CHARD VlR11.1E Autom otl"~ A.D., Madl>on,\Jr1 Tech> leal Co!Jese B.S., Univenlty of Wllcoru.in Stout Graduate Study, Unlvcroity of Wlsconsin Slo\11, University of Wisconain Madlson... PET,B VUSDES R~c::rca.Uon Resourceffourbl Recrtation.B.A., 'University of Mlchigon M.A., Univc r~ty of Wlsccnaln-Madison '. ' Graduato Study, Unlve..Oiiy o( Wliconsin Madlsoti LLA WALDMAN,..... Olfi«:Tt<hnolOj!y B.S., University o! Wlsconsln.Madi~n. M.S., Un\Veu lty o( WKon~n-Madiso.n Oraduale Study. UnlvcuUy of WJ~ons! n-madisbn GAlL WALKER. Resplr lao'y Thtr1py ' A.D, Mod~ Are1 T«:hn!cul College JOANN ALKE Phf'ltal Education B.S., UnivuaiiY of Wiscoa$i.D.:Madis0fl., ~ Grad11o1te Study, University of Wiseons\n~isan,.K~owood College... ' HENRY WALSK. :. ',,, Data Proc:eniQJ '.. : S.S., W'mna1 $1&1< CG<Ogt M.S.,.Univetllt~ of Wl$00nS!noStoul TONWAL5K O<cuJ>'tl.. ol ll>uapy Te<hftlciM> B.S., Urilvorslty or WKoosin Mtdiooo />1.5.. Ualmitty. oc Wi,..,rt$la Stout O.T.R.,.Aa>orlcao Occupell..,.l Therapy AS<odatlon. NA'J'HAN 0. Wl!CT...Eiiaii \Ond Spoe<h.. J.A., Un1Vrr6lly of Wi1oon.sl"'M..U.OC,.. Gr duatc: Study 1 l)alvcrsuy of Wisconsin-.Mp.dJ~p J~NCE wrnbllrg...,..'.'.. Data r,r9<u~ a.,.... B.A.. $tal< Unlvcnlty.o~Cortltii!~. Now 'fork SQNJA. WJi'NE.R)',.,..,. "". 'EnJ b ' ' '..;.,. '' B.A. University or St. 1'hcmes Houal0n M.A, tjnlvmlly o! Te10s E Paso Gr~d~'ale Study, \Jnlversity ol Wisc:onsin-.Madis.on AL VTN WRTAK! PollceSclnoce. B.S., UnlvfldiY of Wlsconsin M<lison J.D.. \Jolvm!ly ol Wiscoosin Law School POfiiiEST G, WTSON lnduurlol FCJ!d Wioconsln Res"ll'~ntli,.tltule; Madison Are Tec6nlcal College Lewis Hotel Motel School, Woshington, D.C. Spcclnl Study, University of Wlsc>orlSin Sioul BOYDWiliT' Wood Tedtnln. B.s:, Uni.venUy at WllCOit ln&ot M.S., UPi..,.lty of WiscOilsln.stout Graduate Sludy, Nordwrn Wnols University, NDEA nstitute Son Jose Sl1te College CLAR A. WlllDilRDLT l'sycholoty B.S.. Loyola Unlye,.lly, Chl<ogo M.S., Ulllvenlty ol WlS<olllia Mudlscn of ~~~:l~.s'1t!'t Unlver&lty of W~.sin-Madi~. University KATHERNE WGGNS nterior' DeiiJn B.S Unlvetllty of Wlocoru. Modlson FREDRC WlU.lAMS P"J'cho!aay B.A~, Uni.-ers:ity of Wi.Jconsi.n Madison M.A., University of llinois Grodu te Study, U lversl!y ol Wisconsln M dison CATElliNti WLSON Occup tjanal Ther p r B.S., Unlvers.lty o! Wlscon.sln Madisoo Oredu tc Study, U11iver.Nty of Wi~on.sin-Mtdison O~T.R.~ Amer\cln Occ\lpt~tlonal Therapy Aisot:i~:ioo JOHN L. \VlLSON.. A-.imal T~chnlclan D.V.M., owa State University LARRY s. WJi.SON M rktling B.S.,,ndian Unlveclily. M.S., Un)veully of \Vsoollllin M!dioo!\ Gr1ductc Sludy, Universl\y of Wlscoruin-Madl$0n, Unlvenlty ol WiJ!'Osln Siout.., ji\nl WMBB'LY Hwna.n Se-noice Associate A.J\.. Daniel P01ync University M.S.W., Unl...,rs.lty o Miehia DAVD WNSLOW Matllicrm1Ua M.$., Univ.,t ily of ~feryt.nd. Graduate Stuctx. Univ~ttaity of Wisconsin-M.,dison ARLSLB WOLFF or~~ao T..:hnotoar.. B.Ed., Unlveraily ol WiJCXJruiQ Whitcwater. M.A., Columbia Uolvenl!y Graduate Sludy; C.~fOnia "State Uaive~&iti. Univeni~ of Mlf\llcoofa, Unlvmity of Wi><on>in Modi><fn. Unlvel!ity o( WtsCO:Wa. ~u Clelre, Unfvenlty of \\f'iscdnsin Whilewater, University o! North Dileo~ Unlvenlty of Colarudo. Norlbern lllif'cis University - J.vl6T A. YOD!R Er>&llsbfrruu LeornJni'Conter B.:A., UnjvcrsUy of Wisconsfn St~ven.s Point M_.A., Uninnity o! Mlnncsola Minn~>~polis i i :

100 AJph.abetlcal ~el!c 195, '. A. AJpbbeUcallndex Acad=U: Apeeals Academic Honor Awards., _.:.. ;. 11 Academic Probation and Di.smlssal.,.... _... 1 Academic Standards....,... :. ~ Access to Student Records..... :.,... 9 Account Clerk-program.....,.,....,.... 5$ Accountin~ program...,,...,.,..,.,.. : Accountmg-eour!>e$ Accreditation and Memberships Administrative Assistant lnfonnation Proceulng program Administrative Assistant Seaetariai program -c, 56 Adm~n~tr ati-.:e Officers..,,.,..,.,,,.,,.,. _;180 Admtsstons... '.,. _ ;,,, 8 Advance Reservation F~;e.....,..,..,.. '..., ""' 1 Adv11nc~d Stnndlng... :,..,.,..... >1 Agrib'uslness Programo..,..,..,...,. 9. Agriculture Mechanie!-program......,., Agriculture Meehanics<ourses Agride'o(elopment progratn......,.:...,.., '. 5 Alter~U~tlve Le;uning..,..., " :..., Alumni Association.... " <',...'"....,... 8 Animal Technlcian program......,, ;....,,. Animal Tec hnlciail<ou~... _.....,. :..., ;. 115 Appeal From Academic Actions...,. ;. 1 Apprenticeship ,.. :.,... Apprenticeship Programs... 7 Architectural Technician prograrn.... ; flrcbitectur l Techniclan-couisb, :,....,. :. i6 ;.rt-eourses.... :.,... :... : :... ~ -:... : i7 Associate in Applled Arts Degree. ;.. ;.. :... :l Assbciate in Applied Science Degree.. : :. Attendance.., Auditing a Course U Auto Body-program... :... :99 Auto Body Servicing program.,.... "'...,.. 99 Auto Mechanics prograjll, , Automotive Servicing-program.... : Automotive Serv~cing CO!l'SCS ; 1() ~utomotivc T~cb.niclan program.. '.,.. -,.QO Automotive ''echnician courses..... ', B Barbering-program '..',,. 101 Barberlng Apprenticeship...., Ba!ber~urses ~., Bookstores...,..._ Bulletin, Weekly.....:.,..., Business Programs...,, Business Administtatio)l-eourses...,,., Business o&ta: Processing-courses,,,,.. 18 Business Machine&<:ourses...., ~ Business Related-eourses., Business Mid Manogernent-program,,.. 57 c Child care ',5 Child Care Services-program...,.....,..,.:, 80 Child Dcvelopment-eouraea...;;.. 19 Class Size....., Clerk Typist-program....'.....,. 57. Clini';'ll Laboratory.or AffilLltions...,.,.,., 1 Clothing and TextJies program....,. :80 Clothing-courses...,.. ;..., Q Clubs and Student Organizalion~., :, Qxle of Conduct College Transfer.....,...,,... 9, Commercial Art-program :...., ! -Commercial Art courses..,......,..,.. 1Z Community Developmentel Disablllties:proi!ram :. 81 Coli'lmunity Developme'ntai Ql$a~i]ities courses 18 Community'lnvolvement.,.,',... 1 _... :s CommU;>lty Show Choir.,..,..... :-' :._..,,... 1 g:~: ~!~ripu~~- ::::::: :.:::-:: : :; :: ~: ; :~.: i:~ Numerical Guide to Course De~criptions., Court and Conference ReporUng program_.,.._ Cracker Barrell...,,,..,.,.,.. :...: Credit for Experlentiai.Learpin&...,_., :: Crop Production-program Crops and Soib-eolllSeS....:..,.., D Dairy Herd Managem nt progjam.....,,.... 'DaiiJ Herd Management<Qurtes.,.,... i... 1~~ Data Entry Operation~ program.....,. '"... ; Data Processing Compurer.. OpetatiO!-PJOBratn......,, Data Processing-Computer..,... -Programming progrsm ,.,, Degr~s, Diplomas. Graduation.., ,,. JO D~ees, Types of...,... Dental c()urses Dental ASslstant ptogram..., Dental Hygiene Clinic...,,,,.,..,... "'.. :..6 Dental Hyglenlst-progr~m..,...,... 7 Diesel and Heavy Equipment Mechanics-program,....,......, Diesel and Heavy Equipment Mechanics course.s.,.....,..._ Dietetic Technician-program...,,..., Dismissal, Academic Dismissal, Non Academic, ,... Downtown Center..,,...,..,.., Drafting, Architcctural program , Drafting, Architectural-courses Dress Code ,.. 1~!

101 Alpbabetical ndex ' ' ' Alphat;etJcallndex 197 E llconomlc Development Electronics program , Elec!ronics.courses...,......, Electronic.Servicing-program., ,,., 101 )':lec!ronic Servicing-courses...., '1 Emergency Medical Services-program ~ Emergency Medical Services-courSes English-courses..., ,......,..., 19 Equal Opportunity-Notice to Applicants, 'Paren'ts and Guardians i! Evaluation and Assessment.., E1(periential Leamins. Credit for...,.,.. ;..,.. 1 F Facilities-Madison!ill Ar~., i77 Faculty.. ~... :.:, ,... ~ Farm Economics'courses ,..., Farm Training-program..,...; :.. : :....,,..,. ;..~, Farm Training-courses..... :.... :., F~rm Training-Sheep Productron-program..... ;. '. F~rrn 'l'raining Sheep Productlon-co~Jtse.~.....us Fashion Retailing'Jlroi:rain ' '. &7 Fees-e TUition iuid others.:: ;:..... :: ~ l'ee Arrangements..... "..... : :~ 1 FeeArrapgernents Receiva.ble :.....,....'." ~=~:~~;~~ :: :::::: : : :: :: ~ : : :- : ~: ::: : ):~ Fil\liileial Aid File Protecti<m program...,..., f'=~~~~~r-~:: :: ::.:: ::. : : ~ : : : :: ~ : :.:~~. : FOOd Prepar!ltion Aslilslant.progr~m : :.:,. :.<.... a<\ FOod Servi~,,....,...,, ,...,.. " a6.. Foreign l.ilguage cour5es..,..,.,...: ", ;,,,,;~.5 Foreign Students..., , ;. ",.;:,g Fort Alki!lson.Campus.,.'...,.,...,. _;...:179 follnll~!iql), M~TC... : ''..,., -''< Fimctions and Goals.,... :..,..... ; ::....,:,. G Oeogr!lphic Area of District,... :...., :. : :'. 177 Governing BOard. :... :,., :.. :.,.. :.;).::..:. 178 G~ade Point, Figuiing.Avi:,rage..,.,...:...,,11 Grade Reports,., :,.,,.., :,.,. ',.,,,'; : ;,. :.. 1.Grad~idioll..., :,';:...:.' :., 10. Graduatio11 Fee.....,.....,. ;.,..,...,.1 GraphicArts Program :... :...., 67 Grants ,...., :~ Conditions for R~yment 'o f Grante.".. :..... ~~: thndit~~pped~ Special Needs.....,.,,. Health Forms and f'hyslcal Bxam ,... 8 Health Occupations Programs Health ~rvices Historic Milestones MATC,,...,....,... 5 History-courses,..,....,.., Hold forlndebtedness ,..,.. 1 Home J!conomics Programs Homemaker/Horne Health Aide-program... 8 Homemaking-cottrses {) Home Management and Furnisbings-cour6CS Honor Roll...,, !. Horticulture-program..,...,.. :.,.. f Horticulture-courses ,....., Hospitality Management-program.....,...:.. 87 HospitaUty Management-courses ' :1~9 Housing , ;. :. Human Services-program H uman Serv.ices-courses , J,K lnc!)mpletes..... :... :.. a ndustrial Foods Programs ,, 8 ndustrial Hydraullcs course,.....,. :..., ;1 'ndustrial Welding-program..,,:.:.; :..... ;.;.10 ndustrial Welding-courses...,,,.. ;..,.... 1~ nstructional Resource Centers.;.... : nstrumental ~nsem\>le ;....,. ',.,.;. ; : tnsurance Service~pr~gram..,., : ~.,.r. ~.~8 ln.surance~ourses...,....".", :.,,', nterior Design-program :.... :.. c8.. nterior.design courses.... ;.. ; 17 Jiuz Ensemble :..,.,..., ;,...-o Job.Piacem<!nt......,,, :. ;. ;, /. L,... Legal Transuipoonist prosrarn,.::.:....,.. :.:.::~ LiQel'al Studies Degrees.. :~..... :....., ~ J, 6 Libtaries (fflgj.,..,...,,., ;... :,,76!Jeans o t o o o o o!, o, t o o> o ; 01, ~ t o o, : : ', o ' ': : : -~ M ' Mac.liine Tooiing Technics program.. ;...,., 'Machine Tooling Technlcs~courses.., Marlteting Programs,,,,,,,.,,.,,,, ",. ;,., 85,;,SB Marketing-courses.,... :,.,....,.,,', ;,,;.. 11 Milrkeling-Fashlon Mercha~dlslng-program..... : 89 Matbematics eourses. ;, h. ~ -,. ; j 6 Mechanical Odign-progra'!l..,, ,.,. 10 Mechanical Oeslgn~ourses '0 Me<:hanlcal Drarting~ourses.,,,......'... 1S Medical Assistant-program,...,.....,.. ; :.. 75."Medical Msistant-c0urses......,, :. :.... 1!1 ~e<lic~l J..i!l?!>ratory Technician program. :, : edlco.l Laboratory Technlclan courses,... 15_ Medical Offlee Mld Man gement prognim......!il Medical Secretary-program..... :.. : Medi~al Tr1l!Criptlonlst program.,,, Metallurgy~ouraes ,.,,... 15, Music ,...0. M1ic course ,.,:..,., N New C'..ollege Singers ,. 0 Newsmaga:tine.SNT ,... 8 Non-Resident l'cc,.,,......,..,,.,,.,... 1 Nursing-associate degree pro~:ram... 7 Nursing-courses Nursing Assistant-program Occupational Therapy-program Occupational Therapy-courses Operating Agribusiness for Re.sults-program Operating Agribusiness for Results-courses.... ll Operating Room Assistant progrnm Operating Room Assistant-courses Optical Dispensary, Optometric T~chnlcian.progrnm...,.,..., 77 Optometric Technician-courses ,.., Orgat1izational Stru,:tur<;., ,,, Outrea\ili Services ,...,.,5 Outside Work....,,...,., ,.... lo p Parts Specialist program..., PartS-courses ,,. :.,...,... 1{) Philosophy and Mission-MATe PhotograJlhy program Photograpby~urses......,..., 1 Pbysical Education-courses ,..., Physki!JJ;xi>m, and Health Forms Police Science-program....., Pollee Science-courses ,... Portage Campus ,,, Practical Nursing-program......,...,,,.,....'77 Pregnant Students, Poli.cy f.9r' Work Stud'y, or Clinical Affiliation.., Printing prog~a rn'.., : ,.. 69 Priqting and Publishing-program,,,., Printing'courses Probation-Academic , Probntion Non Acadcmic...., Prog~am and Activities Council , Program and Materials Fees....,.,,, Progress Requirements,......,,.\ Public Safety Programs...,......,., Public Works Technician-program...,...., 10 Public Works Technician-courses,,.,.,...; 1 Q.R Racial Harassment......, Radiography-program...,..,....,..., 78 Radiography-courses, 1,,,,,, 158 Reading-courses..., ,., Readmittance,..,.,.,,, Real Bstate program...,......,., Real Estate-courses..,..,,..,,,,.,,, Recreation Resource Operatlon progtam Recreation Resource Operation-courses...,,..! 9 Reedsburg Campl!S Refund Policy,,,,,,.,,.,,...,...,..,..,. :. 15 Registration..., ,.. :. 9 Registration-Late Fee ~.., Respiratory Ther~py program,...,..,.,.....:. :. 78 Respiratory Tl)erapy'COurses :..,.... :155 R<:S[aurant and Hotel Cookery-program..... ::!.. 8 ' Restaurant and H~tel Gool\erJ:-cOurses..,.,...':.15 ". /, '\.. :. ~~~.!:t~ ~~~~~;y : : : : :: : ~ : : : :: : :::::-: :. ':.: :!!~ SChool O!Strids Withln DStrict...,.,.. ::,,, science-courses.. : :., : ~ :.:.'.8 secretarial Science-courses ' ' ' '. ' Sexual Harassment , ,., SLANT-Newsmagazine ,,....,.8 Small Engine ano;l Ch a$~i s Mec))anics program Small Engine and Chassis Mechanlcs-coun;es... Social Science.courses ,....,., Social securityn!rilbl'f " -~ Special Needs-Counseling and Services Special Service AwardS' ,, U Speech-courses ,.17. stenographer-progrsjll student Activities :.....,,... 6 StUdent Code of Conduct Student Due Process Procedure Stl!denl Q,;ganiations and, Clubs.. :...: Student Records, Access to,... 9 Sudent Setlate , Study Load.,,, ,..., Slip~rvisors Management Technician-program.. 91 S!tpervisors Management Techniciao courses,. 11 Supplemental Fee.,.,.,..., , 1 T Taxi<lermy-program......,.., Taxidermy-courses Tax-Supporting Towns, Villages and Cities in District....., Textbooks and CJa.ss Materials ,, Tourist Recreation-program,....,,....., 91 Tourist Recreation-courses..., Trade and ndustry Programs..,...,, Transcripts , Tuition (fees)...,.,,, i.

102 .-- - u,v,w v~t~rans Bene{tcs '.... '.. VA Reporting Vision Screenings Visitors... 1 Visual CommWiications-program Visual Communic:aqons-courses...., 15 Vocational Diploma5.... Vocationai Technical Oevelop-ntal..., 65 Watertown Campus..., Welding-program..., Weldi.og-courses Withdraw ls i~ Wood Technica program ~ : Wood Technics-courses...., _.... =.,... :.

103 L.JMadison Area C'~:r8 Technical c.. < : ::: ::-.-7:J College 550 Anderson Street Madison, W 570

104

105 MADSON.AREA ~ TECHNCAL COLLEGE CATALOG. POST :SECONDARY PROGRAMS For Further nformation, write: MATC Student Services 550 Anderson St. Madison, W 570 Or phone: (608} 6-MATC MATC reserves the right to make changes in the regulations and courses announced in this catalog without further notice.

106 -- --o o -.. -Conlents Table of Contents WhyMATC? Why MATC?- Why MATC? Philosophy and Mission ~ functions end Coals Accreditation Memberships Community nvolvement : Historic Mllcstones Student lnformouon- Polldes/Proccdures Admissions Scholastic Policies... lo Academic Probst ion ond Dlsmlssnl Fees and Residency..., General Policies of the College Student lnformatlon- Scrviccs/Aclivltlcs..., i Counseling Financial Aid...,......,,.,... Student Resources....., ,. 5 Student Activities , o 6 Clubs and Student Organi<alions Music...,..,.,...,,.,., ,... 0 Athletics li'ducalionnl Services... Types of Degrees Other Services, Apprenticeship Altcmnlivc Learning Program> of Study Agribusin.,;s Apprenticeship Business General Studies Grnphic Arts Health Occupulions Home Economics ndustrial Foods Murketing , Public Safely ,..., 9 Trade and ndustry Course Dcscrlpt!vns,.,,.,,.,.,.. o,,,.. 11 Numerical C9nrsc Guide..., ,. o, 107 Organizational Structure,,,,,.,,,,,, Fncilities-Madison and Area.....,., Governing Board ,.., Stnf( and Fnculty....,...,, , Alphabetlwl ndex l 9S PHLOSOPHY AND GOALS ACCREDTATON MEMSERSHPS COMMUNTY JNVOLVBMENT. '!:.,_ 1: -:

107 Why MATC? WhyMATC?-5 PHLOSOPHY AND MSSON Madison Area Technical College $ dedlcalt'<l to the policy that the most precious resources of the n~ lion reside in the many and varied abilities of its citizens. The college, therefore, endeavors to provide broad educallonal opportunities to all d tiens of the district. The primary function of the college is to give substance to the ideal o( equai educational op portunity for all citizens. Titus, a liberal admissions policy is an essential pmr1 of its operating philosophy. The mission of Madison Area Tt!ebnical College is to provide the following educational services: () Technical, vocational and semi professional programs designed to prepare students for employment upon.completion of such programs; () Continuing education deslsnec! to provide an expandfng opp.ort unity for vocational growth and development, with programs to upgrade and retrain employed persons according to long-term employ.ment opportunities and tteeds in ndustry, agriculture and business; () Transfer courses designed to provide lower division and prc-prof<ssional programs which prepare students for entry into tlie four-year institutions of their choice; () Gulclance and counseling services to assist both youth and adulls to fit themselves better into an ncreasingly complex technological society; 15) Cultural programs and services designed to enrich the life of the community and its citizoens. Function5 and GoB/s To carry out its philasopby, the college offers educational opportunities for all high school graduates in its service area. ts presence encouro.ges the enrollment of young people who might otherwise terminate their educations at the end o( high school. With its strongly individualized pproacb to education and personal guidance, the college gives these students the opportunity to d etermine their vocational DC' prpftsslonal objectives nnd to seek further edllcl\tion to gain their obj~ctives. To aid these 'tud nt~. the faculty works to: flj Help ~tudcnts understand themselves an<l those!ltooti thein and to unde.rstnnd.democ.ratic processes:.... () Prepare ~!udents to take part in the eco(\omlc life of the community;. () Develop students' aelf relianc:e by encouraging lhein to think critically in aolving problems; () Encourage students to tak.e part in some creative aclivlty and to appreciate the creativity of others (5! Help student~ develop sense of social r~spo n tlbility and: an increased understanding of the socioeconomk: problems cbnfronting our nation and the world; (6) Teach studetlts an awareness of!he.contrlbu Uons afforded by other deas, races and rellglons, Accl"ffdit.tlon Madison Area Technical College is accredited by (accreditation.uso includes the campuses at Fort Atkinwn,. Portage, Reedsburg and Watertown); Wisconsin Boand of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education North Central Association of Colleges and Schools National League for Nursing Wisconsin State Board of Nursing Commission on Dental Accreditation of the American Dental A$sociation Am erican Association of Medical Assistants American Dietetic Association Council on Medical Education of!he.american Medical Association. American Occupatlonal Therapy Asso;;ialion ;. American S,oclety of Clinical Pathol9glsts American Society of Medical Technologists American Veterinilry Medkal As~ocfatlon National Shorthand Reporters AssOciation Wisconsin Department of Healtl'i and Social Services Barbering Division ' State of Wisconsin BdlK:ational Approvl!l Board )for tl\e education of veterans and war orphans) MembershiP. Madison Area Technical Colleg~ holds.mem,berships in: Adrninistrati~e Management Society American Association of Accountants American Association of Collegiate :Registrars and Admissions Officers American Association of COmmunity arid Juni9c Colleges. American Education Assoclatlo.n. American Tecllnlcal Education Association American Vocational AssOciation.. Association of Bducatlooal Com.mlinica!ions and Technology Association for Supervision and CUrriculum Development :Council o North Central Community 1unior Colleges. Ct>uncll on Hotel, Rc taurant and nstitutional Education Midwest College Art Conference National As.loclalion of Public School Adult Education National Council of Local Administrators of Vocational, Technical <lnd Adult Education.National League for Nursing Council of AssOciate Degree Programs, and Council of Practical Nursing Programs National Society for Study of Education North Central Asaociatlon of College.o and Schools Wisconsin Association of Collegiate Registmrs and Adml!!ions Offlccr Wisconsin Association of Schools and College Admwions Counselors Wisconsin Educational Media Association Wisconsin Vocotiona.l Assodation Wisconsin Education A~ lation Community lni'onemem-economlc DenJopment MATC's Planning a nd Bconomic ljevelopment offlee a&slsts n the delivery of instructional support services in the areas of research, planning and economic development, and submits projects to ob lain federal, slate and/or local funds to s upport district programs and services that will help individuals, communities and industries to improve productiv!ty by having access to a pool of skilled workers. The activities include: Res"l!rch to assess the needs of business, in dustry (employers) and the community for programs and services that District should provide; Working with 'comn\unities to enhance economic growih in the area; Asllisting employers by developing tailored train ing programs and services that are ''employer specific;" Providlnz assistance to local firms to help them solve their technical problems; Conducting surveys to re eiltch the changing n~eds of business and industry, and developing programs and servi.ccs to cope with tech nological changes; Providing boule skill programs and developing tailored basic sku! ndustry programs to help those already employed to improve job stability and up ward mobility. Community lnvolllement-outlwch SetVcel The primary focus of MATe's Outreach Services office is on adult continuing education beyond traditional cour5cs S&Ociated with formal clas!ll'oom C tlvltiea. By cooperating with indu try and buslness, public and private agencies, communi!)' groups and other institutions of learning, MATC is able to spon sor and develop a wide variety of institutes, seminars ond workshops. Objectives and goals reflect the desires and concerns bf the population served. Need assessments and other research activities are carried out periodically to determine new offerings and to eva l~o~ate on-going ones. The Outreach Services office se ks and welcomes cobtacts, requests, lnq'uirles and suggestions in lts effort to expand a nd become more effective in lts offerings in the adult continuing education area. A number of adult and continuing education offerings wiu be of fered as part o( the Weekend CoRege Program that will begin operation n the fall of The (ollowing are some eumples of programs of fered through the O~o~treach Services office: Tax Workshops Sltill Upgrading Workshops-use of modern data processing systems, auto mechanics, human relations, etc. (Available on job site or at MAT C) Business Management/Supervision workshops Development of Training Packages and Manuals Small Business Workshops-qllality control, statistical control, etc. Workshops for Properly Assesso" and Municipal Clerlu Workshops for Secretaries and Office Peraonnel Seminars for Owners and Managers of Apart ment Buildings Workshops of General Public nterest-home buying, home management, fitness, career planning, parenting, nutrition, etc. Hlslorlc M/leslones 191: School of ndustrial Education Opens. 1917: Becomes School of Vpcational Education. 197: Becomes School of Vocational and Adult Education. 1961: School ia aut~ to grant Associate in Applied Science degree. Becomes Madison Vocational, Technical sod Adult School. 1966: Sc.hool is autbotized to offer collegiate transfer courses. Acoepted as a candidale for. membership in the North Central Association of col legea and Schools. 1967: District enlarged to include apptoxltnately four counties-the Area, Vocational, Tecbni.:.l and.adult Education, District Jl!o : Becomes Madison Area Technlcal College. 1969: Madison Area Technical College ia accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. 197: Atlts meeting on July 0, 197, the North Central AS$0clatlon or Colleges and Schools voted to continue the accreditation of Mlldlson Area. Technical College for a period of ten years. 197: On November 5, 197, the v.oters or Area Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, :Qistrict No. approved a referendum in the arnount of $0 miuion to help finance construction of a new cam-. pus foc' Madi&On Area Technical College and satellite facilities in Fort Atkinson, Watertown, Reedsburg and Portage : Dedication of new facilities for MadlaOn Area. Technical College satellit e schools in Fort Atkinson and Watertown : Dedication of new f<!cililies for Madison Area Technical College satellite schools in Portage and Reedsburg.. 198Z: Approval of Madison Area Technical. College-Madison's spilt campus facilities plan!o in, clucle a Downtown Education Center, the Truax Airpark Site, and the Technical Center.. 198: Madison Area Technical CoUeg is reaccredited by the North Central Association of Col leges and School~ for a period of ten yean. 198: Ten years of legal controversy were ended when the Supreme Court, on March 7, 198, revemd an unfavorable decision from the Court of Appea.ls, freeing the district to proceed with the building of Madison Area Technical College facilllles. 1985: On January Z, 1985, bids were accepted for lhe building of facilities at Truax Airpark and renovation of the 11 North Carroll Street faculties. 1986: The first pha5e of the Truax facility s completed and classes begin. 1987: The Downtown Education Center, these cond phase of the Truax facility, and temodeling of the Technical Center will be completed.

108 Student nformation Policies and Procedures ADMSSONS ACADEMC PROBATON AND DSMSSAL FEES AND RESDENCY GENERAL POLCES OFTHECOLLEGE Student lnformation 7

109 8 Sludent nformation Student Jnformiltlon 9 l l ADMSSONS Requirements Madison Area Technical College is open to au adults and to all youths years of age and older wlw are capable of profiting from instruction. l'ost secondary programs are open to those who are high school graduates and to tl\ose who have passed high school equivalency tests (equivalency is interpreted to mean a passing score in au parts of the State of Wisconsin High School Equivalency Test or a passing result in the GED test. A photocopy of the GED certificate or W~n5ill High School Equivalency Test resulu is requir~d i.n these cases., 1111d to tho_se mature individuals who, through work e)(jlerience, can prove that they are capshle of.ma.sterlng the subject matter. For particular programs within the college, sdmis.sion requirement YBrf depending o.n aptit11de (or the curriculum, available student stations, and.a reasonable probability of acad'emic success.. A current application fcmn indicatesadmlssion testing. Specific exami'nations are required for cer tain programs, A student's application is evaluated on the basis.of a combination of high school and other tl'al!scripts, work experience, entrance examination results, and an interview il it is deemed necessary. t i$ possible fo.r.students to be C!)ncurrenlly. enrolled in high school and in classes offered by Madison Area Tech11ical Coll~ge. lo all cases, students must be years of age or over at the time classes start, and the student must have parent or guar(l.ian permission and consent Of the high school principal. Costs for.~ose attendillg in lieu.of high. school, undenh.e provisions of Section i\8, 1~ o(!he Wisc.onsin. statutes, are charged in ac.x,rdance with' the la\'i. Nouc~ 1o ApPlicants, Parvnta or Gu~rdlens Services,. 'financial aid andotlletl:lenefit~oflhe.. Wisconsin Board of VocatioJial, 1'echnicalali.d Ai\uli EDuca~io~ are provided OD :il non-discriminatoey ~is, 1is r~qqired by the, Civil Rights Ad of 196.'.Jndiviauals applying for.or receiving as~lstance. t)lrough t_bis agency Who believe that di5crlminatlon M lbl\-ground of race, cqlor or natioiilil origin is'lle lng-:practiced by-tile Wi5consin &~t~. Qf Vcx:ational, Technlca) pndadultbducat[on may file a :written complalnt wit~ tbe state ag~ltey, til.~ fei:lenit agency or -both,. ' - '.. ' Any ~itten ~ornplaint is.to be signed by.the cilmplainant, shall give in detail the time, place and pertinent facts ana circumstances of the alleged discrimination and shall be submitted to the State Director, Wisconsin Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, 10Price Place,' P.O.!lox 787, Madison, W The Atea Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No. is in full compliance with Tille V and V of the 196 Civil Rigl1ts Acts, Executive Order 1, Title X of the 197Z Education Amendments, Equal Pay Act, Age Discrimination in Employment AL:t, TlUe Yf! and Title Vlll-l'ublfc Health Service Act, Section 50-l97 Rehabilitation Act and Wisconsin Fair Employment Law. t is the policy of the district not to discri!llinate on the basis of a person's age, race, creed, color, handicap, marital siatus, sex, national origin, ance~t r y-, sexual orientation, arr.est record or conviction record in its educational programs, admissions, activities or employment policies. nquiries regarding compiiance with the above nsmed regulations may be directed to the Affirmative Action Officer, 550 Anderson Street, Madison, Wl570 fphone ) and to the Assistant Director, Student Service5 (phone 608/6-609!). AdmlssiQns Procertunts Applications for post-seco.ndary programs are a~cepted beginning t!te third Mooday in November for the follow.ing school year. Forms for this purpose may be obtained from local high school counselors or by writing the Admissions Administrator, 550 Anderson Street, Madison, W 570. Applicants currently ej>rojied in high school must have completed sbqemesters prior ta making application. Tileclosing date far advance application by m~i) for a fall semester is the last friday in July. After this date, new applicants may apply lo person for.programs where openings are available. Whenever possible; :the applicant should have-the h(gh school send witll the application a trausctipi of high school records: f currently cnroile~ in high s~ hool, the applicant Sbc;Juld also send a list:ing of. senior year courses and credits~ fa. gradu~te,--a com plete high sch!lot-itanscript should be-supplied as well as a ran script of any add.itlonal,education. These should be.sent by lhe institutlon a.\tended. Depending on piogram cjioice, the applicant is notified of a date for add.itional tests when ~oinpleted application and. transcript have.been received, Evaluation of application, transcript and lest results are made by the progr~m chaijperson, and the appli cant is notified of the status of his/her application. Those who do not qualify for the programs of their choice may consult with a cpunselor to consider alternatives. The accepted applicant is notified of detailed registration procedures prior to the start of the school year. n certain prc>grants, applications ate accepted for the second semester. A list of openings is available by the.mid term of the.first.semester. The closing dote for second-semester application& by mail is the third Friday in November. After this date, new applicants may apply in person. Health Forms and Physlc$1 Examination All students enrolled in post-secondary programs are required to complete a health information form which shajj be submi tl~d to the registrar prior to registration. n addition, Health Occup~tions students are re quired to have a physical examination and the results mailed to the registrar by their physicians prior to registration. Forms are provided. ( the results of the physical exntnination have not been 1 l l! l received by the registrar prior to registratiol], a student may be allowed lo register at the.~iscretlon of the aj?propriate dea>.. chairperson. Under no cit cumstances, however, are students assigned to the clinical area until this tequ_irement is met. Due to the nherent risk of exposure t9 harmful agents and the requirements of some affiliating agen cies, all Health Occupatioll Division students are re quired to show evidence of health insurance coverage prior to their assignments for clinic<!) ex pericnce. The limits of such coverage shall be at least as c;omprehensive as those of the student health 'insurance available through Mac!is~m Area Technical CoUege. Since Health Occupations individuals are subjected to varying degrees of physical demand and/or mental stress, and all students~ed to per form at " predetermined level of competency to be eligible for graduation, it is recommended that ap plicants who question their ability to meet these requirements consult with the appropriate program administrator. Barber students must' pas.s the physical re quirements set up by the Wisoonsitl State Bo<trd of Health. Admfsslons Tests Certain programs require testing and others. do not. A curredt application blan.k int\lcates testing requirements. Upon receipt by the college of an sp-. plication form and transcripts, notice of a test date is sent to the applicant for programs where special tests ate requued..., --- Students who wish their pre-admissions test r~lts interprete may consult. with a counselor. Additional intere. t and aptitude testing is available for students interested in developing educational and occupational plans. Foreign StudeiJts M":dison Area Technical College is approved for the a ttendance of!on im'migrant studellts under 'the lllu)gration and Nationality laws an d the issuance o~ l 0.forms. Non~immlgran t foreign stude:nts who wish to upply must: fl) Demonstrate a _level of proficiency in English to pursue the programs of their choice; () ~ave a!) MATC district r esident as a spon5or; () Stgn an MATC trainlngagreement:. (.) S)lbmit_ English-worded tra.nscripts; (5) Submit TOEFL or Mlcbigan Test scores; /6) To oblain an -0AB or -0MN visa, deposit 5,000 toward semester fees. All.visa students are accepted on academic probation. Tntnsferof Cred/15 Studen.ts transferring from other nstitutions may have lhe1r records evaluated ~y the division dean/chairperson to. receive permission to waive certain program requirem ents pro\rided tlie courses be ing transferred are equivalent in!ulture, and satisfactory grades were received.. At the discretion of the division dean/chairperson, students previously enrojjed at other institutions of higher learning who are no longer acceptable for academic reasons at such institutions, or students who were oo probation upon leaving such lnstltu lions, may be accepted on a strict probationary status for one semester. Such~tudents mwt achieve a grade poin't.average of.0 or better by the end of the semester in order to continue. College TrefJfller Students who are non-residents of Dislrict No. are not considered for ~nrollment ln the college transfer program.. Non-resident students currently enrolled in technical (associate degree! or Yocational (diploma) programs are not.allowed to transfer to the colleg~ transfer program. Students enrolled in college transfer-liheral arts are limited t.o acquiring 7 credits at the college for the following reasons; (1) 'l;'be Wisconsin State.Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education-has a policy which limits enrojqleot in liberal arts transfer programs to 5 percent of the total post-high school full-time equivalent enrollment; (Z) ;rhe board limits enrollments in such p rograms to residents of District No. ; () A maximum of 7Z credits are transferable to other iostihitions of higher learning. ReghJiretion. Regis.t_ration for classes.is conqucted after students have beed accepted into a progra,m by the dlvfsloo deanf~hairpei'"sll,q.. Reglstr.lt!on js on" scheduled basis by program and a)pbabetical name of s.tudents. Letters an: sent informing. students ah<iut.the specifics of registration.... Mail and n-person registration is conducted separately for part-time students enrolling in degr e lllld non-degree classes. These classes_ a"' listed in a timetal:ile and/or new pap rs. Social Seci t~ Number Social security numbers are used {Or identification of student records and.are kept in strict confidence. Failure to furnish this voluntary numbe~!nay delay processing.and hinder the maintenmce of files while a number is heing assigned. Access tq Student Records Madison Area Technical CoUege, 'to be in com. pliance with the Family l!ducalional Rights and Privacy-Act of 197(Buckley:Amendment), CODslder; the following to be directory information and may be released to anyone who requests: Name, address, telephone listing, date of birth, major field of study, participation in officially-recognized activities and sparta, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance 'Which includes credits enrolled in e_ach semester!, total credits completed toward ~ c!eg:-ee, dates of withdrawal from courses or programs, degrees and awards received, the most rece11t previous educatiol)al agen cy or institutlo.u attended. Students have the right to inform MATC that any or all of the above information should not be releas ed without their prior consent. Students who wish.to do this are to report to the registration office within 0 days from tl.me of enrollment to fill out the

110 lo Studenl lnformalion necessary form revoking any or all of the public in formation Usted. Revocation remains in effect until the student modifies it Jlncluding after the student has left the collegej. n accordance w'ith this Act, students have the right to inspect, review and challenge the contents of their educational records and to request corrections to inaccurate or misleading data contained.in their records, or to submit an explanatory statement for inclusion in their records if the outcome of ~ hearing is unsatisfactory. Student educational recocds are maintained and kept in the office of the registrar. All r<>quests to in spector review one's ('ducational records, and for obtaining copies thereof, should be made to the registrar. Records placed oit "hold'' for individual in debtedness to the e llege are not released until cleared of the obligation. No personally identifiable information from information records is disclosed by the college Without each student's prior wrillen con sent, except when prior written consent is not re quired by the Act. ' Study Load A full time student iu an associate degree program may take a maximum of eighteen credit hours. ln some programs in the vocational studies division, when the study is largely confined to the classroqm or laboratory. up fo twenty credit hours may be taken. A student who is carrying a twelve-hour credit load or is in classroom attendance twenty perio<!s per week is considered a full-time student. Outside Work A maximum of tv-~enty hours of outside work per week is suggested for thejull_.time student. This. maximum may be too many for $0me students. Wben a student's academic work declines because of outside work, t is suggested tbat the work load be reduced. Financial aid is available to help those students-who need it. Class Schedule Period l Time 7:0 8:0 a,m. 8:0-9:0 o,m. 9:0-JO:ZO o.m. l0:0 ll : :0-JZ:0 p.m. ll: SO- :ZO p.ill. 1:0- :0p.m. PenOa l:li 1' l - 'nnte: :0-:0 p.n!. :0-:0 p.m. :0-5:0 p.m..5:0-6:0 p.m.. 6:1!-'7:0 p.m. 7:0- ~:ZO p.m. 8:0-9::!0 p.m. SCHOLASTC POUCES Degntes, Diplomas and Graduation Under the provisions ofchapier 5{, Laws of 1961, the Wisconsin Board of Vocaifonal. Technical and Adul\'llducaliort authc'n:u:es local boards o( voca tional and adult education to grant vocational diplomas and associate degrees in tbe appropriate areas to students \vho ouccessfully complete one and two y~~rs of _pos~ high school technical level instruction. An associate degree is granted to students who successfully complete th«: two-yesr college trunsfer programs or the two year technical programs. Diplomas are issued to tudents who successfully complete one-year to two year vocational programs. Certificates may be issued to t110se who have corn plcted special courses of study. jsee types of degrees.) Diplomas or associate degrees are issued to students who complete the prescribed curriculum both in hours of attendance and in terms of achieve ment, participate in graduation exercises, have ob tained satisfactory achievement {"C" or.0 grade point average) in their major field subjects, have maintained an overall "C " or.0 grade point average and are recommended by t~e instructors within the deparlmen t and the dean/chairperson of the division. Certificates of completion are issued to students who attain a GP A of.0 or better in their major field subjects and have an overall GPA of less than.0. Certificates of attendance are issued to students who attain a GPA of less than.0 in their major ficid subjects. The overall GPA is of no significance for attendance certificates. Students who terminate their attendance for a semester or more are required to meet tbe re quirements of a program when they re-enroll. At least one half of the credit requirements necessary for obtaining a diploma or an.associate degree ih any program must be taken at the college. (See advanced standing and transfer of credit.) Scholastic residency mandates that the student be registered in and satisfactorily complete applicable program courses in the semester prior to completing the appropriate program requirements. To obtain an additional diplomo or degree, a student must acquire one-half or more of new, addi.tional credits in residency. No rnoreihan one half of previously-earned credits ~rom-a diploma or degree may be applied toward an additioool diploma or degree. (See ~ho!astic resid(mcy.j Associate deg(ees, diplomas and certificates are granted at the end of each semester and,summer school. Students who receive incompletes or have other deficiencies. to remove from their records ate granted their associate degrees, dlp)ol'!las or cer tificates at the end of the se!llester durillg which all obligations have been satisfied. Deans/chairpersons may excuse from participation in the graduation ceremony only those students who they consider have valid reasons such as illness, death in the familr, military commitment or other justifiable excuses. SchofasUc Residency At lea$! one-half of the credit requirements necessary for obtaining ~ diploma or an as~ociate degree in any pro gram must be taken at the college. (See advanced s!lll\d[ng and transfer of credits.) Scholastic residency mandates that the student be registered in ond satisfactorily complete applicable program courses in the semester in which he/she is completing the appropriate program requirements.!. Student lnfortnatlon ll Any exception to this mandate shall be approved in writing by the dean/chairperson <;Jf the area in which the program is offered aud approved by the registrar. To obtain an additional diploma or degree, a stu dent must acquire one half or more. of new, add tiona! credits i!l residency. No more. than one hal o previously-earned credits from a diploma or degree may be applied toward an additional diploma or degree. Graduatloil Specl l Setvice Awards.Graduting students demonstrating el(traordinacy service to fellow students and the college are nominated for the Special Service Award. Nominees must be recommended by at least two-faculty members. These nominees will have demonstrated leadership in student.government, cl!lbs, and/or par ticipated voluntarily in college sponsored educa tional or recreational activities. Nominees are sub mitted to the Awards Committee after approval of the division dean/chairperson. Selected students will be designated on the gr11duation program and will wear a gold cord at the graduation ceremony. A Special Service Certificate will be.received in the mail with the studeni's diploma. GtaduaUon Acatlemic Honor Awards Candidates or Graduation Academic Honor Awards must attain a program cumulative grade point average jcgpaj of. 75. Graduating students beco.me eligi\lle in two year programs by achieving a.75 CGPA after three semesters.. (,haduating students in one year prqgrams becom e eligible by achieving a.75 CGPA after one semester. Can didates are designated on the graduation program. and wear a white cord at.the graduation ceremony. Final determination and the awarding-of Graduation Academic Honor Award certiflcates include the graduates achleving a. 75 after program completion. Students r«eive their certificates in the mall with their diplomas. Academic Standards Student~ are e><11ecled to maintain a high level of scholarship. Gr des.are recorded at the end of each semester on a.pennanent transcript on the following basis: Grade A AB B )!C c 0 p Numerical or below Point&.6.5 ~ J Q 'l'he allowing letters that may be shown on grade reports have the following defmihons:!-ncomplete W-Withdrawal (Attended but withdrew, or transferred to another course section) X-Course still in- progress Au-Auditing Note: Mi&&ing a final examination wilhout11oti[ylnt the in!truccor and wilhout having a satisfactory excuse results ill an automatic "F ' on the exam. Auditing Course A student may audit -a course for no credit with the consent of the division dean/chairperson. Selec tion of audit must be made at tne time o registra lion. The same ee is charged as if for credit. A stu -.. ' '""' dent taking a ~ourse for audit may not change to credit, nor can a student change from a credlt course tq audit after classes begin without the wtillen pet mission of the dean/chairperson. The course is in diclited ns " Au" for audit on the tratucrlpt. An auditor must meet the attendance requirements and may participate in the classroom work and complete, assignments, but!flay not take examinaiions. Figi,Hing ~ Point Average Grade point averages are figurl!d on a 0 st~~le with credit points granted for " A.''.5 credit points for "AB,''.a credit points for "B,".5 credit points for ''BC," credit points for "C," ~ qeclit point fo~ "D," and 0 credit points for "F" an<;! ".'' f any course is repeated, the hi$her grade is recorded OJ! the p~rnuinent academic record, and the lower.grade is deleted. To figure your own GPA, divide the total grade points received for one semester by the number of credits taken that semester."for exa:inple: You.enroll ed for credits this semester and you get credit$ of " A," credits of " B," credits of " C," and credits of "D." Your total grade points re (X.) + (x) + (x1 + (xl) = il()totnl grade points. Your GPA for the semester is 0 divided by = :50. Stude11ts in all programs are required to maintain a current and cumulative grade average. of.0 (''C" average). fyour.grade average, current or cumulative, s less than.0, it is re~ommended that you make an appointment with your instructors, and if necessary, the program dean/chairperson to discwis your academic record. Achieving Jess than a.0 grade average at the-end of a semester may result in probationary action according to the Academic Probation and Dismissal Policy. tncompfetea A grade or lnollldp!ete is given i a student h~s done passing work, and because of illness o~ mai,or cause beyond the student's control, fails to complete the course requirements. ncomplet~s must be made up by the end of the. next semester or the grade automatically changes to an "F." n a continuing course, a student must remove an incomplete by thj: end of \he next nine weeks or automatically receive a failure and be withdrawn from the second semeater of the continuing course. n Health Occupations counts with a clinical oom -ponent, the student may be given. an incomplete if the deficiencies in clinical performance~ are such lhat the instructor believes they may be corrected in the sequential cour$e which has a clinical compo nent. When the identified deficiendes are corrected, the $tudent is given a grade for the course. f the deficiency in clinical performance s not corrected by the end of the eequeutial course.which has a clinical component, the incomplete becomes an "F." No studenl is allowed to graduate without the removal of au incompletes.

111 1-Student nformation Student lnformatlon-1 Wlthclrawels Non Btt~ndance does not constitute a cancellation of pre-registration. l.'or your <:onvenience, yqu may telephone yoijr cancellation prior to the beginning of the course. Official Withdrawals: A student withdrawing from school at any time is required to schedule a conference with the program deartlchairper~on or a counselor to complete Withdrawal and Course Change forms. Failure to do so tnay result in grades being recorded as failures. Official withdrawals are not granted during the scheduled semester final ex am period. (See refund policy for applicable refund payment due.j Withdrawing from a Couroe: A student, with a deanlchairperson's consent, may withdraw from a course with the withdrawal r~corded as follows: "Withdrawn, too SOQn 'to measure progress." Unless an adequate explanaiion is provided, a stu dent who is absent for consecijtive calendar days (not class meetings! after the last class period attend ed may he withdrawn from that class with a grade of "W.. " A student who is absent without an adequate explanation 5 percent or more of the total schedul ed dass periods may be withdrawn from that class. Re-admlssion after withdrawal is with the rnutual con5ent of the divi~ioii des':'/ chairperson and the ln$tructor. Clinical LAboratory or AffiliatWns A: student may be Withdrawn from the clinical component of a nursing course at any time there is a status Of failure to provide a "standard of care" as established by course QbjecUves, basic nursing competencies, affiliating agency agreements and the Rule of Conduct (Chapter NlO and Nl 11 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code, Rule Of Board of Nursiilg. Thiswlthdrawal may result in failure of the course and is reviewed by the program a sociate. chairperson. The same pdlicy applies to any other program withiil the Health Occupations Division which has a clinical component or!n any other department or division of the college requiring affiliations. Advanced Stflndlng A: student may be granted credit toward a diplotna ~ran associate degree by making application to the d(vj.siqn dean/chairperson for transferring applicable credits. from other institutions of higher learning (see transfer of credits). Students.Diiy alsq apply for e~q>edential advanced standing credit. Such credit may be for previous work experience, previous military education or ex perlence, and advanced high school ~curses comparable in contenfand level. At the discretion ()f the division dean/ch~rso n, the. ev~uation of such credit is by oral, writien or performance testing, or by. a C<Jmbination of tl!ese. A student may not request advanced standing by testout for <lly e Urse during the semester in which he or ahe has registered for that course without the permiaslon. of the division deanlchairperaon. The decision to grant advance!;! standing rests with the division dean/chairperson. Students currently enrolled in vocational diploma programs who wish to transfer to associate degree programs may request evaluation of their completed courses on the same basis as indicated above. Credit for Experiential Leeming Students may earn up to one half of the credits r~ quired for an associate degree through evaluation of their experiential learning. Credit may be given for learning occurdng outside the classroom which is firmly related to a particular program and academic procedure.. Giving credit for experiential learning refers especially to learning which occurs in work settings, communities or self-directive accomplishments emphasi,:ing performance over con cept. The office Qf the division deanlchairperson may be contacted for further information. Attendance Students who will not be in attendance for 'their first' class meetiilgs. must inform the appropriate dean/chairperson in writing, Extenuating circumslililces arising on the first day of class wliich. prevent attendance shall be made known to the divic sion office. Failure to comply may jeopardize (:Ontinued enrollment. Attendance is the responsibility of the individual student. n cases of absence, work must be made up by arrangement with the instructor. (Refer to withdrawals.} Missing a final ex9nlida tion without notifying the'instructor and without having a l;atisfactory excuse results in an automatic "1.'" on the examination. [Refer to academic standards.) Grac1e ReportS Grade.reports are is,sued within two weeks of the end of each semester. Unless otherwise requ.ested,' grade reports are m~iled directly to students. An additio!lnl stjident copy may be obtained from the divi sion dean/chairperson. Transcripts The student's record is confidential and is not released.from the college except by 'the signed re quest of the student. Each student is ent.itled tq three free transcripts. A charge of $1.00 is made for each additional transcript. Honor Roll Honor Rolllettera are sent to students and made public for those who are enrolled as fulj.fime students and who have completed a News lnfonnation Card. High honors are a.ssigned to those.fulltime students with a grade pqint average of.50 or better and honors to those with a grade point average of.0 through.9. ACADEMC PROBATON AND DSMSSAL Probation A student ls plnced on probation if less than a.0 grade point average is achieved, currently or cumulotivdy, at the end of a semester of enrollment. Dismissal A student on probation may be dismissed from a program if less than a.0 grade point average is achieved, currently or cumulatively, At the discre tion of the division deanlchairperson, a student may remain on probation if the dean/chairperson is cdnvinced that the student is capable of achieving a.0 cumulative gr~de p()int average at the end of the semester. Studel!ts Admitted on Probation A siudent admitted on probationary status may be dismissed from a program if less than a.0 grade point average is achieved at the end of the first semester of enrollment. Dismissed stud~nts may not enroll for the'!lext succeeding semester or the next schdol year depending on the program in which they were enrolled. n addition, the Health Occupations and Home Jlconomics ~ivisions have specific policies which apply to particular courses and programs. Copies of these policies are available from 'instructors and the division >lean/chairperson.upon request. Academic Appeals Committee Tne conditions upon w)1ich the student agtees to enroll in the instilutian and in the course/cours es of inst~uction arc; bas.ed ~n certain premises. Anion& these is academic teaming.. Academic learning im plies ihat the jnstrtlctor has something to impartknowledge, skill, value judgments, etc.-to the stu dent, and thst the instructor evaluates, in terms of a grade, whether' t,he student has achieved that which is expec!ed. The procedure below shall be followed in.sequence~!1} When a student sii~cerelythinks the fi11al grade he or sh~ has re~eiv~d ln.a c.ourse is inaccurate or unjustified, he or she sb.ould make an appointment with the instructor who issu~d the grade andexplain the reasons ior this belief. This process mut be in itiated within 15 days ofreceiving the grade. The in s.tructor and the student should moike every ef(orfto resolve the issue, for onl.y the instruclor can change the grade b.y submitting a grade change form to the registrar. Us e~pected that most, if not all, misunderstandings will be resolved at this.level. () However, if the student and the instructor are noi able to reach an agreement, the student may re quest, no later than t~n days alter meeting with the instructor, that be dean/chairperson of the par ticular divisiqn in which the instructor s employed nrr.nge a meeting with the instructor and the de~nlchairperson to attempt to resolve the issue. l'rior to the meeting, the student.shall place in writing a signed statement indicating the rensons for his or her belief and submit copies to the nstructor and to the dcanlchalrperson. 11 Should the issue still he unresolved, or should the decisii>n be adver$e to the student, the student may request in writing, no later ihan {lve days after the meeting with the instructor and the deanlchairperson, that the Assistant Director nstructional Services call a meeting of the Academic Appeals Committee. The Assistant DirectQr, nstructional Services shall chair the committee which shall be composed of himself, the Student Ser vices Coordinator, the dean/chairperson of the par ticular division, and four instructors from the same or a similar instructional field. The student will be dotified in writing of the time and place of this hear ing, at which time the.student may present his or her case. At this hearing, the instructor may also present his or her case. Mter hearing the cases of the student and the instructor, the Academic Ap peals Committee shall make a determination in the matter. The st.udent will be informed in writing of their decision. 1} Any party may have, at option, the right of an appeal from the decision of the Academic Appeals Committee. A hearing before the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and.adult Education, District No. shall be held at which time. the party will be allowed legal counsel if desired. Any party who desires to appea l the decision of the Academic Ap peals Committee must do so by petitioning the board in writ!ng no later than five days after the receip't of the decision of the Academic Appeal Co.mmittee. Mter the hearing has been held. by the. boord, the party shall b~ notified in.writiilg a:; to their decision. Appeal From Academic Actions snd Re-Admittance. Appeal from academic actions may be made.to the Academic Appeals Committee. f a student has bt:en dropped for academic reasons, re-admittance may be sought after a semester has elapsed. This application must be passed on by the Academic Appeals Committee. FEES AND RESDENCY Payment ol Fees All fees ere peyabie at the time of registratlon Or deferred upon approval and sigrring of a fee arrangement. Registration is not compleie until a!l fees are paid, "Hold" for ndebtedness Records and registration are withheld for student who fail to meet fiilancial obligations that are levied by recognized college offices, Advam:e Reservation Fee An advnnce reservation fee of $5.00 is due. within 15 days after notification of ac;;eplance. The receipt for thio fee is th;, student's assurance of a place n the program or a place on the.. waiting list for the program in which he or she has been accepted. lf a student does nat withdraw prior to classes commen cing, the advance reservation fee applies toward pro gram and materials fees. Prior to the semester of en try, $10.00 of the fee is refundable if the otudent

112 1-Studcnt nformation Student lnformotlon-15 notifies the college of cancellation in writing one month before cl11sses convene. f a student pays lhe advance reservation fee and program and materials fees and wlthdr1ws within one month prior to the beginning of classes, the advance reservation fee is non-refundable. Late ReglatntUon Fee New and continuing students in full-time postsecondary programs who fail to register arid pay their fees at the appoinied registratio!l time are charged an additional $5.00 late registration fee is not applicable toward any other fees or charges and is non-refundable. Textboolcs ttnd Clast Material$ Students purchase their own textbooks and class m;lterials as required. Graduation Fee At the time of registration, $15.00 graduation fee, plus tax, is. paid by each student if it is anticipated that the student will graduate a~ the end of the semester..! the student is dropped for academic, medica.! or other :reasons, or withdraws. of bi&lher own volition, this fee js refijnded upon request. Program and Materials Fees Program and materials fees are established annually by the Wisconsin!l<>ard of Vocational, Technical and.adult Educatipn according to Wisconsin state statutes. Transcript Fee Students are entitled to three free' transcripts. A charge of $J.OC.is made for each additional copy. Supplementel Fee A,supplemental fee of $1.5 per credit is chmged all students enrolling in post-high scllool courses at Madison Area Technical College. This fee is not refundable unless the college cancels the course or the student withdraws belore classes begin. Field Trfps The cost of field trips is paid at regis1ati6n time. Refunds are not.granted for non-participation in field trips unless the student officially withdraws prior to the field trip. Non-Resident Fee By act of the Wisconsin State Legislature /Chapter 9, Laws of 1965), a non-resident fee is authorized and charge<! for all students who are non-residents ofarea Vocational, Technical 81\d Adult Education, District No.. Non-resident rates ~r~ computed by the Wisconsin Board of Vocational, Technical ami Adult Bdt"illion in accordance with state statutes. The rates vary from year to year ao they are based on current instructional costs and expenditures... Students who are legal residents of Wisconsin, but who reside. in another Wisconsin vocational school. district, may have the non-resideni fee paid by that vocational school distiict provided that the student completes the requjred form ~nd the student'.s district asrees to pay, and provided that such local vocational district does not offer a similnr program of study. Forms for this purpose ore mailed at the time of attendance. All out-o f st~te students, all foreign students, and all non-resident stt~d ents w.ho do not have the proper form signed are responsible for paying their own non-resident fee. n all ca es, the individual sludent is responsible for proving his/her residency status; Fee Arrangements The Meo Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult.Education, District No. will allow students to dcler payment of semester fees upon completion of a "fee aitangemej)." A fee arrangement, a legally-binding noie, becomes official when signed by the student and a representative of the college. Students may sign a fee arrangem~nt only upon enrollment and payment of a minimum of $100.'00. Under e>ctenuating cir.c l.lmstances~ exceptions may ~granted by the controller or financial aid ad- ministrator. A $10.00 processing fee is charged for each fee arrangement. All student grades and/or transcripts will be placed on hoid until. the fee arrangem~mt is paid. f an individual is receiving food stamps, is on AFDC, county o r city welfare, financial aid, etc.~ and can produce documentation to this fact, an adjust, ment on the $ minimum deposit referred.fo above could be made. District No. would then use th"is documentation for reporting. " Services to the 1 Disadvantaged" to the state board... j Fee arrangements shall be. made due the bi5t day l of the week in which the student,' s first disburse - ~ ment of financial aid becomes availabl~ n each. ~ semestet unless the student has a valid reason for im a extension. Alt ~xtensions shall be due at least 0 calendar days prior to the end,of school.. J Failure to officially withd.taw frorri clas~es nr ~eing f officially withdrawn from a class by an inatructor 1 for non-attendance does not relieve the student's j obligafion for the fee arrangement 1 Additional fee arrangements shall not be permitted for studen~ who have _previo-us firil!"cial obli$afions. due the colle$e. BxceptiQns ntay be granted by the registrar or adn'li!siqns administrator if the student provides evidence that h~lshe will be te~elvi(lg finanei~l ald. Collectlon.of Fee Arntngemenrs Receivable (l) The grades and transcripts of eacb student who signs a fee arradgement shall be placed on hold until au fees are paid. () & ch student must pay-all previous debts to the district before being allowed to register or Sign a ne~ fee arrangement. This tequi.l'ement may be watve<l by the registrar or his designee. () Witl!in 60 days after the stan of the first or se c.ond semester of each school year, the buslneu offtce shall revlew all new fee arrangements to determine: ja) The portion of the unpaid balance that will be covered by financial aid.., : fb) Fot those students who areenrolled in school and have an unpaid fee arrangement, a letter shall be sent informing them of the amount due. (c) For those students who have an unpaid fee arrangement and have dropped from school! (1) The business o" i.ce shall review each student account to determine if a refuetd per board policy may be due. f so, the information shall be sent to the registrar for a.fimi! review and proces.sing; () f there s a balance due, the business office shall send 01 bluing to the student showing the i!ffiount due. H the amount due is unpaid withtn 0 days, a follow-up letter sball be sent. lf the amount due is unpaid within 60 days, the account shall be refened to a collection agent or the district's atiorney in secor dance with poucy number l OZ5. REFUND POLCY (For Program, Material and Non-Resident Tuition FeN} lf yqu plan to withdraw from a particular course, do so immediately. A single day can make il m~jor difference in the. amount of refund. Non-attendance does not constitute a cancellation of registration. E~ cept in' cases of Cilnce!lation or discontinuance of courses, or when the studen t is sponsored. tbe STU DENT M UST REQUBS.T THE REFUND Wl'fHN THE STPULATED TMB PEROD. The district may establish a charge of not more than $.00 per course to be c!educted from any refund to defray processing costs. Stop payment of a check does not cons~itute. a formal cancellation. For stop payments, there will be a returned check fee of SS.OO and the registrant will be held liable for the fee untll the date of official cancellation. Allow four weeks from the date of cancellation to receive.a full refund of payment. ) Refunds fo r oll courses regardless of length: (a) f the district cancels a course, the refund is 100 percent of all (program, materials and nonresident. tuition) fees paid.. (b) f the district discontinues or cancels a cou.rse. during the.80 percent refund period, the refund is 100 percent of all (program, materials and nonresident tuition! fees paid. After this period, or after consumable materials have been issued to studel)ts,. the refund is a proportionate amount of the above fees.paid, (c~ f the student m1kes application for a refund before the first class m eeting which the student s scheduled to attend, the refund is 100 percent of above fees paid.. (d) A student who drops from one course a.nd adds another during the first 1 calendar days of the term shau receive cr.edit for all awlicable program fees, materials fees, inter-district tuition and out,ofst~te t11lt10n for the course dropped-which must be applied to the course added: (l)lf the applicable progr~m fees, materials fees, inter-district tuition and out-of-state tuition for the course added exceed the fees fur the course dropped, tltc student will he assessed the additional amount; ()1 the appllcoble program fees, muterlals fees, inter-district tuition and out-of-state tuition for the course dropped exc<!<'d the fees lor the course lidded, refunds w(ll be' made pursuant to Wisconsin Administrative Code, A-V () For all coursc5 which arc scheduled to meet a semest~r or longer, the ~!Uld for 1111 such tour$es s: (aj 80 percent during the flrst! calendar days from the first instructional day or the term. "lbl 60 percent during the 15th through the 8th calendar days from the first instructional day of the term. (cl Zero percent after the 8th calendar day from the first instruclional day of the term. (} For all COjlrses which are scheduled to m eet less than an 18-week semester, the refund for each course s: Jal 80 percent if less than 11 percent of the total. potential hours. of nstruction.have been completed. Jb) 60 percent if 11 through 0 peti:eni of the total potential hours of instruction have been ~:ompleted. (cl Zero percerlt after more lhail 0 percent of the total potential hours of instruction hove bceo completed. rot.'f:elvfhc JJlt S(!!XlfDTO-'f.F.'': A S~!.ESTf.R Oft.J)~GU: REFUNDS. GENERAL POLCES OF THE COUEGE Weekly College Bulletin An all-college b.u)letin is di$tributed each Monday during the academic year. N~ces of meetings and other important communications to students are included in the bulletin. Any new policies that l\ffect student~ are publlshed in the b ulletin. ClaB*room Attendance and Visits n acca>rdance with the provisions of Wisconsin Statutes 8... and i 18.15, persons shall be sixteen years of age or older in order to enroll fn or attend any classes offered by' the A:tea Board of Voclltional, Technical and Adult EducaUon, District No.. Non-students, regardless.of age; shall be permitted lo visit classes offered by the district board with the consent of the instructor teaching lhe class to be visited or by obtaining a visitor's permit from the appropriate administrator. Consent and permission will be granted only for the purpose of becoming ~nowjedgeable about a course or oriented to the educational mission of the district. This _policy.!hall not.inhibit persons of any age from receiving services in the dental laboratories, the barber shop, or elsewhere if personal services ore being provided. n these instances, the person shall follow the established appointment practice or procedure. Further, students or non-students are prohibited

113 -Studcnt lnformation Student nformation-17 from.leaving a child under the age of sixteen years in district facilities unattended. This policy does not preclude allowing a child in class where the child contributes to th~ instructional process. Class Size The college reserves the right to discontinue any class which has au.attendance of less than ten. Student Code of Conduct MATC is a tax-supported institution which serves a large student body, many community groups and a large number.of visitors. t is important for the school and its students that the conduct of all students. be governed by a rea5onable sei of rules, and that the:ie rules be enforced. Accordingly, each student is expected to comply with the general stan dard set out below and to be familiar with all rules and regulations. The following principles and rules apply to all students of Madison Area Technical College: ll Students are expected to comply with all state statutes and.city ordina.nces. 1~1 At all times, students are expected tq conduct themselves in such a manner as not to interfere with the educational process at MATC. () Students. are expected to conduct themselves in such a manner as. not to endanger the safety or welfare of their fellow students. (1 Students mll5t comply with the following school rules and may be suspended or expelled, or be liable to legal procedures as may be appropriate, for the following offenses: (a Obstrudion.or disruption of the normal operations of the college or al:(ivities authorized by the college. lb) Physical or verbal abuse or detention of any person(sj on college property or at college activities when such endangers the health, safety or rights of such person(sj. ' (cl Theft or damage to property of the college or property of any visitor or member of the college community. (d) Unauthorized entry to or use of college pro perty Of facilities. 1 1 X,Jse, possession or distribution of narcotic or illeg~l Qfllg~, firearms, explosives, dangerous chemicals,.etc. on college-owned or.controlled pro perty or at.~ ollege sponsored activities. ffl.dishonesty!cheating, plagiarism, etc.) or knowingly furnishing false information to the college. )g) Ga!Jlbling.as defined by law, Any violation of an MATC rule or policy may serve as a basis for.;me of the following actions: As a first step, a violation will be reported io the district directoi or hi~; designee who will determine what, if any, disciplinary action is appropriate. The district director or his designee may temporarily suspend a student pending an investigation When the student's continued presence might ~ndanger the student or others. f the disvlct director or his designee deter mines that suspension or dismissal is appropriate, disciplinary action shah follow the Non Academic Probation or Dismissal Policy. Dismissal The district board has several policies under which a student may be dismissed from the.coilege: (1) Academic Dismissal: A student may be dismissed from a program for failure to achieve a.0 grade point average. (See academic probation and dismissal.) 11 Code of Conduct: Students failing to comply with the policies under the Student Code ofconduct may be suspended or dismissed in accordance with such polky. (See student code of conduct.) 1! Harassment: a student violates the policies defined under "Harassment," the student may.be suspended or dismissed.!see harassment policy. See also the procedures tot dismissal and suspension under non-academk probation and dismissal.) Dress Code Most students at MATC are preparing to.seek employmentin one or two years, Others will ask for recommendations relative to transferring to other institutions of higher learning. t is the policy of this school that students shall dress in a manner that would be appropriate. to the vocation for which they are preparing, and in any case, be neat in appearance. Both appearance and maturity of behavior are important factors Which will influence the facul ty members who are called upon to recommend a student for employment or for transfer. Non-Academic Probation or Dismissal 11) When th~ administration and/or board has. reasonable cause to believe that a student has pur, sued a course of conduct which should require suspension or dismisssal, the student is informed of the specific charges in writing by registered mail or personal delivery thereof. () The student is notified in writing of the time and place of a hearing, at which time the student may present the case if desired. The student is advis ed of the action taken.bjr.the administration. (1 The student may have, at option, the right to appeal action taken by the administration. A hearing before the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No. is held at which time the student is allowed legal counsel if desired. A stu dent who was suspended or dismissed by the ad ministration who desires to appeal the action must do so by petitioning the board in writing within five days of the date of suspension or dismissal. After the hearing has been held by the board, the student.is notified of their detision. (1 Pending action. of the charges, the status of a student should not be altered, or the right to be pre sent on the campus and to attend dasses suspended, except for reasons relating to his or her physical or emotional safety and well-being, or for reasons relating to the safety and well-being of students, faculty or college propertyc Parking On-<:atnpus parking is availabl ~ at all camp)ls sites, except ~he Downtown.llducational Center c.,_mpus at 11 North Carroll Street. The cost for parking is estoblished by the district board. nformation on parking is available at the time of registration. Polley for Worlc Study ol' Cllnfcal Afffllatlon Experlenr;es tor Pregnant Students A student enrolled in any program of the district which requires. a.clinical affiliation or work ex perience at Madison Area Technical College or any other school within the district or with another agen cy who becomes pregnant shall be permitted io par ticipate in such clinical affiliation or work ex pericnce with the following provisions which will govern the student's continuance of the program: (1) A medical doctor or certified nurse midwife shall certify the period of pregnancy. The division dean/chairperson andlor program administrator shall be informed. 1) The student shall present a monthly statement from her medical doctor or certified nurse midwife for each of the last three months of ~ncy in <licating whether or not she may continue in the program.. () The student's program may l)e terrni'nated after six months of pregnancy at the discreiion of her physician, the affiliating agency, and administrators of the college. (1 This decision shall be made jointly by the attending physic.ian or certified nurse midwife, the dean/chairperson of the Health Occupations Division, and/or the educational administrator of the program in consultation with the physician consultant to the college, When aecessary, and.the appropriate administrator from the affiliating agency. 15/ The return of the student to the program shall be determined by the medical doctor or certified nurse midwife and as the schedule for clinical experiences-permits. School Vsitors The board arid the staff welcome visitors to the college. f a visitor to the college conducts him/herself in such a way that would endanger the safety or welfare of students, staff or other visitors, or that would irtlerfere with the educational process, the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No. authorizes the district director and administrativ.e personnel or appropri.ate designees to:., (11 Give warning to persons who shall enter the building {or the purposes of soliciting, peddling or loitering l)y posting signs at all entrances which shall. state: " No person may enter these facilities for the purp.oses of soliciting, peddling, loitering or for ij. legal purposes." (1 Notify the police whenever they deem it necessary to safeguard the well-being of students, staff, other visitors and property of the district. (/ File a formal complaint and bring charges against such individuals. Student Due Process Procedure When a student sincerely believ~s he or she bas a valid complaint against any member of the sta ( (staff meaning any full- or part-time employee of the board), he or she should comply in sequence with tbc following procedure: () Wl!hin 15 days of the date the alleged incident took place, t~e student shall make an appoin\ment wi.th t."ls persqn and explain the nature o.f the com plaint and the reasons for!hi~ belief. The staff member involved and the student should make every effort to tesolve the issue. t is expected that most, if not all, misunc\erstandings will be resolved at this level. Students wliofeel in.tiq~idated by the staff member involved may proceed to Step, Com plaints involving the district.director which are not resqlved at the meeting level should be addressed to the Area Board of Vocational, Tec.hnical and.adult E<'[ucalion, Di~lrict No.,. (11 the student and the staff person are not able to reach a.satisfactory agreement, the student 1uay, no later than ten days after meeting with tl)e staff person, request that the supervisor of the staff per son arrange a meeting with the student, the staff person and the supervisor to attempt to resolve the issue. Th.e student shall place in writing the nature o( the.complaint and submit copies to the supervisor and the staff person prior tq the meeting. 1) Shoul.d the issue be unresolved at Step, or shol!ld the issue be adverse to tbe, student, the student may appeal in writing,.no late~ than flve days after the meeting with the supervisor and the staff, person, to one of the following administrators. Complaints concerning instruction should be ad-' dressed to the Assistant Director-nstructional Services. Complaints concerning student services should be addressed to the AssUiiant Director Student Services. Complaints concerning support staff should be addressed to the Personnel Officer. CompWnts concerning administrators or deans/chairpersons should be addressed to the District Director. The parlicular administrator will call a meeting ~( the student and the p'ersons involved to attempt to resolve the pro\)lem. 'rhe resolution andlot decision shall be conveyed in writing to the s~lldent (1 Should the issue still be unresolved aftefstep, or. should the decision be adverse to the student, the student may request in writing, no later than five days after receipt of thdetter from the particular ad ministrato~,. that the. particular administrator call a meeting of the Appeals Committee. The particular administrator will chair the committee which will consist of a total of sev en people: the administrator, three staff persons from the particular.area inv olved!chosen either by the president of the Teacher's Union, if it relates to in~tr\lction, the president of the Support Staff Union, if il relates to support staff, or by the district director, if it relates to student ser. vices, admmistra.tors or deans/chairpersons), the president of the Student Senate. and two other senators cl)osen by the president. The student will be notified i~ writing of!he time and place of this hearing at which time ihe student. may present his or her case. At this hearing, the staff person against whom!he complaint is being issued may illsq p resent his or her case. All have the right to be represented by legal counsel at!heir own ekpense unless otherwise provlded for by the Area Board of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education, District No..

114 18-Stuclent lnformotlon Mter hearing the ~tud.,nt.tn<~ the ~taff P<!f&on, the Appeals C~;~mmUtee shall make a detennina!ion in!he matter; The stud~ht and the staff person will b.. 1~furni~d _in,writing of the Appeals Committee deci SOn WJthm,en days. A copy o.! the decision shall be 1;ent to the district director.. js) Should the deci ion of the,\ppeals Committee be unsatisfactory 1v the student, the district director hils the option of either attempting to mediate the complaint or o a~epting the decision of the A weal Com~ittee: in either case, the district director shall so. n~tifi:' the student of hls decision in writing Wlthm f1ve days of receiving the decision of. the Appeals Committee. (61 The student has the rlght to appeal the decision of the Appeals Colllmittee and/or the district dlrector to the Area Board of Vocational, Tecbilical and. Adult Education, District No... A student who desires to appeal the decision must do so by petitioning t_lie_ board in ":'r_iting no l~ter than five days alter receipt af the decision. A heari.ng before the board shall be held at $1ich time as the board designates.' The. ~tudent shall be notified accordingly. After the bearmg has been held by the board, the student shall be notified in writing. within 0 days, as to their decision. Note: ln thi! p;ocedure, all.staff members i!lvolved shall keep. d re~ord of the times, dates and other penfnent (JJ!ts rolatmg to!he.liature of the corrferencr!s i~. which lliay were invoned. Harl~ent Ttie _d lstoc~ board, through jts commitment jo afftrmabve achon, will ensure that au employees and students work and study iii an environment free-of harassment. The district board w ill take au st~ps necessary t? prevent ~aras~ent from occ~rring. Such ~ t-~s mclude afflrmahv.ely raising the subjeqt, expre~1og stmng disapproval, informing employees and students of their rights to raise and how to raise. he. issue, and.de'velt')ping m<!!hods to sensitize au CQnceroed. Deflnitloos Harass~ent Slurs or other verbal or physical conduct 'di(ected to an individual constitute harassmen~ when this conduct:,.l~l H~s the pu_rpose or eff~ct o( creating ail inturu.datmg, hostile or offens ve '!"Orking or acadelllic envuorunent. (Z) Ha8 the pu'ri?o"':- ~r effect of unreasonably interfering Wilh ali indiv1dual'a work or academic performance. (]-Otherwise adversely affects an individual's employment or academic opi>ortunities.. Sexu~ Harass~'ent; Onw~lco~e sexual advanc~s;, requests for sexual favors, and other Verbal or phys1cal conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when:.... (J Submission. to such c:ondutt is miule either explicitly or mplicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or a~ ademic progress. (1 S~~missi.on to or rejec ti~n of ~uch conduct by an lildavidualis used as il basis for employment decl sions or academic progrcs, affecting such indiyiqual. (1 Such co_nduct has the purpose _or e'ffect of. substlmtially interfering with an individual's work or academic performance or creating an ntimidating, hostile or offensive working or academic environment. R~lallfatwisment: Racial slurs and other verbal or physical conduct relating to an individual's race constitute racial harassment w hen this conduct: () Has the purpose or effect of creating an intim~dating, hostile or.. olfenslve working or academic environment. () H.!s the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or academic perfornwlce. (1 Otherwise adversely affects an individual's employment or academic opportunities. Any person who. believes that thq may b,ave been harassed may follow sither the in{otmal or formal procedure or ~oth without feat. of recrim.inati<;>n, 11nd ~hall ~ a~sured of a pr.ompt and confidential an.vestigabon. lnforltl Procedure There shall be a. Harassment Cormnittee wlilcb shall co~sist of.three faculty mem~s. appointed.by the p_resident of the Teacher's Union, one. ~tudent appomted by the Student Senate, one admini ttator appointed by the district director, ;~nd_i>ne support staff membe~ appointed by the president of the sur' port Staff Umon. The Harassment Committee shal ~ als~ reflect affirmative action iargeted.group.s..a chaafp<!rson will be selected by the committee. An up to-dale Jist of committee members may "be obtained from the director's office, the student senices office, and the student senate office. All members of the co.mmitt~e shall maintain confidentiality... The commiuee member($) -may help individuals who alleg.. to be harassed. Any person who believes that she/lie has been ~ictim ofharassmentiwiy consult with the commtttee memberjs) n6 later than the 0th calendar day following the one in which Uie alleged incident is known or should have been known by the complainant. The committee niember(s) will offer consultatlon, outline options, and ;oay draw,.upon other support and counsellng sernces to assist the.tomplainant. The committee ~.memberls) may make an effort to.resolve the "issue ~nfor~all~ and in th~ strictest privacy. Duiil\g the,. mvest gation, the allegations will be treated with sensitivity and f<!dfidentiality, and every effort will be made to avoad damage to the rep11tation of the acc~ed or ac~user:a w~itten record will be kept and filed wltb the afflrmalive action officer or personnel. officer until the time has elapsed for initiating the. formal procedure, and shall be made available if a formal complaint is flied. Formal Proc:edui:e Act:Ording. to reci;gnied due process procedures ~ the following steps shall be pursued Jn the event of a :J ~arasstnent eompl~t. These steps shall be invoked, m the order of their appearance in this written ' 1 policy, until all steps have been exhausted or until i! i the complaint has been resolved to the ~tisfaction of all parties concerned. Depending upon the nature of the harnssment complaint, in order to expedite the process, some steps may be eliminated if that.is the judgment of the district director or his/her designee. n order to be considered under due proeess procedures, written complaints must be made no )ater than the 0th calendar day following the one inwhich the alleged incident is known or should have been known by the complainant. For the purpose of mailing written complaints, the :allege's mailing address is: Madison Area Technical College, Area Vocational,.Technical d Adult l!ducation, District No., 550 Anderson Street, ' Madison, W1570. Complaints, and copies thereof, should be addressed to the attention of the appropriate personnel noted below in Step. Due Process Pro~edures Step J;.The compla_inant(s) shall confer with tb~appropriate administrative personnel 1see below) and make a writt~ complaint. () Any acts committed by facility which may constitnte harassment shall be reported _in writing to the Assistant Director nstructional Service. (l Any acts committed by suppori staff which may co!uititule. harassment shall be reported n writing _to th~ Pl'r~onnel Officer Any acts committed by administrative S)aff whicb may c.onstitute harassment shall be reported in wnting to the District ;lirector.. {1 Any acts COmmitted by students \vhich mayconstitute harassment shall be reported _in writing to the Assistant Director-Student Services. The signed complaint shall give ln detail the time, place, perth1ent facts and circumstances of tho:: alle"ged harassm~nt, and Shall be Cited with the Affir- : io"' "... Student lnformation-19 mative Action Officer or Personne'-Officer. A copy will be sent within seveq calendar days to the person against w hom ihe complaint is made. The appropriate administrative personnel listed above-shall, within 1 calendar days of receiving the complaint. 'nvestigate the complaint,.attempt to resolve the compll!.int, and prepare a written report of the Findings. One copy of the complaint, findings and recommendations shall be given to the alleged.harasser, one copy shall be sent to the.affirmative Action Officr.r ot Pet"sonnel Officer. and one copy shall be sent to the District Director. f the complaint is not resolv ed at this level, Step shall be invoked... Step : Within 1 calendar days alter Step 1 has been completed, the Affirmative Action Officer or rersonnel Officer shall investigate the complaint, atteinpt to re.soh e the problem, and'prepare a written. report o( his/her findings. A copy of this report shall be referred to the District.Director. Step : After attempting to resolve the complaint,. the District D irector shall nial<e a decision within 0 calendar days of receiving the report -of the Amrmative Action Officer or Personnel Officer. The. complainant and the person against whom the.com- plaint is made shall receive a copy of the decis_ion. Appeal Procedur~.... Appeals of the District' Director's decision shall l:>e referred to the Area Board of Vocational, Tec"hn!cal and Adult Education, District No.. Within.0. calendar days.of receiving.the app\!111, the area board shall concluct a hearing at \vhlch time_ all parties, shall have the ~ight tci-leg~l counsel.at their expense. f th" are board rend.efs-,a,~~cision which is.not satisfactory to the complainant, the complainant has the right to seekredress through external