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1 Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized Projects Department Western Africa Regional Office Education Division Document of The World Bank FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY, STAFF APPRAISAL REPORT GUINEA SECOND EDUCATION PROJECT Mar-ch 3, 1983 Report No GUI This document has a restricted distribution and may be used by recipients only in the performance of their official duties. Its contents may not otherwise be disclosed without World Bank authorizntion.

2 CURRENCY EQUIVALENTS Currency Unit = Sylis US$1.00 Sylis MEASURES 1 kilometer (km) = 0.62 mile 1 square kilometer (km 2 ) = 0.39 square mile 1 meter (m) = 3.28 feet 1 square meter (m 2 ) = square feet FISCAL YEAR January 1 - December 31

3 FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY REPUBLIC OF GUINEA STAFF APPRAISAL REPORT SECOND EDUCATION PROJECT TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. GLOSSARY BASIC DATA iii iv I. THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING SECTOR... 1 A. Social and Economic Background... i B. The Education System... 3 C. The Government's Strategy for Educational Development... 8 D. The Bank Group's Role in the Sector II. THE PROJECT... il... A. Project Summary.... il B. Project Components Vocational Training Institutes Technical Instructor Training Institute Central Supply Unit Educational and Human Resources Planning National Pedagogical Institute Production and Distribution of Primary School Textbooks Primary Teacher Training Colleges Project Management III. PROJECT COST AND FINANCING PLAN IV. PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION V. PROJECT BENEFITS AND RISKS VI. AGREEMENTS REACHED AND RECOMMENDATIONS This report is based on the findings of an appraisal mission that` visited Guinea from January 23 to February il, The mission members were Messrs. D. Rouag (general educator), B. Dahlborg (technical educator), A. Papineau (architect), A. LeBel (economist-consultant), and N. Burton (printing and publishing consultant). This document has a restricted distribution and may be used by recipients only in the performance of their official duties. Its contents may not otherwise be disclosed without World Bank authorization.

4 - ii - TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont'd) ANNEXES 1. Structure of the Education System 2. Comparative Education Indicators 3. Labor Force and Employment 4. Enrollments and Teachers 5. Comparison of Per Student Costs in West Africa 6. Projections of Recurrent Expenditures ( ) 7. External Financing for Development Projects 8. Cost Summary 9. Financing Plan 10. Summary of Specialist Services il. Summary of Fellowships 12. Implementation Schedule 13. Schedule of Disbursements 14. Disbursements Against Statements of Expenditures 15. List of Related Documents Map No

5 - iii - GLOSSARY AfDF African Development Fund Fonds Africain de Développement CER Revolutionary Education Center Centre d'education Révolutionnaire (name of schools in Guinea) COTRA National Transportation Company Compagnie Nationale de Transport DEF Education and Training Division Division de l'education et de la Formation DPE Education Projects Directorate Direction des Projets Education DGPE General Educational Planning Direction Générale de la Planification Directorate de l'education DGT General Directorate of Labor Direction Générale du Travail EEC European Economic Community Communauté Economique Européenne ENI Primary Teacher Training College Ecole Normale d'instituteurs/trices FAPA Agro-pastoral farm Ferme Agro-pastorale d'arrondissement IDEC Educational Printing Office Imprimerie de l'education et de la Culture IPN National Pedagogical Institute Institut Pédagogique National IPS Vocational Training Institute Institut Polytechnique Secondaire ISFORPET Technical Instructor Training Institute Institut Supérieur de Formation des Professeurs de l'enseignement Technique MEPU Ministry of Pre-University Ministère de l'enseignement Pré- Education and Literacy Universitaire et de l'alphabétisation MESRS Ministry of Higher Education Ministère de l'enseignement Supérieur and Scientific Research et de la Recherche Scientifique METMFP Ministry of Technical Education Ministère de l'enseignement Technique and Vocational Training Moyen et de la Formation Professionnelle MPS Ministry of Planning and Statistics Ministère du Plan et de la Statistique PDG Democratic Party of Guinea Parti Démocratique de Guinée PRA District Government Authority Pouvoir Révolutionnaire d'arrondissement PRL Local Government Authority Pouvoir Révolutionnaire Local SF Saudi Fund for Development Fonds Saoudien pour le Développement USAID United States Agency for Agence des Etats-Unis d'amérique pour International Development le Développement International

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7 - iv - GUINEA BASIC DATA General (1979) CDP per capita US$290 Land area 246,000 km 2 Population (1980) 5.4 million of which: urban 1.0 million rural 4.4 million Population growth rate 2.6% urban 6.1% Life expectancy at birth 44.5 Literacy rate 20% Enrollment in Education (1978/79) Gross Enrollment Pupil/Teacher Level Age Group Enrollment % Female Ratio Ratio Primary , % 39 Lower secondary , % Upper secondary , % 29 Technical education , Higher education , % 36 Education Expenditures (1978/79) Recurrent expernditures on education as a % of total governnent recurrent budget 17.5% Recurrent budget as a % of GDP 4.1% Percentage Distribution of Recurrent Education Expenditures Primary 25 Secondary general 26 Secondary technical 2 Teacher training 4 Higher education 26 Scholarships 2 Literacy, distance learning programs and research 1 Administration 8 Other (incl. costs of technical assistance) 6 Average Annual Cost per Student (1978/79) Sylis US$ Primary 1, Secondary 4, Teacher training (primary) 17, Secondary technical 14, Higher education First level 5, Second level 13,

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9 1. THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING SECTOR A. Social and Economic Background Population 1.01 Guinea ranks among the least developed countries in West Africa, with a population of 5.4 million (1980) and a GDP per capita of US$290. The annual population growth rate is about 2.6% overall and 6.1% in urban areas. About 80% of the people live in rural areas, life expectancy at birth is 44.5 years (among the lowest in the world), and infant mortality rates are still high at 30% of the 1-4 age group. Caloric intake is about 84% of requirements, and about 88% of the population do not have access to safe drinking water. The relatively young population (51.8% are under 19), coupled with increasing economie development activity and an adult literacy rate of only about 20%, makes providing of adequate opportunities for education and training a substantial burden on the Government budget. However, efforts to provide these opportunities are complicated by the existence of six official languages besides French, which is spoken by only the formally educated. Political Organization 1.02 The only political party, "Parti Démocratique de Guinée" (PDG), controls much of the economic and political decision-making; through an efficient organizational network, it operates the education system and other social services from the national to the village level. Party institutions have either direct administrative functions or supervise all government activities. The Economy 1.03 Well endowed with arable land, water and mineral resources, Guinea is potentially one of the richest countries in West Africa. However, economic development has been constrained over the 20 years since independence by inadequate economic planning and management and a low level of human resource development. Since 1958, when Guinea left the French Union and became independent, the Government has used a Marxist but essentially nationalistic ideology, expressed through the PDG, to promote self-sufficiency and economic independence. Its ideological objectives are implemented for economie management through the extensive use of public enterprises, administrative pricing, and other instruments of direct control The management of a centrally planned economy, with state ownership of the principal means of production and resource allocation through centralized decision-making rather than market mechanisms, places heavy demands on public administration. At the same time the necessary high- and middlelevel manpower is in short supply. The lack of adequately trained staff for the planning and administration of the economic and financial system is reflected in inadequate data collection and processing, inadequate investment planning and insufficient project preparation, implementation and supervision capabilities. Public enterprise performance is poor in all sectors. The Government is rehabilitating some of them while entering into joint ventures with private investors to create mixed enterprises.

10 The productive and financial bases for a more dynamic economy have been strengthened since 1973 by the opening of two major bauxite mines. Economic activity increased by 21% in real terms between 1973 and 1979, at an average annual rate of 3.2%. The rapid real growth of the mining sector at 20% per annum increased its contribution to GDP from 4.2% in 1973 to 18.5% in Higher bauxite exports and favorable world prices for bauxite and aluminum increased Government revenues. Major investments were made to mechanize agricultural operations. Nonetheless, rural sector output stagnated and its share in GDP decreased from 58% to 41% between 1973 and The main reasons for this were the lack of producer incentives, misdirected application of mechanization, crop plagues and drought in some years. Prospects 1.06 Since 1978, improvements in economic performance have been further encouraged by more pragmatic policies, in particular by improved political and economic relations with Western countries and with neighboring countries which have encouraged trade and increased access to international aid. Recent analyses and projections indicate that in both the short and medium term, economic growth will continue to hinge critically on the rate of growth in the mining sector. On the other hand, long-term prospects depend on efforts to promote rural development, especially the Government's ability to provide incentives to smallholder farmers. As balance of payment difficulties are likely to persist for several more years, the success of Guinea's development efforts will depend upon the availability of external financing for key investment projects. Manpower 1.07 Guinea does not have a conventional labor market. The sudden departure of the colonial administration in 1958 created critical manpower shortages. Those Guineans who were suddenly placed in positions of responsibility learned quickly on the job and performed quite well, but continuing shortages of qualified and experienced administrators and managers have hurt the economy. Furthermore, implementation of public programs has suffered because civil servants rarely receive the training they need to become efficient administrators; for example, most senior officials in the education sector are trained as teachers and not as managers The total labor force in Guinea is estimated at 2.3 million people, representing 45% of the total population (1978). Total wage employment in the modern sector is estimated at 140,000 people (1979), of whom about 40,000 are in the civil service and 34,000 in rural enterprises (Annex 3). Guinea does not have a conventional labor market and outside the mining sector, and private wage employment is limited to domestic activities and the informal sector Employment in the public sector is guaranteed by law to all graduates of vocational training institutes and universities, and the graduates are assigned to jobs by the Ministry of Labor. However, the Governent has recently said that it does not believe that the state should be expected to provide

11 - 3 - employment to graduates indefinitely, and it may reconsider its policies. Meanwhile, manpower and educational planning has not been sufficiently developed to control student flows through the education system, and to effectively correlate output with employment opportunities in the modern sector. This has led to an excessive supply of secondary school and university graduates throughout the economy. The agricultural sector has had a particularly large excess of middle- and higher-level graduates in technical engineering and veterinary occupations. By 1979, the annual output of agricultural technicians was 2,300 as compared with a maximum projection of annual manpower requirements of roughly 1,500 workers. The output of agricultural engineers and veterinarians in the same year was 1,700 as compared with an estimated maximum annual requirement of about 400 graduates The excess resulted from the creation of faculties of agriculture at the university level in 24 of the country's 33 administrative regions between 1976 and 1979, increasing the total number of these faculties from 7 to 33 during this period. There were about 2,000 graduates in 1976 and 4,000 in Most of these were assigned to work in 320 agro-pastoral farms (FAPAs) that were created in 1979, and it is expected that by the end of 1982 more than 10,000 graduates will have been placed on the FAPAs. The Government intends to pay the salaries of the agronomists and technicians during the first three years. However, serious difficulties have occurred in the start-up of these FAPAs and the Government is reviewing its policies in this respect and bas reduced the number of new entrants to the agricultural faculties (para. 1.34). In contrast to the surplus of workers in high-level technicai agricultural occupations, skilled workers, as well as competent managers and administrators, are in short supply throughout the economy In the industrial sector, the situation is similar. The annual supply of engineers is about five times the number of available job openings. Although the supply and demand are roughly equal for skilled workers in the industrial sector, they lack minimum skill levels for effective job performance. B. The Education System 1.12 The structure of the education system in Guinea is shown in Annex 1. Six years of primary education are followed by three years of lower secondary school. Students can continue their studies in secondary technical schocls, which offer terminal technical and vocational programs, or in a general course that prepares them for the baccalaureate and entrance to institutions of higher education. Enrollment and staffing details are shown in Annex 4. The country's political orientation is reflected in the organization of the school system: schools are called "Centres d'education Révolutionnaire" (CERs) and each one is administered by a board composed of student delegates and presided over by the school's principal. Organization 1.13 Responsibility for education and training is shared by three ministries: (a) "Ministère de l'enseignement Pré-Universitaire et de l'alphabétisation" (MEPU), responsible for primary and secondary general education and

12 - 4 - for literacy programs; (b) "Ministère de l'enseignement Technique Moyen et de fa Formation Professionnelle" (METMFP), responsible for secondary technlcal education; and (c) "Ministère de l'enseignement Supérieur et de la Recherche Scientifique" (MESRS), responsible for higher education and secondary teacher training. The educational administration maintains close links with the Educational Commission of the PDG, which is responsible for the formulation of sector policies and for monitoring their implementation, and is headed by the Minister of Higher Education Both the MESRS and the MEPU have planning units. The MEPU unit was established only recently and is not yet fully operational. The planning unit in the MESRS was established in 1976, but it is not well staffed and its technical capacities are very weak. The collection and analysis of educational data are inadequate in both ministries. The METMFP was established only in February 1981 and is not yet fully organized Educational research and curriculum development are the responsibility of the National Pedagogical Institute (IPN), which is attached to the MEPU and which is also in charge of teacher upgrading and the production of educational materials. The IPN's technical capacity is inadequate to deal with its responsibilities. Textbook printing is handled by the "Imprimerie de l'education et de la Culture" (IDEC), which is attached to the distance learning services of the MESRS; its low efficiency is due mainly to the insufficient number of textbook manuscripts provided by IPN, but also to the inefficient use and maintenance of the equipment The responsibility for manpower planning is shared by the Ministry of Planning's education and training division ("Division de l'education et de la Formation" - DEF) and the Ministry of Labor, specifically the Directorate General of Labor ("Direction Générale du Travail" - DGT) Since independence, Guinea has implemented one of the most farreaching educational reforms in West Africa, using local languages as media of instruction at the primary level, obliging students to participate in productive agricultural work, and organizing mass literacy programs. Guinea has been able to rapidly expand enrollment rates and to train a large number of technicians and professionals. Few attempts were made, however, to link this post-primary educational expansion with economic objectives or future manpower needs. The sweeping nature of the reform, combined with rapid enrollment growth, has resulted in a low quality of education at all levels. The main issues in the education and training sector at present are (a) low access to primary education, (b) low quality of instruction, (c) inadequate external efficiency, (d) inefficient allocation of available resources, and (e) weakness of the key educational institutions. Access to Education 1.18 At independence, educational opportunities in Guinea were among the lowest in Africa: the gross enrollment ratio was about 10% at the primary level and less than 1% at the secondary level, and there was a total lack of

13 - 5 - facilities for higher education. Guinea's secondary school enrollment ratio (15%) is now among the highest in the region and its higher education enrollment ratio (7%) exceeds the ratios in all other West African countries. Unfortunately, the primary school enrollment ratio remains among the lowest in the region, due to the weak financial capabilities of the Local Goverunnent Authorities as well as the reluctance of parents to enroll their children either for soclo-cultural reasons, as in the case of girls, or for economic reasons, such as having the children help with field work. Only about 34% of the 7-12 age group is enrolled in prlmary school, and this ratio varies considerably among regions and by sex. The female proportion of enrollments is likewise low, with girls comprising 34% of all students at the primary level, 27% at the secondary and 20% at the university level The Government has begun a program to increase school enrollments, especially in rural areas, where enrollments are particularly low, and where incomes are the lowest, by allocating central government funds for school construction to the PRLs to compensate for regional disparities in enrollment ratios. Alternative formulas for school organization and schedules should be considered, however, to take account of the need for children of poor rural families to help with field work during the planting and harvesting seasons. Quality of Education 1.20 There are numerous indications that the quality of formal education in Guinea is low. The shortage of classrooms bas resulted in crowded classes, mainly in urban areas. Sixty percent of the primary school teachers and 75% of the secondary school teachers are not qualified. Primary teacher training is unbalanced, with only 16% of the time allocated for professional training. Textbooks and equipment are almost totally lacking at all educational levels and laboratory facilities are virtually nonexistent. As a result the teaching/learning process is limited to lecturing, note-taking and recitation. Since 1960 the six national languages have been used, but the students are not sufficiently prepared for the transition from the national languages to French as the language of instruction at the secondary level. This adversely affects comprehension and learning capacities in secondary education, particularly in mathematics and sciences, and consequently students enter higher education with substantial deficiencies. Furthermore, a highly theoretical curriculum, a lack of equipment and consumable materials, and poorly qualified instructors have led to poor qualitative results in the vocational training institutes ("Instituts Polytechniques Secondaires"-IPS) The poor quality of teaching conditions has had a negative impact on the internal efficiency of the system and only about one-third of those startirng primary education, half of those starting lower secondary education, and about one-quarter of those starting upper secondary education complete each level without repetition Although the reform of the educational system (para. 1.17) has generally had a positive impact in adapting to the socio-economic environment, the Government is well aware of the system's weaknesses. It has

14 - 6 - already decided to take measures to improve the quality of education such as improving teacher training programs at all levels, providing an adequate supply of textbooks and teaching aids to the schools, reducing overcrowding in urban primary and lower secondary classrooms, providing adequate laboratories and equipment in secondary and higher education institutions, and improving the quality of French language instruction. External efficiency 1.23 The Government has consistently emphasized the role of the education system as a supplier of skilled manpower but has not been able to link the development of the system with the needs of the economy and consequently has over-produced low-quality graduates of middle- and higher-level education and at the same time has failed to train sufficient numbers of skilled workers. Between 1960 and 1970 the development of secondary education was emphasized and educational priority and enrollments increased tenfold. Then, under the pressure of increasing numbers of secondary school graduates demanding access to higher education, and with the objective of promoting agriculture, the Government in 1973 shifted its priority to the rapid growth--and eventual over-expansion--of higher-level agricultural education; however, the major foeus was on engineering and technician training, while skilled worker training was almost totally neglected The mismatch between manpower requirements and education has been compounded by the Government's dual commitment to provide at least 12 years of education to every child entering the education system and to guarantee employment to vocational training and university graduates. Students' efforts to obtain enough education to qualify for guaranteed employment, together with low standards of promotion, have resulted in high transition rates between primary and lower secondary education (87%) and between lower and upper secondary education (80%). Also, the same standardized general education program of 12 years is now offered to all students prior to further specialization in universities, primary teacher training colleges, or even IPS skilled-worker training programs. Although the theoretical IPS entrance level is the completion of lower secondary education (Grade 9), about 75% of the students admitted in 1979 had completed Grade 12 but failed the baccalaureate examination The emphasis on the expansion of enrollments in higher education and the relative neglect of primary education and skilled worker training, combined with the prevailing employment policy, have influenced economic policies. To create employment for university graduates, public investments in agriculture are oriented toward suboptimal projects in large-scale mechanized agriculture. The civil service and state enterprises are over-staffed. As a result, Government expenditures on wages and salaries and on subsidies to state-owned enterprises are increasing, the urban demand for imported goods is escalating, and the smallholder farmer is being neglected.

15 To match the output of the education system more closely to the requirements of the economy, the Government has established higher examination and graduation standards to control student flows at the secondary level and has also decreased the number of students in higher education, particularly in the agricultural faculties (para. 1.34). It has also prepared a draft decree altering requirements for entrance to teacher training colleges and the duration of specific streams in vocational training schools, and has adjusted these streams more closely to the skills-training requirement of specific jobs. However, significant changes in the system's structure and management will still be required. The duration and the content of both general education and specialized training need to be reviewed and the flow of students through the education system controlled to more closely reflect the human resource requirements of the economy To this end, the Government is undertaking, with financial support from IDA under the First Education Project (Cr 849-GUI), employment surveys and a manpower study in the key sectors of the economy to prepare projections of future manpower requirements, by industry and by occupation, and to develop job profiles. The first phase of this study is expected to be completed by June 30, 1983 and present education and training policies will be reviewed in light of these studies and surveys. Educational Costs and Financing 1.28 Education at all levels is free and the Government finances nearly all education expenditures except primary and lower secondary investments, which are financed by the local and district government authorities (PRLs and PRAs). In addition, profits from productive school activities, estimated at 2% of the total recurrent education budget, provide valuable financial support to the schools. The cost per student is estimated at about UJS$54 for primary education and US$203 for secondary education, representing 18% and 70% of GDP per capita. The unit costs per student at the higher education level are estimated at US$258 and US$602 for the first and second levels respectively. As a percentage of GDP, these unit costs are comparable to those in neighboring countries (Annex 5) In 1978, Guinea's recurrent education expenditures accounted for 4.1% of GDP and 17.5% of the total recurrent budget. This is about average for West African countries, but the figures are not strictly comparable because of different accounting and budgetary procedures. In 1979 the Government spent about 60% of its recurrent education budget on secondary and higher education. The achievements in secondary and higher education (para 1.18) have, through their impact on the budgetary structure, curtailed primary education expansion, with only about 25% of the Government's recurrent expenditure allocated for primary education. Therefore, any further significant expansion of primary education has to be linked to a decrease in the relative allocation to secondary and higher education in the education recurrent budget. A recent sector review report, prepared with Unesco's assistance, attempts to quantify high-level manpower needs and suggests some

16 - 8 - specific enrollment targets and policy measures. The report' s recommendations have been accepted by the Government and will be used as a basis for the Bank Group's continuing dialogue with the Government. During negotiations, assurances were obtained from the Government that it will prepare a program for the implementation of the policy recommendations of the sector review report and the manpower study (para. 1.27) including enrollment targets and a schedule for accomplishing specific objectives, discuss this program with IDA prior to June 30, 1984, and at regular intervals review implementation progress with the Association. Institutional Weakness 1.30 As in many other West African countries, the weaknesses of key institutions in Guinea's education sector (MEPU, MESRS, METMFP, IPN, IDEC, Education and Training Division in the Ministry of Planning and Statistics) are a serious obstacle to coherent sector planning, project preparation and educational evaluation. Adequate educational and manpower planning are of particular importance in the context of the country's centrally planned economy, where the Government is responsible for a much broader range of activities than in market economies. The Government should therefore give high priority to the preparation of a comprehensive strategy for the development of the education system, taking into account the financial constraints, manpower priorities and need for quality improvements at all levels. The assistance provided under the First Education Project to undertake a manpower study and to strengthen the technical capacity of the planning unit of the MESRS (para. 1.14) is an important first step in this direction. The Government recently decided to move further in this direction by establishing a General Educational Planning Directorate ("Direction Générale de la Planification de l'education" - DGPE) and an Education Projects Directorate ("Direction des Projets Education" - DPE) that will serve all three education ministries The capacity of the IPN for curriculum development and for educational evaluation is limited and should be strengthened quickly in view of the need to provide guidance to policy makers with regard to investment decisions aiming at qualitative improvements. C. The Government's Strategy for Educational Development 1.32 Since independence, the Government has aimed at establishing a system of mass education that would offer broad and continual educational opportunities to both children and adults by expanding the formal education system to meet the educational needs of school-age children and by mounting a mass literacy campaign to provide basic education for adults. However, this policy did not take sufficient account of diversity in the occupational structure and qualifications of the different economic sectors. Consequently, the Government is becoming increasingly aware of the key issues facing the sector and intends to: (a) train skilled workers for industry and agriculture in vocational schools, thus offering secondary school leavers an alternative to higher education;

17 - 9 - (b) strengthen human resources planning to match the output of the education system more closely to the manpower requirements of the economy; (c) lower the pass rates in secondary school examinations and decrease the proportion of secondary school leavers admitted to higher education; and (d) improve the quality of education through the provision of teaching materials and improvements in teacher training, starting with primary education. These objectives support the Government's overall economic development strategy, which gives priority to the development of the mining sector and a revitalization of agriculture (para. 1.06) The Government's strategy is conceptually valid and commendable, but is not yet expressed as a set of coherent quantitative targets with a schedule for specific actions. Therefore, the Government's planning and project preparation capacities need to be strengthened to enable it to implement its basically sound sectoral objectives through a balanced and coherent strategy and a series of well-prepared projects To achieve a better match between education system outputs and the country's manpower requirements, the Government has already taken steps to: (a) reorganize and increase staff and responsibilities of the planning units responsible for manpower and education in the Planning and Education ministries; (b) lower the pass rates in secondary schools and decrease the proportion of secondary school leavers admitted to higher education; this has already decreased the number of baccalaureate candidates from 9,200 in to 5,100 in 1979 and decreased the success rate for this examination during the same period; (c) decrease the number of students in higher education particularly in agriculture, by not recruiting first-year students in eight out of 33 agro-zootechnic departments in ; (d) train skilled workers for industry and agriculture in vocational schools after nine years of general education, and at the same time review the admission level, the duration of training and the curriculum of the training streams; and (e) improve the quality of education through the provision of teaching materials and improvements in teacher training starting with primary education.

18 Assistance Outside the Bank Group 1.35 In addition to the Bank Group, several agencies are providing assistance to the education sector (Annex 7). USAID and EEC are financing improvements (construction and equipment) for two of the agricultural schools. The EEC is also financing equipment and scholarships for a broad range of projects in the sector. Socialist countries are also an important source of technical assistance. D. The Bank Group's Role in the Sector Previous Investments 1.36 The Bank Group's sectoral strategy has reflected the limited knowledge of the education sector in Guinea and lending was restricted to investments that satisfied clearly identified and high-priority manpower needs. This strategy has had a dual focus: lending for project-related training and for the development of important and well-defined subsectors of the education system. The Bank Croup has introduced training components into highway, water supply, power and agricultural projects and IDA has provided US$8.0 million for the First Education Project (Cr. 849-GUI) to help the Government to improve and expand training programs for industrial technicians and skilled workers. The IDA credit was signed on September 28, 1978, and became effective on January 16, Thorough preparation and efficient project management have contributed to outstanding implementation performance. The appraisal target dates for physical implementation have been met and the project institutions were operational by the end of Higher than expected inflation led to cost overruns of about 10%, which were met by the Government. The project is meeting all of its institutional development objectives, although the manpower study did not get underway until early in The project is expected to be completed by June 30, Sectoral Strategy 1.38 Based on the findings of a Country Economic Memorandum, the Bank Group's dialogue with the Government has intensified recently with the completion of a thorough analysis of the economy. Policy recommendations emphasize the need to: (a) promote economic growth by broadening the country's export resource base through investments in the productive sectors, especially mining and agriculture; (b) remove development bottlenecks, including manpower shortages;- (c) strengthen economic management and promote substantive policy reforms;

19 - il - (d) encourage foreign investment, with the Bank Group taking a leadership role whenever appropriate; and (e) improve income distribution through increases in rural incomes relative to urban incomes. In accordance with these policy recommendations, support of technical vocational training for the modern sector remains an important objective of Bank Group lending. However, increased sectoral knowledge and efficient project implementation justify broadening the scope of education lending. Key issues that remain to be addressed are: (a) the low primary enrollment ratio and resulting high adult illiteracy rate, which is likely to be a serious constraint on the Government's efforts to increase agricultural productivity and rural income (paras and 1.19); and (b) the poor quality of primary education and technical vocational training (para. 1.20) This broader sector strategy requires that the Bank Group continue the dialogue with the Government in respect of a number of fundamental policy issues, such as: (a) a revision of the system of guaranteed employment for vocational training, and university graduates (para. 1.09); (b) the possible reduction in the minimum number of years of general education that the Government is providing to all students (para. 1.24); (c) the lowering of entrance requirements for all teacher training colleges (para. 1.26); and (d) the need to control the quality and number of students throughout the education system in line with the manpower requirements of the economy (para. 1.27). II. THE PROJECT A. Project Summary 2.01 The project's principal objectives, which reflect the Government's sectoral priorities (para. 1.32) are to: (a) emphasize improvement of vocational school training;

20 (b) develop the manpower and education planning capacity required to formulate a quantified strategy for addressing the external efficiency issues; and (c) improve the quality of primary education. B. Project Components 2.02 The project would be implemented over the five-year period of , and would have the following components: (a) Vocational training (i) construction, furniture, equipment, materials, incremental operating costs and fellowships for three existing Vocational Training Institutes (IPSs) to expand and improve their existing facilities and their programs for training skilled workers; (ii) equipment, consumable materials, specialist services and fellowships for the Technical Instructor Training Institute (ISFORPET) to support its regular training program, assist with curriculum development; and (iii) furniture, equipment, specialist services and fellowships to develop a Central Supply Unit to carry out the procurement and supply of equipment, spare parts, and working materials for the IPSs. (b) Educational and Human Resources Planning (i) furniture, equipment, incremental operating costs and specialist services and fellowships to establish a General Educational Planning Directorate (DGPE) to strengthen the national capability for educational planning; and (ii) furniture, equipment, incremental operating costs, specialist services and fellowships to strengthen the Education and Training Division (DEF) responsible for the planning of human resources development within the Ministry of Planning and Statistics (MPS). (c) Improvement of the quality of primary education (i) construction, furniture, equipment, incremental operating costs, specialist services and fellowships to upgrade and expand the facilities of the National Pedagogical Institute (IPN), to build up a capability for reviewing teaching methods and preparing primary school textbook manuscripts, and to upgrade primary school inspectors and familiarize them with the new teaching methods and textbooks;

21 (ii) construction, furniture and equipment to improve and expand the existing facilities of the Educational Printing Office (IDEC); consumable materials, incremental operating costs, specialist services and fellowships for the production and distribution of primary school textbooks; and (iii) construction, furniture, equipment and incremental operating costs to upgrade and expand existing facilities for two Primary Teacher Training Colleges (ENIs) and fellowships to improve the quality of teacher training and prepare for the introduction of new teaching methods and textbooks. (d) Project Management: (i) construction, furniture and equipment to upgrade existing facilities for the Education Projects Directorate (PPE) and specialist services, fellowships, and operating costs to strengthen its capability for project implementation; and (ii) specialist services to assist the Government in the preparation of a possible third education project. Vocational Training Institutes 2.03 As regards the overall number of skilled workers required, Guinea's Vocational Training Institutes (IPSs) approximately meet present demands (para. 1.11). However, the specializations taught are not well adapted to the needs of the modern sector and the quality of skills training is unsatisfactory. This is due to a shortage of adequately trained teachers and an over-enrollment of students in relation to training facilities, some of which are poorly planned, underequipped and in need of repair or replacement. On the physical side, the project would therefore emphasize the refurbishing and equipping of existing facilities, including the financing of consumable materials and energy supplies over a two-year period, and the construction of a limited number of complementary buildings at the IPSs in Kankan, Labé and N'Zérékoré. Pedagogically, the project aims at improving the quality of training and changing the patterns of training to cover the skills expected to be in high demand, such as those required for basic building trades and maintenance of vehicles and other mechanical equipment. This would involve the suppression of some existing training for which demand is negligible, such as mechanical fabrication at the IPS in Labé, and expansion of new trades such as sheet metal, welding, plumbing, electrical installation and automobile repair at the IPS in N'Zérékoré. Total enrollment at the IPSs would be essentially unchanged at about 700 students, permitting a total annual output of 280 skilled workers divided among seven basic trades. The duration of training would be two years for general masonry, plumbing, and electrical installations, and three years for joinery, sheet metal and welding, auto mechanics, and reinforced concrete construction. The curriculum would be modernized with the assistance of the Technical Instructor Training Institute (ISFORPET) staff and be very practically oriented with 20 to 24 hours of workshop practice per week.

22 The 55 teachers needed for the three institutes would be trained or upgraded by the ISFORPET in Conakry, established under the First Education Project. Curriculum development and equipment standardization for the IPSs would be supported through continued technical assistance to ISFORPET (para. 2.05). The project would finance 21 manmonths of fellowships to enable IPS directors and workshop training supervisors to study skilled worker training systems and methodology in other countries. During negotiations the Government gave assurances that before December 31, 1983, it will establish conditions of admission and duration of training for the IPSs acceptable to IDA, and by the school year it will introduce new curricula acceptable to the Association for the relevant specializations at the IPSs. Technical Instructor Training Institute 2.05 This institute (ISFORPET) was financed under the First Education Project and became fully operational during the final m3nths of The project would finance limited supplementary equipment and consumable materials to make practical skills training more effective in certain sections, notably in diesel engine maintenance. The project would also finance 17 manyears of specialist services over three years and 105 manmonths of fellowships. The specialist support would allow a further consolidation of ISFORPET's technical teacher training program and provide support for the improvement of secondary vocational institutes country-wide, including the evaluation and revision of training programs and the preparation of training materials (para. 2.04). The fellowships would be provided to train Guinean teacher trainers and instructors specialized in equipment maintenance. Central Supply Unit 2.06 A storage facility built on the ISFORPET site under the First Education Project is used for the temporary storage of equipment and materials for ISFORPET. The Government wishes to develop this facility into a Central Supply Unit for the purchase, storage and distribution of equipment, tools, spare parts and consumable materials for the country's vocational institute system. The project would finance furniture and equipment, six manmonths of specialist services for the organization of the service, and 10 manmonths of fellowships for training the Guinean manager of the Central Supply Unit. During negotiations the Government gave assurances that by January 1, 1984, it will establish the Central Supply Unit and define its organization and functions, and starting January 1, 1984, provide it with adequate funds to make it fully operational. Educational and Human Resources Planning 2.07 Educational planning. The project would assist in establishing, within the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research (M'ESRS), a General Educational Planning Directorate (DGPE) to be shared with the Ministry of Pre-University Education and Literacy and the Ministry of Technical Education and Vocational Training (para. 1.16). This directorate, in collaboration with the Education and Training Division (DEF) of the Ministry of Planning and

23 Statistics (MPS), would be the main instrument used in preparing the technical details for restructuring the educational system. The DGPE staff and the specialists working with them would, on the basis of the manpower study described in para. 1.27, formulate detailed recommendations for implementing: (a) the restructuring of the education system; (b) the control and guidance of student flows; and (c) achievement of a better match between manpower needs and educational outputs. The DGPE would also improve statistical data collection and regional planning by preparing and conducting training seminars on educational statistics and planning for about 30 staff members of the regional education offices. It would also undertake a vocational training development study as well as a tracer study of the graduates of IPSs and agro-zootechnic faculties. To these ends, the project would finance furniture, equipment, operating costs, 30 manmonths of specialist services for education planning and consultant services for the review of higher education statistics and technical education development, for a tracer study and for local training, and 50 manmonths of fellowships for educational planning training (school mapping, statistics, costs and financing, and vocational training). During negotiations the Government gave assurances that it will carry out under terms of reference acceptable to IDA and submit to the Association for review: (a) before June 30, 1985 the vocational training development study; and (b) before June 30, 1986 the IPS and agro-zootechnic student tracer study. As a condition of credit effectiveness, the Government should legally establish the DGPE with an organization and staffing satisfactory to IDA Human resources planning. The project would also assist in the strengthening of the Education and Training Division (DEF) within the MPS. This division, which is responsible for human resources planning as well as for the preparation and control of the education sector plan, would play a leading role in preparing the sectoral policy changes. On the basis of the manpower study and in close collaboration with the DGPE and the General Directorate of Labor within the Ministry of Labor, it would formulate recommendations to the Government for: (a) matching the output of the restructured education system more closely with manpower requirements of the economy; (b) the implications of the sector plan on education and policy; and (c) the revision of the compulsory employment policy for the graduates of vocational training schools and universities. This division would also appraise and follow up on the manpower components of all investment projects and contribute to improved collection of manpower data. To these ends, the Division would be strengthened and reorganized. The project would finance furniture, equipment, and operating costs for the new equipment, 10 manmonths of specialist services for manpower study follow-up, employment-related analysis of development projects and manpower statistics, and 50 manmonths of fellowships for educational planning, manpower statistics and forecasting. During negotiations the Government gave assurances that before December 31, 1983, it will complete a reorganization of the DEF satisfactory to IDA. National Pedagogical Institute 2.09 The National Pedagogical Institute (IPN, para. 1.17) would be responsible for developing primary education programs and producing primary textbook manuscripts, either directly or through contracts with Guinean

24 authors. Toward this end, the Government signed a two year renewable agreement with the French Government in October 1980 providing technical assistance for the preparation of syllabi and textbook manuscripts for the French language programs in primary and lower secondary schools. The Guinean Government has also issued a decree setting authors' fees, and has drawn up lists of textbook titles and teaching guides to be developed under the project The IPN would also be responsible for reviewing teacher training programs and methods, as well as providing on-the-job training for the pedagogical supervisors to enable them to introduce the new curricula and explain the proposed use of the textbooks To ensure appropriate conditions for achieving these objectives, the project would finance construction, furniture, equipment and operating costs to upgrade and expand the IPN facilities. The project would also finance 116 manmonths of specialist services for curriculum development, teacher training, editing and production of textbooks and 132 manmonths of fellowships to strengthen the Institute's capacity for curriculum development and evaluation, textbook and manuscript preparation, teacher training curriculum and teaching methods improvement. The decree establishing the IPN reorganization has been modified to specify its objectives and strengthen its organization. During negotiations the Government gave assurances that it will (a) prepare syllabi and textbook manuscripts for the French language programs in primary schools within the National Pedagogical Institute and not later than January 1, 1984, employ education specialists to assist it in such preparation (para. 2.09); and (b) starting January 1, 1984, provide adequate funds to cover the fees for the preparation of manuscripts by local authors outside the IPN. Production and Distribution of Primary School Textbooks 2.12 The Educational Printing Office (IDEC) was established in 1978 with bilateral French financing. IDEC can print 245,000 books per year, but operates at only 26% of its capacity. There are still practically no primary education textbooks being produced, due to (a) the IPN's weak management capacity and inexperience in the preparation of textbook manuscripts; (b) the lack of IDEC autonomy, the result of the IDEC's establishment as part of the distance learning institute, which has led to administrative difficulties; (c) the lack of skilled printing staff, due to slow implementation of the training program being provided for Guinean staff both abroad and on-the-job in Guinea; and (d) equipment maintenance problems To alleviate these problems, the project would strengthen the technical and management capacities of the IDEC and would include construction, furniture, equipment, consumable materials, specialist services, fellowships and incremental operating costs. Specifically, the project would finance (a) construction, furniture, and equipment to improve and expand the existing print shop; (b) consumable materials for the printing of 1,218,000 textbooks and teacher training guides during the life of the project; (c) 65 manmonths of specialist services to tackle management and technical print shop problems and to establish a textbook storage and distribution system; and (d) 40 manmonths of fellowships for overseas training of print shop staff in print

25 shop management, machine maintenance and printing techniques. During negotiations, the Government gave assurances that (a) before January 1, 1984, it will (a) grant a status of management autonomy to IDEC; and (b) starting January 1, 1984, provide it with adequate funds to make it fully operational The production cost for textbooks would be about Sylis 18 (US$0.78) and the cost of a complete set of textbooks would range from Sylis 18 (US$0.78) for Grade 1 to Sylis 90 (US$3.91) for the final grade. The textbooks would be lent out to the students and would probably last for three years. The lending fee for a complete set would be Sylis 10 (US$0.43) per year. However, students would be charged about Sylis 40 (US$1.73) for each book lost. The lending fees would be collected from schools by the district Education Directorate and sent through the regional Education Directorate to IDEC where they would be used primarily for financing textbook transportation costs Textbooks would be distributed by the National Transportation Company (COTRA) which is charged with the transportation of all goods in Guinea from or to Conakry and within the regions from or to regional capitals. COTRA has specifically allocated transportation capacities by region. The cost of transportation would be financed from IDEC's budget. The textbooks would be transported by COTRA from IDEC to the regional education directorates, which would be responsible for storing the textbooks in their educational materials storage units and would coordinate with COTRA their distribution to the district educational directorates. The cost of this transportation would be financed by regional budgets. Textbooks would be distributed from the district educational directorates to the schools by existing local transportation. Primary Teacher Training Colleges 2.16 Primary enrollment and teacher projections show an increasing need for new teachers from 610 annually between 1981 and 1986, to 810 between 1987 and 1991, and to 1,970 between 1992 and There are currently 13 Primary Teacher Training Colleges (ENIs) with capacities ranging from 65 to 512 students and a total enrollment of 2,650. They have inadequate premises without suitable equipment. The Government intends to consolidate the ENIs by reducing their numbers, increasing their total capacities, providing them with adequate facilities and equipment, and reviewing their levels of recruitment and their training curricula, in order to increase their internal efficiency, improve the quality of instruction and expand their outputs. The project would assist the Government in taking a first step in this direction by financing construction, furniture, equipment and incremental operating costs for upgrading and extending existing facilities located in Labé and Kankan. The enrollment for the two ENIs would be 720 with an output of about 230 per year; the project would also finance 124 manmonths of fellowships to train the staff of the two ENIs in methodology (general teaching, science, French), class observation and evaluation, and to train support staff (laboratory assistants and librarians). At the same time the Government would undertake a study to plan the development of the teacher training system with the view to assuring an adequate regional distribution and economical size of facilities. During negotiations, assurances were obtained that the above study would be undertaken and submitted to IDA for review by June 30, 1985.

26 To reduce expenditures on teachers' salaries, students in the three-year courses at the ENIs would be recruited at the lower secondary level rather than at the baccalaureate level as is presently the case. The teaching program would be revised and would focus specifically on professional training, with about 40% of the time devoted to pedagogical training and practice teaching. During negotiations, assurances were obtained from the Government that it will establish, through a revision of the primary teachers training colleges decree by December 31, 1984, the recruitment of students at the lower secondary level and prepare teaching programs on this basis to be reviewed by IDA by March 1, 1985 and to be implemented by October Construction work on the Nasser Lower Secondary School in Labé and its conversion into an ENI would begin only after the transfer of its students to a neighboring secondary school. This is planned for the end of the school year. Project Management 2.19 The Project Unit, established to implement the First Education Project, Cr. 849-GUI (which has performed satisfactorily), would be reorganized and upgraded to the status of an Education Projects Directorate (DPE) responsible for coordinating the implementation of the second project, as well as all other externally financed education projects. The directorate, to be headed by a full-time director, would be strengthened by an architect, a general educator, a procurement specialist, and an accountant. The training of three construction supervisors and an accountant will be financed from remaining funds in Cr. 849-GUI. The project would finance construction for the rehabilitation of the existing facilities, supplementary furniture and equipment, incremental operating expenses during the implementation period, 87 manmonths of specialist support for project management and architectural services and civil works supervision, and 24 manmonths of fellowships to upgrade the DPE staff in accounting, procurement and management. The project also includes a provision of US$364,000 to finance specialist services and architectural fees for the preparation of a future education project. The Government as a condition of credit effectiveness, should submit evidence that it has legally established the DPE, with objectives and organization acceptable to IDA. The DPE should be staffed with a director, an architect, a general educator, a procurement specialist and an accountant.

27 III. PROJECT COST AND FINANCING PLAN Cost of the Project 3.01 Taxes and import duties are not included in project cost calculations because the Government, in line with the usual policy for Bank-financed projects, has confirmed that it will exempt the proposed project from all taxes and duties. The net-of-tax cost of the project is estimated at US$30.20 million, with a foreign exchange component of US$24.44 million. The breakdown of cost by project component is detailed in Annex 8 and summarized below. % of Project Item Local Foreign Total Local Foreign Total Base Cost ----Sylis million US$ million Vocational Training Educational & Human Resources Planning Primary Education Project Management BASE COST Physical Contingencies Price Contingencies TOTAL PROJECT COST (net of taxes) The base cost estimates are for March The civil works costs are based on the preliminary designs reviewed in July 1982 and on unit costs derived from construction contracts awarded in Guinea from 1979 to 1982 for comparable buildings. The average net-of-tax cost of construction for new buildings would be US$750 per square meter; however, at all project-financed institutions, most civil works are for the restoration and completion of existing facilities. 1/ The high construction costs in Guinea stem from the large share of construction materials and equipment which needs to be imported, the high transport costs, unreliable supply of materials and commodities, excessive demand in the limited local construction market, the absence of sizable local firms, shortages of qualified construction workers and the high cost of foreign staff. The architectural and engineering fees estimate is 1/ For this reason, unit costs per student place are not a meaningful basis for comparison.

28 based on the terms and conditions of the contract signed by the Government and the consulting architects before appraisal (10% of the civil works contracts amount). The furniture and equipment costs are based on lists prepared during appraisal, and on unit costs derived from the first project or from current costs in Guinea. The costs of specialist services and of fellowships are based on recent recruitment experience of the Government and international agencies. They are estimated at US$10,000 per manmonth, including salary, allowances and overhead for expatriate specialists, 1/ and at US$23,000 per year for fellowships. The incremental operating costs are based on consumable materials estimates for supplementary equipment purchased under the project Estimated costs by category of expenditure are shown below. Category % of of Expenditure Local Foreign Total Local Foreign Total Base Cost ----Sylis million US$ million----- Civil works Architectural & Engineering fees Furniture Equipment Specialist services Fellowships Operating costs BASE COST net of taxes Physical contingencies Price contingencies TOTAL PROJECT COST net of taxes / No local specialists are expected to be financed under the project.

29 The project costs include allowances for unforeseen physical contingencies equal to 15% of the estimated base costs for civil works (mostly rehabilitation) and architectural and engineering fees, and 10% for furniture and equipment. The overall allowance for price escalation is about 13.3% of the base cost. The price contingency allowance has been estimated on the basis of the following annual percentage increases for local and foreign expenditures: Local il 1/ il il il Foreign / IMF, Guinea request for Stand-by arrangement (November 10, 1982) EDS , Table 3, p The estimated foreign exchange component of US$24.44 million represents about 81% of the total net-of-tax project cost of US$30.20 million. This component was calculated on the basis of 73% for civil works, 90% for specialist services, and 100% for furniture, equipment, architectural and engineering fees, and fellowships, and 24% for operating costs. Local currency expenditures amount to US$5.76 million, or about 19% of the total project cost. Financing Plan 3.06 Although Guinea has considerable potential for development, its economic performance has been below average by West African standards because of weak and highly centralized economic management and emphasis on sociopolitical objectives. This has led to an inability to generate enough foreign exchange to meet import costs and debt needs and to balance the budget. However, the Government is implementing significant changes in its sector policies (para. 1.34) and the proposed project is providing assistance in this respect. In view of the satisfactory implementation of the First Education Project, the Governnent's positive response to our sector dialogue, the substantial sectoral changes already undertaken (para 1.34), and the need to alleviate the burden on the Government's capital budget of foreign and local costs, external sources should finance 100% of the total foreign exchange and about 40% of the local cost or about 89% of the total project cost or about US$26.79 million The proposed IDA Credit of USS11.0 million would finance 45% of the total foreign exchange costs, or 36% of the net-of-tax project costs. The African Development Fund (AfDF) will provide a credit to finance project items with a total estimated cost of US$11.72 million; the Saudi Fund for Development (SF) would provide a grant to finance project items with a total estimated cost of US$4.07 million. In addition, the SF would finance in

30 parallel, and for about US$2.93 million, architectural and engineering fees, civil works, furniture and equipment for the Faranah IPS for which technical and educational specifications will be prepared under the proposed IDA Credit. The Government would finance local costs estimated at US$3.4 million. As a condition of effectiveness, the Government should ensure that all conditions have been satisfied that are necessary for an initial disbursement from the AfDF Credit and the SF Grant. The financing plan is detailed in Annex 9 and summarized below. FINANCING PLAN (US$ million) Total Cost IDA AfDF SF Government Vocational Training Educational & Human Resources Planning Primary Education Project Management TOTAL BASE COST Physical Contingencies Price Contingencies Total Contingencies TOTAL The proposed IDA Credit of SDR million (US$11.0 million) would finance 50% of the net-of-tax operating costs, 80% of the net-of-tax costs for civil works expenditures, and 100% of the net-of-tax costs for architectural and engineering fees, equipment, furniture, specialist services and fellowships of the following items: (a) civil works for the National Pedagogical Institute, the Educational Printing Office and the Education Projects Directorate - US$1.96 million; (b) architectural and engineering fees for the Vocational Training Institutes, the National Pedagogical Institute, and the Primary Teacher Training Colleges, and to initiate the architectural studies of a possible third education project - TJS$1.30 million;

31 (c) furniture and equipment (including consumable materials for IDEC) for the Central Supply Unit, the National Pedagogical Institute, the Educational Printing Office (IDEC), the General Educational Planning Directorate, the MPS Education and Training Division, and equipment (including consumable materials) for the Technical Instructor Training Institute - US$1.49 million; (d) 314 manmonths (about 26 manyears) of specialist services and 430 manmonths (about 36 manyears) of fellowships for the Central Supply Unit, the National Pedagogical Institute, the Educational Printing Office, the Primary Teacher Training Colleges (fellowships only), the General Educational Planning Directorate, the MPS Education and Training Division, and the Education Projects Directorate, as well as 12 manmonths of specialist services for the preparation of a possible third education project - US$4.18 million; (e) incremental operating costs for the Vocational Training Institutes, the National Pedagogical Institute, the Educational Printing Office, the Primary Teacher Training Colleges, the General Educational Planning Directorate, the MPS Education and Training Division, and the Education Projects Directorate - US$0.26 million; and (f) allowances for physical contingencies and price escalation for items (a) through (e) - US$1.81 million The AfDF is expected to finance 80% of the net-of-tax cost of civil works and 100% of the net-of-tax costs of furniture, equipment, specialist services and fellowships for the following items: (a) civil works, furniture, equipment (including consumable materials for the IPSs) for the Labé and N'Zérékoré Vocational Training Institutes (IPSs), the Labé Primary Teacher Training College, and furniture and equipment for the Education Projects Directorate - US$7.27 million; (b) 204 manmonths (17 manyears) of specialist services and 126 manmonths (about 10 manyears) of fellowships for the Vocational Training Institutes (fellowships only) and the Technical Instructor Training Institute - US$2.17 million; (c) allowances for physical contingencies and price escalation for items (a) and (b) - US$2.28 million The SF is expected to finance 80% of the net-of-tax costs of civil works and 100% of the net-of-tax costs of furniture and equipment for the following items: (a) civil works, furniture and equipment (including consumable materials for the IPS) for the Kankan Vocational Training Institute (IPS) and Primary Teacher Training College - US$3.20 million; and

32 (b) allowances for physical contingencies and price escalation for item (a) US$0.87 million. Project Recurrent Cost 3.11 The table below shows the incremental recurrent expenditures we expect each component to generate during project implementation. (USS March 1983) Annual Building Annual Incremental and Total Annual Incremental Operating Equipment Incremental Project Component Staff Cost Cost Maintenance Cost Vocational training 74, , , ,062 Educational and human 71,820 6, ,320 resources planning Primary education 165, ,948 86, ,158 improvement Education projects 30,630 17,780 3,060 51,470 directorate 342, , , ,010 Government Budget for recurrent expenditure on education (1981) 64,756, By the end of the project (1988), the total incremental cost in the Government budget would increase by about Sylis million (US$883,480), of which Sylis 7.87 million (US$342,170) would be for staff salaries and related benefits, Sylis 6.37 million (US$276,960) for operating costs, and Sylis 6.08 million (US$264,350) for building and equipment maintenance, representing 1.36% of the Government's projected recurrent budget in education. During negotiations assurances were obtained from the Government that it will make adequate budgetary provisions for the staffing, the operation and maintenance of all project-assisted institutions, including the allocation of foreign exchange to purchase imported materials and supplies after the project financing ends. In addition the Government gave assurances that it will provide adequate funding and set appropriate procedures to maintain the existing facilities of the education sector.

33 IV. PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION Project Preparation 4.01 Educational specifications for all the project institutions were prepared by the Government prior to project appraisal, with assistance from the Unesco/World Bank Cooperative Program, and were reviewed during preappraisal and appraisal with senior officials concerned, including those expected to be designated as sub-project directors. Drafts of all the proposed decrees were reviewed during appraisal and found acceptable. Working papers are available for each project component. Architectural sketch and preliminary designs for all project components except the Education Projects Directorate and the Educational Printing Office (handled by the Education Project Unit architect and civil engineer), were prepared with funds available under the First Education Project (US$196,000) and have been reviewed by IDA. The expatriate specialists assigned to the Technical Instructor Training Institute financed under the First Education Project have prepared draft equipment lists for the vocational training component. We expect that these lists will be finalized and that tendering will start by mid To allow the Government to continue project preparation until credit effectiveness (including final architectural design work, 1/ local staff training and the preparation of equipment lists and bidding documents), an advance of US$700,000 from the Project Preparation Facility (PPF) has been approved. The final architectural designs are being reviewed and tendering would start by mid Construction of buildings and installation of equipment are expected to be completed by the end of Recruitment of specialists and identification of fellowship holders has started. Provision of specialist services and local staff training are expected to continue until June 1988, when the entire project is expected to be completed. The Closing Date would bedecember 31, 1988, to allow for all project accounts to be closed. Project Management 4.02 A Project Unit was established to implement the First Education Project (Cr. 849-GUI) within the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research. This unit will be reorganized and upgraded to the status of an Education Projects Directorate (DPE), and will coordinate the implementation of the second project and other externally financed education projects (para. 2.19). The DPE would remain within the same ministry and be headed by the current Project Unit Director. The project includes funds to rehabilitate the Project Unit's offices for the DPE. 1/ Architectural design work has been contracted to a French architectural firm established in Dakar, Senegal.

34 The Ministries of Planning and Statistics (MPS), Higher Education and Scientific Research (MESRS), Technical Education and Vocational Training (METMFP), and Pre-University Education and Literacy (MEPU) would designate senior officials to serve as sub-project directors for the components under their responsibility. For the component under his control, each sub-project director would be responsibl'e for (a) determining the design for the educational programs and their implications on the specifications of buildings and equipment; (b) selecting and supervising specialists and planning their work; (c) determining training programs for Guinean staff and selection of candidates for local and foreign training; and (d) preparing reports on the implementation progress. Responsibility for accounting and procurement of civil works and goods would be centralized in the DPE. The DPE would also (a) coordinate project implementation at the national level; (b) serve as liaison between the sub-project directors and the external financing agencies; (c) monitor project implementation to ascertain compliance with the Credit Agreement and other project documents; and (d) be responsible for financial management and maintenance of project accounts. As a condition of credit effectiveness, the Government should submit evidence that the subproject directors have been officially designated. Specialist Services and Fellowships 4.04 The project would finance about 43 manyears of specialist services (Annex 10). During negotiations, assurances were obtained from the Government that: (a) the qualifications, experience, and terms and conditions of employment of specialists financed under the project would be acceptable to IDA; (b) services of international staff would be procured in accordance with IDA's guidelines; and (c) qualified local staff acceptable to IDA would be appointed as counterparts to the expatriate specialists financed under the project The project would provide financing for about 46 manyears of fellowships for the training of Guinean staff outside Guinea (Annex 11) and one manyear of expatriate specialist services for local training. During negotiations the Government gave assurances that it will (a) award the fellowships to be financed under the proposed IDA Credit to suitably qualified persons for training programs acceptable to the Association; (b) require the fellowship holders to serve at least four years in the positions for which they were trained; and (c) review with IDA the design of the local training programs for primary school inspectors and regional educational planning staff. Sites 4.06 Sites, already owned by the Government and acceptable to IDA, have been selected for all the project institutions. Procurement 4.07 Works. Major civil works to be financed under the proposed IDA Credit, totalling US$2.5 million (including contingencies), would be procured through international competitive bidding in accordance with IDA's guidelines; eligible domestic bidders would be given a preference of 7-1/2%. The balance

35 of construction to be financed under the proposed IDA Credit, totalling USS0.6 million (including contingencies), consists of minor works and buildings too small to interest foreign bidders. These works would be procured through local competitive bidding procedures which IDA found to be satisfactory at appraisal Goods. Equipment, consumable materials and furniture to be financed under the proposed IDA Credit, totalling US$1.9 million (including contingencies), would be grouped into appropriate bidding packages and procured through international competitive bidding in accordance with IDA's guidelines. Qualifying domestic manufacturers would receive a preference in bid evaluation of 15% or the import duty, whichever is lower. Miscellaneous equipment items, consumable materials and furniture in packages of less than US$100,000 would be procured under local competitive procedures which IDA found to be satisfactory at appraisal. Items below US$30,000 in value, for which potential suppliers are limited, might be procured by inviting quotations from at least three reliable suppliers whenever possible. The total value of items procured by both these methods would not exceed US$500, Contract Review. Three bidding packages are expected to make up the estimated US$3.1 million for the civil works to be financed under the proposed IDA Credit. With a threshold of US$500,000 for prior IDA review of procurement documentation, two of the three packages would cover about 97% of the value contracted. All bidding packages for goods valued at more than US$100,000 equivalent would be subject to IDA's prior review of the procurement documentation, resulting in a coverage of about 80% of the goods contracts. The balance of the contracts would be subject to random post-review by IDA after contract award Co-financed contracts. Civil works, goods and services financed by other agencies would be procured in accordance with the relevant guidelines of these agencies. Disbursements 4.11 The proceeds of the IDA Credit would be disbursed against the project items indicated in para. 3.08, as follows: (a) 80% of total expenditures for civil works - US$1.96 million; (b) 100% of total expenditures for architectural and engineering fees - US$1.30 million; (c) 100% of total expenditures for furniture, and equipment (including consumable materials)-ussl.49 million; (d) 100% of total expenditures for specialist services and fellowships - US$4.18 million; (e) 50% of total expenditures for incremental operating costs - US$0.26 million;

36 (f) 100% of the withdrawn PPF funds - USS700,000; (g) initial disbursement for the special account - USSq0,000; and (h) US$1.05 million would remain unallocated Disbursements (Annex 13) have been estimated on the basis of the schedule of implementation summarized in Annex 12. While the disbursement profile takes account of the standard disbursement profile Df education projects in West Africa, it has been shortened considerably to take account of the disbursement experience with the First Education Project in Guinea (Cr. 849-GUI) and the relatively advanced stage of project preparation (para. 4.01) All disbursements from the IDA Credit would be fully documented except for operating costs under category (e), which would be disbursed against certified statements of expenditure, with the documentation not to be submitted to IDA but held by the Education Projects Directorate (DPE) for review by IDA supervision missions. The total amount of disbursements against statements of expenditures is estimated at US$0.26 million, representing about 0.02% of the credit amount. These expenditures would be in local currency and disbursement would be made only to reimburse the Government. Disbursement against certified statements of expenditure is the only reasonable method to disburse against category (e), since the DPE's operating costs would consist of numerous, small expenditures. Details of the procedure to be followed in respect of the statements of expenditures can be found in Annex 14. Special Account 4.14 Because the Government may have difficulty in pre-financing expenditures to be reimbursed under the IDA Credit, a special account of US$60,000 financed by the IDA Credit would be established for the purchase of small items such as office equipment and supplies, and spare parts for vehicles and operating costs of the project eligible for financing by the IDA Credit. The Government would open an account for this purpose in a local commercial bank acceptable to IDA. The account would be operated under terms and conditions acceptable to IDA, and IDA would replenish the account on receipt of evidence of disbursements from the special account for allowable expenditures. Should any payments be made from the special account that are not acceptable to IDA, the Government would be responsible for replenishing the fund in the corresponding amount. In addition to the special account, the Government would establish in a local commercial bank acceptable to IDA a revolving account in local currency of about Sylis 3.5 million for financing the local contribution to the project. This account would be replenished quarterly from the Government's budget. As a condition of credit effectiveness, the Government should submit evidence that (a) a special account and a revolving account have been established; and (b) Sylis 3.5 million has been deposited in the revolving account.

37 Accounts and Audits 4.15 During the First Education Project (Cr. 849-GUI), the Project Unit set up a suitable accounting system, in accordance with accepted accounting practices to record all project expenditures. All accounts have been subject to regular Government auditing by finance inspectors and the audit document was acceptable to the Bank. Assurances were obtained during negotiations that separate accounts would be set up for the proposed project, that the accounting and auditing system would be used again for the proposed project, and that the accounts and audit report would be submitted to IDA no later than six months following the close of each fiscal year. The accounts and the audit would be of such a scope and in such detail as IDA should reasonably request, including a review of the operation of the special account and the revolving fund account and a separate opinion on whether the expenditures withdrawn from the IDA Credit on the basis of statements of expenditures have been used for the purpose for which they were provided. V. PROJECT BENEFITS AND RISKS Benefits 5.01 The main benefits of the vocational training component would be the impact that it will have on economic development through the provision of appropriate specialization and quality of urgently needed skilled workers by (a) consolidating the technical teacher training program started under the First Education Project (para. 2.05); (b) improving the relevance of the vocational training institutes curricula to job needs; and (c) increasing the availability of equipment, consumable materials and spare parts, especially for the project's vocational schools (para. 2.06) The strengthening of educational and human resources planning would provide the administrative and technical conditions for (a) the restructuring of the education system; (b) the definition of realistic educational development targets; (c) the reallocation of resources; (d) the control and guidance of student flows; and (e) the revision of the compulsory employment policy for vocational training and university graduates (paras and 2.08) The primary education component will have both medium-term and long-term benefits. In the medium term, improvement of primary teacher training and the availability of textbooks would improve learning conditions and therefore the efficiency of primary education. In the long term, the improvement of learning conditions in primary education, as well as the strengthening of the technical capacity of the IPN, would constitute a basis for further improvement of secondary education.

38 Risks 5.04 The project faces two risks. First, there is a risk that the Government may not be able to effectively manage the construction of the dispersed civil works proposed for financing under the project. This risk is increased by the fact that most of the construction represents the first Bank Group-financed civil works in the education sector to be implemented outside Conakry, the capital. This issue is being addressed through the financing, under the First Education Project (Cr. 849-GUI), of fellowships to train Guinean site supervisors prior to the start of construction and by providing in the proposed project specialist services to strengthen the civil works management and supervision capacity of the Education Projects Directorate. Second, there is a risk that the country's limited experience in textbook preparation may lead to delays in preparing, printing and distributing the primary school textbooks. This issue will be addressed by financing fellowships to train Guinean specialists prior to the start of implementation and providing technical assistance to back up the Guinean staff. VI. AGREEMENTS REACHED AND RECOMMENDATIONS 6.01 During negotiations, the Government agreed that it will: (a) prepare a program for the implementation of the policy recommendations of the sector review report and the manpower study including enrollment targets and a schedule for accomplishing specific objectives, discuss this program with IDA prior to June 30, 1984 and at regular intervals review implementation progress with the Association (para. 1.29); (b) establish before December 31, 1983 conditions of admission and duration of training for the IPSs acceptable to IDA and by the school year , introduce new curricula acceptable to the Association for relevant specializations at the IPSs (para. 2.04); (c) by January 1, 1984 establish the Central Supply Unit and define its organization and functioning, and starting January 1, 1984, provide it with adequate funds to make it fully operational (para. 2.06); (d) carry out under terms of reference acceptable to IDA and submit to the Association for review (i) before June 30, 1985, the vocational training development study, and (ii) before June 30, 1986, the IPS and agro-zootechnic student tracer study (para. 2.07); (e) complete before December 31, 1983, a reorganization of the Education and Training Division of the Ministry of Planning and Statistics satisfactory to IDA (para. 2.08);

39 (f) prepare syllabi and textbook manuscripts for the French language programs in primary schools within the National Pedagogical Institute and, by January 1, 1984, employ education specialists to assist it in such preparation; and starting January 1, 1984 provide it with adequate funds to cover the fees for the preparation of textbook manuscripts by local authors outside IPN (para. 2.11); (g) grant a status of management autonomy to the Educational Printing Office before January 1, 1984 and starting in Fiscal Year 1984, provide it with adequate funds, to make it fully operational (para. 2.13); (h) undertake a study to plan the development of the teacher training system and submit it to IDA for review by June 30, 1985 (para. 2.16); (i) establish, through a revision of the primary teacher training colleges decree, by December 31, 1984, the recruitment of students at the lower secondary level and prepare teaching programs on this basis to be reviewed by IDA by March 1, 1985 and implemented by October 1985 (para. 2.17); (j) make adequate budgetary provisions for the staffing, operation and maintenance of all project-assisted institutions, including the allocation of foreign exchange to purchase imported materials and supplies after the project financing ends; and provide adequate funding and set appropriate procedures to maintain the existing facilities of the education sector (para. 3.12); (k) employ specialists under the project with qualifications, experience and terms and conditions of employment acceptable to IDA and recruited in accordance with IDA's guidelines, and appoint qualified local counterparts to the expatriate specialists (para. 4.04); (1) ensure that the fellowships to be financed under the proposed IDA Credit are awarded to suitably qualified persons for training programs satisfactory to IDA, and that the fellowship holders will serve at least four years in the positions for which they were trained (para. 4.05); (m) review with IDA the design of local training programs for primary school inspectors and regional educational planning staff (para. 4.05); (n) set up a separate account for the proposed project and submit project accounts and audit reports to IDA not later than six months following the close of each fiscal year (para. 4.15).

40 As conditions of credit effectiveness, the Government should submit evidence that: (a) all conditions have been satisfied which are necessary for an initial disbursement from the AfDF Credit and SF Grant (para. 3.07); (b) it has legally established the General Educational Planning Directorate (para. 2.07); (c) it has legally established the Education Projects Directorate with objectives and organization acceptable to IDA and staffed with a director, an architect, a general educator, a procurement specialist, and an accountant, and nominated the sub-project directors (paras and 4.03); and (d) a special account and a revolving account have been established in a local commercial bank under terms and conditions acceptable to IDA and that Sylis 3,500,000 has been deposited in the revolving account (para. 4.14) On the basis of the above assurances and conditions, the proposed project is suitable as a basis for an IDA Credit of US$11.0 million to the Republic of Guinea.

41 REVOLUTIONARY PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF GUINEA STRUCTURE OF THE EDUCATION SYSTEM 4th CYCLE 1st CYCLE 2nd CYCLE 3rd CYCLE 1st LEVEL t- -~~~-0 2nd LEVEL r TEACHER TRAINING ENI ISFORPET I NATURAL NATURAL SCIENCES SCIENCES PRACTICUM I SOCIAL SCIENCES I SOCIAL SCIENCES J EHNLG - PRACTICUM TECHNOLOGY TELECOMMUNICATIONS HEALTH SEIVICES TECHNOLOGY TELECOMMUNICATIONS r--i 6{ GEOLOGY-MINING J MEDICINE PHARMACOLOGY L THESIS ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES AGRO-ZOOTECHNICS MEDICINE-PHARMACOLOGY * EXAMINATIONS COMMERCIAL ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES * ENTRANCE EXAMS SCHOOL AGRO-ZOOTECHNICS Q STATE DIPLOMA O DEFENSE OF GRADUATE THESIS SECONDARYVOCATIONAL ENI TEACHER TRAINING COLLEGES INSTITUTES ISFORPET TECHNICAL INSTRUCTOR TRAINING INSTITUTE PRACTICUM SCHOOL FOR POLICE 2 SOURCE MESRS Worîd Bank-23960

42 00. O 11, O 00. O O 0 0 0, O , O O OOOOr Oc , O I o00 10 <0... I 0' I - ooo...o10 - <1- O.- ' o - <.0 oo oo 1-1 tt , I.0.0 I.0 O v : I t <t o < , * < >1> 01<1.0 O 11< 1< O O < 00, oO 'o.0I I I I l OC 0 O O O I O I I I O 1>1 I I < I I 000, I 00.0<0c I O oo o... O O <. O * O < 10 O.11 O 0 O 0 O ' Oa O 0.00 O < *... O <00 O Il I 10 I I 00000' l0i000i00i , O O O 01< O O I o , <>.40 I Il Il O I I I O I I I I 11 O I I I I O I I I 0 Il I I I I I I 00000Ill I 11> <000 I O 000 <t t 0. <. tttoo 01< O 1.00 O < O 011 O O I o I l ,00.4 I O t I O I O Il 1.0 I 0 O I O I , 10.00<0 000I II0 I Oooo.0î.0c.0o.0o O 000..,.4 0 I I I ol loi 1I,-0 I 10 I O I 1111< Il> Id 0 I I I I I Il O I , I I loi I.-.0 Il 4, I <1 O O O O O 1<111 Il Il Il 10 Il I I I 0001 I I 10, , I I 000<0 O loi I I I 1010 OooooIOîo.4000 Il Il 0001,0.00 O I I I 0 0 O liii 10 O O O I I I I Il O 0 I « I I.01* I0I<.4 000<0 loi , I I I O O 0 0 0, O 0,0>, 0 O 00< < O O 00.1> 011 O Z ,0000 O t zoo.4< O ,l , < O>tO> 0 0 O> t ,0>0 O> O 0.0> 0>0> O O >0 > O < 0 0, O 0, , I , ,0-.t00 O O O O O , O ' o O O < O O.00 O O O O 0000 O O 0.0 O O O , Oit o040000, , O O O o o o o 0.4 o 0.0 O < O O O O t t t t.0..0 O 000 O O 1- t 0 O t O o c o -. o O.0.0 O O 0< O O 0<.0 t t.0 00 O.0 O O O O Oit 0< t t< I o t O.4< O O 0< t t toc t oo.oooo 0<00<1110 t 0< O 0. < < O 1-0<.00 O 0000<0 00<.00 0<0 O O <<000$ < <0000< < &001.I <>. 00> , 00000,, o z 0 O 0< El0., to.0 0:.,Âî,îc0 <01300l00O.0SO0OI O0OO -,. 000 t t < <0 O ,13< >11., ' =e.4v..4'.ro:.' 00.-c,1.:0, ,tî <

43 COMPARATIVE EDUCATION INDICATORS FEBRUARY 17, R ANNEX 2 CCENTRAL GO VTERNOMENT EXPENDITURE COMPLETION RECURRENT ON EDUCATION ECUCATION ADULT PRIMARY RATE FOR UNIT COST PROGRESSION SECONDARY HIGICER CNP PER AS PERCENT RECURREIIT LITERACY ENPOLL. PRIMARY PRIMARY PRIMARY RATE FROM ENROLL. SECONDARY ENROLL. BASE POP. CARITA PERCENT CNP TOTAL CENTRAL EXPENDITURES RATE RATIO SCBOOL STUDEXTS EDUCATION PRIMARY TO RATIO STUDENTS RATIO YEAR MILLS. (US$) DEVOTED TO GOVERNtMENT ALLOCATED TO: (2) (NET) CYCLE PFR AS PERCENT SECONDARY (NET) PER (CROSS) (1979) (1979) EDUCATION EXPENDITURE PRI SEC HI (1976) (Z) (Z) TEACHER CNF/CAPITA (1) (21) TEACHER (Z) _ 1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) (12) (13) (14) EAST ASIA AND TIIE PACIFIC CHINA i INDONESIA E b 94a :6 2.00* KOREA , b b 7.7* MALAYSIA b 1,460b Sb X PAPUA N.G * * b PHILIPPINES b 69Ob **--- 75b SINGAPORE , OC SOLOMON ISL ` P' 10.0* TbAILAND b 723b b SOUTH ASIA BANGLADESH b P li.ray b 63Y INDIA Y 99* _ * aY NEPAL b 140b g 30 38a ** 20& 2.08*Y PAKISTAN O'Y 5.1Y * 80* * EUROPE, MIDDLE EAST AND NORTB AFRICA AFRGANISTAN / by 69 37b bY 1.00Y ALGERIA ,770 3.Sg a 26a 21* 35 83Y 45a ? 55a 29Y Y EGYPT b 58ob 3,1*W * * 44 84* 80* * 83* * GREECE ,140 2,6W 10.6b by b 6.2? b4 27by 17.80bY IRAN ,7*Y 14.1*Y a' a ** 24a 4.90*Y IRAQ , *y 6,g9y IoOY *Y 29* 9.30*Y IRELAND 81 3,4b *Y 11.8aY JORDAN b 1,420b 4.9' b * LEBANON * Y * * *Y MOROCCO *W 17.5* *Y OMAN , awy 4.9*Y *Y * PORTUGAL b 2, * * 45* 17* 8.30( ROMANIA ,100 3,9by 6.2Y b b b6 22b 10.60by SPAIN , Y 16.8Y bY b bY Rby SYRIA , P by 80 33b by 2Rb TUNISIA ,130 7.OP b 1oo b * TURKEY , a, y Sx a *Y YEMEN A.R PF b Y YEMEN PRD.R b SYMBOLS: SOURCES: FOOTNOTLS: --- DATUM UNAVAILABLE A = DATUS PRIOR TO BASE YEAR... MAGNITUDE NIL OR NEGLIGIBLE B = DATUM MORE RECENT TRAN RASE YEAP? DATEM QUESTIONABLE N = CURRENT PRICES * INCLUDES PART-TIME STUDENTS P = CDP ** COMBINED WITH PRIMARY Q = INCLUDES FOREIGN AID... COMBINED WITE HIG8ER R CENTRAL GOVERtMENT OtLY S = MINISTRY OF EDIICATION (MOE) ONLY T = MOE AND STATE GOVERNMENT ONLY W = PUBLIC EXPENDITURE ONLY X =INCLODES OVER-AGE STU'FENTS Y = UNESCO SOURCES Columns I and 2: World BRnk Atlas *r IBRD missions. Cel.n*. 3 to 14: IBRD missions, Government sources -edir Uneco Statistitcal Yer.book. Comparative Ed-catioe Data are useful Or * evaluation ef varleus edueati io syetettu and analysis cf re-*lae* - tageu cf education1 developmeet betveen var-ius ou-tties. However, en th6 basis *f the present data, cross-natioea1 comparisen shoulc be approached i1th great Daution. Data presented i0 the abeve -tabl h-ve been cellected 1argely by Bank missions frem g * ces; the remainder are tsaff estimates or data fret Unesco. Efferts h-ve been made to standardize defieitions **d, vithin EiSfts, te check th. -cc-racy of the data. Ne-ertheless, uch data are still imperfect in several re-pects and the Bank is working to ieprove th.e pregressively on th. occasion of its operationl vork. In the use *f these data, th. folloiwig qealifications should be kept le *i4d: (1) ''Educatin as defived in the t16bl includes a11 education and training, b6th formal and non-formal. (2) "Primary" educatin renfer to education at the first level nd "secondary" educattio refers to ail ed-catin at th6 secodary levai regardless *f type (e.g., g*enera, technical, *Erlc*11*r*1). (3) Literacy rates (col. 6) are vften obtaided from countrty crnsuse. In many countries they are -cly appr**iractcns and it is doubtful that any uneform definitin *f "literate" has beee fll.e.d c-nitstently. (4) Fublsc expenditure i education" (eol. 4 and 5) re-ers to all capita1 aed recurreet iependitures deveted to education by public ard quasi-pblioc *agenc*ieu (5) "Enrollmeet ratis" (cele. 7, 12 and 14) -efer te ucheol year and *re the pe-cectape f1 e1gib61e chi]d-re enrolled fcol-t-:e ic the apprrpriate school, public and private by level. They are efter subject te a wide margin *0 er ro in the developing ceuetries cwinp to cariatioe the e accuracy ef b-sic data (i.e., age-specific popelatien and e*roll*e*îe). Eerellment figures f-eque-tly are hegher an v the eber cf utudeets actcally le schoel. Ocer-aRed tutdentu whese incleusic is indicated by footnvtes *1ev can inf1ate the -at:vu.

44 RUVOLUT'IONARY' I'IEO'l l'es l,i'ihic O (I'INVJ REPUBLI0UE PODULAIRE REVOLUTIONNZAIRE lie GUINEE SECOND EDUCATION PROJECT.'DEUXIEME PROJET EDUCATION LABOR FORCE AND EMPLOYMENT/MAIN-D'OEUVRE ET EMPLOI, /( ) indicate estimates which are not always consistent with totals7' 7? ) indique les estimations ne correspondant pas toujours aux totaux7 Preliminary/ Prél imina ire 1] A. Lahor Force hv Sex/Miin-d'oeuvre par sexe /1 2,174 2,410 Male/Hommes 1,303 1,452 Fema les/femmes B. Registered Wage Earners by Sector/Effectifs recensés de la main-d'oeuvre salari4e par secteur d'activité 1. Public Administration/Secteurs d'état 33,400 36,800 37,100 37,500 39, Public and Parapublic Enterprises/ 93,200 94,900 98,085 98, ,460 Entreprises nationales et sociétés a. Agriculture and Fishing/Agriculture 32,500 (33,070) (33,155) (33,160) (33,900) et pêche b. Mining/Mines 11,000 (11,120) (11,220) (11,239) (11,301) c. Manufacturing/Industrie manufacturîère 7,200 (7,200) (7,340) (7,361) (7,482) d. Construction and Public Works/Travaux 12,000 (12,100) (12,160) (12,304) (12,576) publics et bâtiment e. Transportation/Transports 8,600 (9,000) (9,200) (9,256) (9,353) f. Public Services/Services publics 7,100 (7,385) (7,885) (8,010) (8,815) g. Banking, Trade and Insurance/ 12,000 (12,175) (12,175) (12,475) (12,808) Banques, assurances + commerce h. Hotels and Domestic Services/ 2,800 (2,800) (2,850) (2,925) (3,125) Hôtellerie + gens de maison i. Others/Autres /2 0 0 (2,200) 2,096 2,100 TOTAL 126, , , , ,830 /I World Bank, Revolutionary People's Republic of Guinea, Country Economic Memorandum, July 1981, Table 1.1 '2 Residual Value/Valeur résiduelle

45 REVOLUTIONARY PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF GUINEA/ REPUBLIOUE POPULAIRE REVOLUTIONNAIRE DE GUINEE SECOND EDUCATION PROJECT/DEUXIEME PROJET EDUCATION ENROLLMENTS AND TEACHERS/EFFECTIFS ET CORPS ENSEIGNANT 1978/79 Student/ Enrollment Teacher As % of Age Qualified Ratio!/ PoulationÉ/6 Age Crotup Croup/ Enroll- Teaching Teachers/ Taux Age Croup/ Effectifs Cirls/ Grades/ Groupe ments/ Staff/ Enseignants Eleves' Population en Z du Filles Level/Niveau Classes d' ge Effectifs Enseignants qualifiés (%) EnseigEnnt groupe d'6ee P_r groupe d'âge (Z) Primary education/erseignemnent primaire ,100 6, :1 735, Lower secondary gencral education/ ,848 ) ) ) 310, Enseignement secondaire général ) (ler degré) ) 3,093 ) 16.4 ) 29:1 ) ) ) Upper secondary general education/ ,328 ) ) ) 280, Enseignement secondaire général (2ème degré) Secondary vocational education/ , /1 10:1 / / Enseignement prolessionnel secondaire (IPS) Teacher training (primary)/enseignement ,457 normal (primaire): Ecole Normale d'instituteurs (ENI) Higher education/enseignement supérieur ,739 1,016 /4 19:1 / /3 (after the Baccalaureat/après le baccalauréat) /l Not included IPS Faranah, Kissidougou, Siguri, Fria/non inclus IPS Faranah, Kissidougou, Siguri, Pria. /2 Estimated for 1979/80/Estimations pour 1979/80. /3 This estimate is only for the first two years of study/estimation pour ler degré du 4ème cycle. /4 This estinmate is for 1977/78 and includes 224 expatriate teachers/estimation pour 1977/78 et comprend 224 professeurs expatriés. /5 This estimate is for 1977/78/Estimations pour 1977/78. /6 Estimated from the population census of December 1972/Estimation sur la base du recensement de décembre 1972.

46 PEOPLE'S REVOLUTIONARY REPUBLIC OF GUINEA/ REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE REVOLUTIONNAIRE DE GUINEE SECOND EDUCATION PROJECT/DEUXIEME PROJET EDUCATION COMPARISON OF PER STUDENT COSTS IN WEST AFRICA/ COMPARAISON DES COUTS UNITAIRES EN AFRIQUE DE L'OUEST Annual Recurrent Cost per Student/Coût unitaire in $US / en $EU as a % of GDP / en pourcentage PIB Secondary Secondary Education/ Education/ Primary Educa- Enseignmt. Primary educa- Enseignmt. Year/ Gui per capita/ tion/enseignmt. général tion/enseignmt. général Année PIB par tête primaire secondaire primaire secondaire Guinea/Guinée Benin Central African Republic/Rêpublique Centrafricaine Ivory Coast/ , Côte d'ivoire Mauritania/ , Mauritanie Senegal Upper Volta/ Haute Volta ri

47 REVOLUTIONANY PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OP GUINEA! REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE REVOLJUTIONNAIRE SE GUINEE SECOND EDUCATION PROJECT/DEUXIEMEf PROJET EDUJCATION PROJECTIONS OP RECUREENT EXPENDITURRI/PEOJECTIONSES REPENSES COUEANTES ( ) (Enro1lmeots je thousando of un,its/effectifs on milliers d>unités) (Expenditures in millions ut Sylis/Répeses e- millions de Sylis) hlypothesis A/Nypothès A 1/ Hyppotheois B/11yj-thèse I 2/ u.alitatit Change! Without Qualitative Changes! QuaI it-tivu- ag Wlithout Qualitativ,e Changes/Ions chang.emet qualitatif Amli.r. qualitative ~ Sans changement qualitat if AmsIio.a'1ittv 'vo os vo il~~~ o Oaa osa >sv va O 010~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Î Fn~~o 4> O 55 e O 4,0~ o. o 4> n. o. -e~~~~~~~~~~0 5>- es e -. n O e -M0 o o.0 > V-at trinig/ip n -n. 7.0 C5» >-O e3> OC Ce9 animal husbadry)/4èc O ana e -- >4, us cy~~~~l., ler4> v adegrvé5 4>5 n CslauCf.agr.-O 0 C -> n s>vt-s> ov aa oain os 04 First u.iversuity l.v.1 o ou o (agriculur. & ainali as4. 2a5o e. vo. 164a 235a o o va 1s 79, va 4 > 9. e5. se, e6. vo7 4 h.sba.dry)/4èmc eyo a -> 04 O a so -o e--> ml 0-- Secod lvel iv.sity on 4, v >1-a on O7 9-4us 12vs 8102as' vu1.!4ème cye-le, a2n on s S O 00> ssem 4degré 0 00 v2 Pnimarp/ler cycl > 6> 2> > - >1 6> ' 559.7I06> - 6> deodsy2e t15> 558 4> 8> 179 J87 5> 4> I >P,07IB 50 2> 1> ? 999, Sème cycleseymsso/msio 'éue etoill nec Teohe traini,a~ngetn a 2>eag ann>8 35t 3 44> 3 slre 4ra 11>6n/PBa.mntn 47>0a58>6o4e5 15>2 3F 61>2 76>4 sa.4re r7ls -20o.n4>s1>t6>7 2.7n>9 77s. 2/GI icrain a a veag a.ulrae f %an raislaie icrain b 24, r t hese at a DPpe cptapi agmnan a tu mende5zpr n t aaiesril Voc tatxiona4l oi a mramingtaux4 que I 24>2 63>9 7>h a12 139b34 173i10 3>09ta47n89 8> >t1..8> 1>

48 G H A N A GWSC - ACCRA/TEMA METROPOLITAN AREA SOURCES AND APPLICATION OF FUNDS STATEMENT FY (e 000'S) Fiscal Year 1980!1/ 1981-/ 19821/ 1982-/ Actual Esticated Forecast Yorecast Forecast Forecast Forecast SOURCES Income Before Interest (5,379) 4473' (5,042)-/ (11,253) 11,449 16,850 36,735 Depreciation 1,411 1,323 4,521 2,525 5,582 6,027 6,875 (3,968) 1,770 (521) (8,728) 17,031 22,877 43,610 LESS: Principal ,272 4,272 4,272 Interest 1,590 1,548 1,935 1,090 2,419 3,024 3,780 Total Debt Service 1,590 1,548 1,935 1,090 6,691 7,296 8,052 Internal Cash Generation (5,558) 222 (2,456) (9,818) 10,340 15,581 35,558 Borrowings IDA II 2,554 1, Other Donor (Pipeline) ,000 9,000 3,600 CIDA 7,343 1,801 2,350 1, AFDB , Local Banks 4, Total Borrowing 13,898 3,682 3,500 1,900 3,800 9,000 3,600 Coverr.nent Contributions - Local 6,067 5,281 4,500 3,600 5,000 12,500 7,500 - Foreign (IDA 111) ,000 7,500 4,000 APPLICATIONS TOTAL SOURCES-' 2,! (428,,.ss Capital Investment Second Stage Project 18,377 14,068 10,800 3, Technical Asstce/Rehab'n ,800 29,000 15,100 Sewerage Works ,500 Other Water Supplies 1,960 1,500 1,600 1,200 2,600 3,000 10,000 Total Investment 20,337 15,568 12,600 4,900 14,900 32,500 29,600 Working Capital Cash Increase (Decrease) (6,182) (8,447) (8,456) (6,156) 5,240 10,981 14,758 Increase (Decrease) 252 2,064 1,400 (3,062) 2,000 1,100 6,300 TOTAL APPLICATIONS (9AIL) Z& L 250^ Debt Service Coverage (tirmes) NIL NIL NIL NIL / and 2/ See Footnotes in Annex 5.4 3/ After Government Subsidy 4/ 752 Equity and 25i Grant - ATMA Share of IDA III relates to Rehabilitation of Pipeline, Spares, etc.

49 EDI'EATIIN PR0,JECT :o ars e:ort hs 9-osect Comrooest O'S DELLAIS '000 ANNOEX 8 TEC.INICAL i4stroctop ~ NATIONAL EOECATIONAL 84906UER PREJEOT Cn oeep IF? ' INSTITITE2~F E1J-CAI39N PLANNAIN PLANNINO PROJEET JNIT PREPARATION ipo N1ANAN19 LAPE 90ZE8E8RE 6ARE88U5E COLLESE EN: KANKAN EN! LAPE EPICATION PRW SHOPIRECTORATE DIRECTEORTE 3P598D180 SERVICES T-OOIOâu,,- 1. NVESTNENT ST A,011 CIVL 18K 1, ,3S4.7 2,622, ,920,9 ;3: ,246,2 :0.2 1,831.9 PhusîCal Coxtingee.c:es , : pries Oon.tin14eneles 173, F ,M 4.5-1,410.' : ,1 Sub-Thtal INCLUPING C0NT.148ENCIES 1.B ,123,0 2,434, :1, ,9 Taxes 061, , , , 4,640, : Forelun Esechanas 0, , , :, , B. FURN193RE , , , '09,3 : PFhxsieaî CotoeeeM , Pries Contirenscie ,9 0. A 15.2, , Sub-Total INELEPINI6 CONTINGEMCIES : % 3,2 Taxes , , : EDVIPNENT 415, , 3,380, Pliosocal Cootinueoceas Pries Continsence5e Sut-Total INOLUDIN8 0814T]NGENCIES 548, , B ,9-4, ,99,1 Taxes , , , , D. PRO&ESSI8ML FEES :92, :24.8 1, I14,8. P8,ysîcal Continienceîs 22, M : Pries contongescies , , Sut-Total 84Et68188 C3flTIN8ENCIES : :, Foreign SErcaasg 178,1l , ,609,4 23,2 2Q0,9 E. SPECIALIST SERVICES , ,8 95, C.23, 2, Prizes Cootiongexes :7.2 0, 0. Sut-Total INELUDINE CONTIN8ENCIEE ,331, ,25739.' 00 Fareils Exehanas-e , :186.î U ' , F. FELLMHI0PS , :014, ,307, Pries Cont:ngesceis , : CID Sut-Total INaLUDING CONTINSENIES , :126.0 : Foreims Exchange , ' : ' , Total INVESTMENT COSTE 2.146, ,170.62, , ,980.0 : %hsieal ContonAeoeies , ' 2'.? ,441, Prire Contmngeneies 293, , : ,7 2':,.6 Total INCLOSINU CONTIN8ENCIES ,258,4 4, ,844,3 2, ,001, , , , ,710.0 Taxes 1, , ,279.5 :093 6S.o Foreia x Phranue ,090, ,973.1l , ,307,7 ' ', , II. EOLMENT A. OMA88614 EXPENSES : CID PrmEe Cortingsîciex , Sul-TOtal INCLOOINO CENTIN8ENEIES , ? : , 0..0 Taxes , à ' Foreiln Exehange 15, B. L8EAL SENONRS , Pries Coantinen-exss , Sut-Total INCLUOIN800ONTIHOENCIOSS : Total RECU8RENT0C0STS 42,6 84, :.71 19, , Pries Continapurmes : ,0 7, : Total INCL00IN8 CONTINGENCIEE 54.0 : , 1I9.o Taxes 38,3 75, : , Foresun Exchanoe 15, : ,7 ' 13, Total PASELINE C0STS 2, ,429,4 3, ,469. 2, , , , , ,441.5 PhysieaI Contin encies , , , Pries COxtinssnciex , 27.:1 :42, , Total PR8JE00 COSTS 2,717.94,365, ,745,72, , ,.:6.7' S ,370,9 064.: 019, 9.22,713.:

50 ANNEX VI GHANA Water Supply and Sewerage Technical Assistance and Rehabilitation Project Project Cost Estîmates in Thousand US Dollars (March 1983 Prices) US$OO0s Foreign Local Total I. Technical Assistance A. Salary Costs 1,800-1,800 B. Support Costs 500 1,500 2,000 C. Office & Training Equipment D. Vehicles Sub-Total 2,490 1,500 3,990 II. Management Improvement Program A. Personnel in Ghana ,334 B. Personnel in Home Offices C. Local Consultant Support D. Reimbursable Expenses E. Office Equipment F. Vehicles Sub-Total 1, ,350 III. Consultant Services A. Design B. Supervision C. Reservoir Studies D. Reservoir Studies Sub-Total 1, ,270 IV. Pipeline Rehabilitation A. Cathodic Protection B. Recoating 1, inch 1, , inch C. Pipe Replacement inch , inch D. Valves and Fittings E. Maintenance Equipment and Supplies F. Crossings Sub-Total 4,673 1,636 6,309 V. Miscellaneous A. Spare Parts and Tools a B. Public Fountains C. Water Meters D. Pick-up Trucks and Cars E. Mopeds Sub-Total 1, ,150 TOTAL BASE COST 10,700 4,369 15,069 CONTINGENCIES (Physical) 12% 1, ,824 (Price) 1,000 4,507 5,507 TOTAL PROJECT COSTS 13,000 9,400 22,400 January 10, 1983

51 REVOLUTIONARY PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF GUINEA/ REPUBLIQUE POPULAIRE REVOLUTIONNAIRE DE GUINEE SECONfD ERICATTON PROJIECT/DEUIXTEMF PRO TET F.DIJATTON SUMMARY OF SPECIALIST SERVICES/TABLEAU SOMMAIRE DES SPECIALISTES DE L'ASSISTANCE TECHNIQUE Reference in Total Cost Appraisél Man- Estimates Report/ Number of Local/ Months/ (US$)/ Starting Référence dans Specialists/ Expatriates Total Estimations Date/ Project Components/ le Rapport Title/ Nombre de Cuinéens/ Mois- des Coûts Date de Summary Job Description/ Elements du Projet d'evaluation Titre Spécialistes Expatriés lommes ($EU) Démarrage Description Sommaire des Tâches A. Technical Instructor Carpentry and joinery in- 1 E ,000 7/83 Train Cuinean instructor trainers; prepare and evaluate Training training Instituts/ structor/expert en programs in expert's specialty and related subjects/formation Institut Supérieur de menuiserie des instructeurs guinéens;préparation et évaluation de Formation des programmes de formation des IPS dans sa spécialité. Professeurs de l'enseignement Masonry instructor/ 1 E ,000 7/83 Supérieur (ISFORPET) Expert en maçonnerie Mechanical workshop in- I E ,000 7/83 -_ structor/expert en mécanique générale Plumbinginstructor/ I E ,000 7/83 Expert en plomberie Automotive trades in- I E ,000 7/83 -_ structor/expert en mécanique auto Sheet metal welding in- 1 E ,000 7/83 -_ structor/expert en chaudronnerie et charpente métallique Inistructor for heavy 1 E ,000 7/83 -_ machinery/instructeur engins travaux publics B. Storage Unit/ Store manager/ 1 E 6 60,000 10/84 Organization and initial operation of a central service for Magasin Central Cestionnaire de stock purchasing, storage and distribution of working materials, tools, spare parts, etc./organisation et démarrage du magasin central. C. General Education Educational planning 1 E ,000 10/83 Organization of the Caneral Educatimn Planning Directorate Planning Directorate/ specialist/spécialiste (DGPE) and contribution to planning studies and training of Direction GOn_Urale de en planification de local staff/organisation de la Direction Générale de la la Planification de l'éducation Planification itudes de l'edupation l'education (DGPE) et contribution (DGPE) aux de planification et à la formation des guinéens. Consultants for higher 3 E 6 60,000 4/84 Short-term consultants for higher education statistirs, vocaeducation, vocational (2x 1) tional asd tracer studies/etudes sur les and tracer statistiques de l'enseignement supérieur, le développement de studies/consultants (1 x 4) l'enseignoment technique et le devenir des élves des IPS. pour études sur l'enseignement supérieur, le développement de l'enseignement technique et le devenir des élèves Consultants in educational 3 E 4 40,000 4/85 Short-term consultants for local training of regional planning statistics and planning for (2 x 1) staff/consultants à court-terme pour la formation locale en local training/consultants ( x n) planification de l'éducation du personnel régional. pour la formation du personnel local en statistiques et planification lo D O Z>

52 Refoeeco in Toto] CooL Appraisal Man- Estimates Report/ Nsmber of l,ocal/ Months/ (us$)/ Starting Référesce dans Specialints!/ Epatriates/ Tota] Estimations Date/ Project Componeots/ le Rapport Title/ Nombre de Guinéens/ Mois- des Coûts Date de Sunnsary lob Desc-iption Eléments du Projet d'evalation Titre Spécialistes Expatriés Hommes ($EU) Démarrage Descriptisît Sommaire des Tâciles D. Ioom Resoorces Conssltants in masposer 3 E ,000 10/83 Slort-term consaltants for follos-sp ni anpo-er -eeds Planning/PlaniFication statistics and planning/ stody and organication of manpoer statistics/consaultants des Ressources Consultants pour les à court-terme pour l'élaboration do saisi Ndscatif des HNimaines statistiques et la plani- (i $2) besoins de main-d'oeuvre et l'organisation des fication de l'édscation/ statistiques de l'emploi. formation E. Notiottoi Pedagogical Cfrricalnm developnent I E ,000 10/83 Coottibstion ta primary ed-cation and teacher traimiîtg Nnstitate/Inlstitsle specialisr/nnpeet on clrrinla, asd to tbe training of Goincansg/Par ticipation National Pédagogiqae élaboration des à l'élaboration des programmes do primaire et de la programmies formation des maîtres et de ses hîomologues goinéens. Initial and fs-service I E ,000 9/84 Contribution to initial and in-setsiie teacher teainiaf teabher training curîiulsa and preparation né teacher troin,ing documents/ specialisit/epert en Participation 3 l'elaboration des programmes de formation formation et recyclage initiale et continue des maîtres et préparation de des maîtres documents pédagagiqoes poilr la formation. Textbook editing specialist/ i E ,000 10/83 Contribstion ta the elaboration af textbook specificatio.s, Ftpert en édition des technical follos-up af the authors terms and editorial nannels croies of tbe aoanscripts/contribîrtifnt S l'élaboration des spécificatio.s tecbniques des manuels, au soivi technique des auteurs et -o contrôle éditorial des projets de manscls. Textbook productio I le ,000 10/ô3 Conrribation to setting up the textbobk prodiirtioiî departspecialistt/epert en ment, draftisg the printing specificatio-s nf the textbooks production des mansels and planning their prodsction/contribîîtian I la mise en place do département, élaboration des spécifications techniq-es d'impression et N la planificaton et contrôle do processus d'élaboration dem -nasels. Consultants for local 6 E 8 80,000 1/84 Ihort-term eonnoltaors for IPN and regional staff traisi,ag staff training in experi- i1 pedagogical and study techniques and for the organisation mentation, esaluation, (4 o ).5) nf IPN doesmentation/coesiltants pour la formation do methodology af teaching (l 20.25) person,nel de l'ipn et des régions N des techniqaes and for organizing IPN pédagogiques et d'értdes et N l'organisation de la documentatioo/caassltanes (3 x 0.75) documentation de l'ipn. pour la formation de pet- Osonel local pour empérimentation, évaluation, méthodologie et organisation de la documentation de l'ipn F. EdNcation Print Printing techniqua I E ,000 7/83 Contribution ta the general manageenet of the print shap and Shop/lnprimerie de specialist/spêcialiste des particularly ta the srganization of printing operations/ I'Edolcation et de techbiques de l'imprimerie Participation à la gestion générale de l'imprimerie et la Culture (IDEC) particulièrement à l'organisation de l'imprimerie. Consultants for textbook 3 E /84 Short-term consaltants for the organization of textbook storage and distribution ' storage and distribution, and for equipment maintenan-e and eqîtipment maintenance/ (I n 3) training/consultants ô -ort-terme pmur stockage et Consaltan1to pour le stockage (2 o I) distribrti-n des manuels et formation N la maintenante dcs ct distribution des man-els êquipeme-ts. et formation à la maintenance des éqaipements G. Education Project Managerial assistant/ I E ,000 7/83 Gceneral management nf the project/c(estion générale du Directorate/Direction de Gestionnaire projet. Projets Edscation Architect/Architecte N E ,000 7/82 Supersision of arehitectural design nork and construction! Supervision des études architecturales et de la constroction. Gonsultants/Consultants 4 E 9 90,000 7/82 Preparatian of equlpment lsts and biddlng documents: (2 l) schedule ni accsmmodations for the IPS et Faranah/ Z (2 n 2) Preparation des listes d'equipe...nt et de, Is"et (2 o 1.) d'ampeo d'offres; nemelatîîre don Io d le ' 0 5i1 de Faranah.

53 REVOLUTIONARY PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF GUINEA/ REPUBLIQUE REVOLUTIONNAIRE POPULAIRE DE GUINEE SECOND EDUCATION PROJECT/DEUXIEME PROJET EDllCATTON SUIMMARY OF FELLOWSHIPS/TABLEAU SOMMAIRE DES BOURSES DE PERFECTIONNEMENT Roforence in Total Basic Appraisal Local/ Mao Qualifications Report/ Abrood/ Months/ Total Costs af Trainees/ Starting Réféce-ce dans Locales! Total (<us/ Quolificatioos Date/ Project Componeots/ le Rapport Field of Study/ NBmber/ à Mois- Colts totaux Pondoseetolea Dats do Summory of Responsibilities/ Eléments do Projet d'evaluation SBoets d'etudes Nombre l'etranger Hommes ($EU) des Boursiers édmarrage Description des Responsabilitîs A. Tech ical Instructor Masagement of vocatiomal teacher 1 A 1 5,000 Siroctsr-Oonerol of ISFORPET 7/83 Management and development af sacs- Training Institate/ training institutiosm/gestion or alternate/directeur de tisnas teacher troisieg/direction Institut Supérieur de d'uo institut de fomatise de l'isforpet os son adjoint et gestion g5pfrolc de l'isforpet Formation des Professeurs professeurs de I 'E seg ignent Toehbique (ISFORPET) Troiaing methods for vocational 9 A ,0û0 Experienced vacatioeal teach- 10/83 Theoretical aad practical instractoachers in respective (9 a 9) er oith good trade experience/ tie af vsocational teacher specialty/formation de formateurs Professeur expérimonté trainees/professeurs à l'isforpet dans les spécialités retenues d'enseignement technique dans doms Se projet les filières concernées par le projet Organization and implementation 2 A 20 46,000 Experienced vacational tosacer 1O0i3 Organization and oafagemt ai of equipment maistenance in va- (2 o 10) or maintenasco tochnician with equipment mointeancoe In soati.onl cational schobls/organisotion good technical bockground/ schools/orgaoisation et maintenacce et mise os ses-ro de la Professeor de mécanique et des éqoipements de L'ISFORPPT et IPS maintenance des éqaipem..ts électra-méoanique expérimenté à l'isforpet et dans les IPS Use and operation of photo lab B A 3 9,000 Photo technician with eoporioncc Operation af photo lob ta support as support for vaotional in productien and use of peda- vocational teacher trainieg/ teacher triainig,'utilisation gogic :oteriols/techbicien photo Opération do laborotoire phato d'an Iaborataire photo pour avec experierce de l'otilisotion de I 'ESFCPPET l'élabarotise de materiel do matériel pédagogique didbctiqoe I. scotiasal Traintit si Maoagement af vocational ede- 3 A 3 15,000 Director af IPS or alternate/ 10/83 Management and deselopment of Polytechi iq ies Secondaires cation & traioing/gestion des (3 s S) Directeur de l'ips ou soa voctional training/direction et (IPS) yc e c aips do Lobé, Kankan et adjoint gestias géméro1e des IPS de l.abé, (EPS) ~~~~~~~~~~~N'Zéréksré Kookas, et NRUêérébré Practical oorkshop ksills 3 A 18 44,000 Experienced vocational teacher I0/83 Supervisios of practical skills training in vocational (3 x 6) with industrial trade experiesce/ training in vocational schobls/ schoolq/plasifioation et Professeur d'enseignement tech- Chef de travsas dons les IPS contrôle des travaux pra- nique espérimesté.a chef de fionadcs tiqoes trevsas C. Cestral Starage Orgasiostian oad mo..agement S A 10 23,001 Ooad basic teobnical edocotion 10!83 MH..age..e.t ai -etral storoge umit/ C CitMngtsiaL Cestral af a central unit for pur- and administrative experienoe/ Gestion de stockage et distributins chasing, storage and dis- Bonme formation technique et des éqoipemeets et matière d'oessre tribation af edocati oal empérience de 1'adaimistrttieu materials/orgaisatiton et gestion du magasin central d'équipement et matière d'oeuvre S. Ge..erin Edacton Educati1ation i plsnig witb a 4 A 40 92,000 Ad,anced trainiag in education/ 10/83 P1annion staff if the GeneraL Ploaoiag T),c.a. specializatioa (soboal mappisg. (4 5 15) Stades spgriesres em sciences de Educatioo Planning Directoroto! Directioa an Crorl statistios, -ot aced Diaosisg, l'éducation Personnel de la Directios de la PIasificatios vecational training)/ Plant- Gémélrale de la Planification de 1 'Education (DGPE) fication de E'éducation avec de l'edcaptiae ose spécialisation EdRcation and career cosa- 1 A 10 23,000 Advanced training tn dedcation 10/83 " n seling/information scolaire or school guidance/8tudes sapéet usiversitaire rieures en éducation om orienta-, - tion scm1aire Educational planning/ Planification de l'éducation 30 L ,000 Officers with planning and ad- 4/85 Staff af the regional education (3 x 0.5) ministrative responsibilities in planning anits/personnel des regional offices/personnel régional bureaux de planification régionsau ayant responsabilités ea planifioation et admisistratios

54 Reference in Total Basic Appraisal Local/ Mn Qualifications Report/ Abroad/ Months/ Total Costs of Trainees/ Starting Référence dans Locales/ Total (0s$) / Qualifications Date/ Project Components/ le Rapport Field of Study/ Number! à Mois- Cots totaux Fondamentales Date de Summary of Respsibli Eléments du Projet d'evaluation Sujets d'etsdes Nombre l'etranger Hommes ($EU) des Boursiers Démarrage Description des Resp' sabiliù E. Humas Resources Education planning with a 2 A 20 46,000 Advanced training in educa- 10/83 Planning staff of the luman Planning/Planifieation specialization(vocational (2 x 10) tion or economics/etudes Resources Planning Division/ des Ressources humaines training, cost and financing)/ supérieures en éducation Personnel de la Division des Planification de l'éducation ou économie Ressources Humaines avec une spécialisation Manpower planning/ 2 A 20 46,000 Advanced training in econs- 10/84 Prévisions de mais-d'oo,,vrc (2 x,10) mics/etudes supérieures en économie Manpower statistics/ 1 A 10 23,000 Advanced training in statis- 10/83 Statistics staff of the Directcats' Statistiques besoins tics/etudes supérieures en nf EmRlovment/Fonctioensir,c main-d'oeuvre statistiques de la Direction do Travail F. National Pedagogical Curriculum development/ Institute/lnstitut Péda- Elaboration des programmes 2 A 20 46,000 Advurced training in education 9/82 Research staff of the National gogique National (2 x 10) ucienccs and.teaching experiesco' Pedussgical émuti;ute!cssrg% Rtsds-s nspériesrs s. cins i tides de I l'in de l'éducation et expérience de l'enseignement Evaluation techniques! 2 A 20 46,000 9/82?cc},niqlcs d,valuation (2 x 10) Science tca.,hi,g el:hodu/ I A 10 23,000 Advanced training in sciences 9/83 Méthodo1ogie de l'enseignement and experience in teaching/ des sciences Etgdes supérieures e sciences et oxpérience de l'enseignement Mathematics teaching methods/ 1 A 10 23,000 Advanced training in Mathematics 9/83 Mé'thodologie de l'enseignement and teaching experience/etudes des mathématiques supérieures en mathématiques et expérience de l'enseignement Teaching methods/méthodologie 2 A 20 46,000 Advanced degree in education 9/82 de l'enseignement (2 x 10) und experience in teacher training/etudes en sciences de l'éducation et expérience de la formation des maîtres Teotbhok development and 2 A 20 46,000 Advanced degree in education 9/82 editing/rédaction et édition (2 s 10) and experience in teaching/ des manuels scolaires Etgdes en sciences de l'éducation et expérience do I 'OenseigneOment Tcxtbook production und control/ 2 A 20 46,000 Advanced degree in education 9/82 Production et contrôle des (2 s 10) and experience in textbook manuels scolaires production/etudes en sciences de l'éducation et expérience de la production des masuels Librarian/Docmuentaliste I A 6 12,000 Qualification and experience 9/84 commensurate with the fonction/ Qualification et expérience commensurable avec la fonction Illustrator/Dessinateur 1 A 6 12,000 Illustrator/Dessinateur 9/82

55 Reference in Total Basic Appraisal Local/ Man Qualifications Report/ Abroad/ Muoths/ Total Costs of Trainees/ Starting Référenee dans Locales Total ($0S)! Qualifications Date/ Prcject Components/ le Rapport Field of Study/ Number/ à Mois- CoGts totaux Fondamentales Date de Su=ary uf Responsibilties/ Eléments du Projet d'evaluation Sujets d'etudes Nombre l'etranger Hommes ($EU) des Boursiers Démarrage Description des Respossabilités G. Education Print Shop/ Eleetrical/electronic maintenance 1 A 10 23,000 Degree in electrotechno- 10/83 Technical staff of IDEC/ Imprimerie de l'eduac- (printing machinery)/electro- logy and experience/diplôme Personnel technique de l'idec tion et de la Culture technique (photocomposition et en électro-technique et (ldec) photo-gravure) expérience Maintenance mechanie/mécanique I A 10 23,000 Degrec i 0 mechanics and 10/83 de maintenance experienc.e/diplôme en méchanique et expérience Printing management/gestion I A 10 23,000 Print Shop technician with 10/83 de l'imprimerie a general experience in printing/spécialiste de l'impression avec expérience Offset and printing press 1 A 10 23,000 Print shop technician with 10/83 specialist/technicien offset general knowledge ef printing et presse machines/spécialiste de l'imprimerie avec expérience du fonctionnement des presses H. Teacher Training Science teaching methodology/ 2 A 20 46,000 Science teacher with long 10/83 ENI staff/personncl Colleges/Ecoles Normales Méthodologie enseignement des (2 x 10) experience/professeur de *ies EN' d'instituteurs (ENI) sciences sciences avec longue expérience General teaching methodology/ 4 A 40 92,000 ENI professors/professeurs Méthodologie de l'enseignement (4 x 10) ENI Curriculum develspment and 2 A 20 46,000 evaluation/elaboration des (2 s 10) programmes et évaluation Methodology of teaching 2 A 20 46,000 ENI teachers of Frencb/Pro- French/Méthodologie du (2 x l0) fesseurs de français à l'eni français langue étrangère Librarian/Documeantliste 2 A 12 24,000 Secondary schuol graduate and (2 x 6) teachingepcin/3ile esseignement secondaire et.epori.nce de 1'ensoignse..sr Laboratory technicias/ Technicien du laboratoire 2 A 12 24,000 Scie.rtific baccslal.eate'bac- (2 x 6) calauréat sciestifique t. Education Project Bookkeeping/Comptabilité 1 A 10 23,000 Degree in sccaqnting/diplsur q '63 Education Project Diroctorate Directorate/Direction en comptabilité staff/pers... 1 de la D:rect:on des Projets Educatios, do projet. Procurement and bidding I A 10 23,000 Secondary uchool graduate/ 05æû3 docsments/passation des Dipl8mé enseignement seco- daire marchés et préparation des appels d'offres Coordinatios of study 4A 20,000 4/84 Pro/oct Director/Directe-r (travel)/dlirection(voyages dii pro'jet. d'études)

56 PREPACATION EXECI.TION CRNSUAThTION VOCATIONAL TEkINING: LNSTIT1TTES/LNSTINDTS POLYTECANIQlUES SECONDAIRES (IPS) Civilwartts/Génie_clv'i ; = = t= :z= EqRuip,ns-Purntura/Eauipst-awbier - 4F.z-t - - Locail staff rleaining/pormaticn personne. lc_a1 _ =I SiÇj TECENICAL INSTRUCTOR TRALNL\G INSIITUTE/LNSTIT 1 DE PROFESSEURS DE L'ENSEIT,li lt TECHIIQi (ESFC-tET> I= - CENTRAL SlORAGE UNIITI}fAASTN t CENTRALi =t~-- =' W =tt SpecialisesTie/eVCsd rrn te =0-rTeWe -EENENRÀLECATIO 2PLA'NING DIRECTORAIE/DlRECT - O= CENERALE DE LA PLANIFICATION DE L'EDUCATION (DCPE) - -, - SpeOiZli1t s ' S i da :péccon.i _ E: _R L.. 1oa staff tr.i.i.g/por mtion peroneoal.. =l 1- HRbbUMA RESL'RCE I PLA NNIG/PLANIFICAlION DES i, + _ - T = NFATIONAL PEDAGOGICAL INSTITUTE/INSTITUI CiviI vok/é ie iil LEDrCATION PRINT1 SHOP/sLMPRIIIERIE DE L'EDLCATION EIT ' tjr - 4 DE LA CLLTUR (LDEC)!I i 4 it T Civi1 -ok i/genie civil 1 iit i»^ -_ - + i-t t J 2 & - If t Eqip=et-Funitre/EuiptentbiIiat_- t,it f!i lli :! lzcer TalINL COLLEGES/Lervies NeMocALESte I D'NTTUER taftaningfrain)ronllcœ (Ea 4L t WÙDCATION IP m 0 < PRPRTION /iconsllatai.ion M-CUITIN

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