CENTRAL STATE UNIVERSITY

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1 CENTRAL STATE UNIVERSITY CENTRAL STATE UNIVERSITY CATALOG, Published by Central State University, Wilberforce, Ohio This publication is neither a contract nor an offer to make a contract. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this publication, the University reserves the right to make changes at any time with respect to course offerings, degree requirements, services provided, or any other subject addressed in this publication. The information in this publication is provided solely for the convenience of the reader, and the University expressly disclaims any liability which may otherwise be incurred. 1

2 SYMBOL OF STRENGTH Galloway Tower on the Central State University campus is an historic symbol of the University s 123 years of higher education. TABLE OF CONTENTS Academic Calendar... 3 The University Campus Life Admission Fees and Expenses Cash Management Financial Aid Registration The Academic Program General Education Transfer Module The Center for Academic Success (TCAS) University Programs and Services Central State University Dayton Campus College of Arts and Sciences College of Business and Industry College of Education Course Descriptions Trustees and Faculty Index

3 ACADEMIC CALENDAR FALL SEMESTER 2010 (AUGUST 16 DECEMBER 11, 2010) AUG 5, 6 University Institute AUG 9-14 Late Registration ($ Fee Assessed) AUG Orientation, Testing and Registration for New and Transfer Students AUG 11 Residence Halls Open for New and Transfer Students Only AUG Freshman Academy Begins for New Students AUG 14 In-Person Registration for Returning Students AUG 14 Residence Halls Open for Returning Students AUG 16 Classes Begin AUG 16 Last Day for a 100% Refund AUG Drop/Add Period AUG % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University AUG 24 Last Day to Add a Class AUG 24 Last Day to Drop a Class Without Record AUG 25 Last Day to use Book Voucher AUG 26-SEP 6 50% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University AUG 30 Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) SEP 6 Labor Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) SEP % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University SEP English Proficiency Examination Main Campus SEP First Interim Grade Reporting Period SEP 24 Last Day to Make Up I Grades from Spring and Summer SEP 24-DEC 11 0% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University OCT 8-9 Homecoming OCT 8-11 Fall Break (No Classes on Main Campus and CSU Dayton Campus) OCT 12 Classes Resume OCT 16 English Proficiency Examination CSU Dayton Campus OCT Second Interim Grade Reporting Period OCT 20 Career Day OCT 20, 21 English Proficiency Examination Main Campus NOV 5 Last Day to Drop or Withdraw from a Class with a W Grade NOV 8 Registration Begins for Spring Semester 2011 NOV 11 Veteran s Day (No Classes, Main & Dayton Campuses) NOV Thanksgiving Holiday NOV 29 Classes Resume DEC 1 Deadline to submit Application for Graduation DEC 4 Last Day of Classes DEC 6, 7, 8, 9 Final Examinations for the Main Campus DEC 6, 7 and 11 Final Examinations for the CSU Dayton Campus DEC 9 Residence Halls Close DEC 14 Final Grades Due 4:00 p.m. 3

4 SPRING SEMESTER 2011 (JANUARY 10 MAY 5, 2011) JAN 3-8 JAN 6 JAN 6 JAN 7 JAN 7 JAN 10 JAN 10 JAN JAN JAN 18 JAN 18 JAN 19 JAN JAN 17 JAN 24 FEB 1-17 FEB 7-8 FEB 7-11 FEB 18 FEB 18-MAY 6 FEB 21 FEB 24 FEB 28 MAR 1 MAR 11 MAR 10 MAR MAR 16, 17 MAR MAR 28 MAR 30 APR 1 APR 3 APR 5 APR 30 MAY 2, 3, 4, 5 APR 30, MAY 2, 3 MAY 6 MAY 7 MAY 10 Late Registration ($ Fee Assessed) Orientation, Testing and Registration for New and Transfer Students Residence Halls Open for New and Transfer Students In-Person Registration for Returning Students Residence Halls Open for Returning Students Classes Begin Last Day for a 100% Refund Drop/Add Period 90% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Last Day to Add a Class Last Day to Drop a Class without Record Last Day to use Book Voucher 50% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday (No Classes, Offices Closed) Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) 25% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University English Proficiency Examination Main Campus First Interim Grade Reporting Period Last Day to Make Up I Grades from Spring and Summer 0% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Presidents Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) Co-op Intern Career Day Final Deadline for Submitting Graduation Application Charter Day Senior Salute English Proficiency Examination CSU Dayton Campus Second Interim Grade Reporting Period English Proficiency Examination Main Campus Spring Break Classes Resume Registration Begins for Summer and Fall Semesters Last Day to Drop or Withdraw With a W Grade New Student Orientation (NSO) Honors Convocation Last Day of Classes Final Examinations for the Main Campus Final Examinations for the CSU Dayton Campus Rehearsal for Commencement Commencement (Saturday) Final Grades Due 4:00 p.m. 4

5 SUMMER A TERM 2011 (MAY 16 JUNE 20, 2011) MAY 13 Residence Halls Open MAY 13 In-Person Registration for New and Continuing Students MAY Late Registration ($ Fee Assessed) MAY 16 Classes Begin MAY Drop/Add Period MAY 16 Last Day for a 100% Refund MAY % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University MAY 18 Last Day to Add a Class MAY 18 Last Day to Drop a Class without Record MAY % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University MAY 24, 25 English Proficiency Examination Main Campus MAY 26-JUN 3 25% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University MAY 30 Memorial Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) MAY 31 Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) JUN % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University JUN 13 Last Day to Drop courses or Withdraw from a Class with a W grade JUN 18 New Student Orientation (NSO) JUN 20 Last Day of Classes JUN 22 Final Grades Due by 4:00 p.m. SUMMER 2011 Final Examinations Final Examinations for Summer A Term classes will be held on the last day of the regularly scheduled class meeting time. SUMMER B TERM 2011 (JUNE 22 JULY 26, 2011) JUN Late Registration ($ Fee Assessed) JUN 20 Residence Halls Open JUN 20 In-Person Registration for New and Continuing Students JUN 22 Classes Begin JUN Drop/Add Period JUN 22 Last Day for a 100% Refund JUN % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University JUN 24 Last Day to Add a Class JUN 24 Last Day to Drop a Class without Record JUN 28, 29 English Proficiency Examination Main Campus JUN 28-JUL 1 50% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University JUL % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University JUL 4 Independence Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) JUL 6 Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) JUL 10 New Student Orientation (NSO) JUL % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University JUL 18 Last Day to Drop courses or Withdraw from a Class with a W grade JUL 26 Last Day of Classes JUL 26 Residence Halls Close JUL 28 Final Grades Due by 4:00 p.m. SUMMER 2011 Final Examinations Final Examinations for Summer B Term classes will be held on the last day of the regularly scheduled class meeting time. 5

6 FALL SEMESTER 2011 (AUGUST 15 DECEMBER 10, 2011) AUG 4, 5 University Institute AUG 8-13 Late Registration AUG 9-12 Orientation, Testing and Registration for New and Transfer Students AUG 9 Residence Halls Open for New and Transfer Students Only AUG Freshman Academy Begins for New and Transfer Students AUG 12 In-Person Registration for Returning Students AUG 12 Residence Halls Open for Returning Students AUG 15 Classes Begin AUG 15 Last Day for a 100% Refund AUG Drop/Add Period AUG % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University AUG 23 Last Day to Add a Class AUG 23 Last Day to Drop a Class Without Record AUG 24 Last Day to use Book Voucher AUG 25-SEP 6 50% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University AUG 28 Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) SEP 5 Labor Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) SEP % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University SEP English Proficiency Examination Main Campus SEP First Interim Grade Reporting Period SEP 23 Last Day to Make Up I Grades from Spring and Summer SEP 24-DEC 10 0% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University OCT English Proficiency Examination Main Campus OCT Homecoming OCT Fall Break (No Classes on Main Campus and CSU Dayton Campus) OCT 15 English Proficiency Examination CSU Dayton Campus OCT Second Interim Grade Reporting Period OCT 18 Classes Resume OCT 19 Career Day NOV 4 Last Day to Drop or Withdraw from a Class with a W Grade NOV 7 Registration Begins for Spring Semester 2011 NOV 11 Veteran s Day (No Classes, Main & Dayton Campuses) NOV Thanksgiving Holiday NOV 28 Classes Resume DEC 1 Deadline to submit Application for Graduation DEC 3 Last Day of Classes DEC 5, 6, 7, 8 Final Examinations for the Main Campus DEC 5-6 & 10 Final Examinations for the CSU Dayton Campus DEC 8 Residence Halls Close DEC 13 Final Grades Due 4:00 p.m. 6

7 SPRING SEMESTER 2012 (JANUARY 9 - MAY 3, 2012) JAN 2-7 JAN 5 JAN 5 JAN 6 JAN 6 JAN 9 JAN 9-17 JAN 9 JAN JAN 16 JAN 17 JAN 17 JAN 18 JAN JAN 23 JAN 31-FEB 16 FEB 6-11 FEB 7-8 FEB 17 FEB 17-MAY 4 FEB 20 FEB 23 MAR 6 MAR 7 MAR 7, 8 MAR 9 MAR 10 MAR MAR MAR 26 MAR 30 APR 3 APR 4 APR 28 APR 30-MAY 1, 2, 3 APR 28, MAY 1, 2 MAY 4 MAY 5 MAY 8 Late Registration ($ Fee Assessed) Orientation, Testing and Registration for New and Transfer Students Residence Halls Open for New and Transfer Students Only In-Person Registration for Returning Students Residence Halls Open for Returning Students Classes Begin Drop/Add Period Last Day for a 100% Refund 90% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday (No Classes, Offices Closed) Last Day to Add a Class Last Day to Drop a Class without Record Last Day to use Book Voucher 50% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) 25% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University First Interim Grade Reporting Period English Proficiency Exam Main Campus Last Day to Make Up I Grades from Spring and Summer 0% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Presidents Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) Co-op Intern Career Day Charter Day Final Deadline for Submitting Graduation Application English Proficiency Exam - Main Campus Senior Salute English Proficiency Exam- CSU Dayton Campus Second Interim Grade Reporting Period Spring Break Classes Resume Last Day to Drop or Withdraw With a W Grade Honors Convocation Registration Begins for Summer and Fall Semesters Last Day of Classes Final Examinations for the Main Campus Final Examinations for the CSU Dayton Campus Rehearsal for Commencement Commencement (Saturday) Final Grades Due 4:00 p.m. 7

8 SUMMER A TERM 2012 (MAY 14 JUNE 18, 2012) MAY 11 MAY 11 MAY MAY 14 MAY MAY 14 MAY MAY 16 MAY 16 MAY MAY 21, 22 MAY 24-JUN 1 MAY 28 MAY 29 JUN 2-18 JUN 11 JUN 18 JUN 20 Residence Halls Open In-Person Registration for New and Continuing Students Late Registration ($ Fee Assessed) Classes Begin Drop/Add Period Last Day for a 100% Refund 90% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Last Day to Add a Class Last Day to Drop a Class without Record 50% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University English Proficiency Examination Main Campus 25% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Memorial Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) 0% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Last Day to Drop courses or Withdraw from a Class with a W grade Last Day of Classes Final Grades Due by 4:00 p.m. SUMMER 2012 Final Examinations Final Examinations for Summer A Term classes will be held on the last day of the regularly scheduled class meeting time. SUMMER B TERM 2012 (JUNE 25 JULY 30, 2012) JUN 22 JUN 22 JUN JUN 25 JUN 25 JUN JUN JUN JUN 27 JUN 27 JUN 27, 28 JUN 29-JUL 5 JUL 4 JUL 6-13 JUL 9 JUL 14-JUL 30 JUL 23 JUL 30 AUG 1 AUG 1 Residence Halls Open In-Person Registration for New and Continuing Students Late Registration ($ Fee Assessed) Classes Begin Last Day for a 100% Refund Drop/Add Period Late Registration ($ Fee Assessed) 90% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Last Day to Add a Class Last Day to Drop a Class without Record English Proficiency Examination - Main Campus 50% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Independence Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) 25% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) 0% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University Last Day to Drop courses or Withdraw from a Class with a W grade Last Day of Classes Residence Halls Close Final Grades Due by 4:00 p.m. SUMMER 2012 Final Examinations Final Examinations for Summer B Term classes will be held on the last day of the regularly scheduled class meeting time. 8

9 PROPOSED Proposed Fall Semester 2012 (August 13 - December 08, 2012) AUG 2-3 University Institute AUG 6-11 Late Registration AUG 7-10 Orientation, Testing and Registration for New and Transfer Students AUG 7 Residence Halls Open for New and Transfer Students Only AUG 8-12 Freshman Academy Begins for New and Transfer Students AUG 10 In-Person Registration for Returning Students AUG 10 Residence Halls Open for Returning Students AUG 13 Classes Begin AUG 13 Last Day for a 100% Refund AUG Late Registration ( $ Fee Assessed ) AUG Drop/Add Period AUG % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University AUG 21 Last Day to Add a Class AUG 21 Last Day to Drop a Class Without Record AUG 23-SEP 4 50% Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University AUG 31 Enrollment Census Date (Official Statistics Date) SEP 3 Labor Day (No Classes, Offices Closed) SEP % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University SEP English Proficiency Examination Main Campus SEP First Interim Grade Reporting Period SEP 21 Last Day to Make Up I Grades from Spring and Summer SEP % Refund for TOTAL WITHDRAWAL from the University OCT 5-6 Homecoming OCT 4-8 Fall Break (No Classes on Main Campus and CSU Dayton Campus) OCT 9 Classes Resume OCT English Proficiency Examination Main Campus OCT 13 English Proficiency Examination CSU Dayton Campus OCT Second Interim Grade Reporting Period OCT 17 Career Day NOV 02 Last Day to Drop or Withdraw from a Class With a W Grade NOV 5 Registration Begins for Spring Semester 2011 NOV 9 Veterans Day ( No Classes, Main Campus & CSU West, Offices Closed) NOV Thanksgiving Holiday NOV 26 Classes Resume NOV 29 Deadline to submit Application for Graduation ($25.00 late fee after Dec. 31 NOV 30 Last Day of Classes NOV 3-6 Final Examinations for the Main Campus NOV 6 Residence Halls Close DEC 3-4 & 8 Final Examinations for the CSU Dayton Campus DEC 11 Final Grades Due 4:00 p.m. 9

10 Commencement speaker, Joyce Beatty '72 and President John W. Garland 71 THE UNIVERSITY Purpose. 11 Mission History Locations The Campus Students and Faculty Accreditations Affiliations Academic Programs. 13 Graduation

11 PURPOSE The purpose of Central State University is to provide opportunities in higher education for the citizens of Ohio and other qualified applicants, including both national and international students. MISSION Central State University, as Ohio s only public Historically Black University, academically prepares students with diverse backgrounds and educational needs for leadership and service in an increasingly complex and rapidly changing world. As an open access institution, the University fosters academic excellence through a strong liberal arts foundation and majors in selected professional fields. Central State University is dedicated to: providing a nurturing and culturally enriched learning environment; stimulating in students an intellectual curiosity and a continuous search for knowledge; teaching students to think critically and communicate effectively; instilling in students an aspiration for excellence through teaching, service, and scholarly research; preparing students to address the challenges of a technologically oriented world; providing quality educational programs in scientific and technological fields; offering programs with multicultural and global perspectives; reaching out to underserved populations; and collaborating with other educational institutions, business organizations and government agencies to enrich learning experiences and educational opportunities for students. HISTORY Central State University was established on March 19, 1887 by the Ohio General Assembly in an act that created a Combined Normal and Industrial Department at Wilberforce University. The older institution was founded by the African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1856 and named in honor of the great abolitionist, William Wilberforce. The new Department was considered to be a separate school and had its own Board of Trustees. In 1941, the General Assembly expanded the Department, which offered two-year courses, into a College of Education and Industrial Arts, which provided four-year college programs. In 1947, the College began operating independently from Wilberforce, continuing its programs in teacher education, industrial arts and business, and adding a four-year liberal arts program under the name Wilberforce State College. In 1951, the legislature provided the name Central State College, and in November 1965, Central State was granted university status. Today s CSU is Ohio s only predominantly African American public institution of higher education. The enacting legislation of 1887, however, stipulated that the institution be open to all persons of good moral character. This remains true today as Central State actively promotes ethnic diversity in its student body, faculty and staff in order to enrich the university experience, even as the institution maintains its core historical responsibility to educate African American youth for success, leadership, and service on state, national and global levels. The University offers 38 academic majors in 10 departments, located in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business and Industry, and Education, as well as a Master s Degree in Education. LOCATIONS Central State University Main Campus is located in Wilberforce, Ohio, four miles northeast of Xenia and 18 miles east of Dayton. The main campus is midway between Cincinnati and Columbus on U.S. 42, about 55 miles from each city. Airline, bus and taxi services are available in Dayton. Central State University Dayton, the university s satellite location is located at 840 Germantown Street, Dayton, Ohio. THE CAMPUS Central State University has facilities valued at more than 95 million dollars, including the Center for Education and Natural Sciences; Cosby Mass Communications Center; the McLin Center for Water Resources Management; the Paul Robeson Cultural and Performing Arts Center; the Hallie Q. Brown Memorial Library; the Newsom Administration Building; the Ward University Center; the Galloway Tower; the Walter G. Sellers Alumni Center; and the Louis Stokes Center on Aging. 11

12 The Hallie Q. Brown Memorial Library has approximately 169,380 volumes, 590,000+ microfilms, a periodical collection of 2,058 titles, and an audiovisual collection of 4,348 pieces. The library is an integral part of the Ohio Library and Information Network (OHIOLINK), which links the state library and 59 Ohio private and public institutions of higher learning. Through the university library s computer workstations, CSU students and faculty can access any of the library holdings of the other member institutions. Additionally, the CSU library maintains membership in the Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education (SOCHE), a consortium of 17academic, community, and special libraries which engages in cooperative acquisition of expensive and little-used materials that would be beyond the reach of an individual library. CSU faculty and students may borrow items directly from most of these participating libraries. Athletic facilities include the Walker Gymnasium, the Beacom-Lewis Gymnasium for intercollegiate basketball, tennis and racquetball courts, and McPherson Stadium for football and special events, and practice fields. The campus terrain is rolling and planted in lawns accented by flowering shrubs, trees and flower beds, and centered by the attractive Sunken Gardens. Spacious paved walkways make foot travel across the campus easy and convenient. Across Brush Row Road and along U.S. 42 is the University s outdoor education area, a natural reserve, and within a hundred yards of the Robeson Center is the National Afro-American Museum and Cultural Center, an outstanding facility that chronicles African American history and sponsors a variety of programs. Central State University Dayton offers array of evening and weekends classes for students seeking to receive a degree or obtain professional development. STUDENTS AND FACULTY Central State University s enrollment was at 2,436 students in the Fall of Of the total, 2,401 were undergraduates and 35 were graduate students. Central State University employs more than 200 full-time and adjunct faculty. In addition to their teaching and research, faculty members at Central State have a deep commitment to helping students outside the classroom, especially in academic advising and mentoring throughout the year. The faculty serves as academic advisors to students in their respective academic disciplines. ACCREDITATIONS Central State University is accredited by: The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Higher Learning Commission 30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, IL (800) The Art Program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). The College of Education is accredited by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE) and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The Manufacturing Engineering Program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET). The Music Program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM). AFFILIATIONS American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education American Association of University Women American Council on Education Association of American Colleges and Universities Association of Governing Boards Association of Physical Plant Administrators Midwest Central Association of College and University Business Officers College and University Personnel Association Dayton Area Chamber of Commerce Educational Testing Service International Association of Black Business Educators Inter-University Council of Ohio Miami Valley Consortium for African and African American Studies Miami Valley Higher Education Consortium Midwest College Placement Association National Academic Advising Association National Association of College Admissions Counselors National Association of College Deans, Registrars and Admissions Officers 12

13 National Association of College and University Business Officers National Association of Educational Buyers National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education National Association of Student Personnel Administrators National Black Child Development Institute National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) Ohio Association of College Admissions Counselors Ohio Association of College and University Business Officers Ohio Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers College of Arts and Sciences Fine and Performing Arts Art Education Graphic Design Studio Art Jazz Studies Music Education Music Performance Humanities Communication (Broadcast Media) Communication (Print Journalism) English English Education English Pre-Law History In addition, minors are offered in Communication (Broadcast Media), Communication (Print Journalism), Foreign Language, Philosophy, Public Relations, Sound Engineering and Recording and Speech Theatre. Mathematics and Computer Science AYA Integrated Mathematics Computer Science Mathematics Military Science Four-year program (Army ROTC) Two-year program (Army ROTC) In addition, a minor in ROTC is offered. Natural Sciences Biology Chemistry In addition, a minor in Physics is offered. Social and Behavioral Sciences Criminal Justice Political Science Political Science (Pre-Law) Political Science (Public Administration) Psychology Social Work Sociology In addition, minors are offered in African Studies, Africana Studies, Criminal Justice and Gerontology. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Ohio Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators Ohio Chamber of Commerce Ohio Learning Network OHIOLINK / OHIONET Ohio Student Personnel Association Southern Ohio Consortium for Higher Education The College Board (College Entrance Examination Board) The Ohio Academy of Science The Ohio College Association Xenia Area Chamber of Commerce College of Business and Industry Accounting and Economics Accounting Economics Business Administration Entrepreneurship Finance Hospitality Management International Business Management Management Information Systems Marketing Manufacturing Engineering Industrial Technology Manufacturing Engineering In addition, a minor in Nuclear Engineering is offered. Water Resources Management Environmental Engineering Geography Geology Water Resources Management College of Education Health, Physical Education and Recreation Multi-Age Health Education Multi-Age Physical Education Recreation Professional Education Adolescent to Young Adult Education Integrated Language Arts - Integrated Mathematics - Integrated Social Studies - Life Science - Physical Science Early Childhood Education Intervention Specialist Mild/Moderate Middle Childhood Education Mathematics Science Multi-Age Education Health Education Music - Physical Education Visual Arts Master of Education Personnel Services Research Student Services 13

14 Central State University Cheerleaders CAMPUS LIFE Student Affairs Norman E. Ward University Center Standards of Student Conduct Residence Life. 15 Off-Campus Living Greek Affairs 16 Intramurals. 16 The Lionel H. Newsom Student Leadership Institute 16 Student Government Association (SGA) Student Activities. 17 Career Services Center, Cooperative Education, Internships and Service Programs Career Services Cooperative Education Program 17 Internships Volunteerism Inter-Faith Campus Ministry 19 Student Health Center Counseling Services Disability Services Transportation.. 20 Campus Police 20 14

15 Student Affairs Norman E. Ward, Sr. University Center Second Floor Dr. Jerryl Briggs, Vice President for Student Affairs (937) Norman E. Ward, Sr. University Center Room 302 Darryl A. Peal, Dean of Students (937) NORMAN E. WARD UNIVERSITY CENTER The Norman E. Ward, Sr. University Center houses the following Student Affairs offices: The Dean of Students, Student Activities, Student Leadership and Development, Greek Affairs, Career Services, Student Government Association, Transportation and Intramurals. Its facilities include a ballroom, Bookstore, Commuter Student Lounge, Cyber Café, game room, Taco Bell and The Chill Spot. Numerous co-curricular activities are held in this facility each year. STANDARDS OF STUDENT CONDUCT The University expects all students to cooperate in maintaining high standards of personal conduct and social responsibility. Student self-government in the democratic tradition has been adopted as the process for the conduct of good citizenship on and off the campus. Additionally, stated University objectives and regulations governing student conduct are described in the Student Handbook. It is the responsibility of each student to become informed of these regulations. Standards for the conduct of student life are set forth in a code carefully written and regularly reviewed by a committee of students, faculty and staff members. This Code of Student Life reflects the principles expressed in the 1967 Joint Statement on Rights and Freedoms of Students, drafted and endorsed by the National Student Association, the American Association of University Professors and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Accordingly, the code relates only to student misconduct which adversely affects University process or function, or some distinct interest of the University as an academic community. Students are expected to acquaint themselves with the code and to conduct themselves in accordance with the standards it sets forth. Attendance at Central State University is a privilege and not a right and may be forfeited by any student who does not abide by the regulations of the University or who is unwilling to adjust to the University environment through responsible conduct of high moral and ethical standards. Thus, University officials reserve the right to sever, for appropriate reasons and through due process, the connection of any student with the University. RESIDENCE LIFE Foundation II, Room 115 Mr. Raynaldo Gillus, Residence Director (937) All non-married full-time freshman and sophomore students are required to live in the University residence halls, if space is available. Junior students with an overall grade point average below 2.5 and who do not live with their parent(s) or a legal guardian are also required to live in the residence halls. Permission to live off-campus must be obtained in writing from the Director of Residence Life and approved by the Vice President of Enrollment Management/Student Services. Any student residing in a hall must be enrolled as a full-time student (12 hours or more credit hours is considered full-time). Failure to maintain full-time status will result in vacating the room. The student will still be responsible for payment for the room for that semester. The University agrees to assign accommodations only after a student has endorsed a housing contract and submitted a non-refundable housing application fee of $60. Subject to availability, the University will attempt to assign accommodations according to the student s preferences, but the University will not guarantee assignment to a particular room, residence hall or roommate. The Central State University Board of Trustees reserves the right to make any changes or adjustments in fees and charges at any time as conditions or circumstances make the changes necessary. Room assignments are made without regard to race, color, nationality or religion. Students wishing to be assigned with a certain roommate may request such at the time the application fee is paid. The University will 15

16 attempt to honor these requests. The possibilities are improved if the reservation is sent early, and if both parties wishing to room together send their contracts at the same time. The University provides room furniture as well as a computer outlet for each student and a cable TV outlet for each room. Each student is required to provide his/her own pillow, bed linen, blankets, bedspread, towels, study lamp, wash cloths, personal accessories and telephone. Prohibition of certain electrical appliances (see housing contract, Student Handbook and the Residence Life Living and learning Guide) will be adhered to. Supervision of living arrangements and food service is done with the student s health and welfare in mind. Students living in University residence halls are required to eat in the University Cafeteria. No charge is assessed for vacation periods, during which the cafeteria is closed. No reduction or refund will be made for failure to eat in the cafeteria. Students are expected to participate in the life of the residence hall in which they live, and to set standards for themselves. The use or distribution of drugs (narcotics, hallucinogens, stimulants, depressants, etc.), except for established medical purposes determined by the prescription of a physician or the reasonable use of non-prescription medicines, is prima facie evidence of drug abuse. Violators are subject to university disciplinary action. State and federal laws prohibit the distribution of drugs except by licensed agencies. The University cannot protect student violators from prosecution by law enforcement agencies. OFF-CAMPUS LIVING Eligible students may elect to live off campus in private housing. Rental units such as apartments or sleeping rooms with varying types of privileges are available in Wilberforce and in nearby communities including Xenia, Yellow Springs, Beavercreek, Cedarville and Fairborn. Information on the availability of housing can be obtained through the Residence Life office. GREEK AFFAIRS Norman E. Ward, Sr. University Center, 1 st Floor Mr. William Murray, Coordinator for Greek Affairs (937) The Greek Letter organizations are identified by three categories: social, professional, and honorary. The Greek Letter organizations are governed by university rules and regulations and by the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Both governing bodies are overseen by the Office of the Dean of Students. Student involvement enhances the campus community and provides students with the opportunity to develop responsibility and leadership outside the classroom. INTRAMURALS Norman E. Ward, Sr. University Center, 1 st Floor Mr. Al West, Coordinator of Intramurals and Wellness (937) The Intramural program offers a holistic approach to total wellness and fitness through a program designed for organized play in team building, cooperation, and unity. Refer to the Student Handbook for further information. THE LIONEL H. NEWSOM STUDENT LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE Norman E. Ward, Sr. University Center, 1 st Floor Office of Student Leadership and Development Ms. Kellea Tibbs (937) The Student Leadership and Development Program provide CSU students an opportunity to take positive action to prepare for a life of committed citizenship and leadership. The program has three components: Training Modules, Active Citizenship, and University and Community Service. Students who successfully complete the leadership program may receive a Student Leadership and Development Transcript that provides certification of citizenship experiences, service, or module completion. 16

17 STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA) Norman E. Ward University Center, 1 st Floor Office of Student Leadership and Development Ms. Kellea Tibbs (937) The Student Government Association (SGA) is a body of vested student representatives, with an executive and legislative board, senators and class officers with an office located in the Ward Center on the first floor. This body serves as the liaison between students, staff, faculty and administrators by keeping students informed through monthly mass student body meetings. SGA has the responsibility to seek and maintain a spirit of cooperation in the activities of the university and to encourage student initiative through service. Information concerning student participation in the various phases of self-governance is detailed in the Student Handbook. STUDENT ACTIVITIES Norman E. Ward, Sr. University Center, 1 st Floor Office of Student Activities Mr. Marc DeWitt, Coordinator of Student Activities (937) There are a variety of student programs, events and organizations that provide and reflect the diverse interests of the campus. Students interested in expanding their social, professional and academic development are encouraged to participate. Currently, there are approximately 41 student organizations on campus, classified under four categories: physical, mental, social, and spiritual. The Office of Student Activities and Inter-organizational Council (IOC) monitors the recognized student organizations. For more details, refer to the Student Handbook. CAREER SERVICES CENTER, COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, INTERNSHIPS AND SERVICE PROGRAMS Norman Ward Building, 1 st Floor (937) CAREER SERVICES CENTER The Career Services Center provides quality professional career counseling and career/life planning programs and experiential opportunities to all students. The Center achieves its goals by making available the following services: career counseling, on-campus interviewing for full-time prospective graduate and student teacher placement, networking, referrals, credential services, on-line graduate school information, careerrelated brochures/handbooks, up-to-date career writing and interview techniques, Career Day, and other services throughout the academic year. Job referrals for alumni, faculty and staff are available. All students who utilize the Center must submit a professional résumé and sign the Family Rights and Privacy Act Form (Buckley Amendment). To clear for graduation, prospective candidates must complete the Graduate Exit Form and provide a résumé. Students are highly encouraged to attend programs, utilize office services and register for placement services no later than the first semester of their sophomore year. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM The Cooperative Education Program at Central State University provides practical training, responsible management experiences and attitude development required for permanent job placement in career fields matching the student s interest and potentialities. Central State University and the Career Services Center set the general guidelines and educational objectives for the program and place students in co-op positions providing maximum educational advantage. The Center also provides an on-going student counseling and advisement service to assure a positive relationship among student, employer and the University. The University attempts to match students with assignments that are related to their career objectives, thus providing experiences that enhance knowledge acquired in the classroom. Once a Cooperative Education training assignment has been approved, the student must register for co-op and pay for co-op credits and fees 17

18 the same as for any other course. Students holding part-time or full-time jobs may register for academic credit. There are two types of co-op plans: Parallel Co-op: A parallel co-op is similar to a part-time job. The student enrolls in classes part-time (6 semester hours) and works 20 hours a week each semester. The student receives 6 semester credit hours for parallel co-op. Alternating Co-op: With an alternating co-op, the student alternates semesters between full-time work and full-time study. Students receive 12 semester credit hours for alternating co-op. Both of these plans are used by participating co-op employers and can be structured to fit any particular company need. Student Eligibility To be eligible for the Co-op Program, students must: 1. Have attained sophomore standing. 2. Have declared a major. 3. Submit a resume. 4. Sign the Buckley Amendment. 5. Have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0. (The minimum average is subject to change pending employer requirements.) 6. Secure approval from the Academic Advisor or Department Chairperson, and from the Career Services Center. 7. Participate in on-campus interviews to acquire assignment (optional). NOTE: Transfer students must have attained sophomore standing and have completed one full-time semester at Central State University to be eligible for co-op. Majors/Options Cooperative Education is open to all majors/options. Consult the Departmental Chairperson within your discipline for eligibility. Academic Credit Academic credit is awarded as follows: 1. The student will receive a grade of credit (CR) or no credit (NC) for cooperative education. A final report and employer evaluation must be submitted and approved by a co-op counselor at the end of the assignment before credit (CR) is awarded. Co-op credit will appear on the transcript as Earned Hours and will have no effect on cumulative grade point average. 2. The student must be officially registered within the semester of the assignment to receive co-op credit. Credit is not awarded retroactively. 3. The student may participate in more than 2 co-op assignments; however, additional credit hours will not count towards graduation. 4. The decision whether co-op hours will substitute for other hours in the major is at the discretion of the Academic Advisor, Chairperson, Dean and Registrar. Registration After confirmation of a co-op assignment: 1. Pick up registration form from co-op counselor, academic advisor or the Office of the Registrar. 2. Obtain signature from the co-op counselor located in the Career Services Center. 3. Officially enroll in one of the following course numbers for parallel co-op for 6 semester hours: COE (students with semester hours); COE (students with semester hours); COE (student with 91+ semester hours) 4. Officially enroll in one of the following course numbers for alternating co-op for 12 semester hours: COE (students with semester hours); COE (students with semester hours); COE (student with 91+ semester hours) 5. Complete registration at the Office of the Registrar. 6. Meet with co-op counselor to obtain information packet. 18

19 7. Verify that financial aid award letter, fees and semester registration are complete. The co-op assignment is not final until this verification. NOTE: The student may select any semester to participate in co-op. However, a co-op student may not enroll in more than 18 hours including the co-op hours. INTERNSHIPS There are various types of internships: Regular, Summer and Business. Interns are college students selected by companies/agencies to work in their field of study prior to graduation. A regular internship may consist of full or part-time employment and may take place during the academic semesters September through June. A summer internship occurs during the period of May through August. Credit cannot be awarded to students participating in a regular or summer internship if their department does not offer a credit option within their curriculum. Business Internship credit is available only to students selecting a major/option in the College of Business and Industry. VOLUNTEERISM Volunteerism is an experiential-based program which gives students an opportunity to test career choices while continuing their education. Volunteer positions can offer students part-time professional work when paid internships or a co-op are not available, and have many of the same advantages as a paid position. Volunteer positions usually occur within agencies that are not profit-oriented. Participation in the program is an excellent resume enhancement. For guidelines, academic credit and registration for the programs mentioned, consult the Departmental Chairperson, Career Services Center, the Cooperative Education Student Handbook or the Lionel H. Newsom Student Leadership Coordinator. Guidelines/policies are subject to change. INTER-FAITH CAMPUS MINISTRY Norman E. Ward University Center, 1 st Floor - Career Services Suite Reverend Nigel Felder (937) The Inter-Faith Campus Ministry serves as a means of promoting an ecumenical approach to faith and spirituality for those who desire it. Its mission is to sponsor a meaningful community of worship, study, fellowship and action. The Inter-Faith Campus Ministry provides programs, services and an environment for the spiritual growth and development of students. Every aspect of its program and ministry is directed toward deepening and strengthening the spiritual life of all who voluntarily come under its nurture and care. The Inter-Faith Campus Ministry program is supported by the following participating denominations: American Baptist Convention, the Roman Catholic Church, the American Lutheran Church, the Lutheran Church of America, the Ohio Baptist Assembly, the Episcopal Church, the United Methodist Church, the Presbyterian Church (USA), the United Church of Christ, the Christian Church (Disciples), and the Church of the Brethren. STUDENT HEALTH CENTER Lackey-Lee Health Center Dr. Elmer Wahl, Medical Center Director (937) The Student Health Center provides health care services for the illness, injury, and wellness needs of Central State University students. Student Health services is located on the west side of the campus in the Lackey-Lee building, attached to the Louis Stokes Building. The Clinic is staffed by a full-time physician, a full-time nurse practitioner, and medical support staff, who deliver excellent quality care. If you are a full time student or have purchased the CSU Health Care Plan, you can be seen by us to take care of your acute needs. Health education and limited health screenings are also available. Please read the Student Health Service Insurance information for more in-depth information on the healthcare provided at Student Health Services. The Student Health Insurance plan is mandatory for all full-time students, taking 12 or more credit hours. Parttime students (with less than 12 credit hours) may purchase the health insurance plan. This coverage is to provide convenient medical treatment here on the Campus. The Health Care Plan will also pay for a percentage of referrals made to local providers in the area, including needed ER visits. As is routine with group insurance coverage, the student must assume the responsibility for payment of any remaining balance. 19

20 COUNSELING SERVICES Lackey-Lee Health Center Frank Porter, Counseling Center Director (937) Counseling Services is located with the CSU Health Center in the Lackey-Lee Building on Brush Row Road. Counseling Services is staffed with three full-time Mental Health Professional Counselors and part-time clerk. All counseling records are CONFIDENTIAL and kept apart from other records at CSU. Information contained in these records will not be revealed to any other person or agency without written consent of the student. Regular office hours are from 8:00a.m. until 5:00p.m., Monday through Friday. For assistance after hours and on weekends, Resident Advisors are available. For emergencies, call 911. Counseling Services offers Mental Status Assessments, Crisis Intervention, Academic & Life Skill coaching, Alcohol and Drug Counseling, Post Hospitalization Follow-up, Loss & Grief Counseling, Classroom & Residence Hall Presentations, Consultation Services for faculty, Staff & Resident Advisors and Court Ordered counseling & Judicial Board services free to all CSU students. DISABILITY SERVICES Lackey-Lee Health Center Dr. Wanda Hadley, Disability Coordinator (937) The mission of the Office of Disability Services (ODS) is to provide and coordinate support services and programs that enable students with disabilities to maximize their educational potential. This office also serves as a resource to all members of the University community so that all students with disabilities can freely and actively participate in all facets of University life. Central State University, in conjunction with ODS, offers a variety of services and accommodations to students with disabilities based on appropriate documentation, the nature of the disability, and academic need. The Director of ODS must approve all requests for accommodations. Students with documented disabilities should notify ODS upon their acceptance to the University. TRANSPORTATION Norman E. Ward, Sr. University Center, 1 st Floor (937) The university offers free shuttle service to a wide variety of locations on- and off-campus. Our daily services include transportation to and from doctor s appointments, shopping, field trips, emergencies and other scheduled travel. We provide drop-off service to both the Dayton Greyhound Station and Dayton Airport and we provide drop-off service to both the Dayton Airport and we provide pick-up service. We also provide transportation to the malls and outlets three times a month. Our business hours are from 8:30-5:00p.m. Monday-Friday. Please contact our office for hours of operation. Reservations must be made 48 hours ahead of time. Many students who live on campus don t have vehicles and Transportation Services provides accessibility to their basic necessities like grocery shopping and taking care of their specific business. CAMPUS POLICE Simpson Hall, Campus Police Main Entrance Mr. Anthony Pettiford, Police Chief (937) Crime is a national problem that also affects University campuses, but through a number of ongoing proactive crime awareness activities, serious criminal incidents on campus have been minimized. Central State University s campus safety record is among the best in Ohio and the University is proud of its past record in the area of crime prevention. To reduce crime and to ensure that the University community is as safe and secure as possible, the Central State University Department of Police and Safety employs 10 full-time officers and staff led by a Chief of Police. All officers are certified in the State of Ohio through the Ohio Peace Officer Training Academy and undergo continuing specialized training to maintain and improve their skills. All are trained in first aid and regularly train in the use of firearms. All officers have the responsibility of protecting life and property, preventing and detecting crime, parking and traffic enforcement, fire and hazardous material inspections and providing essential police services to the campus community. On foot and in vehicles, officers patrol the campus and residence halls 24 hours a day. In addition, the Department of Police and Safety utilizes narcotics detection canines to detect illegal narcotics and enforce drug laws. Their efforts are coordinated with federal, state, and local authorities to enforce federal, state, and local laws as well as University rules and regulations. 20

21 Freshman students looking aglow during the Annual Candlelight Service ADMISSIONS Undergraduate Admission Procedure 22 Applications Instructions College Preparation Standards.. 22 Criteria for Undergraduate Admission. 22 In-State Students Out-of-State Students Admission Appeals Process Transfer Students Transient Students Part-Time Students Senior Citizens International Students Criteria for International Student Admissions. 24 Budget for Cost of Attendance Postsecondary Enrollment Option Program..26 Readmission 26 Advanced Placement. 26 Freshman students attend New Student Orientation 21

22 Admissions Norman E. Ward University Center, Ground Floor Norman E. Ward University Center, Second Floor Mrs. Robin Rucker Mrs. Phyllis Jeffers-Coly Director of Admissions Dean of Enrollment Services (937) (937) Central State University is committed to a policy of providing equal educational opportunity for all. In all matters, including admissions, the University adheres to a policy of nondiscrimination and welcomes applicants of any race, creed, sex, age, handicap or national origin who wish to further their education. All students admitted must subscribe to the University policies and procedures set forth in the University Catalog and the Code of Conduct as stated in the Student Handbook. Ethical conduct is as intrinsic to the admission procedure as it is to all other aspects of university life. Misrepresentation of credentials will lead to forfeiture of student status and all accompanying privileges. UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION PROCEDURE Many factors are taken into consideration in the selection of a freshman class, and each candidate is viewed on an individual basis. The strength of a student s secondary preparation is an excellent measure of a student s readiness for college. Also of value are personal qualities, such as maturity, intellectual awareness, and motivation to learn. In addition to school records and personal attributes, aptitude and achievement test scores can be helpful in predicting college performance and are considered with other credentials in the application for admission to Central State University. APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS The deadline for filing a completed application for admission to Central State University for the fall semester is August 2. The deadline for application for admission for the spring semester is December 2. The deadline for application for admission for summer is May 2. A nonrefundable fee of $20.00 should accompany the application. The applicant is responsible for the following: 1. Completing the application for Undergraduate Admission. 2. Submitting the completed application and fee of $20 (in form of money order or cashier s check) to the Office of Admission. 3. Submitting the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Achievement Test (SAT) results. 4. Submitting the official high school/college transcripts. 5. Submitting General Education Equivalency (GED) scores and diploma (if applicable). NOTE: Upon receipt of all the aforementioned items, the student will receive in writing, the status of the application. The Central State University Board of Trustees reserves the right to make any changes or adjustments in fees and charges at any time as conditions or circumstances make the changes necessary. COLLEGE PREPARATION STANDARDS Central State University endorses the overall intent of improved academic competence of Ohio high school graduates as set forth in the recommendations made by the Advisory Commission on Articulation between Secondary Education and Ohio Colleges. Thus, on March 21, 1985, the Central State University Board of Trustees approved the following statement on admission: Effective Fall 1986, 4 units English; 3 units Mathematics; 3 units Social Studies; 3 units Science; 2 units Foreign Language (both of which must be in the same foreign language) are required. CRITERIA FOR UNDERGRADUIATE ADMISSION In-State Students All in-state residents must meet the following criteria for admission to Central State University: 1. Have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. 2. Have a composite ACT score of 15 or above or a combined SAT score of 720 (Critical Reading and Math only) or above. 3. Have passed all five sections of the Ohio Graduation Test (OGT). NOTE: In-state high school graduates must meet the above criteria. Applicants who do not meet the above criteria will be evaluated by an Admissions Appeals Committee on an individual basis. 22

23 Out-of-State Students All out-of-state residents must meet the following criteria for admission to Central State University: 1. Have a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. 2. Have a composite ACT score of 19 or above or a combined SAT score of 910 (Critical Reading and Math only) or above. NOTE: Out-of-state high school graduates must meet the above criteria. Applicants who do not meet the above criteria will be evaluated by an Admissions Appeals Committee on an individual basis. ADMISSION APPEALS PROCESS Applicants seeking full-time enrollment who do not meet the stated admissions criteria must submit the following documents for consideration by the Admissions Appeals Committee: A 300-word essay that, in light of your current academic record, explains your ability to succeed in college and your ability to overcome unexpected obstacles. Two letters of recommendation from a high school principal, guidance counselor, or teacher that address your academic readiness for college-level course work, social maturity, and ability to study independently. Students who complete the admissions appeal process will be reviewed on an individual basis. Materials should be mailed within 30 days of notification to: Central State University Admissions Processing Center P.O. Box 547 Wilberforce, Ohio TRANSFER STUDENTS Applicants who have attended any other college and/or university must have all official transcripts forwarded to the Admissions Office. Courses accepted for transfer credit are subjected to meeting the requirements of the selected major. Applicants with less than 45 transferable quarter hours or less than 30 semester credit hours must submit an official final high school transcript. Credits accepted from another institution are recorded on the student s permanent academic record, but grades are not transferred to the record. Only courses completed at Central State University are included in the cumulative grade point average. Students who have been dismissed for academic or disciplinary reasons from another post-secondary school will not be considered for admission to Central State University until one calendar year after the date of the dismissal. Criteria for Transfer Admission All transfer applicants must meet the following criteria for admission to Central State University: 1. Have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. 2. Submit official final high school transcript if, less than 45 transferable quarter hours or less than 30 semester credit hours. TRANSIENT STUDENTS Students in good standing in a recognized college or university, who wish to enroll in courses at Central State University for one semester only, and expect to return to the original institution at the end of the semester, may be admitted as transient students. Transient students are not eligible for Central State University financial aid funds. Their registration will terminate at the end of the semester. If, at the end of the semester an enrolled Central State University transient student wishes to remain at the University, the student must submit official transcripts from any other colleges and/or universities attended and re- apply for regular admission as a transfer student. Criteria for Transient Admission All transient applicants must meet the following criteria for admission to Central State University: 1. Submit undergraduate admissions application. 2. Submit letter of good standing from the Registrar of the home institution. 23

24 PART-TIME STUDENTS Persons not wishing to pursue full-time study and not currently seeking a degree may be classified as parttime and may enroll in from one to eleven hours per semester. Credit earned as a part-time student may be applied to a degree program. Criteria for Part-time Admission All part-time applicants must meet the following criteria for admission to Central State University: 1. Submit undergraduate admissions application. 2. Submit official final high school transcript or GED scores. 3. Submit all official college transcripts from previous colleges and/or universities attended. SENIOR CITIZENS Senior citizens (age 60 or older) may enroll in classes at Central State University free of charge for Audit only. Such enrollment is made on a space-available basis during the late registration period only. Senior citizens enrolling in classes are responsible for meeting listed course prerequisites and for the payment of Special Course fees which may apply. INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS Central State University welcomes students from other countries and cultures that bring to the campus direct contact with the rich heritages of other people and nationalities. International students should complete the International Application forms for admissions and return them to the Office of Admissions by the deadline. Students who are attending other schools in the United States should not withdraw and plan to come to Central State University until they have received a definite notice of acceptance. The applicant is responsible for the following: 1. Original high school transcript of Secondary Cycle accompanied by notarized translation if original copy is not in English. 2. Original General Exam transcript accompanied by notarized translation if original is not in English. 3. Original college transcript accompanied by notarized translation. Transcript should reflect the duration and number of hours for each course (Transfer Students only). 4. English Proficiency Test Scores/documents. 5. Financial Affidavit forms. 6. Two Letters of Recommendation. CRITERIA FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSIONS In order for you to be considered for admission to Central State University, you must follow the instructions below. As soon as items 1 through 6 are received in the Office of Admissions, you will be informed of the admission decision. 1- Official Application The enclosed application form must be completed fully in English. It should be typewritten or printed clearly in English. All international students must apply as full-time students and must specify a major. Your application must be in our office by the following deadlines: Fall Semester (Starts in August) May 15 Spring Semester (Starts in January) October 1 In order to ensure consideration for admission, we recommend you apply by the deadline. It is to your advantage to supply all requested information by the deadline. When filling out the application, you should use your complete name and be consistent in its use. Please use the same order of your first name, middle name, and last name in all your correspondence with Central State University offices. Any inconsistency in name order may prevent proper processing of your application. NOTE: It is important to sign and date your application before mailing it out. 24

25 2- Application Fee All applicants to Central State University are required to submit a nonrefundable application fee of $20 in US currency. Please make draft checks or money order payable to Central State University. Fee waivers are not accepted from international applicants. 3- Academic Records Official transcripts of all secondary schools and universities previously or currently attended should accompany your application for admission. A high school transcript is a record of all the courses/subjects you have completed and the grades (marks) attained for each class of the four years of study prior to graduation from high school. An official transcript of the General Secondary School Examination administered by your country must also be submitted with your high school transcript and other documents. Photocopies of original documents must have the signature of the registrar and the seal must be original and separate from the photographic image. Attested or "true" copies are not acceptable. All documents not issued in English by the officials signing them must be accompanied by notarized English translation. All official documents must be received in our office by the deadlines outlined above. 4- Educational Data Record Form Educational systems differ from one country to another. Furthermore, some countries have more than on educational system. Please complete the form to show the educational system in your country and your personal academic history. Failure to submit this form may delay the processing of your application. 5- English Proficiency Requirements It is essential that you, as an international applicant, be proficient in the English language. The ability to understand, speak, read, and write in English effectively is essential to a successful academic career. No student is exempt from this requirement unless his/her native language is English. English proficiency is a university requirement that can be met through one of the following: A) TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) This examination is administered several times each year at many centers throughout the world. Information about this test, including the places and the exact dates at which you can take it, can be obtained by writing or calling: TOEFL Educational Testing Services Box 6154 Princeton, New Jersey USA Phone: (609) Fax: (609) The minimum TOEFL score required is 500. Please note that TOEFL is valid for two years only. Students are urged to take this test at the earliest possible date. You must request that your scores be sent to the Office of Admissions at Central State University. B) SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) A Total score of 910 or higher (in Verbal and Math) is required provided that the verbal section is not less than 500. C) At least one full academic year enrollment in a USA college or high school provided that; I) College: student has successfully completed 36-quarter or 24-semester credit hours of college level courses (remedial courses are not accepted). II) High School: Student has completed at least 12th grade schooling and successfully passed the 12th grade English college prep unit. ESL courses are not accepted. If you graduated from a USA high school, you are required to take the ACT or SAT at least once. 6- Financial Support Central State University does not guarantee any kind of scholarship or financial assistance to international students. Therefore, it is mandated that students show proof of financial support. Estimated expenses for the academic year are as follows: BUDGET FOR COST OF ATTENDANCE FOR ACADEMIC SCHOOL YEAR Tuition and Fees $11, Room & Board 7, Books and Supplies 1, Transportation Miscellaneous/Personal 1, TOTAL $23,

26 This amount does not include travel expenses to and from the United States. It is calculated on full -time basis for two-semester academic year. Tuition and fees must be paid at the time of registration for courses. Room and Board fees are due at the beginning of each semester. No exceptions are made for these requirements. Students must have adequate finances to cover all expenses for the entire time that is required to earn the degree. Students with a family should budget approximately $4,000 per year for a spouse and $2,000 per year for each child. Please note that tuition and fees are subject to change. Your first month in the United States demands more financial outlay than any other single period. An additional $1,000 should be available to meet these expenses. The financial forms are included with the application in this packet and are required before an I-20 (the form required to obtain an F-1 student visa) is issued. International students must complete a financial sponsorship form including bank verification of funds, the sponsor may be the student, if he/she has personal funds, a relative, organization or government, either foreign or American. 7- Two Letters of Recommendation Recommendation letters should be from faculty or administrators who are familiar with your academic and personal achievements. POST-SECONDARY ENROLLMENT OPTIONS PROGRAM (PSEOP) The PSEOP at Central State University offers qualified high school students an opportunity to earn college credit and/or high school graduation credit through successful completion of college courses. PSEOP is open to Ohio students in grades 9 through 12 in public, community and non-public high schools. Its purpose is to expose students to rigorous academic options beyond the high school classroom. Option A: allows the high school student to choose, upon enrollment, college credit or both high school and college credit. In this case, the cost of the program is funded entirely by the student s family. Option B: allows the student to receive both high school and college credit. Students choosing this option will not be required to pay for tuition, books, materials or fees. To qualify for participation in PSEOP at Central State, students must: 1. Complete the CSU application for admission. 2. Submit an official high school transcript. Student must have a 3.0 GPA in the subject(s) they wish to study in the college curriculum. 3. Submit PSEOP guidance counselor and parent authorization form. READMISSION A student whose enrollment is disrupted for more than one academic year and one term, excluding summer, is required to apply for readmission prior to registering for classes. Students applying for readmission and who have attended any other college and/or university, after separation from Central State University, must follow the transfer criteria (See page 40). Students are required to submit official transcripts of all college-level work completed since separation from the university. A nonrefundable application fee of $20.00 must accompany the application. ADVANCED PLACEMENT The State of Ohio, working through the University System of Ohio, has initiated polices to facilitate the ease of transition from high school to college as well as between and among Ohio s Public colleges and universities. Beginning in the Fall term 2009: 1. Students obtaining an Advanced Placement (AP) exam score of 3 or above will be awarded the aligned course(s) and credits for the AP exam area(s) successfully completed. 2. General Education courses and credits received will be applied towards graduation and will satisfy a general education requirement if the course(s) to which the AP area is equivalent fulfill a requirement. 3. If an equivalent course is not available for the AP exam area completed, elective or area credit will be awarded in the appropriate academic discipline and will be applied towards graduation where such elective credit options exist within the academic major. 4. Additional courses or credits may be available when a score of 4 or 5 is obtained. Award of credit for higher score values varies depending on the institution and academic discipline. 5. In academic disciplines containing highly dependent sequences (Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics STEM) students are strongly advised to confer with college/university advising staff to ensure they have the appropriate foundation to be successful in advanced coursework within the sequence. 26

27 FEES AND EXPENSES Cash Management Fees Financial Policies and Notes Payment Plan Book Refunds or Vouchers for Financial Aid Recipients Residence Halls. 29 University Withdrawal Policy. 29 Cash Management Withdrawal Policy Refund Policy Financial Aid Withdrawal Policy Financial Aid Recipients Who Withdraw Determination of Federal Aid Earned Return of Unearned Federal Aid Registration Withdrawal Policy 30 Financial Aid Student Financial Aid Award Notification Financial Need.. 31 Cost of Attendance at CSU.. 31 Budget for Cost of Attendance for Academic School Year The Financial Aid Award Awarding Aid on the Basis of Hours Enrolled Adjustments to Financial Aid Awards Change in Financial Situation Employment Options Financial Aid Payments to Students Student Rights/Responsibilities Types of Financial Aid Student Aid and Scholarships at CSU. 34 Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid

28 Cash Management Lionel Newsom Administration Building, Room 103 (937) or (937) ALL FEES MUST BE PAID BY THE 1st DAY OF THE SEMESTER A Full-Time Student is one who is registered for 12 or more credit hours. A Part-Time Student is one who is registered for fewer than 12 credit hours. FULL-TIME STUDENTS (12 to 18 Credit Hours) Ohio Resident Out-of-State Tuition, Health & Fees* TOTAL (Commuter Student) $ $ Room Rent per Semester $ $ Board per Semester 19 Meals per week plan $ $ (Reduced meal plan available for junior and seniors) Total for Campus Resident $ $10, *Breakdown of Tuition, Health & fees are available upon request. OVERLOAD Ohio Resident Out-of-State Overload (over 18 hours) per hours $ $ PART-TIME STUDENTS (1-11 credit hours) Ohio Resident Out-of-State Tuition and Fees TOTAL (per credit hour) $ $ Optional Health Services(flat rate per semester) $ $ SUMMER FEES - SUMMER TERM A OR TERM B (12-15 credit hours) Ohio Resident Out-of-State Tuition, Health &Fees TOTAL (Commuter Student) $ $ Room Rent Per Summer Term $ $ Board Per Summer Term $ $ Total Summer Fees for Campus Resident $ $ OVERLOAD Ohio Resident Out-of-State Overload (over 15 hours) per hours $ $ PART-TIME STUDENTS (1-11 credit hours) Ohio Resident Out-of-State Tuition and Fees TOTAL (per credit hour) $ $ GRADUATE Ohio Resident Out-of-State Graduate (per credit hour) $ $ The Central State University Board of Trustees reserves the right to make any changes or adjustments in fees and charges at any time as conditions or circumstances make the changes necessary. 28

29 FINANCIAL POLICIES AND NOTES REGISTRATION IS NOT COMPLETE UNTIL CERTIFIED BY THE OFFICE OF THE BURSAR All incomplete registrations must be cancelled by the student before the end of the 100% refund period to avoid charges for the semester. To be financially certified each respective semester, the following criteria apply: 1. All unpaid balances from a previous semester must be paid in full. 2. Students will be required to have 100% of their current semester s bill (all charges) covered by any combination of the following before registration is approved. Cash, Money Order and Cashier s Check Visa, MasterCard or Discover Accepted Financial Aid, Approved Loans, Excluding Work Study Documented Third Party Payer Be in good standing with the University s Payment Plan. Students who have not met their financial obligations may be subject to administrative withdrawal. PAYMENT PLAN To help you meet the expenses of attending Central State University we offer a convenient monthly tuition payment plan. This plan gives you two options for making monthly payments. You may make payments by either automatic bank payments or by charging payments to your MasterCard or Discover. You may budget tuition and other expenses by the semester. Because this plan is not a loan program, there is no credit search and there is no interest or finance charge assessed on the unpaid balance. There is a $25.00 per semester non-refundable enrollment fee to participate in this program. BOOK REFUNDS OR VOUCHERS FOR FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS At the beginning of the term the University will defer $ of the refund of financial aid in excess of fees to issue a Book Voucher for all eligible students who receive Financial Aid, excluding PLUS loans, Federal Work-Study or Part-Time Work. The Book Voucher will be equal to the amount of financial aid accepted less the semester current balance, not to exceed $500. RESIDENCE HALLS In accordance with the Housing Contract, students living in the residence halls are committed to on-campus housing for the duration of the contract (one academic year). These fees are non-refundable. Because of the shorter length of the Summer term, the charges for Room and Board are prorated. If it is necessary for a new key to be made during the semester, a new key fee must be paid before a new key is issued. The Room Damage Deposit and the Key Deposit will be refunded to the student s account if no damage is done to the residence hall room or contents and if after the last semester of enrollment the residence hall room key has been returned. The amount will be applied against any outstanding balances. If there is no outstanding balance, the amount will be refunded. UNIVERSITY WITHDRAWAL POLICY CASH MANAGEMENT WITHDRAWAL POLICY The Refund Policy below applies to total withdrawals only. Students who drop classes after the scheduled refund period will be charged for the courses. Refund checks will only be issued when all outstanding charges have been paid. The student s account will be reviewed for completeness of charges before refund checks are issued. After the 39th day of a full semester (fall or spring) or the 18th day of the summer term, no fees will be refunded other than the remaining full weeks of the board charge. If a student withdraws before the registration is complete he/she is indebted to the University for the amount determined by the policies stated. Students withdrawn for disciplinary reasons during the semester forfeit the refund of any portion of their fees except prorated board charges. The refund policy does not apply to students who drop classes. Students who fail to officially withdraw forfeit the refund of any fees. 29

30 REFUND POLICY One hundred percent (100%) refund of fees for students will be honored during the first day and any day prior to the start of the semester. Credit will be made to the accounts of students whose total withdrawals are completed during the refund period. Fall through Spring 2nd through 10th day of the semester 90% 11th through 22nd day of the semester 50% 23rd through 39th day of the semester 25% 40th through the end of the semester 0% WITHDRAWAL REFUND PERIODS Summer only 2nd through 4th day of the term 90% 5th through 9th day of the term 50% 10th through 17th day of the term 25% 18th through the end of the term 0% FINANCIAL AID WITHDRAWAL POLICY When you withdraw from classes, an adjustment to financial aid awards will be made in conformity with federal and state regulations. A portion, or perhaps all, of your financial aid may be returned to the fund(s) that originally paid the charge. If all the financial obligations to the University have been paid, a check for the balance of the refund will be processed for you. FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS WHO WITHDRAW Students who completely withdraw from classes are subject to the Return of Title IV refund calculation as dictated by federal regulations. DETERMINATION OF FEDERAL AID EARNED Earned aid is determined based on the number of calendar days the student attended classes divided by the total number of calendar days in the term. The result is a percentage of federal aid funds that the student is entitled to keep. For example, a student who attends 20% of the term has earned 20% of the total aid value that was disbursed to their bill. RETURN OF UNEARNED FEDERAL AID The total federal aid disbursed at the point of withdrawal less the earned amount constitutes the unearned aid that must be returned to the federal government. The university will allocate the return of unearned aid in the following order: 1. Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan 2. Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan 3. Federal Perkins Loan 4. Federal Parent or Graduate PLUS Loan 5. Federal Pell Grant 6. ACG 7. National SMART Grant 8. Federal SEOG 9. TEACH Grant REGISTRATION WITHDRAWAL POLICY Students withdrawing from the University must complete a withdrawal form or totally withdraw via MyCSU on the web. The form may be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. Students may withdraw at any time during the semester through the last day of the 12th week. Students can totally withdraw from the University via MyCSU on the web. Students who stop attending classes without officially withdrawing will receive failing grades. 30

31 Financial Aid Norman E. Ward University Center, Ground Floor Norman E. Ward University Center, Second Floor Mrs. Robin Rucker Mrs. Phyllis Jeffers-Coly Director of Admissions Dean of Enrollment Services (937) (937) STUDENT FINANCIAL AID Central State University offers financial aid to all eligible students based upon financial need and academic standing. Central State University utilizes the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to determine the eligibility of the financial aid applicant for grants, loans, and employment. You may access FAFSA on line at The priority deadline to receive full consideration for student aid is March 1, for continuing students to complete the FAFSA. For new Freshman and Transfer students, the priority deadline is February 15. Students selected for verification must submit all their documents by April 15. AWARD NOTIFICATION Each year students are required to complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), to be considered for most types of financial aid. The FAFSA is used to determine a student s eligibility for federal aid. Students may accept or decline any portion of the financial aid award listed. All aid offers are contingent on the availability of federal, state, and institutional funds and the student s continued eligibility. You can view your financial aid award online via your MyCSU account. Paper award letters will only be mailed to first-time students. You should maintain a file containing all financial aid correspondence and information, as well as all statements of account. This will assist in answering any questions that might occur in the future. FINANCIAL NEED Aid from most of the programs discussed in this catalog is awarded on the basis of financial need. When you apply for federal student aid, the information you report is used in a formula established by the U.S. Congress. The formula determines your Expected Family Contribution (EFC), an amount used to determine a student s eligibility to receive certain need-based aid. The Office of Financial Aid does not automatically renew your financial aid. COST OF ATTENDANCE AT CSU The cost of attendance at CSU for an academic year (two semesters) is based on the assumption that a student will be enrolled full-time (12 to 18 credit hours) each semester. The budget for students is shown below to assist you and your parent(s) in estimating your cost of education. BUDGET FOR COST OF ATTENDANCE FOR ACADEMIC SCHOOL YEAR In-State Student (Ohio Residents) Tuition and fees $5, Room and Board 8, Books and Supplies 1, Transportation Miscellaneous/Personal 1, TOTAL $16, Out-of-State Student Tuition and fees $12, Room and Board 8, Books and Supplies 1, Transportation Miscellaneous/Personal 1, TOTAL $24, THE FINANCIAL AID AWARD How Financial Aid is awarded: The Office of Student Financial Aid has developed a philosophy of awarding various types of aid to students that is designed to meet several objectives given the resources available. The objectives are: 1. Meeting the need of as many students as possible. 2. Awarding each student the best combination of funds available. 3. Awarding the total amount of funds available during the award period. 4. Limiting, if possible, the amount borrowed by students to a minimum required level. 5. Awarding funds according to donor specifications. 31

32 AWARDING AID ON THE BASIS OF HOURS ENROLLED During the academic year your financial aid award will be based on the number of hours for which you are registered. We assume that you will be enrolled full-time (a minimum of twelve credit hours each semester) unless you have indicated otherwise. This is reflected in the original award notification, which outlines the exact types and amount of aid to be received for the period of enrollment. For those students who are enrolled less than fulltime, all affected aid will be reduced proportionately, and other aid (i.e., state grants or outside full-time scholarships) that requires full-time attendance may be canceled. For example, if you enrolled for six hours (half-time) Fall Semester, some aid for that semester may be reduced to onehalf the amount of aid for which you would be eligible as a full-time student. Students enrolled less than full-time will be required to repay those funds previously credited or disbursed for full-time enrollment during a given semester. ADJUSTMENTS TO FINANCIAL AID AWARDS Receipt of outside awards and /or resources will result in a review of your financial aid package to ensure that no over-awarding of federal or state funds has been made. For those students who receive outside awards and/or resources, and have had their demonstrated financial need met with awards including campus-based funds, financial aid awards must be reduced dollar for dollar by the amount of the outside award based on federal regulations. Students who receive campus-based funds and still have remaining unmet financial need equal to or greater than the amount of an outside award will not have their aid reduced. Any student who receives a combination of outside and institutional gift aid assistance in excess of the amount it costs to attend the academic year will have institutional funds reduced or canceled so that the total award does not exceed the cost of attendance (budget). CHANGE IN FINANCIAL SITUATION Your family s financial situation may change after you submit your Free Application for Federal Student Aid or Renewal Application. In the event of a substantial change in your family circumstances (such as a loss of employment or the death of a parent), you should notify the Office of Financial Aid immediately to request a reevaluation and possible adjustment to your award. Your appeal must describe the change in detail, specifying the changes in dollar amounts. Any adjustment in your aid award is contingent upon your eligibility according to program regulations and the availability of funds. EMPLOYMENT OPTIONS The Federal Work-Study Program involves a part-time job on campus which gives the student an opportunity to gain work experience and earn extra money to help meet educational expenses. The eligible student is placed by the Financial Aid Office. Job assignments can be in a variety of areas such as clerical, office services, student activities and lab assisting. The student works no more than 20 hours per week. The student may work up to 40 hours per week when classes are not in session. To be determined eligible, the student must meet requirements explained on this page. FINANCIAL AID PAYMENTS TO STUDENTS Federal Loans funds will not be credited to your account until you have completed and signed a Master Promissory Note (MPN), and Entrance counseling in accordance with the instructions that accompanied these forms. Scholarships, grants, and loan funds are credited to your account at the University on the 14 th day of the term. Federal Work Study (if earned through on-campus employment) is received in the form of a paycheck every two weeks beginning approximately four weeks after you begin campus employment for the hours worked. Other funds that may be listed on the award letter, such as outside scholarships, are received directly from those sources. The University may or may not be involved in disbursement of these funds. This section involves only those funds disbursed through the University billing system scholarships, grants, and long-term loans. STUDENT RIGHTS You have the right to: Know what financial aid is available, including information on all federal, state, and institutional financial aid programs. Know the deadlines for submitting applications for each of the financial aid programs available. Know the cost of attending the institution and the school s refund policy. 32

33 Know the criteria used by the institution to select financial aid recipients. Know how the school determines your financial need. This process includes how costs for fees, room, and board, travel, books, and supplies, personal and miscellaneous expenses, etc., are considered in your budget. Know what resources (such as parental contribution, other financial aid, your assets, etc.) are considered in the calculation of your need. Know how much of your financial need, as determined by the institution, has been met. Request from the Office of Student Financial Aid an explanation of the various programs in your student aid package. If you believe you have been treated unfairly, you may request reconsideration of the award which was made to you. Know what portion of the financial aid you received must be repaid and what portion is grant aid. If the aid is a loan, you have the right to know what the interest rate is, the total amount that must be repaid, the pay back procedures, the length of time you have to repay the loan, and when repayment is to begin. Know how the school determines whether you are making satisfactory progress, and what happens if you are not. Know that the Department of Public Safety provides for all interested students and parents a leaflet entitled Safety, Health, and Law Enforcement Information in accordance with the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of Know that the Office of the Dean of Students provides the Student Handbook which details the special facilities and services available to handicapped students. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES It is your responsibility to: Review and consider all information about the school s program before you enroll. Complete all application forms accurately and submit them on time to the right place. Pay special attention to and accurately complete your application for student financial aid. Errors can result in long delays in your receipt of financial aid. Intentional misreporting (misrepresentation) of information on application forms for federal financial aid is a violation of the law and is considered a criminal offense subject to penalties under the U.S. Criminal Code. Return all additional documentation, verification, corrections, and/or new information requested by either the financial assistance office or the agency to which you submitted your application. Read and understand all forms that you are asked to sign and keep copies of them. Accept responsibility for all agreements you sign. If you have a loan, notify the lender of changes in your name, address, and enrollment status. Perform the work that is agreed upon in accepting a federal college work-study award. Know and comply with the deadlines for application or re-application for aid. Know and comply with your school s refund procedures. Know your responsibility to read and adhere to the Office of Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Standards (SAP). TYPES OF FINANCIAL AID The Student Financial Aid Office at Central State University offers three basic types of financial aid: Student Employment: Money that is earned hourly and may be paid bi-weekly (if the job is on campus). Grants: Grants are considered gift aid and do not have to be repaid. Most grant aid is based on some type of need-based eligibility requirement. Scholarships: Funds that are awarded to students, and are based on students meeting particular criteria. Scholarships may be need or merit based. Loans: Low-interest funds that are borrowed and must be repaid six months after borrower ceases to be enrolled at a post-secondary institution at least half-time. In accepting a loan, students need to be aware of the repayment implications. 33

34 STUDENT AID AND SCHOLARSHIPS AT CSU Student Employment Federal Work-Study (FWS) Description and Term: Part-time jobs on campus. Eligibility: Will be based on financial need. Application: Complete Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Salary: Will be at least the current federal minimum wage. Grants Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) Description and Term: A federal grant awarded to full-time undergraduate students who completed a series of specified coursework in high school, and who are also eligible for the Federal Pell Grant. Application: Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Selection: After the review of high school coursework by the Office of Admissions, eligible students will receive the aid. For year two, student s GPA will be reviewed. Federal Pell Grant Description and Term: A direct grant from the federal government through CSU awarded to undergraduate students demonstrating financial need. Application: Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Selection: All eligible applicants receive aid. Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Description and Term: A federal grant awarded to full-time students with exceptional financial need. Application: Complete Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Selection: Pell Grant eligible students who meet the priority deadline are considered first. National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent Grant (SMART) Description and Term: A federal grant awarded to full-time undergraduate students who are enrolled in an eligible major as established by the U.S. Department of Education, have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0, and are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant. Application: Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Selection: After the review of academic coursework by the Office of the Financial Aid, eligible students will receive the aid. Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education Grant (TEACH) Description and Term: Awarded to students who intend to teach in a public or private elementary or secondary school that serves students from low-income families. Deadline date is determined by the agency. Application: Complete Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Selection: After the review of academic requirements by the Office of Financial Aid, eligible students will receive the aid. Loans Federal Parent Loans (PLUS) Description and Term: Loans available to parents for dependent undergraduates. Repayment begins 30 days after disbursement. Loans are fixed for all new PLUS Loans at a rate of 8.5%. Maximum amounts: Parents may borrow amount up to the cost of education per year per eligible dependent student. Application: Complete Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and PLUS loan application. Selection: Credit worthy parents of undergraduate students. Subsidized Federal Stafford Loans Description and Term: Need-based loan borrowed through federal government. Repayment begins six months after borrower ceases to be enrolled at least half time or graduates. Maximum amounts: undergraduates 1st year $3,500; 2nd year $4,500; 3rd year and 4th year $5,500; graduates $8,500 per year. Application: Complete Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and Master Promissory. Selection: All eligible applicants receive aid. Unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan: 34

35 Description and Term: Loan available to all students regardless of need or income. The terms are similar to the Subsidized Stafford except the borrower, is responsible for paying all of the interest. Unlike the Subsidized Federal Stafford Loan Program the borrower can make monthly or quarterly interest payments or capitalize the interest. Capitalizing means the lender will add accrued interest to the principal while the borrower is enrolled in school. Application: Complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and Master Promissory. Selection: All eligible applicants receive aid. Scholarships Choose Ohio First Scholarship Program (Do-Stem) Description and Term: Full and partial scholarships awarded to current and new students who are majoring in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, mathematics education or science education. Application: The application is available in the Financial Aid section of the Central State University website. Institutional Scholarships Description and Term: Institutional scholarships are band grants, choir grants, ROTC grants, athletic grants, Freshman Scholarship, Upper Classman Scholarship, Foundation, and Presidential Leadership and Service Award Scholarship. Application: Each department will have their own application and selection process for the scholarships listed above. Private Donor Scholarship Description and Term: Private donor scholarships are awarded to students based on academic merit, financial need, and/or other donor specifications. Application: Complete with College Department, College Student Services Office, or Financial Aid Office. SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR FINANCIAL AID Federal financial aid funds are awarded with the understanding that students will make progress toward their chosen degree. Central State University, as directed by the U.S. Department of Education, has established Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress that students must meet in order to receive Title IV student aid. Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress apply to the following types of federal financial aid: Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG), National SMART Grant, TEACH Grant, Federal Work-Study, Federal Perkins Loan, Nursing Loan, Health Professions Loan, Federal Stafford Loan, Federal Graduate PLUS Loan, and Federal Parent PLUS Loan. What are the standards of Student Academic Progress that I am expected to meet? Undergraduate Student Standards The Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress for undergraduate students has two measures - - qualitative and quantitative. Qualitative Measure Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA): As a student, you will know if you are meeting SAP requirements based on your cumulative GPA and the quality hours you have earned: Quality Hours Minimum Cumulative GPA Quantitative Measure Completion Rate Requirements: The maximum time frame for a student to complete the educational objective at Central State University is 150% of the published length of the educational program. In other words, a student typically has six years to complete a four-year degree. However, consideration is given to the student s enrollment status i.e. part-time and full-time. 35

36 You must successfully complete at least two-thirds (67%) of your total cumulative credit hours attempted 1. What happens if I don t meet the SAP requirements? If you are not meeting one and/or both of the measures of SAP, you will be initially placed on financial aid probation for one semester. At the end of the probation period, your academic progress will be reevaluated. At this time, if you are meeting both measures of academic progress, then you will once again be in good standing. However, if you are still not meeting the completion rate requirements, then your financial aid eligibility will be suspended. What does it mean when my financial aid is suspended? Suspension of financial aid means that you will no longer be eligible to receive any federal aid (including federal loan assistance) until you are once again meeting the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy. Can SAP affect me if I am a Transfer Student? Yes, SAP can affect you as a Transfer Student. Credit hours accepted by CSU will be included in the maximum time frame towards completion of a degree. What if I have not attended Central State for over 1 semester, will my past credits be considered towards SAP? Yes, all prior credits will be considered in determining SAP for students who return to CSU after one or more semesters of absence. If I change my major will those credits be reviewed for SAP? General education requirements credits will be considered in determining you SAP. However, for students who change majors, credits attempted and grades earned for a previous major that do not count toward the new major will not be included in the SAP determination. What grades are calculated when determine SAP? ALL of them. Grades of IP (In-progress), W (Withdrew), and WP (Withdrew passing) are not included in calculating a student s GPA, but as coursework attempted. WF (Withdrew Failing) and FA (Failing due to attendance) are counted as an F. How does SAP apply to graduate students? Graduate students must also meet Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress. There are two components to the policy for these students: timeframe and grade point average. Maximum Timeframe for a Master's degree program is six years and the requisite Grade Point Average is determined by individual colleges or departments but must be above a 2.0. Can I appeal a SAP decision? Yes. You have the right to appeal if you are experiencing extenuating circumstances. Appeal forms are available online. Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeals Committee (SAPAC) meetings are held on the third Thursday of each month. Appeals are reviewed in the order received. Appeals must be received no later than the first Thursday of the month to be reviewed at that month s meeting. The decision of the appeals committee is final and only one may be granted. Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Procedures At the end of spring semester each year, the academic records of all students who are receiving or applying for federal financial aid will be reviewed. Those students who fail to meet the Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress will be sent a letter notifying them of their status. This letter will also outline steps students can take to maintain or restore their eligibility. 1 The number of credits that must be earned is based upon the number of hours attempted and the appropriate enrollment status. Even periods of enrollment when you do not receive federal assistance will be counted in the evaluation of satisfactory academic progress 36

37 REGISTRATION Procedures & Policies Registration Procedure Course Credit-Unit of Instruction Study Load.. 38 Statute of Limitations on Grade Changes Grading and Grade Points Grading System Calculating the Grade Point Average Student Classification Satisfactory Academic Progress Academic Probation & Suspension Appeal for Readmission after being Academically Suspended 40 Transfer Application Advance Standing Transfer Credit Policy Incomplete Repeating a Course Auditing Courses SOCHE Cross-Registration Senior Citizen Enrollment Drop/Add Courses Declaring a Major Major and Minors Double Majors Graduation Applications for Graduation.. 43 Catalog for Graduation English Proficiency Requirement for Graduation 44 Release of Records/Transcripts Residency Veterans Affairs Selective Service Registration Students work with staff from the Office of the Registrar to finalize their paperwork 37

38 Registration Lionel Newsom Administration Building, Room 105 Larry R. Cannon University Registrar (937) The Office of the Registrar conducts the process of registering students in courses, maintaining official academic records and certifying students for graduation. This office is also responsible for calculating and recording the academic progress of students. REGISTRATION PROCEDURE Central State University is on the semester system. The academic year is divided into two semesters (fall and spring) and two summer sessions. Registration is open to all continuing students according to the Academic Calendar available on CSU s web site. The dates are published in the Academic Calendar on CSU s web site. Fees for students who register early are due prior to the start of the semester and are published on CSU s web site. During the open registration period, students must pay fees or prove ability to pay. Late registration allows students to register one week before classes begin with an additional fee for late registration. Registration is not complete until certified by the Cash Management Office. All incomplete registrations must be cancelled by the student. Students must be officially registered for classes during the semester in order to be eligible to receive grades at the end of the semester. Students will not be retroactively registered once the semester has ended. If a student has reason to request an exception to this policy, the request must be submitted in writing to the Academic Standards Committee. COURSE CREDIT-UNIT OF INSTRUCTION Course credit is computed in terms of semester hours. The semester hour is the unit of instruction used in computing the amount of work required for graduation. One semester hour is equivalent to one fifty-minute period of lecture or recitation per week during the semester. STUDY LOAD A normal study load is 15 to 18 semester hours. The maximum study load is 21 hours per semester for the Fall and Spring Semesters. A normal study load for the Summer term is 12 to 15 hours. The maximum for Summer enrollment is 18 hours, permission required. Written approval of the Department Chairperson and the College Dean is required if a student wishes to enroll in more than 18 semester hours during Fall and Spring Semesters. A student who enrolls in more than 18 semester hours without approval of the Department Chairperson and the College Dean will be required to drop all hours above 18. Twenty-one semester hours is the maximum number of hours for which credit will be granted during Fall and Spring Semesters by Central State University, including credit taken for classes on campus, through SOCHE Consortium cross-registration, or as a transient student at another institution. A FULL-TIME student is one who enrolls for 12 or more credit hours per semester. Students registering for more than 18 credit hours per semester must obtain permission from their Department Chairperson and the College Dean. A PART-TIME student is one who enrolls for 11 or fewer credit hours per semester. STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS ON GRADE CHANGES Grade changes, with the appropriate approvals, will be processed by the Office of the Registrar, up to two (2) years after the completion of a course. This policy does not apply to I grades. GRADING AND GRADE POINTS Students will not be retroactively registered once the semester has ended. If a student has reason to request an exception to this policy, the request must be submitted in writing to the Academic Standards Committee. At the close of each semester a letter grade indicating the quality of the student s work is 38

39 reported by the instructor to the Office of the Registrar. Most departmental major courses require the student to earn a C grade or better in order for the course to satisfy graduation requirements. If a student receives a D or F grade in such a course, the student will be required to repeat the course. No course substitutions or waivers will be permitted to replace the course in which an unsatisfactory grade was received. The repeat attempt must take place at CSU. The student may not take a comparable course at another institution and transfer it back to CSU in an attempt to satisfy the CSU requirement. Points are assigned to each letter grade. The students are graded in accordance with the grading system. Grading standards are a faculty prerogative. Grade A - Very High 4 B - High 3 C - Satisfactory 2 D - Low (poor work) 1 F - Failure 0 Z - Non-Attendance 0 FZ - I - GRADING SYSTEM Grade Point Letter Interpretation per Semester Hour S - U - P - Quit Attending/Didn t Withdraw Incomplete Satisfactory Unsatisfactory Pass CR - Credit NC - No Credit AU - Audit IP - In Progress W- Withdrawal CALCULATING THE GRADE POINT AVERAGE The Grade Point Average can be obtained by multiplying the credit hours for each course by the points generated by each grade earned for the course. Next add the credit hours column being careful to exclude courses with grades that by policy do not calculate in the GPA. Then, add the points earned column. Finally, divide the points by the credit hours to obtain the GPA. EXAMPLE: Letter Grade Credit Hours Grade Points Quality Points PSY 2000 B 5 x 3 = 15 BUS 1000 D 3 x 1 = 3 EDU 1330 A 2 x 4 = 8 GEL 1010 C 4 x 2 = 8 Total Grade Point Average (34 divided by 14) = 2.42 STUDENT CLASSIFICATION Freshman: A student who has earned 30 credit hours or less. Sophomore: A student who has earned between 31 and 60 credit hours. Junior: A student who has earned between 61 and 90 credit hours. Senior: A student who has earned 91 or more credit hours. SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS Central State University s primary goal is to provide a nurturing educational environment in which students may develop their intellectual potential. Students are expected to actively pursue their coursework and maintain persistence in fulfilling degree requirements within a reasonable time frame. Students are expected to meet the standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress stated below. Petitions for exceptions to these standards may be submitted to the Academic Standards Committee. Such petitions must be in writing and must be accompanied by appropriate documentations. Specifics of any unusual circumstances that warrant an exception to stated policy should be clearly explained and documented. The Academic Standards Committee reviews such petitions and makes recommendations to the Academic Vice President who may grant exceptions to stated policy on an individual case basis. 39

40 Minimum grade point averages for Satisfactory Academic Progress are as follows: Total Cumulative Quality Hours Grade Point Average and above 2.0 ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SUSPENSION A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 is required for completion of an undergraduate degree at Central State University. Some programs require a higher GPA. When the cumulative grade point average falls below the required minimum, students will be Placed on Academic Probation for the following semester. At this point, the student is required to register with the Office of the Academic Advising and Assistance and will be assigned an academic advisor to complete an academic success plan. NOTE: Students are permitted to enroll the next semester, but must earn a 2.0 for that semester. If the next semester s GPA is less than 2.0 and the cumulative GPA is less than the required minimum, the student will be Academically Suspended at the end of that term. Students who wish to return, after remaining out the appropriate period of time, may obtain an Appeal for Readmission packet from the Office of the Registrar. After completing the Appeal form, the student must make an appointment with his/her Academic Advisor to review the Appeal, prepare the Time Management Plan, and complete the Student Readmission Agreement in preparation for submission to the Academic Standards Committee. The Appeal must be submitted to your Academic Advisor no later than 60 days prior to the beginning of the term. The Committee must receive from the advisor, your Appeal at least 30 days prior to the beginning of the term in which the student wishes to re-enroll. Students, who are academically suspended for the first time, will not be allowed to enroll for the next semester. Students who have been academically suspended for a second time are not eligible to be considered for readmission for one academic year. After a third academic suspension, readmission may not be granted. These guidelines also apply to transfer students who have been dismissed or required to withdraw from the last college or university attended. APPEAL FOR READMISSION AFTER BEING ACADEMICALLY SUSPENDED A student who has been academically suspended and who seeks readmission must submit a petition to the Academic Standards Committee. Appeals are available from the Office of the Registrar. Appeals for readmission must include a plan signed by both the student and an academic advisor. The chair of the student s major program and the Dean of the student s college must also sign appeals for readmission. Once readmitted, students must show evidence of following the agreed upon plan for academic success. Failure to do so will be taken into account in the review of any future appeals for readmission. Appeals must be filed with your Academic Advisor at least 60 days prior to the beginning of the semester for which one is seeking readmission. The Committee must receive from the advisor, your Appeal at least 30 days prior to the beginning of the term in which the student wishes to re-enroll. Hours and grades earned at another accredited institution during period of academic suspension from Central State will be considered during the decision on whether to grant readmission. If the student is readmitted, credit hours earned at another institution will be accepted and posted to the student s transcript in accordance with rules on the application of all transfer credit in effect at the time of readmission. Students who are admitted after being Academically Suspended will be readmitted on Academic Probation must achieve at least a 2.0 semester GPA or they will be Academically Suspended again. NOTE: The student is required to register with the Office of the Academic Advising and Assistance and will be assigned an academic advisor to complete an academic success plan. Readmission after one or two Academic Suspensions is not automatic and may be denied upon the recommendation of the Academic Standards Committee. While the Academic Standards Committee will consider petitions for readmission after three or more academic suspensions, such petitions will be approved only under the most exceptional circumstances. Students with multiple academic suspensions are advised to pursue their education at another institution or to consider a career path that does not require an undergraduate degree. 40

41 TRANSFER APPLICATION An applicant who was enrolled in another college or university for at least one course is classified as a transfer applicant. Official transcripts (sealed envelope with the raised seal on the document) from all other institutions attended must be submitted to the Office of Admissions as part of the Central State University Application. Failure to list attendance at a college or university on the admissions application may be grounds for revocation of admission or dismissal from the university. The Office of the Registrar will evaluate overall transfer credit for acceptance by the University. The Department Chair, of the department you are seeking entrance into, will evaluate credits for their applicability to program and degree requirements. How accepted transfer credits are applied toward degree requirements will take place within the first 30 days of your matriculation at Central State University. The student will receive a copy of the degree check sheet and if applicable, a course substitution form will be sent to the Registrar s Office at this time. ADVANCE STANDING In order for advance standing to be granted, institutions you have attended must be accredited by one of six national accrediting agencies: Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools North Central Association of Colleges and Schools New England Association of Schools and Colleges Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges Southern Association of Colleges and Schools /Commission on Colleges Western Association of Schools and Colleges You can check the accreditation of your institution online at The acceptance of transfer credits from any other institutions must be approved by the Office of the Registrar. Central State University operates on a semester academic calendar. One semester credit equals 1.5 quarter credits. For example, if you transfer 15 quarter credits, that will be the equivalent of 10 semester credits. Central State University will accept Advanced Placement Credit Program credits (AP) and College-Level Examination Program credits (CLEP) under the auspices of the College Board. To receive AP credit a high school student must have completed an official AP (advanced placement) course and taken the test in that subject. Credit is granted for test scores of 3, 4, or 5. CLEP examinations cover material taught in the first two years of college. Students earning satisfactory scores in the CLEP examination will be granted the same amount of credit granted to students who successfully complete the course. Credit is also accepted from the Defense Activity for Nontraditional Education Support (DANTES). Central State University awards transfer credit for Military Experience based upon the American Council on Education s Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. Applicants interested in receiving consideration for any of these alternative forms of credit must have the official score report sent directly to the Office of the Registrar, where official granting of credit begins. You may transfer a great many credits from another institution; however, you are still required to earn a minimum of 30 semester hours at CSU. Your Department Chair may require you to take specific courses at Central State University to earn your degree. This information should be shared with you at the time you receive your official check sheet. TRANSFER CREDIT POLICY Central State University accepts transfer credit from colleges and universities accredited by regional accrediting associations. The registrar will determine whether the university accepts credit from other universities. Under state law, the university is required to accept grades of D or better for transfer credit from state assisted colleges and universities in Ohio. (Credits from D grade courses will count towards the 124 credits required for graduation. However, the student may still need to repeat the class if Central State requires a C grade in the course.) Grades of C or better are generally acceptable from out-of-state schools. Department chairs will determine whether credits accepted by Central State may be used to satisfy major requirements. Grades of S, pass and credit are considered for transfer credit. Students who have already received a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution and wish to pursue a second baccalaureate degree will automatically receive 94 semester credit hours. They will be ranked as seniors and will need to complete a minimum of 30 semester credit hours at Central State 41

42 University to earn a second baccalaureate degree. An advisor will determine degree and whether the student will need to take more than 30 credits to complete the second degree. INCOMPLETE A grade of incomplete I is a temporary grade assigned to students who lack final assignments or projects, or who, for some other extenuating circumstance, were unable to complete the requirements of the course within the semester. This grade is assigned by the instructor with the consent of the student, and the mutual understanding of the conditions under which this grade may be changed. The incomplete grade requires the signature of the instructor and the student with a brief description of the requirements necessary to receive a grade. Both the student and the instructor understand that if the additional coursework is not satisfactorily completed and submitted to the instructor within six (6) weeks after the beginning of the next semester of enrollment (up to one year), the grade will change to an F. The instructor has ten (10) days after the stated deadline to process the paperwork and to submit the Change of Grade Report to the Office of the Registrar. Once an I grade has been changed to an F grade, no further change is permitted. Individual exceptions to this policy, due to extenuating circumstances, will be considered by the Academic Standards Committee upon receipt of a formal appeal presented to the Committee by the student s Academic Advisor or Department Chair. REPEATING A COURSE Students may repeat most courses in which a grade was earned. All course repeat attempts will be recorded on the student s academic record. The first grade earned will be excluded from the calculation of the cumulative grade point average by the last repeat attempt. Students are advised to check with the Office of Financial Aid to determine the effect of repeated courses on their financial aid awards. AUDITING COURSES Students are permitted to audit courses but will receive neither grades nor credit for those courses. The student who audits is expected to attend class but is not required to submit assignments or take examinations, unless contractually agreed. The fees for auditing are the same as those for enrolling for credit. Changing from audit to credit or from credit to audit is not permitted once the registration is complete. SOCHE - STUDENT CROSS-REGISTRATION PROGRAM Cross-Registration is a program of the Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education (SOCHE) to allow students who are degree-seeking and/or participating in certification programs access to academic opportunities not available at their own institutions. Students attending colleges and universities within SOCHE may register for courses that are applicable to their degree program offered by other SOCHE institutions. Generally, all classes, including those offered through distance education, are open, subject to space availability and completion of prerequisites and with permission of the host institution. Courses categorized as workshops are not available for cross-registration. In order to cross-register for a course at another SOCHE institution, the desired course(s) must not be offered at the student s home institution during the term in which the student desires to enroll. Students must adhere to the cross-registration guidelines established at each SOCHE-member institution. SOCHE brochures and additional information are available in the Office of the Registrar. SENIOR CITIZEN ENROLLMENT Senior citizens who are Ohio residents may enroll in classes at Central State University free of charge for audit status only. Such enrollment is made on a space available basis during the Late Registration period only. Senior citizens enrolling in classes are responsible for meeting limited course prerequisites and for the payment of any special course fees which may apply. Proper identification is required (Golden Buckeye card or verification of age 60). 42

43 DROP/ADD COURSES Students may drop or add courses during the first nine days of the semester. Students are not permitted to add courses after the first nine days of the semester. Exceptions require the written permission of the instructor. Students may drop courses during the first nine days of the semester without record. All drops after the ninth day of class will result in a grade of W. Students are not permitted to drop classes after the last day of the 12th week of the semester. DECLARING A MAJOR All new students are assigned to an academic department and a professional advisor for mentoring and advising. It is expected that a major be declared during the first semester of enrollment. A Declaration of Major form must be completed and filed in the Registrar s Office no later than the sophomore year. MAJORS AND MINORS A student must declare a major in the department of choice upon entering the University. The major may be changed at any time during the student s academic career, however, the student should finalize a major no later than the beginning of the junior year, since certain General Education courses are required in specific disciplines. A major consists of a minimum of 30 semester hours, while a minor is a concentration of at least 20 to 24 semester hours. (See under each individual department s degree requirements.) Students seeking an Ohio Teaching License should confer with the Dean of the College of Education. DOUBLE MAJORS A student who plans to pursue more than one major notifies the Office of the Registrar of such an intention and completes major requirements for both programs, the General Education requirements being common to both. The student should note, however, that the special requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees differ. The student combining two such majors must satisfy both sets of special requirements. (See GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS.) The transcript will reflect both majors. Such a student has two academic advisors to assist in coordinating the programs, but it is the responsibility of the student to notify the Office of the Registrar at the time the decision is made to pursue two majors. GRADUATION Prospective graduates are required to file an application for graduation with the Office of the Registrar and pay the application fee during the application period as outlined in the Academic Calendar. The application fee is nonrefundable and non-transferable. The academic advisor, the department chairperson, and the dean will verify that degree requirements have been satisfactorily completed for graduation. Course substitutions or waivers must be submitted on a Substitution/Waiver Form and must be approved by the academic advisor, department chairperson and the dean. The Registrar will certify that all graduation requirements have been satisfied after receipt and review of the student s final grades. A major requires the successful completion of a minimum concentration of 30 credit hours of work in a specific field. In those departments that require a minor, a concentration of 20 to 24 credit hours is necessary. Students who seek an Ohio Teaching License should confer with an advisor in the College of Education for guidance. APPLICATIONS FOR GRADUATION Applications for Graduation are accepted beginning September 15th of the year preceding the student s anticipated graduation date. A $20 application fee is required (this fee can be charged to your account). The application fee is non-refundable and non-transferable. All commencement regalia are available for purchase at Senior Salute or the University Book Store. Applications are valid only for the academic year in which they are submitted. The following steps and minimum requirements must be satisfied in order for a student to be considered as an applicant for graduation: 1. Contact your academic advisor for a graduation evaluation. 2. Submit a completed Application for Graduation, Degree Check sheet and the $20 application fee by the last day of final examinations for the Fall Semester. An incremented late fee of $10 per month will be accessed, 43

44 in addition to the application fee, beginning December 1st (i.e. $10 December 1st, $20 January 1st, $30 February 1st, etc.) for Graduation Applications submitted after the Fall Semester deadline. Graduation Applications will be accepted through March 1st, with payment of the late fee. To participate in the May Commencement Ceremony your application must be submitted by March 1st. 3. All course requirements must be completed by the end of the Spring Semester. 4. A minimum cumulative grade point average is required for graduation from Central State University. The actual requirement varies by degree earned and by major program of study and will always be a 2.00 GPA or better. Students must check with their college and major department to determine their GPA requirements. 5. Take and pass the English Proficiency Examination or enroll in ENG 3000 and successfully complete the course with a C grade or better. 6. Pay or make satisfactory arrangements to pay your financial obligations to the University by March 15th. Graduation Applications for candidates who do not complete their requirements as planned, are retained by the Registrar for three (3) years. Students in this group who wish to re-apply for graduation for a subsequent semester may do so by submitting a letter of intent accompanied by the appropriate application fee. Students who have not submitted an Application for Graduation within the last three years must complete a new Application, and pay the appropriate fee. NOTE: Except in cases of inclement weather, the Commencement Ceremony is held in McPherson Stadium. CATALOG FOR GRADUATION Students have a total of eight calendar years in which to complete the degree requirements for graduation. Students who take longer than eight years from the date of initial enrollment to graduate will be subject to degree requirements of the current catalog. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION (See page 61, Under ASSESSMENT OF THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM). RELEASE OF RECORDS/TRANSCRIPTS The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, govern the maintenance and release of records/transcripts. A copy of these regulations is available in the Office of the Registrar. The University will not release a copy of the student s grades without the student s permission, except where required by law. If a prior balance is owed to the University, the student s transcript (official or unofficial) will not be released. The student must pay the prior balance before a transcript will be issued (Finance Policy #8609). RESIDENCY An Out-of-State student who feels that he/she qualifies as an In-State resident must complete a request to change residency status form and submit it to the Office of the Registrar. Supporting documentation and verification is required. In-state residency approval is neither retroactive nor automatic. All requests for residency changes, with supporting documentation, must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar no later than one week prior to the beginning of the semester for which the residency change is requested. POLICIES OF THE OHIO BOARD OF REGENTS REGARDING RESIDENCY Ohio Student Residency for State Subsidy and Tuition Surcharge Purposes (A) Intent and authority (1) It is the intent of the chancellor of the Ohio board of regents in promulgating this rule to exclude from treatment as residents, as that term is applied here, those persons who are present in the state of Ohio primarily for the purpose of receiving the benefit of a state-supported education. (2) This rule is adopted pursuant to Chapter 119. of the Revised Code, and under the authority conferred upon the chancellor of the Ohio board of regents by section of the Revised Code. (B) Definitions For purposes of this rule: (1) Resident shall mean any person who maintains a twelve-month place or places of residence in Ohio, who is qualified as a resident to vote in Ohio and receive state public assistance, and who may be subjected to tax liability under section of the Revised Code, provided such person has not, within the time prescribed by this rule, declared himself or herself to be or allowed himself or herself to remain a resident of any other state or nation for any of these or other purposes. (2) Financial support as used in this rule, shall not include grants, scholarships and awards from persons or entities which are not related to the recipient. (3) An institution of higher education shall have the same meaning as state institution of higher education as that term is defined in section of the Revised Code, and shall also include private medical and dental colleges which receive direct subsidy from the state of Ohio. (4) Domicile as used in this rule is a person s permanent place of abode, so long as the person has the legal ability under federal and state law to reside permanently at that abode. For the purpose of this rule, only one domicile may be maintained at a given time. (5) Dependent shall mean a student who was claimed by at least one parent or guardian as a dependent on that person s internal revenue service tax filing for the previous tax year. (6) Residency Officer means the person or persons at an institution of higher education that has the responsibility for determining residency of students under this rule. 44

45 (7) Community Service Position shall mean a position volunteering or working for: (a) VISTA, AmeriCorps, city year, the Peace Corps, or any similar program as determined by the chancellor of the Ohio board of regents; or (b) An elected or appointed public official for a period of time not exceeding twenty-four consecutive months. (C) Residency for subsidy and tuition surcharge purposes The following persons shall be classified as residents of the state of Ohio for subsidy and tuition surcharge purposes: (1) A student whose spouse, or a dependent student, at least one of whose parents or legal guardian, has been a resident of the state of Ohio for all other legal purposes for twelve consecutive months or more immediately preceding the enrollment of such student in an institution of higher education. (2) A person who has been a resident of Ohio for the purpose of this rule for at least twelve consecutive months immediately preceding his or her enrollment in an institution of higher education and who is not receiving, and has not directly or indirectly received in the preceding twelve consecutive months, financial support from persons or entities who are not residents of Ohio for all other legal purposes. (3) A dependent student of a parent or legal guardian, or the spouse of a person who, as of the first day of a term of enrollment, has accepted fulltime, self-sustaining employment and established domicile in the state of Ohio for reasons other than gaining the benefit of favorable tuition rates. Documentation of full-time employment and domicile shall include both of the following documents: (a) A sworn statement from the employer or the employer s representative on the letterhead of the employer or the employer s representative certifying that the parent, legal guardian or spouse of the student is employed full-time in Ohio. (b) A copy of the lease under which the parent, legal guardian or spouse is the lessee and occupant of rented residential property in the state; a copy of the closing statement on residential real property located in Ohio of which the parent, legal guardian or spouse is the owner and occupant; or if the parent, legal guardian or spouse is not the lessee or owner of the residence in which he or she has established domicile, a letter from the owner of the residence certifying that the parent, legal guardian or spouse resides at that residence. (4) A veteran, and the veteran s spouse and any dependent of the veteran, who meets both of the following conditions: (a) The veteran either (i) served one or more years on active military duty and was honorably discharged or received a medical discharge that was related to the military service or (ii) was killed while serving on active military duty or has been declared to be missing in action or a prisoner of war. (b) If the veteran seeks residency status for tuition surcharge purposes, the veteran has established domicile in this state as of the first day of term of enrollment in an institution of higher education. If the spouse or a dependent of the veteran seeks residency status for tuition surcharge purposes, the veteran and the spouse or dependent seeking residency status have established domicile in this state as of the first day of a term of enrollment in an institution of higher education, except that if the veteran was killed while serving on active military duty or has been declared to be missing in action or a prisoner of war, only the spouse or dependent seeking residency status shall be required to have established domicile in accordance with this division. Domicile as used in division (C) (4) (b) of this rule shall have the same meaning as used in division (C) (3) (b) of this rule. (D) Additional criteria which may be considered in determining residency may include but are not limited to the following: (1) Criteria evidencing residency: (a) If a person is subject to tax liability under section of the Revised Code; (b) If a person qualifies to vote in Ohio; (c) If a person is eligible to receive Ohio public assistance; (d) If a person has an Ohio s driver s license and/or motor vehicle registration. (2) Criteria evidencing lack of residency (a) If a person is a resident of or intends to be a resident of another state or nation for the purpose of tax liability, voting, receipt of public assistance, or student loan benefits (if the student qualified for that loan program by being a resident of that state or nation); (b) If a person is a resident or intends to be a resident of another state or nation for any purpose other than tax liability, voting, or receipt of public assistance (see paragraph (D)(2)(a) of this rule). (3) For the purpose of determining residency for tuition surcharge purposes at Ohio s state-assisted colleges and universities, an individual s immigration status will not preclude an individual from obtaining resident status if that individual has the current legal status to remain permanently in the United States. (E) Exceptions to the general rule of residency for subsidy and tuition surcharge purposes: (1) A person who is living and is gainfully employed on a full-time or part-time and self-sustaining basis in Ohio and who is pursuing a part-time program of instruction at an institution of higher education shall be considered a resident of Ohio for these purposes. (2) A person who enters and currently remains upon active duty status in the United States military service while a resident of Ohio for all other legal purposes and his or her dependents shall be considered residents of Ohio for these purposes as long as Ohio remains the state of such person s domicile. (3) A person on active duty status in the United States military service who is stationed and resides in Ohio and his or her dependents shall be considered residents of Ohio for these purposes. (4) A person who is transferred by his employer beyond the territorial limits of the fifty states of the United States and the District of Columbia while a resident of Ohio for all other legal purposes and his or her dependents shall be considered residents of Ohio for these purposes as long as Ohio remains the state of such person s domicile as long as such person has fulfilled his or her tax liability to the state of Ohio for at least the tax year preceding enrollment. (5) A person who has been employed as a migrant worker in the state of Ohio and his or her dependents shall be considered a resident for these purposes provided such person has worked in Ohio at least four months during each of the three years preceding the proposed enrollment. (6) A person who was considered a resident under this rule at the time the person started a community service position as defined under this rule, and his or her spouse and dependents, shall be considered a residents of Ohio while in service and upon completion of service in the community service position. (7) A person who returns to the state of Ohio due to marital hardship, takes or has taken legal steps to end a marriage, and reestablishes financial dependence upon a parent or legal guardian (receives greater than fifty percent of his or her support from the parent or legal guardian), and his or her dependents shall be considered residents of Ohio. (8) A person who is a member of the Ohio National Guard and who is domiciled in Ohio, and his or her spouse and dependents, shall be considered residents of Ohio while the person is in Ohio National Guard service. (F) Procedures (1) A dependent person classified as a resident of Ohio for these purposes under the provisions of paragraph (C) (1) of this rule and who is enrolled in an institution of higher education when his or her parents or legal guardian removes their residency from the state of Ohio shall continue to be considered a resident during continuous full-time enrollment and until his or her completion of any one academic degree program. (2) In considering residency, removal of the student or the student s parents or legal guardian from Ohio shall not, during a period of twelve months following such removal, constitute relinquishment of Ohio residency status otherwise established under paragraph (C)(1) or (C)(2) of this rule. 45

46 (3) For students who qualify for residency status under paragraph (C)(3) of this rule, residency status is lost immediately if the employed person upon whom resident student status was based accepts employment and establishes domicile outside Ohio less than twelve months after accepting employment and establishing domicile in Ohio. (4) Any person once classified as a nonresident, upon the completion of twelve consecutive months of residency, must apply to the institution he or she attends for reclassification as a resident of Ohio for these purposes if such person in fact wants to be reclassified as a resident. Should such person present clear and convincing proof that no part of his or her financial support is or in the preceding twelve consecutive months has been provided directly or indirectly by persons or entities who are not residents of Ohio for all other legal purposes, such person shall be reclassified as a resident. Evidentiary determinations under this rule shall be made by the institution which may require, among other things, the submission of documentation regarding the sources of a student s actual financial support. (5) Any reclassification of a person who was once classified as a nonresident for these purposes shall have prospective application only from the date of such reclassification. (6) Any institution of higher education charged with reporting student enrollment to the chancellor of the Ohio board of regents for state subsidy purposes and assessing the tuition surcharge shall provide individual students with a fair and adequate opportunity to present proof of his or her Ohio residency for purposes of this rule. Such an institution may require the submission of affidavits and other documentary evidence which it may deem necessary to a full and complete determination under this rule. VETERANS AFFAIRS Lionel E. Newsom Administration Building, Room 105 Mrs. Dorothy Foster, Veterans Coordinator (937) The Veterans Affairs Office, located in the Office of the Registrar, provides assistance and registration information for veteran students. Persons with questions related to Veterans Administration benefits, registration and study at the University should contact the office. Veterans are afforded the same privileges and assume the same obligations as other students at Central State University. They should apply to the nearest Veterans Administration office for a certificate of eligibility. This certificate of eligibility for training must be presented at the time of registration to the certifying official. Students receiving Veterans Benefits must abide by all regulations in the Federal Benefits for Veterans and Dependents 1-S-1 Fact Sheet. (See also under REGISTRATION.) VETERANS REGULATIONS/CONDUCT POLICY All students receiving federal benefits for veterans and dependents are obligated to follow regulations of the Federal Benefits Program and those of the University. The Registrar is the certifying officer. The following University regulations are applied: 1. All veterans are required to submit a copy of their DD All veterans can be certified on a semester or annual basis. It will be the veteran s responsibility to notify the certifying officer in the Office of the Registrar of any changes in the Semester Class Schedule. 3. All veterans are responsible for notifying the certifying officer of any repeated courses. 4. All veterans are required to alert the Office of the Registrar when adding a course, dropping a course, or withdrawing from the University. 5. Any veteran receiving incomplete grades ( I ) during any semester must remove those incompletes by the last day of the sixth week of the following semester enrolled. (See also under FINANCIAL AID AND THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM-GRADING). 6. All veterans are responsible for notifying the certifying officer of any transfer work. 7. Veterans benefits will be discontinued for any veteran student who has been required to withdraw. Recipients of Title IV and/or Veterans Educational Benefits will be required to complete successfully a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester. A Title IV student who must repeat a course that was originally paid with Title IV monies will be required to pay for the repeat course with the student s own funds. SELECTIVE SERVICE REGISTRATION All male Ohio resident students ages 18 through 25 must register with the Selective Service to qualify for In-State fees. To register log on to: The Out-of-State Surcharge will be assessed to those students not registered with Selective Service at the time of registration. 46

47 THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM The Academic Program General Objectives Degrees Special Requirements for Bachelor of Arts Degree. 48 Special Requirements for Bachelor of Science Degree Special Requirements for Bachelor of Science in Education Degree. 49 General Education Requirements. 49 General Education Curriculum Exceptions to the General Education Requirements.. 50 General Education Checksheet.. 51 Transfer Module. 53 The Center for Academic Success (TCAS) Office of Academic Advising and Assistance (OAAA) Office of Faculty Development (OFD) Learning Skills Center (LSC) Student Support Services (SSS).. 59 Center for Academic Success Programs First Year Seminar Learning Communities Summer Early Start Program Tutoring. 60 University Programs and Services American College Testing (ACT) Assessment of the Academic Program Proficiency Examination (CLEP) English Proficiency Requirement for Graduation The Center for Allaying Health Disparities through Research and Education Center for African Studies. 62 Center of Excellence in Emerging Technologies. 62 Hallie Q. Brown Memorial Library.. 63 Honors Program Other Awards. 65 Central State University Dayton (CSU-Dayton)

48 Academic Affairs Division Lionel E. Newsom Administration Building, Room 204 Dr. Juliette B. Bell, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs (937) THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM GENERAL OBJECTIVES The Central State University education strives to empower its students with insight formed by the liberal arts, motivation to solve problems through science and technology, competence to achieve economic self-sufficiency, disposition encouraging service and lifelong education, values promoting personal and community health, understanding of one s own and other cultures, responsiveness to major problems confronting humankind. DEGREES Central State University offers a Master s degree in Education (for degree requirements, see under COLLEGE OF EDUCATION) and the following baccalaureate degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music Education, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Science in Education, and Bachelor of Science in Manufacturing Engineering. Undergraduate degree requirements: 1. A minimum of l24 semester hours, as follows: 1.1 The General Education Requirements (See page 49). 1.2 Special Requirements for the baccalaureate degrees (See below). 1.3 Requirements for a major or minor concentration of courses (in general, a minimum of 30 hours for a major, 20 hours for a minor. See under individual department or program). 1.4 Additional electives as needed to complete the minimum 124 hours. 2. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of Passing the English Proficiency Examination or equivalent (See ASSESSMENT OF THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM). 4. Application for graduation filed with the Office of the Registrar. 5. At least 24 of the final 30 semester hours in residence at Central State University. The student is expected to fulfill the graduation requirements in the catalog of matriculation or a subsequent one, but not excerpts from both. In the case of discontinued or superseded courses, the academic advisor will assist in making any adjustment. Under rare circumstances, the University may choose to award a degree posthumously. To be considered for such an award, the student must have been in good academic standing with the University at the time of death and must have completed a minimum of 104 semester hours. Further, the student must have exhibited qualities of scholarship and community membership that warrant special consideration. When these conditions are met, a departmental recommendation will go to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, the President and the Board of Trustees for final approval. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 1. A grade-point average of at least 2.2 in the major concentration. 2. Presentation of no more than 40 semester hours in any one discipline toward the minimum 124 hours. 3. Humanities Requirement 3.1 Completion of at least six (6) semester hours of humanities in addition to the GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT in humanities. 3.2 The additional humanities hours are to be selected from two of the following disciplines: art, drama, history, linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, religion, speech, and foreign languages (beyond the first year of the course). 48

49 4. Foreign Language Requirement 4.1 The foreign language requirement for the Bachelor of Arts is a passing grade in foreign language II (or equivalent proficiency by testing). 4.2 Students with no prior coursework in a foreign language should begin with Foreign Language I. 4.3 Students with some prior coursework in a foreign language should discuss appropriate enrollment with the Foreign Language Coordinator in the Department of Humanities. 4.4 In general, one year of a foreign language in high school is equal to one semester of foreign language coursework at CSU. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 1. A grade-point average of at least 2.0 in the major concentration. 2. Except when required to meet accreditation or other professional standards, presentation of no more than 50 semester hours in any one discipline toward the 124 hours. 3. The sciences and the more technical subject-matter areas must receive concentration and emphasis. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 1. A cumulative grade-point average of at least A grade-point average of at least 2.7 in the major teaching field. 3. A grade of C or above in each required professional education course. 4. Completion of at least 60 semester hours in courses numbered 2000 and above. 5. Except when required to meet licensure or other professional standards, presentation of no more than 47 semester hours in any one discipline toward the 124 hours. 6. Eligibility for Ohio Licensure requires personal fitness, specific prerequisites, and laboratory and field experiences. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS The General Education Curriculum provides a liberal arts base to our major programs. Its main areas are English composition, mathematics, humanities and fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, and the natural and physical sciences. From these hours, a student may also assemble a transfer module (See TRANSFER MODULE). An additional 6-8 semester hours are devoted to personal development, including first-year orientation seminars, introductory computer science courses, and courses in health and physical activities. Throughout this curriculum, there are numerous choices emphasizing multiculturalism and global awareness, as well as writing intensiveness, literary readings, research, critical thinking, computers, and computer-assisted instruction. 1. ENGLISH COMPOSITION 8-9 semester hours (two courses) 8-9 hours 2. MATHEMATICS 3 semester hours (one course) 3 hours 3. HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS 9 semester hours, as follows: A) African-American History 3 hours B) One course in Global History 3 hours C) One course total, chosen from 3 hours these areas: Music and Philosophy 4. SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES GENERAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM (42-46 hours) Art, Drama, History, Literature, 9 hours 9 semester hours from at least two areas: Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History (American), Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, and Social Work NATURAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 7 hours 7 semester hours from at least two areas (one choice must be a lab course): Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Physics, and Water Resources Management 6. FIRST-YEAR SEMINAR 1-2 hours 7. COMPUTER SKILLS 2-4 hours A computer course from one the following areas: Art, Computer Science, Business, Manufacturing Engineering and Music 8. HEALTH* 3 semester hours, as follows: a Health and Wellness course 2 hours a physical activities course 1 hour

50 *Upon recommendation of a physician, a student with a physical disability may be excused from the one our physical activity course requirement. Students, who are 25 years of age at the time of entry into CSU or at time of re-entry after extended absence, are exempt from the one-hour physical activity course requirement. Students who are exempt from the physical activity requirement must make up the exempted hour to complete the minimum 124 hours toward graduation. Note: Please see the General Education Requirements check sheet and lists of approved courses on pages EXCEPTIONS TO THE GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS Students may be exempt from some General Education courses on the basis of Entrance Test scores. A student may be exempt from ENG 1100 on the basis of entry test scores. Exemption does not mean that the student receives credit for that course; it means only that he/she is excused from the specific course, but must make up the additional hours for graduation. Other exceptions to the General Education requirements occur when the student s major field requires specific introductory courses in the Social Sciences, Natural Sciences and Humanities. The three music degrees offered in the Department of Fine and Performing Arts have General Education Requirements that are different from the University requirements in order for these programs to meet the curriculum standards of the National Association of Schools of Music. General Education requirements for these three programs total semester hours, and are listed on the department s checksheets. 50

51 Central State University General Education Requirements Approved October 2009 Effective Fall 2010 Name: ID#: Advisor: Date entered: College: Department: Major: Degree: I. English Composition 8-9 credit hours Must pass all of the following with a grade of C or above. Transfer Module Requirement. Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes ENG 1100* or 5 ENG ENG * Student should register in ENG 1100 or ENG 1101, depending on placement score. II. Mathematics 3 credit hours Transfer Module Requirement. Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes MTH III. Humanities and Fine Arts 9 credit hours Transfer Module Requirement. Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes HIS HIS 1121 or 3 HIS 1122 Three credit hours from List A on Page 52. Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes 3 IV. Social and Behavioral Sciences (9 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List B on page 52). Transfer Module Requirement. Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes Transfer Module = 36 Hours from Areas I - V General Education Requirements Completed Advisor s Signature Date V. Natural and Physical Sciences (7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C on page 52; one choice must include a lab.) Transfer Module Requirement. Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes VI. First Year Seminar 1-2 credit hours FYS 1101 is required of all first-time entering freshmen and transfer students with less than 30 cumulative credit hours. FYS 1102 is required of students on Academic Probation during freshman year. Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes FYS FYS VII. Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours from List D on page 52). Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes VI. Health 3 credit hours Course Hrs Grade SEM/YR Notes HPR One credit hour from List E on page English Proficiency Requirement Exam Passed: (Date) or ENG 3000 Passed: (Date) (Grade of C or above required.) Revised

52 LIST A. HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS ART Introduction to Art (3) ART Ancient & Early European Art History (3) ART Later European Art History (3) ART Arts of Africa (3) ART African American Art History (3) DRM Introduction to Theatre (3) DRM Development of Drama: Tragedy (3) DRM Development of Drama: Comedy (3) DRM African American Theatre (3) ENG Great Books, Great Films (3) ENG Literature and the Global Village (3) ENG Literature in our Times (3) ENG The Literary Tradition (3) ENG Literature and Gender (3) ENG African Literature (4) ENG African American Literature I (3) ENG African American Literature II (3) ENG American Literature I (3) ENG American Literature II (3) ENG British Literature I (3) ENG British Literature II (3) ENG World Literature I (3) ENG World Literature II (3) ENG Literature by Women (3) FLA Foreign Literature in Translation (3) FLA Literature of Spanish America (3) FLA Survey of French Literature (3) HIS Survey History of Africa (3) HIS Colonial Latin America (3) HIS Africa before 1800 (3) HIS Africa Present (3) MUS Music Appreciation (3) MUS History of Jazz (3) PHI Survey of Global Philosophy (3) PHI Global Religion (3) PHI Critical Thinking (3) PHI Applied Ethics (3) LIST B. SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES ECO Introduction to Economics (3) ECO Principles of Microeconomics (3) ECO Principles of Macroeconomics (3) ECO Economic Problems of the Black Community (3) EDU Educational Psychology (3) GEO1101. World Geography: Western Hemisphere (3) GEO1103. World Geography: Eastern Hemisphere (3) GEO1110. Fundamentals of Geography (4) GEO2202 Economic Geography (3) HIS History of the U.S. to 1877 (3) HIS History of the U.S. since 1877 (3) PSC American National Government (3) PSC Introduction to Africa (3) PSY General Psychology (3) PSY Human Growth and Development (3) SOC Introductory Sociology (3) SOC Cultural Anthropology (3) SOC Social Problems (3) SWK Introduction to Social Welfare (3) LIST C. NATURAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES BIO Organismal Biology w/lab (3) BIO Genetics and Diversity w/lab (4) BIO Environmental Science w/lab (3) BIO Evolution (2) BIO Biology of the Environment (2) BIO Human Anatomy & Physiology I w/lab (3) BIO Biology of Aging (2) CHM Chemical Concepts (3) CHM Elements of Chemistry w/lab (3) CHM General Chemistry I w/lab (4) GEL Physical Geology w/lab (4) GEL Historical Geology w/lab (4) GEL Oceanography (3) GEL Environmental Geology (3) PHY Physical Science I (3) PHY Physical Science II (3) PHY Experimental Science w/lab (2) PHY The Physics of Sound w/lab (3) PHY The Visual Image w/lab (2) PHY Basic Physics I w/lab (3) PHY Basic Physics II w/lab (3) PHY Introductory Astronomy (2) PHY 2211/2212. University Physics I w/ lab (5) PHY 2213/2214. University Physics II w/ lab (5) WRM Intro to Water Resources Management (3) LIST D. COMPUTER SKILLS ART Introduction to 2-D Computer Art (2) BUS Computer Applications for Business (3) CPS Computer Literacy (2) CPS Computer Fundamentals (2) CPS Computer Science I (4) MFE Principles of Manufacturing (3) MUS Computer Music Technology (2) LIST E. HEALTH: PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY HPR Archery (1) HPR Cycling (1) HPR Fencing (1) HPR Golf (1) HPR Advanced Golf (1) HPR Racquetball (1) HPR Beginning Swimming (1) HPR Advanced Beginning Swimming (1) HPR Intermediate Swimming (1) HPR Beginning Tennis (1) HPR Advanced Tennis (1) HPR Volleyball (1) HPR Aerobic Dancing (1) HPR Conditioning & Weight Training (1) HPR Prescriptive Exercise (1) HPR Badminton (1) HPR Walking to Fitness (1) HPR Water Aerobics (1) HPR Basketball (1) HPR Fitness for Life (1) 52

53 Transfer Module State Policy INSTITUTIONAL TRANSFER The Ohio Board of Regents, following the directive of the Ohio General Assembly, has developed a statewide policy to facilitate movement of students and transfer credits from one Ohio public college or university to another. The purpose of the state policy is to avoid duplication of course requirements and to enhance student mobility throughout Ohio s higher education system. Since independent colleges and universities in Ohio may or may not be participating in the transfer policy, students interested in transferring to an independent institution are encouraged to check with the college or university of their choice regarding transfer agreements. TRANSFER MODULE The Ohio Board of Regents Transfer and Articulation Policy established the Transfer Module, which is a specific subset or the entire set of a college or university s general education requirements. The Transfer Module contains quarter hours or semester hours of specified course credits in English composition, mathematics, fine arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural science and physical sciences and interdisciplinary coursework. A Transfer Module completed at one college or university will automatically meet the requirements of the Transfer Module at the receiving institution, once the student is accepted. Students may be required, however, to meet additional general education requirements that are not included in the Transfer Module. CONDITIONS FOR TRANSFER ADMISSION Students meeting the requirements of the Transfer Module are subject to the following conditions: 1. The policy encourages receiving institutions to give preferential consideration for admission to students who complete the Transfer Module and either the Associate of Arts or the Associate of Science degrees. These students will be able to transfer all courses in which they received a passing grade of D or better. Students must have an overall grade point average of 2.0 to be given credit for the Transfer Module. 2. The policy also encourages receiving institutions to give preferential consideration for admission to students who complete the Transfer Module with a grade of C or better in each course and 90 quarter hours or 60 semester hours. Students must have an overall grade point average of 2.0 to be given credit for the Transfer Module and only courses in which a C or better has been earned will transfer. 3. The policy encourages receiving institutions to admit on a non-preferential basis those students who complete the Transfer Module with a grade of C or better in each course and less than 90 quarter hours or 60 semester hours. These students will be able to transfer all courses in which they received a grade of C or better. Admission to a given institution, however, does not guarantee that a transfer student will be automatically admitted to all majors, minors, or fields of concentration at that institution. Once admitted, transfer students shall be subject to the same regulations governing applicability of catalog requirements as all other students. Furthermore, transfer students shall be accorded the same class standing and other privileges as all other students on the basis of the number of credits earned. All residency requirements must be successfully completed at the receiving institution prior to the granting of a degree. RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS In order to facilitate transfer with maximum applicability of transfer credit, prospective transfer students should plan a course of study that will meet the requirements of a degree program at the receiving institution. Specifically, students should identify early in their collegiate studies an institution and major to which they desire to transfer. Furthermore, students should determine if there are language requirements or any special course requirements that can be met during the freshman or sophomore year. This will enable students to plan and pursue a course of study that will articulate with the receiving institution s major. Students are encouraged to seek further information regarding transfer from both their advisor and the college or university to which they plan to transfer. 53

54 TRANSFER APPEALS PROCESS A multi-level, broad-based appeal process is required to be in place at each institution. A student disagreeing with the application of transfer credit by the receiving institution shall be informed of the right to appeal the decision and the process for filing the appeal. Each institution shall make available to students the appeal process for that specific college or university. If a transfer student s appeal is denied by the institution after all appeal levels within the institution have been exhausted, the institution shall advise the student in writing of the availability and process of appeal to the state level Articulation and Transfer Appeals Review Committee. This State Appeals Review Committee shall hear and recommend to institutions the resolution of individual cases of appeal from transfer students who have exhausted local appeal mechanisms concerning applicability of transfer credits at receiving institutions. PROCEDURES A student appealing a decision on the applicability of transfer credit must have exhausted campus-level appeals and must have received a final decision before submitting the matter for further review by the State Appeals Review Committee. The State Appeals Review Committee shall have the power to obtain all records and documents used in the deliberation of the matter at the campus level. Neither the student appealing the decision nor the representative of the institution shall have a right of personal appearance before the committee. STEPS IN THE TRANSFER APPEALS PROCESS 1. The institution publishes both state and local appeal procedures in the catalog or other appropriate student-oriented publication. 2. The student applies for admission. 3. The institution evaluates transcript of accepted student. 4. The institution decides on applicability of credit and sends dated statement of transfer credit applicability to student along with a notification of the 90-day period for filing an appeal. 5. If the student accepts the judgment, the process ends. 6. If the student challenges the judgment, he/she appeals within the institution. 7. The institution initiates its internal appeal process which must involve individuals who did not participate in the original decision. If the institution s appeal process provides for only two stages, initial review and appeal review, then this stage must provide for an institution-wide perspective. If more than one review step is involved, the final step must involve an institution-wide perspective. At each appeal level, the institution shall respond to the appeal within 30 days of the receipt of the appeal. 8. The institution notifies the student and the department, in writing, of judgment and informs the student of the right to a state appeal process and the address to which appeals may be sent. 9. If the student accepts the judgment of the institution s internal review process, the process ends. 10. If the student challenges the judgment, the student appeals to the State Appeals Review Committee. 11. The State Appeals Review Committee notifies the student and the institution of the date of the hearing and requested information. 12. A hearing is held by the State Appeals Review Committee. 13. The State Appeals Review Committee notifies the student and the institution of advisory judgment. 14. The institution considers the advisory judgment of the State Appeals Review Committee. 15. The institution notifies the student of the disposition of the advisory judgment. 16. The process ends. CENTRAL STATE UNIVERSITY TRANSFER APPEALS PROCESS This appeal process will address the applicability of transfer credits between institutions. The process applies to all undergraduate courses, not just those in the Transfer Module. Any student applying for admission to Central State University must have a transcript(s) of credits sent to the Office of Admission for review. The transcripts of accepted students will be analyzed for applicability of credits and the student will be served with a dated statement of credit applicability along with a notification of the 90-day period for filing an appeal. The Registrar, in consultation with the appropriate department chair, will determine the applicability of the general education credits. 54

55 The Department chair will determine what courses can be applied toward the major. This determination may be based on the grade received in the course as well as course content. For example, if native students are required to earn a grade of C or better in a course, transfer students may be required to repeat a course with a grade of D regardless of whether it is acceptable for the Transfer Module. If a student disagrees with the decision of the Registrar on the applicability of courses for the general education requirements, the student may appeal that decision to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs within 90 days after receiving the decision from the Registrar. The Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs will render a final decision within 30 days after receiving the appeal. The decision of the Academic Affairs office will be final. If a student disagrees with the decision of the chairperson on the applicability of transfer credits in the major area, that student may, within 90 days, appeal to the Dean of the College who will render a decision within 30 days. If the decision of the Dean of the College is unacceptable, the student may, within seven (7), days appeal to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, who will render a final decision within fifteen (15) days. TRANSFER MODULE REQUIREMENTS The Transfer Module must include semester credit hours of introductory courses in the following areas: English Composition Mathematics Arts and Humanities 55 Social and Behavioral Sciences Natural and Physical Sciences To complete a Transfer Module at Central State, students should: 1. Select minimum requirements of credit hours from courses marked with an asterisk in the list below and as specified in column 2 of the Transfer Module Grid. 2. Complete the Transfer Module (10-14 additional hours) by freely choosing from other non-asterisk courses listed below and as specified in column 3 of the Transfer Module Grid. 3. Column 4 of the Transfer Module Grid lists Central State s General Education requirements that must be taken over and above Transfer Module requirements for graduation. English Composition - minimum of 3 semester hours *ENG 1100 (5) Introduction to Writing and Reading for College or *ENG 1101 (4) Introduction to Writing for College Mathematics - minimum of 3 semester hours *MTH 1750 (3) College Algebra Arts and Humanities - minimum of 6 semester hours *HIS 1121 (3) Global History to 1500 or *HIS 1122 (3) Global History since At least three additional hours from List A: List A: Arts and Humanities ART 1100 (3) Introduction to Art ART 1120 (3) Later European Art History ART 1210 (3) Introduction to Art ART 2130 (3) Arts of Africa ART 2140 (3) African American Art History DRM 1100 (3) Introduction to Theatre DRM 2201 (3) Development of Drama: Tragedy ENG 1102 (4) Writing, Researching the Essay ENG 3021 (3) African Amer. Literature II ENG 3030 (3) American Literature I ENG 3031 (3) American Literature II ENG 3040 (3) British Literature I ENG 3041 (3) British Literature II MUS 1140 (3) Music Appreciation MUS 2233 (3) History of Jazz PHI 2230 (3) Global Religion PHI 2240 (3) Critical Thinking PHI 2250 (3) Applied Ethics Social and Behavioral Sciences - minimum of 6 semester hours from 2 different disciplines in List B: List B: Social and Behavioral Sciences ECO 2200 (3) Introduction to Economics ECO 2210 (3) Principles of Microeconomics GEO 1101 (3) World Geo. West Hemisphere GEO 1103 (3) World Geo. East Hemisphere GEO 1110 (4) Fundamentals of Geography GEO 2202 (3) Economic Geography HIS 2201 (3) History of the U. S. to 1877 HIS 2202 (3) History of the U. S. since 1877 PSC 1100 (3) American National Government PSC 2205 (3) Introduction to Africa PSY 2220 (3) Human Growth & Development SOC 1105 (3) Introductory Sociology SOC 1111 (3) Cultural Anthropology SOC 1125 (3) Social Problems

56 Natural & Physical Sciences minimum of 7 hours from 2 different disciplines in List C. (At least one course must include a lab.) List C: Natural and Physical Sciences BIO 1100 (3) Organismal Biology w/lab BIO 2200 (2) Biology of Aging CHM 1150 (3) Elements of Chemistry w/lab CHM 1201 (4) General Chemistry I w/lab GEL 2205 (3) Environmental Geology PHY 2211 & PHY 2212 (5) University Physics I w/lab PHY 2213 & PHY 2214 (5) University Physical II w/lab Other course menus for General Education (not part of the Transfer Module) List D: Computer Skills ART 2010 (2) Introduction to 2-D Computer Art BUS 1500 (3) Computer Application for Business CPS 1110 (2) Computer Literacy CPS 1191 (4) Computer Science I MFE 1110 (3) Principles of Manufacturing MUS 2236 (2) Computer Music Technology List E: Physical Education Activity HPR 1101 (1) Archery HPR 1103 (1) Cycling HPR 1104 (1) Fencing HPR 1105 (1) Golf HPR 1106 (1) Advanced Golf HPR 1107 (1) Racquetball HPR 1108 (1) Beginning Swimming HPR 1109 (1) Advanced Beginning Swimming HPR 1110 (1) Intermediate Swimming HPR 1111 (1) Beginning Tennis HPR 1112 (1) Advanced Tennis HPR 1113 (1) Volleyball HPR 1114 (1) Aerobic Dancing HPR 1115 (1) Conditioning/Weight Training HPR 1116 (1) Prescriptive Exercise HPR 1117 (1) Badminton HPR 1118 (1) Walking for Fitness HPR 1119 (1) Water Aerobics HPR 1120 (1) Basketball 56

57 TRANSFER MODULE INSTITUTION: Central State University Effective Date: Fall 2010 AREAS I English/Oral Communication Oral Communication Column B Minimum 3 semester hours II Mathematics, Statistics or Formal Logic Minimum 3 semester hours III *Arts/Humanities Minimum 6 semester hours IV *Social Science Minimum 3 semester hours V Natural Science Minimum 7 semester hours One Lab course required Sub-Total of Hours (A) Minimum General Education Requirements Applied to TM 24 semester hours or 36 quarter hours ENG 1100 (5) or ENG 1101 (4) MTH 1750 (3) HIS 1121 (3) and 3 semester hours from List A. Choose minimum 6 semester hours from 2 disciplines in List B. Choose minimum 7 semester hours from 2 disciplines in List C. At least 1 course must include a lab semester hours (B) Additional General Education Requirements Applied to TM semester hours or quarter hours ENG 1102 (4) Choose any course from List A. Choose any course from List C semester hours (C) Interdisciplinary Hours Applied to TM within Areas I-V Ohio Articulation & Transfer Policy: Appendix B (D) General Education Requirements Beyond the TM for Graduation (Courses listed in this column are not guaranteed to transfer) HIS 1110 (3) 3 additional semester hours from List B. FYS 1101 (1), HPR 1000 (2), 1 course from List D and 1 hour from List E semester hours to meet General Education Requirements. (Courses listed in this column are not guaranteed to transfer) *Courses in Areas III and IV must be from two different disciplines. TRANSFER MODULE TOTAL HOURS - 36 Semester hours (Total Columns A, B, and C) The Transfer Module contains semester hours or quarter hours of course credit. 57

58 Dr. Frank Schiraldi, Director of The Center for Academic Success advises student with her schedule. The Center for Academic Success (TCAS) Library (lower level) Room 35 (937) Dr. Frank Schiraldi, Dean Ms. Karen Franklin, Administrative Coordinator The Center for Academic Success (TCAS) offers a number of programs and services to support student academic success. These services are available to all students, but are especially designed to help new and continuing students who may be experiencing difficulty with particular courses or who may need additional help with developing their learning skills. The Center provides a comprehensive and integrative approach towards academic success for all students. TCAS is designed to help students make a smooth transition to the University and provides an array of support services to help them schedule and complete courses and graduate in the shortest time possible. The mission of TCAS is to provide programs and services persist in their academic pursuits, graduate, enter the professional workforce or go on to graduate or professional school. The Center for Academic Success is organized into four units designed to achieve this goal: OFFICE OF ACADEMIC ADVISING AND ASSISTANCE (OAAA) Library (lower level) Room 19 (937) Mrs. LaKeysha Catron, Director Ms. Heather Scott, Administrative Assistant Dr. Angela Edwards, Academic Advisor, College of Education Ms. Shlisa Hayden, Academic Advisor, College of Arts and Sciences, Mathematics, Science Mr. Tim McKinney, Academic Advisor, College of Arts and Sciences, Humanities and Fine Arts Mr. Van Rountree, Academic Advisor, College of Arts and Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences Ms. Chavin Rucker, Academic Advisor, College of Business and Industry 58

59 The Office of Academic Advising and Assistance serves to support students in the selection of majors, scheduling courses and supporting continuing students who find themselves academically at-risk (on probation or re-admitted to the university following a period of academic suspension). Academic advising is an integral component of the educational process at CSU. All students are provided with a faculty advisor in the college in which their major resides. If a student becomes academically at-risk, they are also provided with an Academic Advisor in the Center for Academic Success. The primary responsibility of Academic Advisors is to assist academically at-risk students achieve good academic standing and to complete their programs successfully. The Office of Academic Advising and Assistance also works with students to declare and/or change majors. Finally, with the other units in the TCAS the Office of Academic Advising offers individualized assistance to students in finding solutions to academic problems they may encounter at the University. OFFICE OF FACULTY DEVELOPMENT (OFD) Library (lower level) Room 13 (937) Dr. Karen Townsend, Director Ms. Karen Franklin Administrative Assistant The Office of Faculty Development, assisted by a Steering Committee for Faculty Development, provides a variety of support programs and services for faculty to help students learn successfully and complete their baccalaureate programs. These programs and services are designed to encourage and support faculty to discover and use the most effective instructional strategies and techniques in response to the learning needs of all students. In addition to the various program opportunities scheduled by the Office of Faculty Development, limited financial support for faculty professional travel designed to support the goals of effective instruction is available. LEARNING SKILLS CENTER (LSC) Library (lower level) Room 18 (937) Ms. Susan Lohnes, Coordinator and Reading Specialist Ms. Heather Scott, Administrative Assistant Mr. Emmanuel Clayton, Mathematics Specialist Ms. Yvette Williams, Writing Specialist The Learning Skills Center provides a variety of programs and services for all students, but has major responsibility for supporting the academic success of new incoming freshmen. These programs and services include learning skill development and tutorial programs to help students successfully complete their current courses The services provided by the LSC are scheduled individually or in formal Learning Skills Experience (LSE 1000) class settings in which students are enrolled. Students may be referred to the LSC by an advisor, an instructor or they may schedule their own participation. The staff also provides advising services to new freshmen who may need additional academic support. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES (SSS) Library (lower level) Room 12 Phone (937) Dr. Frank Schiraldi, Interim Director Ms. Lynn Crockett, Administrative Assistant Ms. Karen Johnson Jordan, Licensed Counselor and Academic Advisor Ms. Erma Yow, Academic Advisor Mr. Randy Vance, Tutoring Supervisor and Computer Lab Specialist The Student Support Services program provides a variety of academic, tutorial and social development services to students who meet the required qualifications and enroll in the program. Eligibility requires that students be the first in their families to attend college, from low-income households, have learning disabilities, and/or have English as a second language. Modest financial assistance is also available to students who are enrolled in the program and also meet the grant aid criteria. The staff also provides advising services to student members who may need additional academic support. 59

60 CENTER FOR ACADEMIC SUCCESS PROGRAMS In addition to the programs and services provided through the four units described above, TCAS has responsibility for several formal programs and initiatives provided cooperatively with other entities in the university. These include: FIRST YEAR SEMINAR FYS 1101 is required for all first-year students and transferring students with less than 30 credit hours. The primary goal of this course is to help first-year students make a successful transition to university life. Topics include CSU s history and traditions, study skills, values, time management, teamwork, and civic engagement. The course is organized to provide for traditional classroom settings, a number of general sessions focusing on issues of universal importance and active participation in the university s convocation program. This course also provides new students with the opportunity to learn how to navigate through the complexities of the university system and learn about the services available to support their academic success. LEARNING COMMUNITIES The CSU Learning Communities Program is on the cutting edge of institutional advancement. Universities around the country are using Learning Communities to help their students succeed, to ensure that students return the following year, and to strengthen the education the university offers. Participants in the program are enrolled in at least two courses together while working for their own success and the success of the group. Faculty teaching Learning Community courses work together to plan common assignments and coordinate learning, thus making connections between courses and assignments. The goal of the CSU Learning Communities Program is to establish a sense of cohesiveness, self-responsibility, and high standards for participating students and faculty. SUMMER EARLY START PROGRAM The Summer Early Start Program is an initiative designed to help those new first-year college students, conditionally admitted to the university, achieve the standards for unconditional admission. Conditionally admitted students are those who do not meet all the University s formal academic requirements for admission, but whom the University believes can be successful academically with additional support and monitoring prior to formal admission to the university. Conditionally admitted students are required to successfully complete this program and demonstrate that they have developed and/or improved the skills necessary for a successful transition from high school to college-level academic work. The program is conducted over a five-week period in the summer and provides students with many opportunities to improve their skills in writing, mathematics, speaking, reading and citizenship. Program expenses for instruction, room and board are covered by the university at no cost to students and their families. At the end of the Summer Early Start Program, successful students are formally admitted to the university and enrolled in classes for the fall semester. The Learning Skills Center operates the program, and, with the assistance of other TCAS units, provides for the instruction, assessment and progress documentation of students necessary to support them in their efforts to prepare for the successful completion of their first year at Central State University. TUTORING Tutoring is available, free of charge, to all students in the university, who are referred to TCAS by advisors, faculty or for students who decide for themselves that tutoring is required. Both professional and student tutors are available through TCAS to guide students through organized review, practice, study skills and test preparation. Specially tutoring programs are scheduled at the end of each academic term to help students prepare for final exams. The TCAS offers tutoring services every day at posted times and/or by appointment. 60

61 UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS AND SERVICES AMERICAN COLLEGE TESTING (ACT) (See ADMISSIONS, page 25) ASSESSMENT OF THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM Wesley Hall, Room 128 Mohammed Ali, Director of Office of Assessment and Institutional Research (937) The Office of Assessment, Research, and Institutional Effectiveness involves a variety of institutional constituencies and serves a coordinating function to provide meaningful and useful information to the academic program planning process. The office collects, examines, and interprets quantitative and qualitative data about student learning, teaching assessment, and institutional effectiveness, and provides that information to faculty and program directors to document and improve student learning on a continuous, ongoing basis. Such quantitative and qualitative data are the major vehicles that drive the curriculum and programs toward change and overall improvement of student learning, and verify that graduates of the University are nationally competitive. The office carries out the Comprehensive Assessment Model, whose key features include: 1. Assessment of pre-college characteristics, including placement testing; 2. Assessment of student learning within individual courses, including proficiency examinations; 3. Assessment of student development and growth; 4. Assessment of mid-level undergraduate student learning in the General Education Curriculum, including the proficiency examination in English; 5. Assessment of student learning in the major using such measures as senior comprehensive examinations, portfolios, senior design projects, internship experiences, student teaching experiences, and/or capstone courses; 6. Assessment of teaching effectiveness. PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS (CLEP) Proficiency examinations are given on a limited basis to students who demonstrate ability and prior knowledge in certain courses. These examinations are prepared by the course instructor or through the College Level Examination Proficiency (CLEP) Program. They are administered only upon presentation of a properly executed petition for proficiency examination approved by the academic advisor of the student, the Chair of the Department in which the course is offered, the Dean of the College in which the course is offered, and the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. The petition for CLEP must be obtained from and returned to the Office of Assessment, Research and Institutional Effectiveness, which will forward the test results to the Office of the Registrar where appropriate credits will be recorded. Proficiency through the CLEP is intended for introductory level courses, while proficiency in a major area course will be assessed by the course instructor. Credit for the tests will be granted only upon satisfactory completion of the examination with a grade of C or better. A student who has taken the course on a regular basis and failed it cannot satisfy the requirement for the course by taking a proficiency examination nor can a proficiency examination be used to repeat a course. Students should investigate the possibility of taking a proficiency examination thoroughly before assuming that it will be made available to them in order to help them satisfy their graduation requirements. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION Proficiency in standard written English is a graduation requirement. All students must take the English Proficiency Exam, i.e., the writing of an argumentative essay from a choice of topics. The essay is administered by the Office of Assessment. Registration and test dates are posted in the University calendar. There is no fee. Successful completion of ENG 1102 (or equivalent) is a prerequisite; the student must also bring a picture ID to the exam. The advisor in the major will assist with early scheduling so that the student can meet this requirement before the senior year. A student not passing the exam has two options: (1) re-take and pass the exam, or (2) enroll in ENG 3000, Advanced Composition, a class in argumentative writing, and pass with a grade of C or above. (See the description of ENG 3000 in the listing of courses.) Any student in ENG 3000 who has not taken the proficiency exam will take it during that semester. 61

62 THE CENTER FOR ALLAYING HEALTH DISPARITIES THROUGH RESEARCH AND EDUCATION The Center for Allaying Health Disparities through Research and Education (CADRE) Project is a multidisciplinary effort to build a Central State University (CSU) research capacity that will ultimately contribute to the elimination of disparities between the health of the minority and majority populations in the United States. CSU, a public Historically Black College/University (HBCU) in Ohio will address the issue by increasing our capacity to conduct biomedical and behavioral research through the following: Developing a Human Exercise and Performance Laboratory; Building a first class Animal Facility; Developing a Geospatial Database Center for Minority Health Disparities; and Developing a Psychology Testing Laboratory We will also conduct three independent research projects: 1. Closing the Health Disparity Gap: Impact of Health Empowerment Technologies on Elderly African American Health Provider Relationships. 2. Isolation and Characterization of Snake Venom Toxins to Combat Prostate Cancer in African-Americans. 3. Cell & Extracellular Matrix Interactions in Development of Tissue Engineered Cartilage. Specific Aims of the CADRE Project are to increase the number of: - faculty conducting research - presentations made at national meetings - funded research projects - publications in peer reviewed journals - graduates from departments - students to enter graduate, professional or medical school - research courses - students completing classes Therefore, a critical goal of this project is to increase the number of CSU graduates who enter graduate and professional school in health related fields that will have an impact in the minority health arena. As an HBCU, CSU graduates have personal knowledge and experience of the disparities in health care. As a part of our capacity building plan, we will collaborate with the University of Cincinnati to improve our administrative abilities in order to better manage our anticipated increased research efforts. Finally, we intend on increasing the capacity of the entire university faculty to solicit external funds by training and encouraging them to write proposals and to enhance the credentials of the faculty, and the university, by encouraging them to publish articles in peer reviewed journals. CENTER FOR AFRICAN STUDIES (A National Resource Center) The Center for African Studies at CSU is one of 15 Centers of African Studies in the United States designated as National Resource Centers by the U.S. Department of Education in The overriding objective of the center is the nurturing of men and women with new knowledge of Africa in order to increase the number of African Americans among the group of Africanists who offer expertise to U.S. policy-making on Africa. In addition, the Center seeks to increase the prospects for greater minority participation in African affairs, including business, diplomacy, and media. This is achieved by building a broad base of competence in African Studies, one that will help students to secure positions in Foreign Service, international business, the media, think tanks, federal agencies, and other professional positions related to Africa. The disciplines of art, economics, foreign language, geography, history, English, philosophy, political science, sociology, health, physical education and recreation, and the International Center for Water Resources Management cooperate in offering an undergraduate interdisciplinary minor designed to equip students with a fundamental orientation in the field of African Studies, to provide basic methods of approach to the study, and to provide intelligent observation of African affairs. Students official transcripts will document their completion of the requirements for the undergraduate minor in African Studies. CENTER OF EXCELLENCE IN EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES The mission of Central State University s Center of Excellence in Emerging Technologies is to graduate a diverse workforce that is highly skilled and prepared for future jobs in emerging technologies in the Miami Valley and 62

63 throughout Ohio. The Center integrates CSU s core competencies in manufacturing engineering, environmental engineering, mathematics and computer sciences, natural sciences, and technology transfer and commercialization through the National Environmental Technology Incubator. The Center will offer expertise in the integration of renewable and alternative energy supporting manufacturing and environmental protection areas. HALLIE Q. BROWN MEMORIAL LIBRARY The general mission of the library is to provide support to the academic programs of the university. The collection is designed to support undergraduate and graduate and instruction and research. The facility allows ample opportunity for individual and group study as well as specialized activities. Library services are tailored for personal assistance. The philosophy of the library faculty and staff is to meet all students at individual thresholds and to help each one towards academic success. The Current collection includes over 223,745 volumes, including both bound and electronic holdings, approximately 2,000 periodical and serial titles, and over 4,000 audiovisual resource items. Special microform collections include the papers of Paul Laurence Dunbar, the Atlanta University Black Culture Collection, and the ERIC collection of 846,190 microfiche items relating to educational research. The library is a founding member of OhioLINK (Ohio Library and Information Network), a consortium of eighty nine libraries, including all of Ohio s public four-year and two-year universities and colleges, the State Library of Ohio, and private colleges and universities. The OhioLINK online catalog contains access to more than forty eight million Library items, as well as more than one hundred research data bases, including a variety of full-text resources. Students and faculty can request books and audiovisual materials from any internet-connected computer without library staff assistance. The material is delivered to the library where it is held for pickup. Facility and Equipment Audiovisual equipment Computer labs Instructional materials production lab Microform reader/printers Music listening lab Small group study rooms Study carrels, tables, and lounge furniture Services Bibliographic instruction for using the library s collections and databases Class reserves HALLIE - the online catalog Instruction for audiovisual production Interlibrary loan Online borrowing across Ohio (OhioLINK) Reference assistance Special Collections Archives Black collection Central State University Dayton Library HONORS PROGRAM Wesley Hall, Room 314 Dr. David Shevin, Honors Program Director Shelitha Lennon, Administrative Assistant (937) or (937) The Central State University Honors Program seeks to attract students who are sufficiently motivated and committed to the highest level of scholarship and academic excellence, have strong academic records, and are truly excited about learning. The Program provides enhanced educational opportunities to our superior students. Students are challenged and nurtured through the use of a rigorous curriculum and through mentoring relationships with leading faculty and scholars at the University. ADMISSION TO THE HONORS PROGRAM Participation in the Honors Program is voluntary. A student who does not enter the Honors Program as an incoming freshman, but whose academic work at CSU is outstanding, may be invited to join the Honors Program at the end of the freshman year. Students with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.2 are invited to apply for participation in the program. To remain in the program, a student must maintain a minimum of 3.2 cumulative GPA annually. 63

64 HONORS PROGRAM CURRICULUM The Honors Program curriculum involves: 1. Honors Study Contracts: Honors students take specific General Education courses as well as other courses in the major, within a more demanding framework. They receive credit by contracting for honors assignments and projects over and above the regular course requirements (Requirement: minimum of 20 credit hours of approved courses). 2. In addition, the honors curriculum includes two colloquium courses. A colloquium course (HON 3300) is conceived as a seminar-type course that is interdisciplinary in nature (Requirement: 4 credit hours). 3. Honors students are also required to write an honors thesis or complete an honors project within the major (HON 4400), starting no later than the beginning of the junior year to allow time to satisfactorily conduct meaningful research by the Spring Semester of the senior year (Requirement: 3 credit hours). Enhanced educational opportunities for honors students embrace more than academic work. The program sponsors activities that offer students unique extracurricular opportunities in which to participate and grow: attending artistic performances and lectures; presenting papers at conferences; participating in workshops that bring together students, faculty and/or community leaders; discussing issues with distinguished visitors in formal or informal gatherings; and being involved in community service programs through volunteerism. The Honors program allows students to get the most from their college years in terms of time, money, and learning, by providing them with a more challenging environment. HONORS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The designation Honors Diploma is indicated on the diploma and transcripts of students who achieve an overall minimum of 3.2 GPA in university course work, and complete all Honors Program requirements. TAKING A REGULAR COURSE FOR HONORS CREDIT A student may elect to take a General Education course or any other course for honors credit with the instructor s consent. Taking a course for honors credit essentially means the student follows an expanded version of the syllabus for a regular course. Typically, the work will involve additional meetings with instructors beyond regular class hours, to be arranged between the instructor and student. For example, these sessions might include more discussion of theoretical issues related to the course. The instructor will be free to use any pedagogical approach. The idea, however, is to make the course more challenging for the student. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the honors work to be required from honors students is approximately 15 percent more than what applies for regular course work. The honors student thus receives honors credit by contracting for assignments or projects over and above normal course requirements. It is the responsibility of the students to indicate their intention to take a regular course for honors credit at the beginning of a given semester, and thereafter enter into a formal agreement with the instructor, by completing and signing an honors study contract. The instructor will indicate in the contract the different course work that the student will have to complete in order to earn honors credit for the standard course. The student has the option of dropping honors credit for the course and reverting to the regular course. The student must earn a grade of B or better for honors credit. A grade below B will earn the student only the standard course credit. RECOGNITION OF ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT DEAN S LIST The Dean s List is compiled at the close of each semester and includes the names of all students who have a semester grade point average of at least 3.2 with a minimum load of 12 semester hours for the academic period. HONORS DAY CONVOCATION An Honors Day Convocation is held each Spring Semester to honor full-time students* who have attained high scholastic standing, as follows: Class Honors to students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.20 to College Honors to students with cumulative grade point averages of 3.50 or above. Gold Cord Honors to graduating seniors with cumulative grade point averages of 3.50 or above who have no D, F, FZ or Z grade. Transfer students are eligible for Honors if they have earned at least 50 semester hours at CSU and they meet the same criteria required of CSU students. 64

65 NOTE: W grades will not be considered in determining full-time status for Honors recognition. Freshman Honors are awarded to students with 12 to 30 quality hours earned. Sophomore Honors are awarded to students with 31 to 60 quality hours earned. Junior Honors are awarded to students with 61 to 90 quality hours earned. Senior Honors are awarded to students with 91 or more quality hours earned. CLASS SCHOLARS Class Scholars are recognized at the Annual Honors Day Convocation. Cash awards are made to the highest ranking Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and graduating Senior with no F, D, FZ or Z grade. GRADUATION HONORS Honors awarded to graduates at commencement are as follows: First Honors Summa Cum Laude to students with cumulative grade-point averages of 3.80 or above. Second Honors Magna Cum Laude to students with cumulative grade-point averages of 3.60 to Third Honors Cum Laude to students with cumulative grade-point averages of 3.20 to *Graduating seniors who meet other specified requirements qualify for all honors regardless of fulltime status. OTHER AWARDS (See also FINANCIAL AID - Scholarships): The Academic Achievement Awards for Health, Physical Education and Recreation In recognition of outstanding achievement as a student in Health, Physical Education and Recreation. The Academic Achievement Award for Special Education in recognition for outstanding achievement as a student in Special Education. The Accounting Club Award an award given to the graduating senior in Accounting with the highest cumulative grade point average. The Accounting Club Book Awards to a male and a female student majoring in Accounting. Accounting Awards Cash awards given to graduating seniors who have displayed academic excellence and potential to succeed in the profession of Accounting. The Alumni Scholarship and Emergency Fund cash award to incoming freshman sons or daughters of alumni members. A scholarship to two rising seniors and an emergency fund to help students in need. The American Institute of CPA s Award Cash award for minority undergraduate scholarships. The Jacqueline Morehead Balthrope Award in Elementary Education an annual award by Jacqueline Morehead Balthrope 49 to the highest ranking graduate in Elementary Education. Becker CPA Award a cash award and Certified Public Accountant course for an outstanding Accounting major. College of Arts and Sciences Honors Recognition of the senior with the highest grade point average. The College of Business and Industry Faculty Award An annual plaque and cash award presented by the faculty of the College of Business and Industry to the senior in the College of Business and Industry exhibiting outstanding achievement. Communication Alumni Scholarship (CAS) an annual cash award given by Communication alumni to a Communications major with a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average. The Financial Executive Institute Award to a graduating senior who exemplifies the qualities and characteristics necessary to achieve a successful career in financial management. The James P. Marable 50 and June M. Marable 48 Alumni Humanitarian Award A cash award given annually to the graduating senior who has demonstrated exemplary service to the University and the community. The Charles F. Porter Scholarship Award An annual award given by Beatrice Porter Thomas 51 in memory of her brother, Charles F. Porter 21 to an outstanding student in Electronics. The Bernice I. Sumlin Scholarship Award Awarded annually by Beta Eta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to a junior student with a 2.60 or above grade point average who demonstrates leadership ability, is actively involved in extracurricular activities, and is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. The recipient is designated by the University and Beta Eta Omega Chapter. Theta Lambda Chapter Award annual cash award by Theta Lambda Chapter, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity in honor of Brother James Dunn, for recruiting students. James Walker Award a $100 annual award to a sophomore football athlete with a 2.80 or above grade point average selected by the Athletic Director. The Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award to the senior in the College of Business and Industry who distinguishes himself/herself in the areas of scholarship, leadership, integrity, and fixture potential. 65

66 Central State University Dayton Campus has great opportunities for students seeking to complete a degree or find professional development. CENTRAL STATE UNIVERSITY DAYTON (CSU-Dayton) Cheryl D. Marcus, Ed.S., Dean 840 Germantown Street Dayton, Ohio (937) (Dayton) (937) (Xenia) Central State University has served the Dayton metropolitan community since the spring of We offer the distinctive Central State supportive atmosphere and quality education while contributing to the success of the region. Programs offered are accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. CSU-Dayton extends the University s instructional programs beyond the main campus to an increasing adult population seeking postsecondary education in the region. Our academic programs are specifically designed for the busy lives of adults who seek to complete a degree begun elsewhere, or who select Central State University as their institution of choice. Our evening and Saturday class schedules allow students to complete general education requirements and most course requirements for a degree from the Business Administration Department in the College of Business and Industry, Early Childhood Education Program in the College of Education, or the Criminal Justice Program in the College of Arts and Sciences. Faculty members from the main campus are joined by local professionals who serve as adjunct faculty members to deliver quality, specialized instruction. Traditionally, CSU-Dayton offers small classes which allow for personal attention and the opportunity to pace learning at the student s comfort level. Technology has increased the availability and opportunity for engaging in scholarly conversation. Faculty members correspond with students by e- mail and chat rooms are set up for both faculty-student and student-student discussion. A state-of-the art computer lab provides internet access to the Hallie Q. Brown Memorial Library on the main campus and for exploration and research. As an integral part of Dayton, CSU-Dayton endeavors to serve the community through outreach services and programs. Long-standing examples include an intensive summer S.T.E.M. academy for middle and high school males, a rigorous semester-long test preparation program for high school seniors and the annual Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Oratorical contest for middle school students. 66

67 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES College of Arts and Sciences 68 Department of Fine and Performing Arts Art Program Studio Art (Drawing and Painting Concentration) B.A. 4-year plan Graphic Design B.A. 4-year plan.. 73 Art Education B.S. - 4-year plan Music Program Jazz Studies B.M. 4-year plan. 76 Music Education B.M. 4-year plan Performance- B.M. 4-year plan Department of Humanities Communication Program English Program English (Pre-Law) Program History Program International Languages and Literature Program. 80 Journalism and Mass Communications Program Communication (Broadcast Media) B.A. 4-year plan. 82 Communication (Print Journalism) B.A. 4-year plan. 83 English (Literature) B.A. 4-year plan English (Pre-Law) B.A. 4-year plan History B.A. 4-year plan Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.. 87 Mathematics B.S. - 4-year plan Computer Science B.S. 4-year plan 89 Department of Military Science Department of Natural Sciences Biology Program. 92 Chemistry Program.. 93 Biology B.S. 4-year plan. 94 Chemistry B.S. 4-year plan Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences Criminal Justice Program Political Science Program. 97 Psychology Program Social Work Program.. 97 Sociology and Gerontology.. 98 Criminal Justice B.S. 4-year plan Political Science B.A. 4-year plan Political Science (Public Administration) B.S. - 4-year plan Psychology B.A. 4-year plan Psychology B.S. 4-year plan Social Work B.A. 4-year plan Social Work B.S. 4-year plan Sociology B.A. 4-year plan Sociology B.S. 4-year plan

68 College of Arts and Sciences Wesley Hall Room 125 Lovette Chinwah-Adegbola, Ph.D., Dean Professor of Journalism & Mass Communication (937) Ms. Hope Kelley, Administrative Assistant Ms. Sheena Cherry, Secretary Mr. Obi Iwuanyanwu, Director, Writing Center The College offers 21 programs in the fine and performing arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics and computer science. In addition, by offering courses to support the General Education program, the College provides students with a broad foundation in the liberal arts. The guiding principle of General Education is that each person who graduates from college should possess the ability to think carefully and analytically, to communicate information and ideas effectively, to know history and its role in shaping the present, to use technology to enhance learning, and to understand human life more deeply and productively through acquaintance with the work of writers, thinkers, and pioneers in the arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. The College comprises six departments - Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities, Mathematics and Computer Science, Military Science, Natural Sciences, and Social and Behavioral Sciences. The College also houses an Honors Program, federal and state-funded research programs, the Center for African Studies, and the Cosby Mass Communication Center. Undergraduate degree offerings include Communications, English, Fine and Performing Arts, History and Music. Through the disciplines of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Criminal Justice, Mathematics, Political Science, Psychology, Social Work and Sociology, the College offers baccalaureate degree programs that prepare students for careers in the pure and applied sciences. The programs in International Languages, Gerontology, African Studies, Philosophy and Physics serve to support major and minor degree offerings, and the University General Education Requirements. 68

69 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Students are admitted to the College of Arts and Sciences by declaring a major in, or an intention to apply to one of the 21 programs in the Arts and Sciences. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Students in the College of Arts and Sciences are required to confer with an assigned faculty advisor within their major, or their Center for Academic Success professional advisor on a regular basis. Beyond this advisement, students are personally responsible not only for selecting their academic programs, but also for adhering to all published regulations and requirements of the University. Students are expected to seek regular academic advisement and ultimately are individually responsible for completing all degree requirements. During the semester immediately prior to the year in which a student expects to graduate, students must confer both with their advisor and the chair of the major department for a final degree checkout and preparation of an application for graduation. Completed graduation applications are due in the College Dean s office prior to the end of the first semester of the year in which a student expects to graduate. TRANSFER OF CREDITS Students who transfer from other colleges of the University and from other accredited colleges and universities must meet with the department chairperson to review and determine the acceptability of transfer credits to the intended degree program. The chairperson may decline to accept the transfer credit for any course which does not meet an approved course description or for which the grade is lower than a C or which does not meet the University General Education Requirements. Students who have completed the Transfer Module (see pages 53-57) at another school will automatically receive credit for Central State s Transfer Module. Such students will, however, be required to meet some additional General Education Requirements not included in the Transfer Module. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The General Education Program, a common curriculum of semester hours, is central to the University s mission of providing students with a liberal arts background. The remaining hours that must be taken to earn a minimum of 124 semester hours come from the departmental major requirements and student s choice of free electives. However, majors in the College are urged to choose, with an advisor, courses that provide the student with a second field of interest or a strong minor concentration. Minimum graduation requirements include: completion of at least 124 semester hours with a grade point average of Some departments or programs may require additional hours and a higher grade point average, completion of at least 30 semester hours in a major field. Some departments may require additional hours, completion of the University General Education Requirements. See complete description on pages of this catalog, and successful completion of the University s English Proficiency Requirement. See complete description on page 61 of this Catalog. PRE-LAW OPTIONS Students interested in law school may take the pre-law option in English. This option is designed for students who wish to pursue any career related to law. Aside from a career as an attorney-at-law, such careers might include public policy, government leadership, criminal justice, education, and related fields. NOTE: The English pre-law option is described under the Department of Humanities. PREPARATION FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONS Many students enter college with the intent to pursue a career in a health care field, such as dentistry, medicine, nursing, optometry, pharmacy, or veterinary medicine. All of these careers are the result of graduate programs, not specific undergraduate majors. Since these are popular career paths, admission to the professional schools are very competitive. In order to have a good chance of getting into a professional school, a student will need to complete all prerequisite courses in a timely fashion and with good grades. The average student admitted to a medical school has an undergraduate GPA of about 3.5 and a score of 810 in each part 69

70 of the MCAT exam. In addition, many schools will be looking for evidence of commitment to a health care career through volunteer work in hospitals, nursing homes, or animal shelters. Other programs may place emphasis on extracurricular activities. Medical school admission prerequisites are fairly uniform. Most schools specify one year of each of the following topics (The corresponding CSU courses are listed in parentheses): 1. Biology (BIO 1801, 1802) 2. English (ENG 1101, 1102) 3. General Chemistry (CHM 1201, 1202) 4. Organic Chemistry (CHM 2401, 2402) 5. Mathematics (MTH 2501, 2502, or 2503) 6. Physics (PHY 2211, 2212, 2213, 2214) Some schools also ask for courses in quantitative analysis, biochemistry, and/or genetics. Courses in psychology are also useful but not usually specifically required. Since most or all of these courses would be part of a biology or chemistry major, many students gain admission to medical schools through those two majors; however, some medical schools have a policy favoring other majors in order to get more diversity in their student body. Requirements for dental, optometry, pharmacy, or veterinary schools are similar to those for medical schools. Students are urged to consult the websites of any schools of interest to see what those schools request. Medical schools also require that applicants take the MCAT exam. (Similar exams are used by dental, optometry, pharmacy and veterinary schools.) A student who plans to enter medical school in the fall immediately after graduation would normally take the MCAT in April of the junior year. Since the MCAT is based on the prerequisite courses listed above, a student should try to complete as many as possible before that time. The specific sequence of courses a student should take will depend on the student s choice of major and the results of placement exams. The student should work closely with his or her major advisor on scheduling, but regardless of major, a student who wishes to go to medical school needs to complete the admission prerequisite courses by the end of the junior year. Some of these courses need to be done in sequence, so planning is needed. The sequence below is suggested. In addition to the courses listed, a student would need to take courses to meet the General Education and major requirements. Freshman year: ENG 1101, 1102; BIO 1801, 1802; CHM 1201, 1202; MTH 2501, 2502 or 2503 (shift back if placement indicates) Sophomore year: ENG 1102; CHM 2401, 2402; PHY 2211, 2212, 2213, 2214 (move to junior year if math is not completed) Junior year: CHM 4300; PSY 1200, 2220 (recommended General Education courses) For more information about preparing for the healthcare professions at Central State University contact: Dr. Cadance Lowell Dr. Gary Pierson (937) (937) Each of the health care professions has an association of its professional schools. These associations have websites that will also provide useful information. American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine ( American Association of Dental Schools ( American Council on Pharmaceutical Education ( American Nurses Association ( Association of American Medical Colleges ( Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges ( Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry ( 70

71 Department of Fine and Performing Arts Paul Robeson Performing Arts Center - Room 218 Mr. William Caldwell, Chairperson (937) Professors: Mr. William H. Caldwell, Mr. James E. Smith Associate Professors: Dr. Ronald Claxton, Mr. Abner Cope, Dr. Jennifer Cruz, Mr. Dwayne M. Daniel, Dr. William M. Denza, Dr. Mervyn R. Joseph, Dr. Lennard V. Moses Assistant Professors: Ms. Lee Hoffman, Mr. Ramon Key, Mr. Kenneth Pointer Instructors: Mr. Collin Richardson The Department of Fine and Performing Arts offers majors in the disciplines of art and music. In addition to its primary role of providing professional and pre-professional training to its majors and minors, the department serves as a major cultural center and resource for the University and offers a wide range of concerts, performances, exhibitions, lectures and courses which promote the aesthetic development of the community. Central State University is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. The department offers programs leading to the following degrees: the Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design, the Bachelor of Arts in Studio Art, the Bachelor of Science in Art Education, the Bachelor of Music in Music Education, the Bachelor of Music in Performance, and the Bachelor of Music in Jazz Studies. All majors and minors in the department are expected to participate in co-curricular organizations and/or activities of respective programs (e.g., art exhibits, concerts, student organizations, professional organizations, etc.). All majors in the department must fulfill the General Education Requirements as stated in the degree requirements below (which vary depending upon the degree) and the specific requirements of the college in which the student is enrolled (College of Arts and Sciences or College of Education). Students enrolled in teacher education degree programs begin as majors in the College of Arts and Sciences and then must apply to be admitted to the College of Education. All majors are required to pass the University writing proficiency examination and the department comprehensive examinations in the respective disciplines. Students are responsible for knowing and adhering to published schedules for the administration of the above tests and for applying for graduation. ART The art programs are designed to produce graduates who are thoughtful, articulate, and literate artist scholars, who possess a broad liberal arts background and the skills necessary to compete in a technologically sophisticated world. The curriculum is constructed to meet the individual needs of students (who may have unique and diverse career aspirations) and is designed to enable each student to acquire a broad range of aesthetic experiences (both in and out of the classroom). Small class sizes allow the necessary one-to-one contact with instructors to develop creative thoughts into strong visual statements. Central State University is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ART MAJORS All art majors must meet the following requirements: Upon entering the department, each major is required to meet with an art faculty advisor to determine a course of study. Students majoring in art are required to exhibit selected works in student exhibitions organized by the department. The department reserves the right to retain, for its student collection, one example of each student s work done in any scheduled class. Students must participate in a senior art exhibition as partial fulfillment of department requirements. The student enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts in any Arts degree program is required to take the core program first. After students have completed the core program they begin, usually in their third year, concentrated work in a major area of study. A student may elect to focus in one of three areas of study: Graphic Design, Painting or Drawing, and Art Education. 71

72 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN STUDIO ARTS - Drawing and Painting Concentration - Students in the studio arts drawing and painting concentration program must take the following general education requirements (32-34 hours): ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours. All students must take the following major requirements: (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following major requirements: ART 1001, 1002, 1101, 1102, 1200, 1210, 2100, 2200, 2400, 3100; Drawing Option - ART 3200, 3300, 4200, 4300, or Painting Option - ART 3200, 3400, 4200, 4400; and twelve credits from the following: ART 1100, 1110, 1120, 2130, 2140, 3150, SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR (with Concentration in Drawing and Painting) IN STUDIO ART The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ART 1001 Fundamentals & Design I 3 ART 1002 Fundamentals & Design II 3 ART 1101 Beginning Drawing I 3 ART 1102 Beginning Drawing II 3 ART 1210 Introduction to Art 3 ART 1200 Introduction to Photography 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ART 2010 Intro to 2D Computer Graphics 2 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ART 1120 Later European Art History (or) ART 3150 Modern & Cont Art Hist I (or) ART 2130 Arts of Africa ART 3160 Modern & Contemp Art Hist II ART 2100 Figurative Drawing and Sculpture 3 ART 2400 Beginning Ceramics 3 ART 2200 Figure Drawing and Painting I 3 HIS1121/22 Global History I or II 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the S. 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR ART 3100 Advanced Drawing 3 JUNIOR ART 3300 Figure and Advanced Drawing I 3 ART 3200 Figure Drawing and Painting II 3 ART 3400 Advanced Drawing & Painting I 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Languages 5 FLA 1xxx Foreign Languages 5 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B SENIOR ART 4200 Figure Drawing & Painting III 3 SENIOR ART 4300 Figure and Advanced Drawing II 3 ART 4400 Advanced Drawing & Painting II 3 ELECTIVES From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 Electives 3 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Studio Arts - Drawing and Painting Concentration

73 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GRAPHIC DESIGN - Students in the graphic design program must take the following general education requirements (32-34 hours): ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours. All students must take the following major requirements: (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following major requirements: ART 1001, 1002, 1101, 1102, 1200, 1210, 2100, 2200, 2400, 3100; ART 2020, 3010, 3061, 3062, 3065, 4061, 4062, and twelve credits from the following: ART 1100, 1110, 1120, 2130, 2140, 3150, SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN GRAPHIC DESIGN The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ART 1001 Fundamentals & Design I 3 ART 1002 Fundamentals & Design II 3 ART 1101 Beginning Drawing I 3 ART 1102 Beginning Drawing II 3 ART 1210 Introduction to Art 3 ART 1200 Introduction to Photography 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ART 2010 Intro to 2D Computer Graphics 2 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ART 1110 Ancient & Early Eur. Art Hist (or) 3 ART 2140 African American Art History (or) 3 ART 1120 Later European Art History (or) ART 3150 Modern & Contemp Art Hist I (or) ART 2130 Arts of Africa ART 3160 Modern & Contemporary Art Hist II ART 2100 Figurative Drawing and Sculpture 3 ART 2020 Image Processing for Artists 2 ART 2200 Figure Drawing and Painting I 3 ART 2400 Introduction to Ceramics 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ART 3100 Advanced Drawing 3 ART 3062 Graphic Design II ART 3061 Graphic Design I 3 FLA xxxx Foreign Languages 4 FLA 1xxx Foreign Languages 5 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SENIOR SENIOR ART 3010 Com. Presentation Graphics 2 ART 3065 Intro to Illustration 2 ART 4061 Advanced Graphic Design I 3 ART 4062 Advanced Graphic Design II 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 Electives 11 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Graphic Design

74 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION ART EDUCATION - Students in the art education program must take the following general education requirements (32-34 hours): ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours. All students must take the following major requirements: (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: ART 1001, 1002, 1101, 1102, 1200, 1210, 1320, 1321, 1421, 1422, 1423, 1523, 2100, 2200, 2400, 3100; EDU 2262, 2264, 2266, 3330, 3350, 4491, 4895, and twelve credits from the following: ART 1110, 1120, 2130, 2140, 3150, NOTE: Changes in the course requirements are subject to change to meet NASAD accreditation standards. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN ART EDUCATION The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ART 1001 Fundamentals & Design I 3 ART 1002 Fundamentals & Design II 3 ART 1101 Beginning Drawing I 3 ART 1102 Beginning Drawing II 3 ART 1210 Introduction to Art 3 ART 1320 Intro to Art Education 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ART 2010 From General Education List D 2 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List A SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ART 1110 Ancient & Early Eur. Art History (or) 3 ART 2140 African American Art History (or) 3 ART 1120 Later European Art History (or) ART 3150 Modern & Contemp Art Hist I (or) ART 2130 Arts of Africa ART 3160 Modern & Contemp Art History II ART 1421 Art Education for Teachers 3 EDU 2262 Ed Fdns & Prin of Instr & Assess 3 ART 2100 Figurative Drawing and Sculpture 3 EDU 2266 Individuals w/ Special Needs 3 ART 2200 Figure Drawing and Painting 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 Electives 3 Take English Proficiency Exam Pass PPST and Apply to COE JUNIOR JUNIOR ART 1422 Secondary Art Education 3 ART 1200 Intro to Photography 3 ART 1423 Secondary Art Education: FBE Lab 1 ART 1422 Secondary Art Education 3 ART 3100 Advanced Drawing 3 ART 1523 Creative Art Teaching 3 HIS 1110 Intro. History of Africans in the U.S. 3 ART 2400 Beginning Ceramics 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Reading 3 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 EDU 3350 Field Based Experience 3 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education Art Education

75 MUSIC The music programs are designed to produce graduates who are thoughtful, articulate, and literate artistscholars, who possess a broad liberal arts background and the skills necessary to compete in a technologically sophisticated world. Students master the language of music (and a number of its diverse dialects), demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the history of music, the arts, and civilization from a world (multicultural) perspective, and critically evaluate music and the arts using both personal and established criteria. Music graduates educate, perform, improvise, compose and publish. Their teaching and their original artistic expressions are informed by knowledge of musical syntax, vocabulary, form, history, style, and aesthetics. The curriculum, the faculty, and all aspects of the academic program work together to create a nurturing, artistic environment in which students develop confidence, discipline, and independence, and become mature individuals who are actively engaged in their professions and assume responsibility for their lifelong development and learning. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC MAJORS The department publishes a Student Handbook containing detailed information about graduation and other requirements for all three music degrees. Students must read this information and work with their faculty advisors to ensure that each requirement is fulfilled before graduation. All music majors must meet the following requirements (other additional requirements specific to each degree are outlined in the Student Handbook): All students must audition on their instrument and receive departmental approval before registering for a principal applied class. Each student enrolled in a degree program in music must pass comprehensive junior and senior examinations. Music students are required to participate in department ensembles (please see the Student Handbook for information about the ensemble requirements for each degree program). Music Education majors must register for and pass seven semester hours of Student Recital MUS 1000 and Music Performance majors must register for and pass eight semester hours of Student Recital MUS Music students must perform on a Student Recital program once each semester they are enrolled in principal applied courses, except for the first semester they are registered. Music students must attend studio classes organized by their principal applied instructors. Students must apply for graduation during the fall semester of the academic year in which they plan to graduate (information about application procedures, deadlines and fees is available from the Registrar s Office). SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC EDUCATION MAJORS Students enrolled in the Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree program should be aware of the following requirements: Students are enrolled first in the College of Arts and Sciences and then must apply for acceptance into the College of Education before being allowed to fulfill the student teaching requirement (information about application procedures and deadlines are available from the College of Education). Music Education majors must complete the application procedure required by the College of Education for a Student Teaching assignment. Music Education majors must complete all requirements of the Teacher Education and Licensure Program as stated by the Ohio Department of Education. Music Education majors develop competencies required by the Ohio Department of Education s Teacher Education and Licensure Standards. Exact standards for each course are included with the syllabus. Music Education majors (except for those students who are piano majors) must pass a piano proficiency exam before they will be allowed to register for Student Teaching. Music Education majors must receive department approval to present a Senior Recital (the faculty will listen to the student perform the recital repertory at least two weeks prior to the planned recital date to judge whether the student is prepared) and must pass the Senior Recital requirement before a student will be allowed to register for Student Teaching (exceptions to this will be made only with the approval of the entire department faculty). Music Education majors must submit a clinical/field-based experience inventory form documenting the hours the student has been involved in clinical/field-based experience before the student will be allowed to register for Student Teaching. 75

76 BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN JAZZ STUDIES ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours and the following major requirements: MUS 1101, 1102, 1151, 1152, 2201, 2202, 2233, 2236, 2271, 2272, 3311, 3312, 3381, 3382, 3386, 3391, 3392, 4341, 4342, 4490, 4495; 16 semester hours in principal applied; and 12 semester hours in jazz ensembles. A grade of C or better is required. NOTE: A grade of B or better is required in Principal Applied courses. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF MUSIC MAJOR IN JAZZ STUDIES The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Intro to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writ & Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 MUS 1101 Music Theory I 5 MUS 1102 Music Theory II 5 MUS 1151 Piano Class I 1 MUS 1152 Piano Class II 1 MUS 1187/2210 Jazz Ensemble 1 MUS 1187 Jazz Ensemble 1 MUS 1xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS 1xx2 Principal Applied 2 SOPHOMORE 76 MUS 2210 Jazz Ensemble SOPHOMORE HIS 1121/1122 Global History 3 MUS 1187 Jazz Ensemble 1 MUS 1187/2210 Jazz Ensemble 1 MUS 2202 Music Theory IV 5 MUS 2201 Music Theory III 5 MUS 2210 Jazz Ensemble 1 MUS 2236 Computer Music Technology 2 MUS 2233 History of Jazz 3 MUS 2271 Jazz Keyboard Harmony I 2 MUS 2272 Jazz Keyboard Harmony II 2 MUS 2xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS 2xx2 Principal Applied 2 MUS 3391 Jazz Improvisation I 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 JUNIOR Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR HIS 1110 History of Africa in U.S. 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 MUS 1187/2210 Jazz Ensemble 1 MUS 1187/2210 Jazz Ensemble 1 MUS 3381 Music History I 3 MUS 3382 Music History II 3 MUS 3386 Ethnomusicology 2 MUS 3392 Jazz Improvisation II 2 MUS 3xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS 3xx2 Principal Applied 2 MUS 4341 Form and Analysis 2 MUS 4342 Counterpoint 2 SENIOR Electives 3 Electives SENIOR MUS 1187 Jazz Ensemble 1 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 MUS 2210 Jazz Band Lab 1 MUS 1187 Jazz Ensemble 1 MUS 3311 Jazz Composition & Arranging I 3 MUS 2210 Jazz Band Lab 1 MUS 4xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS 3312 Jazz Composition & Arrang II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MUS 4490 Recording Studio Practicum 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 MUS 4495 Senior Recital 0 Electives 3 MUS 4xx2 Principal Applied 2 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Music in Jazz Studies - 124

77 BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN MUSIC EDUCATION Students in the music education program must take the following general education requirements (35-37 hours): ENG1100 (or 1101), 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours. All students must take: MUS 1101, 1102, 1151, 1152, 2201, 2202, 2226, 2228, 2229, 2230, 2231, 2232, 2236, 2251, 2252, 2280, 3341, 3342 or 3343, 3375 or 4477, 3376, 3379, 3380, 3381, 3382, 3386, 4341, 4476, 4479, 4480, 4495, 14 semester credit hours in principal applied, 7 semester credit hours in ensembles, and 7 semester hours of MUS Also, EDU 2262, 2264, 2266, 2300, 3330, 4491, and A grade of C or better is required. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF MUSIC MAJOR IN MUSIC EDUCATION The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 1102 Music Theory II 5 MUS 1101 Music Theory I 5 MUS 1152 Piano Class II 1 MUS 1151 Piano Class I 1 MUS 1xx2 Principal Applied 2 MUS 1xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE EDU 2262 Ed Fdns & Classroom Management 3 EDU 2300 Ed. Psychology - List B 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 2236 Computer Music Technology List D 2 MUS 2201 Music Theory III 5 MUS 2202 Music Theory IV 5 MUS 2251 Piano Class III 1 MUS 2228 Brass Class 2 MUS 2280 Introduction to Music Education 3 MUS 2252 Piano Class IV 1 MUS 2xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS 2xx2 Principal Applied 2 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 JUNIOR Pass PPST (Praxis I) 17 JUNIOR Take English Proficiency Exam 16 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 EDU 2266 Ed Exceptional Child 3 MUS 2231 Woodwind Class I 2 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 3341 Beginning Conducting 2 MUS 2229 Percussion Class 2 MUS 3379 Music Methods & Materials/Elem: FBE 1 MUS 3342/43 Adv Vocal/Instrum Conduct 2 MUS 3380 Music Methods & Materials/Elementary 2 MUS 3376 Instrumental Methods 2 MUS 3381 Music History I 3 MUS 3382 Music History II 3 MUS 3386 Ethnomusicology 2 MUS 3xx2 Principal Applied 2 MUS 3xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS 4341 Form & Analysis 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 SENIOR 17 SENIOR 18 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Area 4 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 HIS 1110 African American History - List A 3 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity- List E 1 MUS 2226 String Class 2 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 2230 Voice Class 2 MUS 3375/4477 Band & Orch or Choral Lit. & Arr. 4 MUS 2232 Woodwind Class II 2 MUS 4479 Music Methods & Materials/Sec: FBE 1 MUS 4476 Choral Methods 2 MUS 4480 Music Methods & Materials/Secondary 2 MUS 4495 Senior Recital 0 MUS 4xx1 Principal Applied 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 ELECTIVE From Gen Ed List C, with lab 3 5 th Year Student Teaching & Capstone -12 credit hours Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Music in Music Education degree 148

78 BACHELOR OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE Students must take the following general education requirements: ENG 1100 (or 1101) and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000 and 1 semester hour from HPR ; 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences; 3 semester hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab); and MUS All students must take MUS 1101, 1102, 1151, 1152, 2201, 2202, 2251, 2252, 3341, 3342 or 3343, 3381, 3382, 3386, 3397, 4341, 4342, 4400, 4497; 24 semester hours in principal applied; 12 semester hours in ensembles; and 8 semester hours of MUS In addition, vocalists must take MUS Piano majors must take four credits of accompanying class or secondary applied instead of piano class. Instrumental majors must take 11 credits of free electives; Vocal majors must take 9 credits. A grade of C or better is required in music courses, B or better in principal applied courses. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF MUSIC MAJOR IN PERFORMANCE The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 1102 Music Theory II 5 MUS 1101 Music Theory I 5 Piano Class II/Piano majors take MUS Accompanying MUS 1151 Piano Class I/Piano majors take Accompanying 1 MUS 1xx2 Principal Applied 4 MUS 1xx1 Principal Applied 4 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 2202 Music Theory IV 5 MUS 2201 Music Theory III 5 MUS 2252 Piano Class IV/Piano majors take Accompanying 1 MUS 2236 From General Education List D 2 MUS 2xx2 Principal Applied 4 MUS 2251 Piano Class III/Piano majors take Accompanying 1 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS 2xx1 Principal Applied 4 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 Free Electives 4 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR HIS 1110 History of Africa in U.S. 3 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 3342/43 Advanced Con Inst./Choral 2 MUS 3341 Beginning Conducting 2 MUS 3382 Music History II 3 MUS 3381 Music History I 3 MUS 3397 Junior Recital/Research 3 MUS 3xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS 3xx2 Principal Applied 2 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 SENIOR Free Electives 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab SENIOR MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 MUS 3301 Diction for Singers (Voice majors only*) 2* MUS 1000 Student Recital 0 MUS 3386 Ethnomusicology 2 MUS 4342 Counterpoint 2 MUS 4xx1 Principal Applied 2 MUS 4400 Studies in Pedagogy 2 MUS 4341 Form and Analysis 2 MUS 4497 Senior Recital/Research 3 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS 4xx2 Principal Applied 2 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 Free Electives 4 MUS xxxx Ensemble 1 15 Free Electives (Inst. major only**) 2** Voice majors only* 17 * 14 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Music in Performance degree 124 Instrumental majors only** 16** 78

79 Department of Humanities Charles Wesley Hall - Room 212 Dr. G. Jahwara Giddings, Professor, Chairperson (937) Secretary: Ms. Angi Jackson Writing Program Director: Dr. Amy Hobbs Harris Honors Program Director: Dr. David Shevin Professors: Dr. Lovette A. Chinwah-Adegbola, Dr. G. Jahwara Giddings, Dr. Dinesh S. Hassan, Dr. David Shevin, Dr. Kwawisi Tekpetey, Dr. John A. Zamonski Associate Professors: Dr. Carol Bargeron, Mr. Michael Gormley, Dr. Amy Hobbs Harris, Dr. Anthony Milburn, Ms. Deborah Stokes Assistant Professors: Dr. Padmore Agbemabiese, Dr. Julius Bailey, Dr. Filore Chevaillier, Mr. James DeMonte, Mr. Cyril Ibe, Dr. Jayson Iwen, Dr. Erin Moore, Dr. Yuegen David Yu Instructors: Ms. Annette Lorenzo, Ms. Valena Randolph, Ms. Debra Robinson The Department of Humanities offers the B.A. degree in the disciplines of Communication (Broadcast Media & Print Journalism), English (Literature, and Pre-Law), and History. The Department also offers minors in Philosophy & Religion, Speech/Theatre, Sound Engineering, Public Relations, Spanish, French and Africana Studies. All majors in the department must complete the university s general education curriculum, the specific requirements of the chosen major field, and the special requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. In addition, all majors must meet the university s English proficiency requirement. Students are responsible for knowing and adhering to required exam schedules and for following announced deadlines for applying for graduation. The Department of Humanities supports the larger mission of Central State University; educates students in their B.A. and Minor fields and in General Education courses; stresses critical, independent thinking in its curricula; and supports the creative and professional growth of both students and faculty. COMMUNICATIONS 1. Complete a minimum of 124 hours toward graduation. 2. Complete a minimum of 80 semester credits outside of COM courses; a minimum of 65 credit hours of the 80 hours must be in the liberal arts and sciences (see lists A, B, and C of the General Education Requirements sheet for applicable courses). No more than 40 semester hours in COM courses will be counted toward the minimum of 124 hours. 3. Complete at least six semester hours of additional humanities, exclusive of the University Core requirement, selected from the following disciplines: art, drama, history, linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, religion, speech, and international languages beyond the first year of the course. 4. Attain a cumulative major field grade point average of at least 2.5. ENGLISH The English program offers a curriculum of writing courses to support the university s general education curriculum as well as two degrees: the B.A. in English with a literature option and the B.A. in English with a prelaw option. Each degree requires that students earn at least a C in major courses being used to satisfy graduation requirements. ENGLISH (PRE-LAW) The Pre-Law option is designed for students who wish to major in any career related to law. These students are expected to meet all general education requirements, all special requirements for the B.A. degree, all major requirements as listed above for the Bachelor of Arts in English, and courses in business, communication, criminal justice, political science, psychology. Graduates are expected to pursue advanced studies that will prepare them for careers in criminal justice, law, public policy, and related fields. HISTORY The History program offers a B.A. degree in History, where majors complete at least 33 credit hours from a group of required and elective courses in the major field. The program also offers HIS 1110, 1121 and 1122 to support the university s general education program. A grade of C or better is required in major courses. 79

80 INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE The International Languages and Literatures program offers courses in Chinese, Spanish, French, Swahili, Arabic and Japanese to support the university s general education program and Minor concentration opportunities in Spanish and French. The objectives of the program are to provide all students the opportunity to broaden their backgrounds through the study of international language and culture and to give professional training to students majoring in areas that utilize international language skills. Thus the program offers elementary and intermediate courses focusing on basic language structure, vocabulary development, reading, writing, translation skills, and conversation. Students expecting to use an international language in their careers are strongly urged to spend at least one semester, ideally two semesters, studying in a country in which the language is spoken. Arrangements for language study are made through the Humanities Chair and the Registrar. JOURNALISM and MASS COMMUNICATIONS The Journalism and Mass Communications Program offers two degrees: B.A. in Communication (Print Journalism) and B.A. in Communication (Broadcast Media). Print Journalism and Broadcast Media majors must complete 40 credit hours in the major with a grade of C or above in each course. Both Print Journalism and Broadcast Media majors must complete a practicum and an internship and are strongly encouraged to participate in the pre-professional organizations and other related activities that flourish in the department. All incoming freshmen and transfer students are designated as pre-majors and must apply to be admitted to the Journalism & Mass Communications Program. For transfer students, no more than 12 transfer credits in COM courses will be counted toward the major. Please direct all inquiries to the Department. DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES INTERNSHIPS GUIDELINES FOR JOURNALISM & MASS COMMUNICATION, ENGLISH AND HISTORY The following guidelines for departmental internships outline the responsibilities of the student, the supervisor, and the participating faculty members. Please consult the Director of the Communication Programs for Communication Internship Guidelines. 1. You must achieve junior classification to be eligible for an internship. 2. You should have a minimum 3.0 average in the major, and the permission of an instructor in the major, to obtain an internship. 3. When preparing for an internship, you must write a proposal (three typewritten pages) which explains the specific internship desired, your experience and course work in the field, and how you want your internship to contribute to your career goals. This proposal is due to the department chair no later than the first week of class during the semester in which you begin the internship. 4. Normally you will receive academic credit for your internship (3, 4 or 5 hours) rather than payment. An employer choosing to pay a student should do so at the prevailing minimum wage rate. 5. You may do your internship during a regular academic semester, during summer school, or during winter break. It is your responsibility to make sure that you are properly registered to receive the academic credit. Up to two internships may be completed for academic credit. Retroactive credit cannot be given. 6. Each week you must participate in three to four hours of internship experience for each hour of academic credit received (based on a 17-week semester). 7. When applicable, you should develop a portfolio during the internship to be used later in interviews and as a reference source of your abilities. 8. Your supervisor must complete the Internship Evaluation Form, evaluating your performance, and return it to the department chair by the last day of class during the internship semester. 9. At the end of the internship, you must write an exit essay (three typewritten pages), in which you evaluate the experience. The essay should cover such issues as what you learned, whether it matched your expectations, whether and how it has promoted your career goals, and whether your ideas about your profession has changed as a result of the internship. The exit essay is due to the department chair by the last day of class. 10. The internship grade will be based on the supervisor s evaluation, the proposal, and the exit essay. For cases in which either the proposal or the exit essay has not been submitted to the department chair, the final grade will be adjusted accordingly. 11. Off-campus internships are limited and will be offered on a competitive basis to students based on GPA, commitment to a strong professional work ethic, ability to get along with others, dependability, and ability to project a positive image of the University. On-campus internships also may be limited and will be offered on a first-come basis, with preference given to graduating seniors. 80

81 PHILOSOPHY and RELIGION The philosophy program offers a curriculum to support the university s general education program as well as a minor in Philosophy. MINORS Minor in Africana Studies requires a minimum of credit hours, including AFS 1200; a literature course focused on Africa or the African Diaspora (U.S. or Caribbean), a critical thinking course, at least one course focused on gender, race, class, ethnicity or culture, at least one course focused on Africa or non-u.s. African Diaspora (i.e., South/Central America, Caribbean), and any other course from a list of relevant university-wide courses, in consultation with the student s advisor. Minor in Broadcast Media requires credit hours including COM 2200, 2272, 3315; 4894; 6 additional credit hours of Broadcast Media courses, and a 2-3 credit hour course from a selected department. Communication majors may not minor in this area. Minor in Communication Print Journalism requires credit hours including COM 2200, 2219, 3319, 3327, 4894; 3 additional credit hours of Print Journalism courses, and a 2-3 credit hour course from a selected department. Communication majors may not minor in this area Minor in English a minimum of 30 credit hours as follows: ENG 3030, 3040, 3051, 4080, and additional hours from department courses in literature and language. Minor in French requires: Completion of the University s B.A. language requirements; and completion of four core minor courses consisting of the following: FLA 2241, FLA 2290, FLA 3300 (focused on Francophone African Literature; FLA 3300 (focused on Advanced French Composition); or FLA 3341 (Survey of French Literature); Or FLA 3300 (Topics in Foreign Language 3). Minor in History requires a minimum of 24 credit hours in history courses chosen in consultation with the student s advisor. Minor in Philosophy and Religion requires a minimum of 24 credit hours in philosophy courses chosen in consultation with the student s advisor. Minor in Public Relations require credit hours including COM 2200, 2204 or 3310; 2219; and 3300; 3 additional credit hours of COM courses and 6 credit hours from selected departments. Communication majors may not minor in this area. Minor in Sound Engineering and Recording requires 20 credit hours including COM 2272, 3312, 3460 and MUS 1101; and 6 credit hours from selected departments. Communication majors may not minor in this area. Minor in Spanish requires completion of the University s B.A. language requirements (FLA 1131 and 1132); Completion of the following four core courses: FLA 2231, FLA 3300 (focused on Spanish Translation), FLA 2290, FLA 3300 (focused on Advanced Spanish Composition); FLA 3310 or FLA 3300 (focused on any other topic). A maximum of 3 semester hours of directed individual studies may be applied to the minor. Minor in Speech/Theatre requires a minimum of 20 semester hours including DRM 1110, 1115, and 3315, COM 2204 or 3310 or 3326; and 3 credit hours from a selected department. Communication majors may not minor in this area. 81

82 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION Broadcast Media ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR ; 3 Humanities semester hours from List A; 9 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences from List B; 7 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab) from List C; 2-4 Computer Skills from List D; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following Communication Core courses: COM 2200, 2204, 2219, 3306, 3319, and 4447; and the following Broadcast Media courses: COM 2272, 3300, 3315, 3400, 4894, and 4895, and 4896, and one COM elective. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN COMMUNICATION (Broadcast Media) The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1100 Intro to Writing and Reading (or) 5 ENG1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College FLA 1xxx Foreign Language II 5 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language I 5 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE COM 2200 Intro Mass Communications 3 COM 2219 Intro to Media Writing 3 COM 2204 Introduction to Speech 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 HIS 1110 History of Africans in the U.S. 3 CPS 1115 Computer Fundamentals 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ART 2010 Two Dimensional Art 2 COM 3300 Broadcast Media Prod: Radio 3 COM 2272 Principles of Electronic Media 3 COM 3306 Comm Research Methods 3 COM 3319 Reporting 3 COM 3400 Broadcast Media Production: TV 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 COM 4894 Prac--WCSU Radio/WCSU-TV 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 CPS 2215 Internet Web Essentials 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 3 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition** SENIOR SENIOR COM 4447 Media Law and Ethics 3 COM 3315 Writing for Electronic Media 3 COM 4896 Internship 3 COM 4895 Portfolio and Capstone 3 COM xxxx COM Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE Any Digital Media Course Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Broadcast Media 124 *All communication must take at least 15 hours of liberal arts and sciences in addition to required liberal arts courses. Communications majors may take no more than 41 semester hours of COM hours. 82

83 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION Print Journalism ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR ; 3 Humanities semester hours from List A; 9 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences from List B; 7 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab) from List C; 2-4 Computer Skills from List D; pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following Communication Core courses: COM 2200, 2204, 2219, 3306, 3319, and 4447 and the following Print Journalism courses: 3327, 3340, 4412, 4894, 4895, and SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN COMMUNICATION (Print Journalism) The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1100 Intro to Writing and Reading (or) 5 ENG1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 ENG 1101 Intro to Writing for College FLA 1xxx Foreign Language II 5 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language I 5 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE COM 2200 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 COM 2219 Intro to Media Writing 3 COM 2204 Introduction to Speech 3 CPS 1115 Computer Fundamentals 2 HIS 1110 History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ART 2010 Two Dimensional Art 2 COM 3306 Communication Research Methods 3 COM 3319 Reporting 3 COM 3327 Copy Editing 3 COM xxxx COM Elective 3 COM 4412 Advanced Reporting / Feature Writing 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 COM 4894 Practicum-Gold Torch/Gold Torch Online 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 CPS 2215 Internet Web Essentials 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition** SENIOR SENIOR COM 4447 Media Law and Ethics 3 COM 3340 Online Journalism / Desktop 3 COM 4896 Internship 3 COM 4895 Portfolio and Capstone 3 COM xxxx COM Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List A, B, C* 3 ELECTIVE Any Digital Media Course Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Print Journalism 124 *All communication must take at least 15 hours of liberal arts and sciences in addition to required liberal arts courses. Communications majors may take no more than 41 semester hours of COM hours. 83

84 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH Literature ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR ; 3 Humanities semester hours from List A; 9 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences from List B; 7 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab) from List C; 2-4 Computer Skills from List D; pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following major requirements: ENG 2200, 3010, 3051, 3100, 4080, 4895; 3020 or 3021; 3030 or 3031; 3040 or Students must also take 4 courses from: ENG 3006, 3200, 3202, 4050, 4060, 4070, 4090, and SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN ENGLISH (Literature) The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1100 Intro to Writing and Reading (or) 5 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College ENG 2200 Introduction to Literacy Studies 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language I 5 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language II 5 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE HIS 1121 Global History I (or) 3 ENG 3031 American Literature II 3 HIS 1122 Global History II ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ENG 3020 African American Literature I 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Electives 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ENG 3040 British Literature I 3 ENG 3006 Creative Writ Poetry & Short Story 3 ENG 3200 History of the English Language 3 ENG 3052 World Literature II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ENG 4200 Linguistics and American Grammar 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Electives 6 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR ENG 3010 African Literature 4 ENG 4050 Forms and Genres: The Novel (or) 3 ENG 3100 Literary Criticism: Theory & Practice 3 ENG 4060 Forms and Genres: Poetry (or) ENG 4070 Forms and Genres: Drama (and) 3 ENG 4895 Senior Seminar 4 ENG 4090 American Literary History (or) 3 Electives 6 Electives (6) ENG 4080 Shakespeare and His Influence Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in English - Literature

85 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH - Pre-Law ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR ; 3 Humanities semester hours from List A; 9 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences from List B; 7 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab) from List C; 2-4 Computer Skills from List D; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following major requirements to include 12 hours from the following: BUS 2200; COM 3310, 3323, 3326, 4447; PSC 3381; SOC 3333 (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following major requirements: ENG 2200, 3020 or 3021, 3030 or 3031, 3040 or 3041, ENG 3010, 3100, 4080, 4895 plus choose 4 courses from: ENG 3006, 3200, 3202, 4050, 4060, 4070, 4090, 4092, SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN ENGLISH (Pre-Law) The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1100 Intro to Writing and Reading (or) 5 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 ENG 1101 Intro to Writing for College ENG 2200 Introduction to Literacy Studies 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language I 5 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language II 5 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity Course 1 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 ENG 3020/21 African American Literature I or II 3 ENG 3031 American Literature II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ENG 3040/1 British Literature I or II 3 COM 3323 Voice and Diction (or) 3 ENG 3200 History of the English Language 3 COM 3326 Argumentation & Debate ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ENG 3006 Creative Writ: Poetry & Short Story 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ENG 3052 World Literature II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 ENG 4200 Linguistics and American Grammar 4 PHI 3300 Logic SENIOR SENIOR ENG 3010 African Literature 4 ENG 4050 Forms and Genres: The Novel (or) 3 ENG 3100 Literary Critic: Theory & Pract 3 ENG 4060 Forms and Genres: Poetry (or) ENG 4070 Forms & Genres: Drama (and) 3 ENG 4080 Shakespeare and His Influence ENG 4090 American Literary History (or) 3 ENG 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar 4 Electives (6) Electives 6 PSC 3381 Constitutional Law (or) 3 SOC 3333 Criminology Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in English - Pre-Law

86 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours, and pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements (See ACADEMIC PROGRAM) including special requirements for the B.A. (six additional semester hours in humanities and ten credits of foreign language), and the following major requirements: HIS 1121 or 1122, HIS 2100, 2201, 2202, 2250, 3324, 3325, In consultation with the advisor, students must also choose 9 credit hours of history electives. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN HISTORY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1100 Introduction to Writing & Reading(or) 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College HIS 1110 Intro His of Africans in U.S. 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1122 Global History II 3 HIS 1121 Global History I 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE FLA 1xxx Foreign Language I 5 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 HIS 2100 Research Methods in History 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language II 5 HIS 2201 History of U.S. to HIS 2202 History of the U.S. since ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 HIS 2250 Survey History of Africa 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Take English Proficiency Exam ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 (Summer Internship Recommended) JUNIOR JUNIOR HIS 3301 Africans in America to HIS 3302 Africans in America since HIS xxxx History Elective 3 HIS xxxx History Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 HIS xxxx History Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Electives List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 Electives 3 (English Proficiency Test Required) (Summer Internship Recommended) SENIOR SENIOR HIS 4497 Special Topics in History 3 HIS 4995 Global History Seminar 3 Electives 9 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in History

87 Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Mr. Robert Marcus, Acting Chair Henderson Hall - Room 150 (937) Ms. Jennifer Bradshaw, Department Secretary Henderson Hall - Room 150 (937) Mr. Elias Andebrhan, Computer Classroom Technician Henderson Hall - Room 138 (937) Associate Professor: Dr. Kimerly Kendricks Assistant Professors: Mr. Semere Araia, Dr. John Bidwell, Mr. William Hargraves, Dr. Yu Liang, Dr. Asit Saha, Shi (John) Zhen-Jun The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers majors and minors in the disciplines of Computer Science and Mathematics. In cooperation with the College of Education, the department offers Mathematics at the Adolescent to Young Adult level and Mathematics at the Middle Childhood level. Majors must fulfill the University General Education Requirements, and the specific requirements for each degree program. Students with majors in education must fulfill the requirements in the department (requirements vary from discipline to discipline). Credits for students from an accredited institution may be accepted at the discretion of the department. All candidates for graduation must pass the English Proficiency Examination and a Major Field Achievement Test, or a similar department comprehensive examination. It is the responsibility of the student for knowing and adhering to published schedules for the administration of the above tests, and applying for graduation. Both tests are administered by the Office of Assessment. Usually, the English Proficiency Examination is administered once per semester, while the Major Achievement Test is administered in the Spring semester only. The curriculum in mathematics and computer sciences offer courses leading to the Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, Bachelor of Science in Computer Sciences, and Bachelor of Science in Mathematics Education. A minimum of 39 semester hours in mathematics and a minimum of 8 semester hours in computer science are required for the B.S. degree in mathematics (See DEGREE REQUIRE-MENTS). Computer Science majors must take a minimum of 41 semester hours of computer science, a minimum of 16 semester hours of mathematics, and minimum of 6 semester hours of Industrial and Engineering Technology from the courses listed under degree requirements. Students electing a major in Mathematics Education must complete a minimum of 37 semester hours of mathematics. (See DEGREE REQUIREMENTS). MINORS Minor requirements in Computational Science COE 2255, CPS 1192, CPS 3330, CPS 3450, MTH 3310 and a CSI Science or Engineering 3 hour elective. Electives: CPS 2680 or CPS 3465 or MTH Minor requirements in Computer Science A minimum of 20 semester hours in Computer Science including CPS 1191, 1192, 2220, 2271; and 11 hours in Mathematics including MTH 2501, 2502, and Minor requirements in Mathematics A minimum of 20 semester hours including 2501, 2502, 2503, 3001, 3002,

88 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. All mathematics majors must take the following major requirements: 39 semester hours in mathematics including MTH 2001, 2002, 2501, 2502, 2503, 3001, 3002, 3110, 3520, 3610, 3620, and Mathematics majors must also take CPS 1191, (Note: pre-graduate programs must include MTH 3520, 4120, 4130, 4600). SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN CPS 1191 Computer Science I 4 CPS 1192 Computer Science II 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1121/22 Global Civilization to HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 MTH 2501 Trigonometry 3 MTH 2502 Calculus I SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 MTH 2002 Probability & Statistics 3 MTH 2001 Probability & Statistics I 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 MTH 2503 Calculus II 5 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 Electives 8 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR MTH 3000 Geometry of Teachers 3 MTH 3002 Multivariate Calculus 4 MTH 3001 Linear Algebra 3 MTH 3602 Seminar 3 MTH 3110 Differential Equations 3 MTH 4030 History of Mathematics 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MTH 4600 Advanced Topics 1 Electives 5 ELECTIVE From General Education List B SENIOR SENIOR MTH 3520 Algebraic Structures 3 MTH 4120 Advanced Calculus 3 MTH 3610 Introduction to Discrete 3 Electives 10 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

89 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. All computer science majors must take the following major requirements: CPS 1191, 1192, 2220, 2271, 3340, 3370, 3381, 4410, 4420, 4895; 6 semester hours from courses CPS 2215, 2236, 3320, 3325 and 3465; 20 semester hours in the following Mathematics courses: MTH 2001, 2501, 2503, 3310, and 3610; and 6 semester hours from Industrial Technology, INT 3520 and SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 CPS 1192 Computer Science II 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 CPS 2236 Contemporary Operating Systems 2 CPS 1191 Computer Science I 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 CPS 2215 Web Essentials 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 2 MTH 2501 Trigonometry 3 MTH 2502 Calculus I SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE CPS 2271 Data Structures 3 CPS 2220 Assembler Language 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 CPS 3465 Parallel Computing 3 MTH 2001 Probability & Statistics 4 HIS 1121 Global Civilization 3 MTH 2503 Calculus II 4 MTH 3610 Discrete Structures 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR CPS 3340 Computer Architecture 3 CPS 3316 Computer Networking 3 INT 3520 Digital Systems 3 CPS 3370 Programming Languages 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 CPS 4420 Software Engineering 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 INT 3630 Microprocessor Design 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Electives SENIOR SENIOR CPS 3381 Principles of Operating Systems 3 CPS4410 Formal Languages 3 CPS 4895 Senior Project 3 MTH3310 Numerical Methods 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Electives 8 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science

90 Central State University s Marauder Battalion is the first ever Historically Black College/University (HBCU) Military Science Department. ROTC has been in Wilberforce, Ohio, since Charles Young was the third Black United States Military Academy graduate, the highest ranking Black Officer during WWI, and the second Professor of Military Science and Tactics at Wilberforce University (1894). Department of Military Science Carl E. Jenkins Technology Education Bldg. Room 142 LTC Michael Thomas, Professor of Military Science (937) /6382 Faculty - Professor: LTC Michael Thomas Instructors: CPT Rashad Fulcher, MSG Michael Greer, SFC Rahshaan Greene The Department of Military Science is a cooperative venture between the United States Army and Central State University, Cedarville University, Urban University, Wilberforce University, and Wittenberg University. The program provides a Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) program to full-time students on an optional basis. Satisfactory completion of the program may lead to a minor in Military Science, and a commission as an officer in the United States Army. The program provides students an opportunity to practice leadership skills necessary in society. The emphasis of the program is on leadership development. Students are challenged to apply accepted leadership theory to practical situations. A theoretical basis of knowledge is developed through attendance in Military Science classes and courses offered in colleges throughout the University. Army ROTC is a college elective students can try out for up to two years with no obligation. Unlike traditional college programs, Army ROTC gives you a wide range of experiences while you work toward a degree. You will combine classroom time with hands-on experience, learning skills that are sure to give you an edge over your peers when it comes time to look for a job. ROTC provides students with opportunities to attend demanding active military courses such as: Special Forces Assessment and Selection Courses, Basic Paratrooper Course, Air Assault School, Combat Diver Qualification Course, Combat Survival Training, and Mountain Warfare Training. By offering such demanding training, ROTC provides students with the ability to test the limits of their mental and physical stamina. Whether you are planning a career in the Army or the corporate world, Army ROTC is a smart elective course to take. As part of Army ROTC, you will be in the company of a diverse group of individuals with broad interests those who were presidents of their student governments, captains of their varsity sports teams, club presidents, or members of the National Honor Society. Your studies will include Leadership Development, Military Skills, and Adventure Training. First and foremost, an Army officer is a leader. The officer plans the work of the organization, assigns tasks to others and sees that the work is accomplished to the highest standard. In that regard, an Army officer is similar to a manager in a corporation. But that is where any comparison to the corporate world ends. Even the most junior officer routinely has 40 or more soldiers working directly under his or her control. In the 90

91 corporate world it could take decades for an individual to achieve that level of responsibility. Officers do not just issue orders and disappear into the background. They lead by example. An officer must be willing to personally undertake any task that is assigned to a soldier. The level of integrity and personal conduct required of an officer is quite high with very good reasons. Officers daily make decisions that involve millions of dollars of resources. Their judgment and skill can mean the difference between life and death for the soldiers they command. Over the years, three words have become the hallmark of what it is to be an Army Officer. Those three words are Duty, Honor and Country. No matter what their specific duties are, or where they serve, these three words embody what it is to be an Army officer. We are a people-oriented organization. Consequently, leadership and management skills are essential in our training program. ROTC provides you the opportunity to become a college-educated leader and manager. You will be employed when you graduate employed in an organization that offers competitive medical, dental, housing and retirement benefits. Let s say you decide to move on after a few years and pursue another profession. OK. When you join your friends in the civilian world you will have no problem grasping what they are doing and you will have far greater depth and breadth of experience. They will admire, even envy your exposure, work and travel experience. Trust us, whatever you decide, the experience you will gain will give you the confidence you need to be a success in college and beyond. You will have the edge because employers respect officership Believe it! TO HELP YOU FINANCE YOUR COLLEGE YEARS, ARMY ROTC awards scholarships. Army ROTC scholarships pay tuition and required fees, and can be worth as much as $120,000 or more. They are awarded on merit like academic achievements, extracurricular activities, and personal interviews. Scholarship winners receive a stipend ($300 freshman, $350 sophomore, $450 junior, $500 senior) for each academic month plus an allowance for books and other educational items. If you are a non-scholarship student, you can still receive the stipend as a contracted cadet during your last two years. If you are selected to receive a scholarship, you will have a commitment to the Army after completing the program. You can fulfill it by either serving part time in the Army National Guard or Army Reserve, or compete for full time service on active duty. The U.S. Army is one of the most culturally diverse organizations in the nation, and Army ROTC is committed to drawing a diverse group of individuals with a broad range of interests. As part of this commitment, Army ROTC offers a limited number of scholarships specifically to those individuals who desire to attend a Historically Black College/University (HBCU). The term Basic Course refers to first and second year courses, MIL 1511, 1512, 2511, and 2512, which are designed for beginning students who want to qualify for entry into the Advanced Courses and for those students who may want to try Military Science without obligation. Gain insight into Advance Course in order to make an informed decision. A number of popular or challenging extracurricular activities are associated with these courses. A student can also qualify for entry into the Advanced Course by completing the summer Leadership Training Course, located at Fort Knox, Kentucky. Prior Service, see PMS for placement credit. A minor in Military Science is offered by completing 18 hours of course work as follows: MIL 3511, 3512, 4511, hours BUS 1500, COM 3310 or COM hours Total Hours Required hours The Professor of Military Science may, in extreme cases, make exceptions to the ROTC Course requirements and Professional Military Education requirements, in order to award a Military Science minor. 91

92 Department of Natural Sciences College of Education & Natural Sciences Building, Room 177 Dr. Suzanne Seleem, Chair (937) Professors: Dr. Victor O. Aimiuwu, Dr. Cadance A. Lowell, Dr. Omokere E. Odje Associate Professors: Dr. Anthony R. Arment, Dr. Joe M. Ross, Dr. Suzanne Seleem Assistant Professors: Dr. Sudhindra R. Gadagkar, Dr. Daqing Gao, Dr. Sharath Krishna, Dr. Gary O. Pierson The Department of Natural Sciences includes Biology, Chemistry and Physics and offers the following degrees: B.S. in Biology and Chemistry; Minors in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Environmental Science. In cooperation with the College of Education, the department offers the Bachelor of Science in Life Science and Physical Science at the Adolescent to Young Adult Level, and Science at the Middle Childhood level (see requirements under the College of Education). Majors must fulfill the University General Education Requirements and the specific requirements for each degree program. Students with majors in education must fulfill the requirements of the College of Education, in addition to the requirements in the department. Credits toward the major for students from an accredited institution may be accepted at the discretion of the department. All candidates for graduation must pass the English Proficiency Examination. It is the responsibility of the student for knowing and adhering to published schedules for the administration of the test, and applying for graduation. Pre-Health, Pre-Pharmacy, Forensic Sciences Professionals Programs in Biology and Chemistry can prepare students for post-baccalaureate study in medicine, veterinary science, dentistry, nursing, optometry, pharmacy and forensic science. Students interested in these professions should consult their academic advisor for a list of recommended courses for these fields. BIOLOGY The Biology program prepares students to pursue careers as scientists in a variety of fields such as health, environmental science, animal science, microbiology and genetics. Biology offers curriculum that leads to the Bachelor of Science in Biology, and a minor in Biology. Biology majors must take a minimum of 41 hours of biology, 20 hours of chemistry, 10 hours of physics, and 8 hours of mathematics. A minimum requirement of 29 92

93 hours of biology courses is needed for a minor in biology. Required courses for all degrees are listed under degree requirements. Students interested in medicine can choose to take courses in addition to those required for a Biology major and interested students should consult their advisor. CHEMISTRY The chemistry program offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and a minor in chemistry. Chemistry majors must take a minimum of 39 semester hours in chemistry, 10 hours in physics and 11 hours in mathematics (see degree requirements). A minimum of 20 semester hours are required for a minor in chemistry. Students interested in the professions of forensic science, medicine and pharmacy may wish to take courses in addition to the chemistry major and should consult their academic advisor. ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE In collaboration with the Water Resources Management Department, Natural Sciences offers an interdisciplinary minor in Environmental Science. This minor will be particularly helpful to students majoring in Biology, Chemistry or Water Resources Management, who are seeking a career in the environmental field. PHYSICS The minor physics requires 20 semester hours of physics, 8 hours of chemistry and 14 hours of mathematics. The physics program provides support courses for the University general education requirements and for programs in biology, chemistry, manufacturing engineering, pre-professional studies, and water resources management. MINORS Minor in Biology Requirements - BIO 1801, 1802, 2340, 2400, 2650, 2750, 2850, 3500, A grade of C or better in these courses is required. Students are advised to check for prerequisites on these courses. Minor in Chemistry Requirements CHM 1201, 1202, 2200, 2401, Students are advised to check for prerequisites on these courses. A grade of C or better in these courses is required. Students are advised to check for prerequisites on these courses. Minor in Environmental Science Degree Requirements A core of 26 credit hours is required including a core of 17 hours consisting of BIO 1500, 3500; CHM 2200; WRM 2200 and 3330; and additional 9 hours minimum from elective courses BIO 2050, 2650, 2000, 4200, 4300; CHM 2401, 4200; GEL 2205; MTH 2001; WRM 3306, 4435 and A grade of C or better in these courses is required. Students are advised to check for prerequisites for these courses. Minor in Physics Requirements PHY 2211/2212, 2213/2214, 3320, 3330, Students are advised to check for prerequisites on these courses. 93

94 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. All biology majors must take the following major requirements: BIO 1801, 1802, 2340, 2400, 2650, 2750, 2850, 3050 or 3070 or 3090 or 3150, 3430, 3500, 4100, [4200 or 4300 or 4400],,, 4500, and 4895; CHM 1201, 1202, 2401, 2402, 4300; MTH 2502, 2523; and PHY 2211, 2212, 2213, Only Biology courses passed with a grade of C or above will count towards the 41 hours of Biology requirements. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN BIOLOGY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BIO 1801 Fundamentals of Biology I 4 BIO 1802 Fundamentals of Biology II 4 CHM 1201 General Chemistry I 4 CHM 1202 General Chemistry II 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing & Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 MTH 2502 Calculus I 4 MTH 2501 Trigonometry SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE BIO 2340 Careers in Biology 1 BIO 2650 Microbiology 4 BIO 2400 Molecular Genetics 4 BIO 2850 Plant Biology 2 BIO 2750 Zoology 2 CHM 2402 Organic Chemistry II 4 CHM 2401 Organic Chemistry I 4 HIS 1110 Intro to His of Africans in the 3 MTH 2503 Calculus II 5 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR BIO 3xxx Biology Elective, 3000 Level 4 BIO 3430 Biology Seminar 4 BIO 4500 Undergrad Research in Biology 2 BIO 3500 Ecology 4 CPS 1110 Computer Literacy 2 PHY 2213 University Physics II 5 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 PHY 2214 University Physics Lab 0 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 PHY 2211 University Physics I 5 PHY 2212 University Physics Lab SENIOR SENIOR BIO 4xxx Biology Elective, 4000 Level 4 BIO 4100 Molecular Cell Biology 4 CHM 4300 Biochemistry 4 BIO 4895 Capstone in Biology 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 University Electives 2 University Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Biology

95 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A p. 52; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. All chemistry majors must take the following major requirements: CHM 1201, 1202, 2200, 2401, 2402, 3050, 3501, 3502, 4791, 4792, 4895, and two additional chemistry courses at the 3000 or 4000 level; MTH 2501, 2502, 2503; and PHY 2211, 2212, 2213, Only Chemistry courses passed with a grade of C or above will count towards the 41 hours of Chemistry requirements. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN CHEMISTRY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN CHM 1201 General Chemistry I 4 CHM 1202 General Chemistry II 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1110 Intro to History of Africans in the U.S. 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MTH 2501 Trigonometry SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE CHM 2401 Organic Chemistry 4 CHM 2200 Quantitative Analysis 4 HIS 1121/22 Global History 3 CHM 2402 Organic Chemistry II 4 MTH 2502 Calculus I 4 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 MTH 2503 Calculus II 5 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 University Electives 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR CHM 2401 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHM 2402 Organic Chemistry II 4 CPS 1110 Computer Literacy 2 PHY 2213 University Physics II 5 PHY 2211 University Physics I 5 PHY 2214 University Physics Lab 0 PHY 2212 University Physics Lab 0 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 University Electives 6 University Electives SENIOR SENIOR CHM 3501 Physical Chemistry I 3 CHM 3050 Undergraduate Research II 2 CHM 4791 Undergraduate Research I 2 CHM 3502 Physical Chemistry II 4 CHM xxxx Chemistry Elective 4 CHM 4792 Undergraduate Research II 2 University Electives 8 CHM 4895 Integrated Concepts 3 17 CHM xxxx Chemistry Elective 4 14 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry

96 EXCITING DAY AT THE SBS STUDENT SYMPOSIUM Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences Charles H. Wesley Hall Room 219 Dr. Lawrence E. Dalzine, Ph.D., Acting Chair (937) Interim Director of Social Work: Patricia Johnson-Dalzine, Ph.D., LSW Professors: Dr. Patricia Johnson-Dalzine, Dr. Ebere C. Onwudiwe; Associate Professors: Dr. Lawrence E. Dalzine, Dr. Denise Huggins, Dr. Rose M. Morgan-Woody, Dr. Edison Perdomo, Dr. W. Lynn Rigsbee II, Dr. Greta Winbush; Assistant Professors: Dr. Aherene A. Dungey The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers major concentrations in the disciplines of criminal justice, political science, psychology, social work, and sociology, and minor concentrations in political science, psychology, sociology, gerontology and criminal justice. In addition to the offerings for students whose major or minor interest is in the social sciences, the department provides general education courses and service to other departments (e.g., communications, secondary education, health and recreation). The department offers programs leading to the following degrees: Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice, in Political Science, in Political Science (Public Administration), in Psychology, Social Work, or in Sociology; Bachelor of Science in Psychology, in Social Work, or in Sociology. Minors in the areas of criminal justice and gerontology are available to students from any major in any University department. All majors in the department must fulfill the stipulated General Education Requirements and the specific requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, as well as any special requirements for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees. All majors are required to pass the University writing proficiency examination and the department comprehensive examination in their respective disciplines. Students are responsible for knowing and adhering to published schedules for the administration of the above tests and for application for graduation. CRIMINAL JUSTICE The Criminal Justice program provides an overview of the criminal justice system, the causes of crime and issues relating to social control. The major is structured around a core of criminal justice courses that include topics in law enforcement, the judicial process and correctional system. The course of study consists of a general overview of the components of the criminal justice system with the overall goal of exposing students to a wide variety of academic disciplines: business, political science, psychology, social work and sociology. Within the major, students may choose to emphasize one of three areas. The law enforcement emphasis is designed primarily for students who wish to become local, state or federal law enforcement officers (e.g., city police officers, state highway patrol officers or Federal Bureau of Investigation agents). The judicial emphasis is for those students who wish to continue their education in law school or other areas of this branch of the 96

97 criminal justice system (e.g., victim advocate, pretrial investigator, etc). Finally, the corrections emphasis is best suited for students who wish to work in a correctional setting for juveniles or adults (e.g., correctional caseworker, correctional officer, drug counselor, parole officer or probation officer). POLITICAL SCIENCE The Political Science program offers a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science (Public Administration). The discipline offers a broad range of courses that permit specialization in American government and politics, international politics and comparative politics, or public administration. Individual programs combining the required 33 credit hours of political science courses with related courses from other disciplines allow students to prepare for different careers. The BA in Political Science is a traditional preparation for law school. The option in Public Administration combines general knowledge, administrative concepts, and skills courses in a curriculum designed to prepare students for careers in public agencies. The political science faculty is committed to the development of a sound liberal arts foundation and appropriate pre-professional skills for all majors. Courses are designed to further understanding of the institutions and processes of government and the behavior of decision-makers, to promote awareness of the perennial questions of political inquiry and the concepts useful in responding to them; and to develop analytical skills. As a discipline, Political Science is divided into areas of study based on subject matter. At CSU, political science courses are placed in the following groupings: American National Government and Political Theory (PSC 1100, 2223, 3304, 3351, 3353, 3361, 3362, 3365, 3381); Public Administration (PSC 1120, 3310, 3390, 4403, 4493); and Comparative Politics and International Relations (PSC 2202, 2205, 2405, 3311, 3371). Students are to use these groupings to select their area of concentration and sub-areas of study. PSYCHOLOGY The program for majors in psychology is designed to provide students with a broad knowledge of the field of psychology. In addition to developing professional skills, the program prepares students for graduate study in psychology and other academic disciplines. Courses are offered for both majors and non-majors. Extracurricular opportunities for students allow examination of a wide range of views on issues related to the field of psychology. The faculty possesses extensive professional expertise in psychology, is actively involved in research, and pursues working relationships with other professional institutions. Courses within the program have been designed to prepare students for graduate school or for employment in the fields of mental health and social service, criminal justice, education and related areas, and industry. SOCIAL WORK The primary objective of the social work curriculum is to prepare students for entry-level professional practice. Students are provided opportunities for the study and development of generalist knowledge of social work, skills, values, and ethics required of professional social workers. The content courses, along with field practicum, are designed to provide students with a broad and comprehensive theoretical knowledge base integrated with practical experience. Graduates of the program may seek beginning level social work employment or pursue graduate study. Students who plan to major in social work may take the introductory courses and are considered pre-social work students until they are formally accepted into the program. Transfer students must meet with a social work adviser to determine acceptable transfer courses for the social work major. The major in social work consists of 49 credit hours. Students apply for admission to the program after completing SWK 1100 and SWK 2200 with a grade of C or above. To be accepted into the program, students must have a cumulative grade point average of To continue in the Social Work Program, students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.25 in the core social work courses. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.25 or better to graduate with a degree in social work. Students who fail to earn a C or better in all social work courses must repeat these courses. Students must earn a grade of C or better in SWK 4201 and SWK 4202 to be eligible for enrollment in SWK The Social Work practicum consists of one semester and is designed to provide students with appropriate practice experiences to ensure their professional development. The social work faculty will determine students readiness for the field practicum course. Students must complete a formal application to the 97

98 program at the end of their sophomore year and after the completion of the two required introductory courses in social work. Students are also expected to have completed the required courses in English and mathematics. Applications for the Social Work Program are located in room 311, Wesley Hall. The applications are reviewed by the social work faculty and students may also be interviewed prior to final decisions. Course offerings and departmental policies regarding requirements for majors are subject to continuous review and may be changed. SOCIOLOGY AND GERONTOLOGY The area offers a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science in Sociology and minors in Sociology and Gerontology. The courses are diverse and represent a broad range of practical and theoretical issues in the discipline. Opportunities exist for students to engage in research under the supervision of faculty members. Faculty members work with students on an individual basis, providing them with counseling, research suggestions and other assistance. They are determined to develop and maintain an academically nurturing relationship with each student in the program. Employment opportunities are available to students with a major in Sociology and a minor in Criminal Justice or Gerontology. Courses have been designed to allow students to acquire skills for careers in the criminal justice system or in agencies working with youth, the elderly, and families. INTERNSHIP Internships provide opportunities for students to obtain practical training off campus. Students should work out details for obtaining placement with their academic advisor. Internships will be recommended only for students who have achieved at least junior status and have an overall grade point average of at least 2.5. The maximum number of credit hours a student may earn for an internship are 8, during two separate semesters. However, for Sociology students, no more than 4 credit hours may be used to fulfill the requirement for the major. For each credit hour earned, the student is expected to spend approximately 3 hours per week on the internship site. Internships are generally limited and will be offered on a competitive basis. Criteria such as student attitude, ability to work with others, classification, and the minimum GPA will be used to select the most qualified. Students should apply for an internship the semester prior to wanting to take this course. MINORS Minor in Criminal Justice A minimum of 24 semester hours in Criminal Justice to include CRJ 2210, 2310, 2330, 3310, 3340, 4655; SOC 3333 and 3510 and additional courses selected in consultation with the academic advisor. Criminal Justice minors will also have to complete CHM A grade of C or better is required in all Criminal Justice courses. Minor in Gerontology - The minor in Gerontology is a multidisciplinary program that consists of a minimum of 20 semester hours to include the following courses: BIO 2200; SOC 2230; PSY 3385and SOC Additional elective courses may be selected from SOC 3370, 3380; SWK 3320; HPR 1202, 2230, 3301, 3361, 4401; PSY 2320, 3380, & 3420, in consultation with the academic advisor. A grade of C or better is required in all courses taken for the minor. Minor in Political Science A minimum of 20 semester hours in Political Science including PSC 1100, 2223, 3304, 3381, SOC At least nine of the remaining hours are to be taken from 3000 or 4000 level courses. A grade of C or better is required in all Political Science courses. Minor in Psychology - A minimum of 24 hours including the following courses: PSY 1100, 1200, 2220, 2320, 3334 and SOC 2206 and additional courses selected in consultation with the academic advisor. A grade of C or better is required in all Psychology courses. Minor in Sociology A minimum of 20 semester hours in Sociology to include SOC 1105, 1111 or 1125, 2206, 2800, 3800 and additional courses selected in consultation with the academic advisor. A grade of C or better is required in all Sociology courses. 98

99 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E as well as 10 hours in a foreign language and pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. A minimum of 49 credit hours to include the following courses: CRJ 2210, 2310, 2330, 3310, 3340, 4655, 4895; SOC 2206, 2800, 3333, 3415, 3510; ENG 2020 or COM 3310 and additional courses (12 hours) selected in consultation with the academic advisor. Criminal Justice majors will also have to complete PHI 2240 or PHI 3300, CHM 1610 and ENG 3000; these courses may also be counted toward the completion of any other University requirements. Criminal Justice majors must repeat all required courses in which a grade of D or F is received. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN CHM 1610 Intro to Forensic Science I w/lab 4 CPS xxxx From General Education List D 2 CRJ 2210 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 SOC 1105 From General Education List B SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE PHI 2240* Critical Thinking (or) 3 CRJ 2310 Corrections in America 3 PHI 3300* Logic and Scientific Method CRJ 2330 Police and Society 3 SOC 2206 Social Statistics 4 COM 3310 Public Speaking (or) 2/3 SOC 3333 Criminology 3 ENG 2020 Vocabulary Development ELECTIVE CRJ General Elective 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List C w/ lab 4 SOC 2800 Methods of Research 4 Take English Proficiency Exam 17 15/16 JUNIOR JUNIOR CRJ 3310 Criminal Procedures 3 CRJ 3340 Criminal Law 3 CRJ xxxx CRJ Electives 3 CRJ xxxx CRJ Elective 3 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 FLA xxxx Foreign Language 5 FLA xxxx Foreign Language 5 SOC 3510 Sociology of Deviance 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR CRJ xxxx See List Criminal Justice Electives 6 CRJ 4655 Juvenile Justice 3 SOC 3415 Juvenile Delinquency 3 CRJ 4895 Senior Capstone for CRJ 3 ELECTIVE University Electives 5 ELECTIVE CRJ General Elective 3 ELECTIVE Psychology or University Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice 124 *PHI 2240 will satisfy General Education List A; PHI 3300 will not satisfy General Education List A. 99

100 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E as well as 10 hours in a foreign language and pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. A minimum of 33 credit hours in political science courses to include the following: PSC 1100, 2223, 3304, and Students are also required to take, and receive Political Science credit for, SOC A grade of C or better is required in all political science classes and in SOC Students are required to take ECO 2210 and ECO 2220 as part of their social science component in the general education requirements. Each political science major is to have one area of concentration (9 credit hours), and two sub-areas of study, one with 6 credit hours and one with 3 credit hours. Required classes are not included as part of these hours. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS 1121/2 Global Civilization I or II 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 PSC 1100 American National Government 3 PSC 2223 Introduction to Political Science 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 ECO 2210 Microeconomics 3 PSC 2220 International Politics 3 ENG 2102 Literature and our Times 3 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 PSC 3310 Public Policy Analysis 3 SOC 2206 Social and Behavioral Statistics 4 PSC 3362 Political and Social Theory 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ECO 2220 Macroeconomics 3 ENG 3051 World Literature I 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language 5 ELECTIVE University Electives 3 PSC 3304 American State and Local Gov't. 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language 5 PSC 3353 American Political Theory 3 PHI 3300 Logic and Scientific Method 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 PSC 3365 Modern Political Ideologies SENIOR SENIOR PHI 2250 Applied Ethics 3 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 PSC 3371 United States Foreign Policy 3 PSC 4493 Legal and Public Admin Internship 5 PSC 3381 Constitutional Law 3 PSC 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 University Electives 3 ELECTIVE University Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science

101 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE Public Administration ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E as well as 10 hours in a foreign language and pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. A minimum of 30 credit hours in Political Science to include the following courses: PSC 1100, 1120, 2223, 3304, 3310, 3381, 3390, 4403, 4493, Other required courses are: ACC 2210 and ACC 2220; BUS 1100 and BUS 2343; ECO 2210, 2220, 3350; ENG 3000; BUS 3381; MGT 3343 or SOC A grade of C or better is required. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE Public Administration The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS 1121/22 Global Civilization I or II 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 PSC 1100 American National Government 3 PSC 2223 Introduction to Political Science 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 PSC 1120 Intro to Public Administration 3 HIS 2202 History U.S. Since PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 PSC 3310 Public Policy Analysis 3 SOC 2206 Social and Behavioral Statistics 4 PSY 3420 Social Psychology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/ lab 4 SWK 2200 From General Education List B 3 Take English Proficiency Exam ELECTIVE From General Education List C JUNIOR JUNIOR ACC 2210 Principles of Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Principles of Accounting 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language 5 ECO 2220 Macroeconomics 3 PSC 3304 American State and Local Government 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language 5 PSC 3361 African American Politics 3 PSC 4403 Public Personnel Administration SENIOR SENIOR ECO 3350 Public Finance 3 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 ENG 2020 Vocabulary Development 2 MGT 3381 Organizational Behavior 3 PSC 3381 Constitutional Law 3 PSC 4493 Legal and Public Admin Internship 5 PSC 3390 Public Budgeting 3 PSC 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science Public Administration

102 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E as well as 10 hours in a foreign language and pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. A minimum of 36 semester hours in psychology to include the following courses: PSY 1100, 1200, 2220, 2320, 3334, 3450, 4895 and SOC No psychology course may be counted for major credit unless the grade received is at least a C. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1121/2 Global Civilization I or II 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 PSY 2220 Human Growth and Development 3 PSY 1100 Freshman Seminar 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 PSY 1200 General Psychology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D PSY 2320 Abnormal Psychology 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 2206 Social and Behavioral Statistics 4 PSY 3334 Psychological Measurement 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A* 3 PSY 3420 Social Psychology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B* 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 SBS Elective (other than psychology)* ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language II 5 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language I 5 PHI 3300 Logic and Scientific Method 3 PSY 3450 Research Methods 4 PSY 3496 Field Experience 2 PSY xxxx Psychology Elective 3 PSY xxxx Psychology elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 PSY xxxx Psychology elective SENIOR SENIOR PSY 4450 Special Problems in Psychology 3 PSY 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 Psychology or University electives 11 Psychology or University electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

103 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E and pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. A minimum of 36 semester hours in psychology to include the following courses: PSY 1100, 1200, 2220, 2320, 3334, 3450, 4895 and SOC No psychology course may be counted for major credit unless the grade received is at least a C. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN PSYCHOLOGY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1121/2 Global Civilization I or II 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 PSY 2220 Human Growth and Development 3 PSY 1100 Freshman Seminar 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 PSY 1200 General Psychology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 PSY 3334 Psychological Measurement 3 PSY 2320 Abnormal Psychology 3 PSY 3420 Social Psychology 3 SOC 2206 Social and Behavioral Statistics 4 PSY xxxx Psychology Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B* 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 SBS Elective (other than psychology)* Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 PHI 3300 Logic and Scientific Method 3 PSY 3450 Research Methods 4 PSY 3496 Field Experience 2 PSY xxxx Psychology Elective 3 PSY xxxx Psychology elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 PSY xxxx Psychology elective 3 University Elective 5 University Elective SENIOR SENIOR PSY 4450 Special Problems in Psychology 3 PSY 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 Psychology or University electives 11 Psychology or University electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Psychology

104 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIAL WORK ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E as well as 10 hours in a foreign language, pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better and a minimum of 49 credit hours in Social Work to include the following courses: SWK 1100, 2200, 3011, 3012, 3406, 4201, 4202, 4203, 4595, 4596; SOC 2006 and As part of the General Education natural and physical science requirement, a student must take 7 credit hours from two (2) different disciplines, one (1) of which must include a lab. Social Work majors must select BIO 1500 (Environmental Science with Lab) as one of their choices. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN SOCIAL WORK The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS1121/22 Global Civilization I or II 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the US 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1125 Social Problems 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 SWK 2200 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 SWK 1100 Introduction to Social Work 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE GEL 1101 Physical Geology 4 BIO 1500 Environmental Science 3 PHI 2240 Critical Thinking 3 SOC 1111 Cultural Anthropology 3 SOC 1105 Introduction to Sociology 3 SOC 2800 Methods of Research 4 SOC 2206 Social Statistics 4 SOC 3012 Human Behavior II 3 SWK 3011 Human Behavior I 3 SWK xxxx SWK Elective 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ART 1110 Ancient & Early Europe Art Hist 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language II 5 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 PHI 2230 Global Religion 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language I 5 SWK 3406 Social Welfare Policy 3 SWK 4201 Generalist Practice I 3 SWK 4202 Generalist Practice II 3 SWK xxxx SWK Elective 3 SWK xxxx Electives SENIOR SENIOR SWK 4203 Generalist Practice III 3 SWK 4595 Field Seminar 2 SWK SWK Electives 3 SWK 4596 Field Practicum 12 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Social Work

105 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SOCIAL WORK ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E. and the special requirements for the Bachelor of Science and pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. A minimum of 49 credit hours in Social Work to include the following courses: SWK 1100, 2200, 3011, 3012, 3406, 4201, 4202, 4203, 4595, 4596; SOC 2206 and As part of the General Education requirement, a student must take 7 credit hours from two (2) different disciplines, one (1) of which must include a lab. Social Work majors must select BIO 1500 (Environmental Science with Lab) as one of their choices. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN SOCIAL WORK The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing & Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1121/2 Global Civilization I or II 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 PSY 1200 General Psychology 3 SWK 1100 Introduction to Social Work 3 SWK 2200 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE GEL 1101 Physical Geology 4 BIO 1500 Environmental Science 3 PHI 2240 Critical Thinking 3 SOC 1111 Cultural Anthropology 3 SOC 1105 Introduction to Sociology 3 SOC 2800 Methods of Research 4 SOC 2206 Social Statistics 4 SWK 3012 Human Behavior II 3 SWK 3011 Human Behavior I 3 SWK xxxx SWK Elective 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ART 1110 Ancient & Early Europe Art History 3 ECO 2270 Eco Prob of the Black Comm 3 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 PHI 2230 Global Religion 3 ESC 1101 World Geography: Western Hem. 3 SWK 3406 Social Welfare Policy 3 SWK 4201 Generalist Practice I 3 SWK 4202 Social Work Practice II 3 SWK xxxx SWK Elective 3 Electives 3 Elective 3 SENIOR SENIOR SWK 4203 Generalist Practice III 3 SWK 4595 Field Seminar 2 SWK SWK Electives 6 SWK 4596 Field Practicum 12 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Social Work

106 BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E. and the special requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better. A minimum of 31 credit hours in Sociology to include the following courses: SOC 1105, 1111 or 1125, 2206, 2800, 3800, 4895, and additional courses selected in consultation with the academic advisor. Sociology majors must also complete PHI 2240 and 3300 and ENG 3000; these courses may also be counted toward the completion of any other University requirements. In addition, two semesters of foreign language is required for the B.A. degree in Sociology. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS1121/2 Global Civilization I or II 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC1111/1125 Anthropology or Social Prob 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 SOC 1105 Introduction to Sociology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE PHI 2240 Critical Thinking 3 SOC 2800 Methods of Research 4 SOC 2206 Social and Behavioral Statistics 4 SOC 3325 Race and Ethnic Relations 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 SOC 3345 Soc. of Marriage and Family 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 University Elective 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language II 5 SOC 3300 Criminology 3 PHI 3300 Logic and Scientific Method 3 SOC 3800 Social Theory 3 SOC 3370 The Family and Aging 3 FLA 1xxx Foreign Language I 5 SOC xxxx Sociology Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 University Elective SENIOR SENIOR SOC 3343 Social Stratification 3 SOC 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 SOC 3510 Sociology of Deviance 3 Sociology or University Electives 9 SOC xxxx Sociology Elective 3 Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

107 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SOCIOLOGY ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E, pass the English Proficiency Examination or pass ENG 3000 with a C or better and the special requirements for the Bachelor of Science. A minimum of 31 credit hours in Sociology to include the following courses: SOC 1105, 1111 or 1125, 2206, 2800, 3800, 4895, and additional courses selected in consultation with the academic advisor. Sociology majors must also complete PHI 2240 and 3300 and ENG 3000; these courses may also be counted toward the completion of any other University requirement. Sociology majors must repeat all Sociology courses in which a grade of D or F is received. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS1121/2 Global Civilization I or II 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1111/1125 Anthropology or Social Prob 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 SOC 1105 Introduction to Sociology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE PHI 2240 Critical Thinking 3 SOC 2800 Methods of Research 4 SOC 2206 Social and Behavioral Statistics 4 SOC 3325 Race and Ethnic Relations 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 SOC xxxx Sociology Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 University Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 PHI 3300 Logic and Scientific Method 3 SOC 3300 Criminology 3 SOC 3370 The Family and Aging 3 SOC 3343 Social Stratification 3 SOC xxxx Sociology Elective 3 SOC 3800 Social Theory 3 University Elective 6 ELECTIVE From General Education List B SENIOR SENIOR SOC 3343 Social Stratification 3 SOC 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 SOC 3510 Sociology of Deviance 3 Sociology or Univ Electives 12 SOC xxxx Sociology Elective 3 ELECTIVE University Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Sociology

108 The International Center for Water Resources Management (ICWRM) is housed in the C.J. McLin Building, which was completed in COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY College of Business and Industry Department of Business Administration Degree Requirements. 110 Minor in Business Business Administration Entrepreneurship option B.S. 4-year plan Business Administration Finance option B.S. 4-year plan Business Administration Hospitality Management option B.S. 4-year plan Business Administration International Business option B.S. 4-year plan Business Administration Management option B.S. 4-year plan. 115 Business Administration Management Information Systems option B.S. 4-year plan Business Administration Marketing option B.S. 4-year plan Programs in Accounting and Economics Accounting Program Economics Program Minor in Economics Accounting B.S. 4-year plan Economics B.S. 4-year plan Department of Manufacturing Engineering Manufacturing Engineering Program. 122 Minor in Nuclear Engineering Manufacturing Engineering B.S. 4-year plan Industrial Technology Program Industrial Technology Computer Technology option B.S. 4-year plan Industrial Technology Manufacturing Management option B.S. 4-year plan Department of Water Resources Management Environmental Engineering Program Geology Program Geography Program. 130 Water Resources Management Program. 130 Minors Environmental Engineering B.S. 4-year plan Geology B.S. 4- year plan Geography B.S. 4-year plan Water Resources Management B.S. 4-year plan

109 BEEP. it s not just for Business Students but for the Business Minded College of Business and Industry Charles H. Showell, Jr., Ph.D., Dean Charles Smith Hall - Room 157 (937) The College of Business and Industry prepares students for careers in business, government, private and public non-profit organizations and for graduate school. The college takes great care to ensure that graduates are well-rounded individuals through its Triad for Success which includes emphasis on academics, experiential learning and professional development. Other objectives of the college are to: 1. Provide students with an understanding of the application of business principles and operations to actual work experiences or practical problem solving activities. 2. Assist students in understanding their responsibility to the economic system and the political and social environment. 3. Provide learning experiences that involve state of-the-art technology particularly as it relates to computerization, robotics and expert systems. 4. Provide experience which will enable the student to develop interpersonal skills necessary for proper functioning in a variety of societal settings. 5. Develop within students an appreciation for the fact that the work world of today is not limited by national boundaries. In fact, a global perspective is necessary to succeed in today s dynamic international environment. The college is comprised of three departments: Manufacturing Engineering, Business Administration and Water Resource Management. Undergraduate degree offerings include a Bachelor Science in Business Administration, Bachelor of Science in Water Resource Management, Bachelor of Science in Manufacturing Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology, Bachelor of Science in Accounting, Bachelor of Arts in Economics and a Bachelor of Science in Economics. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Students will be admitted to the College of Business and Industry upon entry to the university by declaring a major within one of the college disciplines. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Students in the College of Business and Industry are required to confer with an assigned major department advisor on a regular basis. Beyond this advisement, students are personally responsible not only for selecting their academic programs, but also for adhering to all published regulations, requirements and policies of the 109

110 University and college. Students are expected to seek regular academic advisement and ultimately are individually responsible for completing all degree requirements. During the Spring Semester immediately prior to the year in which a student expects to graduate, students must confer both with their advisor and the chair of the major department for a final degree checkout and preparation of an application for graduation. TRANSFER OF CREDITS Students who transfer from other colleges of the University and from other accredited colleges and universities must meet with the department chairperson to review and determine the acceptability of transfer credits to the respective degree program. The chairperson may decline to accept the transfer credit for any course description in which the grade is lower than a C or which does not meet the University General Education Requirement. Students who have completed the Transfer Module (see pages 53-57) will automatically receive credit for Central State s Transfer Module. Such students will, however, be required to meet some additional General Education Requirements not included in the Transfer Module. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The General Education Program, a common core of semester hours, is central to the University s mission of providing students with a liberal arts background. The remaining hours that must be taken to earn a total of at least 124 semester hours are designated by the departmental major requirements and the student s choice of free electives. However, majors in the college are urged to choose, with an advisor, courses that provide the student with a second field of interest or a strong minor concentration. A completion of a minimum of 124 semester hours with a grade point average of 2.0. Some departments or programs may require additional hours and a higher grade point average. A completion of at least 30 semester hours in a major field. Some departments may require additional hours. The completion of the University General Education Requirements. See complete description on pages 51 and 52 of this catalog. The completion of a comprehensive examination in the student s major as a part of the requirements for graduation. See complete description on page 58 of this catalog. Pass the English Proficiency Test before graduation. See complete description on page 61 of this catalog. Department of Business Administration Dr. Ben Williams, Chair Charles Smith Hall - Room 163 (937) Faculty Professor: Dr. Leonard Gaston; Associate Professor: Dr. Ben Williams; Assistant Professor: Mr. Charles Anderson, Mr. Firooz Ghavami, Dr. Crystal Gifford, Mr. Lonny Gilbert, Ms. Santhi C. Harvey, Dr. Loretta Lyles, Dr. Lance Revenaugh, Dr. Henry Schrader, Ewidge Sery, Dr. Alberta Thrash, Mr. Henry Tucker Degree Requirements The Department of Business Administration offers options in Entrepreneurship (ENT), Finance (FIN), Hospitality Management (HMP), International Business (INB), Management (MGT), Management Information Systems (MIS), and Marketing (MKT). The department seeks to help students develop an excellent knowledge of business in general and their specialized concentration in particular. This provides the students with the learning atmosphere to enhance their confidence necessary for success in the business world. Detailed course requirements for all business concentrations and specific requirements for each individual concentration are available in checksheets from the department office. Students are required to have all C s or better in their concentration and also maintain at least a GPA of 2.25 in the concentration. A Minor in Business is available for students majoring in other areas. The minor consists of 24 semester hours and includes the following required courses: ACC 2210, BUS 1100, 1500 or equivalent, 2200, 2343, 2353, 3331, and ECO

111 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - Entrepreneurship Option ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E, pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better and the special requirements for the Bachelor of Science. The following business requirements: ACC 2210 and 2220, BUS 1100, 2200, 2203, 2343, 2353, 2260, 2801, 2802, 2901, 2902, 3331, 3370, 4785 and 4795, ECO 2210, and Also, the following Entrepreneurship Option n requirements: ENT 3135, ENT 3355, ENT 3505, ENT 4895, and 3 hours of Entrepreneurship Electives and 11 hours of approved electives. This is a joint program with Wilberforce University, so the 3 hours of electives can come from their entrepreneurship courses. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1500 From General Education List D 3 BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 2260 Business Communication 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2802 Business Calculus II 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 BUS 2203 Professional Development 2 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 BUS 3370 International Business 3 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 2 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 ENT 3135 Entrepreneurship Management 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR BUS 4785 Operations Management 4 BUS 4795 Strategic Management 4 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 ENT 3355 Comp Entrepreneurship Enterprise 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 ENT 3505 Entrepreneurship & New Ventures 3 ENT 4895 Entrepreneurship Capstone Course 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ENT xxxx ENT Approved Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Entrepreneurship Option

112 BACHELOR OF SCIENC IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Finance Option ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 and ENG 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110 and HIS 1121 or 1122 plus 3 Humanities credit hours from List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences - 9 hours from 2 different disciplines from List B; Natural and Physical Sciences - 7 credit hours from 2 or more disciplines from List C (NOTE: one choice must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills (2-4 credit hours) from List D; HPR 1000 and 1 HPR Activity from List E, pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better and the special requirements for the Bachelor of Science. 15 hours from the following finance courses: 3332, 3333, 4431, and six hours from the following courses: FIN 2233, 3334, 3335, 3336, 3337, 3338, 4432, 4437, 4438 or 4466 and 11 hours of approved electives. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION IN FINANCE The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1500 Computer Applications for Business 3 BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 2260 Business Communication 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2802 Business Calculus II 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics JUNIOR JUNIOR BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 BUS 2203 Professional Development 3 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 BUS 3370 International Business 3 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 FIN 3332 Investments 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR BUS 4785 Operations Management 4 BUS 4795 Strategic Management 4 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 4 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 FIN 3333 Financial Institutions 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 FIN xxxx Finance Approved Elective 3 FIN 4431 Financial Management 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 FIN xxxx Finance Approved Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Finance Option

113 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - Hospitality Management Option ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All Hospitality Management majors must take the following College of Business requirements: ACC 2210, 2220, BUS 1100, 2200, 2203, 2260, 2343, 2353, 2801, 2802, 2901, 2902, 3331, 3370, 4785, 4795, ECO 2210, 2220; and Hospitality Management option requirements select 15 hours from the following courses: HMP 1100, 2211, 2220, 2222, 2250, 3310, 3311, 3330, 3331, 4401, 4402, 4411, 4412, 4418, 4426, 4436, 4439 and eleven approved electives. A grade of C or better is required in major requirements. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION OPTION IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1500 From General Education List D 3 BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1101 Intro to Writing for College 4 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 2260 Business Communication 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 BUS 2203 Professional Development 2 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 BUS 3370 International Business 3 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 2 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w./lab 4 HMP 1100 Intro to Hospitality Management 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR BUS 4785 Operations Management 4 BUS 4795 Strategic Management 4 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 HMP xxxx HMP Option Requirement 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 HMP xxxx HMP Option Requirement 3 HMP xxxx HMP Option Requirement 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 HMP xxxx HMP Option Requirement Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Hospitality Management Option

114 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - International Business Option ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All International Business majors must take the following College of Business requirements: ACC 2210, 2220, BUS 1100, 2200, 2203, 2260, 2343, 2353, 2801, 2802, 2901, 2902, 3331, 3370, 4785, 4795, ECO 2210, 2220; and International Business option requirements: ECO 3360, FIN 4437, MGT 4471, MKT 4467, PHI 2230 and eleven approved electives. A grade of C or better is required in major requirements. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION OPTION IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1500 From General Education List D 3 BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 2260 Business Communication 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 BUS 2203 Professional Development 2 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 BUS 3370 International Business 3 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 2 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 PHI 2210 From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR BUS 4785 Operations Management 4 BUS 4795 Strategic Management 4 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 ECO 3360 International Economics 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 MKT 4467 International Marketing 3 FIN 4437 International Finance 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MGT 4471 Seminar in International MGT Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration International Business Option

115 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Management Option ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All Management majors must take the following College of Business requirements: ACC 2210, 2220, BUS 1100, 2200, 2203, 2260, 2343, 2353, 2801, 2802, 2901, 2902, 3331, 3370, 4785, 4795, ECO 2210, 2220; and Management option requirements: MGT 3380, 3381, 4441, 4460; Management Electives: - choose 3 hours: MGT 4471, 4479, 4497 and eleven approved electives. A grade of C or better is required in major requirements. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION OPTION IN MANAGEMENT The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1500 From General Education List D 3 BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 2260 Business Communication 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 BUS 2203 Professional Development 3 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 BUS 3370 International Business 3 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 2 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 MGT 3380 Human Resources Management 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR BUS 4785 Operations Management 4 BUS 4795 Strategic Management 4 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 4 MGT 3381 Organizational Behavior 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 2 MGT 4441 Labor Management Relations 3 MGT 4460 Small Business Management 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MGT xxxx MGT Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Management Option

116 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - Management Information Systems Option ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All Management Information Systems majors must take the following College of Business requirements: ACC 2210, 2220, BUS 1100, 2200, 2203, 2260, 2343, 2353, 2801, 2802, 2901, 2902, 3331, 3370, 4785, 4795, ECO 2210, 2220; and Management Information Systems option requirements: MIS 3351, 3352, 4461, 4462; Management Information Systems Electives Choose 3 hours: MIS 4465, 4491, 4497 and eleven approved electives: MIS 2251, 2252, 2253, 2254 are included.. A grade of C or better is required in major requirements. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION OPTION IN MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1500 From General Education List D 3 BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 2260 Business Communication 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 BUS 2203 Professional Development 3 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 BUS 3370 International Business 3 MIS 3371 Information Management 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 2 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 MIS 3372 Bus Prog &Information Systems 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR BUS 4785 Operations Management 4 BUS 4795 Strategic Management 4 BUS xxxx Business Elective 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 MIS 4461 Information Systems Analysis 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 MIS 4462 Syst Design & Database Implement 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MIS xxxx MIS Approved Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Management Information Systems Option

117 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Marketing Option ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All Marketing majors must take the following College of Business requirements: ACC 2210, 2220, BUS 1100, 2200, 2203, 2260, 2343, 2353, 2801, 2802, 2901, 2902, 3331, 3370, 4785, 4795, ECO 2210, 2220; and Marketing option requirements: MKT 3390, 3396, 4451, 4455, Marketing Electives choose 3 three hours: MKT 4465, 4467, 4478, 4497 and eleven approved electives. A grade of C or better is required in HMP option requirements. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION OPTION IN MARKETING The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1500 From General Education List D 3 BUS 1100 Contemporary American Bus 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 BUS 2260 Business Communication 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 BUS 2203 Professional Development 2 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 BUS 3370 International Business 3 PHI 2240 From General Education List A 3 BUS xxxx Business Elective 2 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 MKT 3390 Retail Merchandising 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR BUS 4785 Operations Management 4 BUS 4795 Strategic Management 4 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 4 MKT 3396 Consumer Behavior 3 BUS xxxx Business Approved Elective 3 MKT 4451 Advertising 3 MKT 4455 Marketing Research 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MKT xxxx Marketing Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration Marketing Option

118 Programs in Accounting and Economics 124 Smith Hall (937) Faculty Professor: Dr. Peter Iwomi; Assistant Professors: Ms. Julia Blockberger, Mr. Kenyal McGee, Mr. James Traylor Degrees are earned in: Accounting Economics ACCOUNTING The accounting curriculum prepares students for successful careers in business, government, and public accounting. The courses seek to prepare the students for direct entry into the accounting environment with minimal on-the-job training, as well as prepare for graduate studies. Computer- based instruction is an integral part of the curriculum. ECONOMICS Economics offers two degrees; a bachelor of science and a bachelor of arts. The primary difference is the Bachelor of Science degree requires more technical courses while the Bachelor of Arts degree requires 10 hours of a foreign language. MINOR Minor in Economics Besides General Education and College of Business requirements, the following courses are required for a minor in Economics (21 credit hours): ECO 2210, 2220, 3320, 3330, 3340, 3360, and A grade of C or better is required. Double Majors with Business Administration Given the many overlapping requirements in the degree programs in economics and business administration, it is quite feasible for a student to major in both at the same time by focusing the choice of elective courses in these areas. That is, economics courses can be presented as electives from the business perspective and business courses from the economics perspective. 118

119 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All accounting majors must take the following College of Business requirements: BUS 1100, 2200, 2203, 2260, 2343, 2353, 2801, 2802, 2901, 2902, 3331, 3370, 4785, ECO 2210, 2220, 3320, MIS 2251, 2252; and Accounting major requirements: ACC 2210, 2220, 3301, 3302, 3330, 3340, 3360, 4420, 4430, 4450, A total of 128 semester hours is the minimum for a Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting. A grade of C or better is required in major requirement. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJOR IN ACCOUNTING The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 BUS 1500 Computer Applications for Business 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 SOC 1105 From General Education List B SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment 3 BUS 2260 Business Communication 3 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 MIS 2252 Spreadsheets for Business 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 PSC 1100 From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C JUNIOR JUNIOR ACC 3301 Intermediate Accounting I 3 ACC 3302 Intermediate Accounting II 3 ACC 3340 Cost Accounting 3 ACC 3360 Accounting Information System 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 MIS 2251 Word Processing 2 MGT 3401 Government Reg. of Business 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C SENIOR SENIOR ACC 3330 Advanced Accounting 3 ACC 4430 Auditing 3 ACC 4420 Federal Income Tax 3 ACC 4895 Seminar 3 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 BUS 4785 Production Management & Control 4 ECO 3320 Money and Banking 3 HIS 1121 Global History I (or) 3 Internship or Elective 3 HIS 1122 Global History II Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Accounting

120 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ECONOMICS ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All economics majors must take the following College of Business requirements: BUS 1100, 2200, 2203, 2260, 2343, 2353, 2801, 2802, 2901, 2902, 3331, 3370, ECO 2210, 2220, 3320, FIN 3332, MGT 4460, MIS 2251, 2252; and Economic major requirement courses: ECO 2210, 2220, 2270, 3300, 3320, 3330, 3340, 3350, 3360, 4895 and three credit hours of electives in economics and/or business from the following: BUS or ECO or ECO 4450 or ECO 4466 or MIS and a three hour elective. For BA Degree in Economics, 10 hours of foreign language will be substituted for BUS 2203, 2252, 3343 and 3353 or electives in economics. Chair and advisors have the flexibility in substituting some courses in business or economics for foreign languages or vice versa. A total of 124 credit hours is the minimum for graduation. A grade of C or better is required in major requirement. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN ECONOMICS The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 BUS 1500 Computer Applications for Business 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 SOC 1105 From General Education List B 3 PSY 1200 From General Education List B 3 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment 3 BUS 2901 Business Statistics I 3 BUS 2801 Business Calculus I 3 ECO 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 ECO 2270 Economic Problems of Blacks 3 MIS 2252 Spreadsheets for Business 2 MIS 2251 Word Processing for Business 2 PSC 1100 From General Education List B 3 JUNIOR Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR BUS 2902 Business Statistics II 3 ECO 3340 International Macroeconomics 3 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 ECO 3350 Public Finance 3 ECO 3320 Money and Banking 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ECO 3330 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ECO 3360 International Economics 3 Business or Economic Elective 3 SENIOR Economic Elective SENIOR BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 BUS 2203 Professional Development 2 ECO 3300 Consumer Economics 3 BUS 3332 Investment 3 ECO 4895 Senior Seminar 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 HIS 1121/22 Global History 3 Electives 3 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Economics

121 Department of Manufacturing Engineering Dr. Augustus Morris, Jr., PE - Chair Carl Jenkins Hall - Room 111 (937) Faculty Professors: Dr. Mahmoud A. Abdallah, Dr. Abayomi J. Ajayi-Majebi, Dr. Morris Girgis; Associate Professors: Dr. Augustus Morris, Jr., Dr. Alessandro R. Rengan; Assistant Professors: Dr. Peter Dreher, Mr. John H. Sassen GENERAL INFORMATION The Department of Manufacturing Engineering, composed of the Manufacturing Engineering Program and the Industrial Technology Program, carries on the University s historic tradition of providing relevant technical education to under-served populations with diverse backgrounds and educational needs. To uphold this rich heritage, the Department offers two baccalaureate degree programs: the B.S. degree in Manufacturing Engineering and the B.S. degree in Industrial Technology. These two programs share faculty, staff and facilities. However, though both prepare students for technical careers in industry and business, they otherwise offer separate degrees with distinct curricula. The Department draws strong guidance and support from an active Industrial Advisory Committee comprised of engineers and executives from diverse manufacturing companies and technical organizations. This industrial support provides for program enhancement and ensures program relevance in preparing students for technical careers. In addition, the Department maintains a program of related research that engages students in practical applications of classroom theory and enhances their skills for generating new knowledge. Spacious laboratories with modern laboratory equipment, computer hardware and software are available to support the teaching and research activities of the Department. To provide special opportunities for students to develop technical leadership and teaming skills, the Department promotes active student chapters of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) and the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). Both engineering and technology majors must fulfill the University General Education requirements. During the Spring semester of the senior year, Manufacturing Engineering majors are also encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination, which is the initial step in attaining professional engineering licensure. All students must pass the University s English proficiency examination prior to graduation. 121

122 Each engineering or technology major receives academic advising by a member of the Manufacturing Engineering Department faculty. Nevertheless, students are responsible for knowing and complying with all published schedules and graduation requirements. MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING PROGRAM General Information Graduates of the Manufacturing Engineering program are in great demand by prestigious firms and government agencies. TRENDS IN MANUFACTURING Manufacturing is one of the major wealth producing sectors of the world economic structure with a direct and powerful impact on the quality of life of each individual. The field of manufacturing has undergone dramatic changes during the past decade. Diverse forces driving these changes include the following factors: rapid technological advances in areas such as computers, lasers, machine vision, robotics and automation; emerging new materials including polymers, composites and ceramics; an increasing global economy with intensified international trade competition; changing national defense and security priorities; changing labor management relationships; dwindling natural resources; increasing energy costs; and, heightened environmental concerns. These factors continue to produce new demands and exciting opportunities for manufacturing engineers. Graduates of the program have found diverse employment in manufacturing fields such as automotive, aerospace, electronics, defense, food processing, and consumer product manufacturing industries. Others have earned related graduate degrees at some of the nation s finest graduate engineering schools prior to assuming industry positions. MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING PROGRAM OBJECTIVES The Manufacturing Engineering Department at Central State University is dedicated to preparing students for manufacturing engineering careers in diverse manufacturing enterprises. The MFE objectives are to: 1. Develop MFE graduates with a thorough understanding of engineering principles. 2. Provide comprehensive preparation for careers in manufacturing. 3. Introduce graduates to research methods and experience. 4. Empower individuals from underserved populations to contribute leadership and service to society. 5. Instill in graduates the University s core values of honesty, hard work, caring and excellence. The Bachelor of Science degree program in Manufacturing Engineering has been designed to address these objectives. The curriculum follows guidelines established by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), an international organization with over 40,000 members in seventy countries. SME seeks to ensure that Manufacturing Engineering programs produce engineers prepared to address industry demands for increasingly sophisticated manufacturing technology, and ready to play an important role in planning, building and optimizing the factories of the future. Emphasis is, therefore, given to computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM), microprocessor control, manufacturing planning and control, quality assurance, and the processing and utilization of engineering materials. The program provides opportunities for hands-on experience in the application of the knowledge embodied in these disciplines. The BS degree program in Manufacturing Engineering is one of only a few programs in the nation which are dedicated to undergraduate manufacturing engineering education, and which are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET). The overarching goal of the program is to produce graduates who are well prepared to: Contribute to the engineering planning and management of a relatively large, modern manufacturing operation. Introduce modern manufacturing methods and design technologies into a small manufacturing operation or assist in the start-up of a new manufacturing enterprise. Maintain a process of life-long learning to retain technical competence, including earning graduate degrees in engineering or related business management or other professional studies and obtaining relevant professional certification. The overall Manufacturing Engineering curriculum consists of strong components of mathematics, basic sciences, engineering sciences, humanities and social sciences, together with the engineering major requirements which can be grouped into the following topic areas: Materials and Manufacturing Processes the behavior and properties of materials and materials processing. Process, Assembly, and Product Engineering the design of products and the equipment, tooling and environment necessary for their manufacture. 122

123 Manufacturing Competitiveness the creation of competitive advantage through manufacturing planning, strategy and control. Topics such as productivity, quality, cost, human resources, product safety and liability, social concerns, international issues, environmental impact, and product life cycle are included in this area. Manufacturing Systems Design the analysis, synthesis and control of manufacturing operations using statistical and calculus based methods. Simulation and Information Technology Simulation, modeling, control, architecture, and information systems are included in this area. Laboratory Experience Measuring manufacturing process variables in a manufacturing laboratory and making technical inferences about the process. Throughout the curriculum major emphasis is given to the engineering design function. The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (EAC/ABET) has published the following description for engineering design: Engineering design is the process of devising a system, component, or process to meet desired needs. It is a decision making process (often iterative), in which the basic sciences and mathematics and engineering sciences are applied to convert resources optimally to meet a stated objective. Among the fundamental elements of the design process are the establishment of objectives and criteria, synthesis, analysis, construction, testing and evaluation. The engineering design component of a curriculum must include most of the following features: development of student creativity, use of open ended problems, development and use of modern design theory and methodology, formulation of design problem statements and specifications, consideration of alternative solutions, feasibility considerations, production processes, concurrent engineering design, and detailed system descriptions. Further, it is essential to include a variety of realistic constraints, such as economic factors, safety, reliability, aesthetics, ethics and social impact. In the senior year, the design experience is culminated with a sequenced three-quarter capstone design project. Students work on individual or team design projects under close faculty supervision. A broad range of resources including machine tools, materials testing and processing equipment, electronic and measuring instrumentation, computers and control devices is available to prepare students for the real-world challenges of the engineering profession. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized in the senior design project. The broad educational experience outlined above is designed to integrate the knowledge, skills, attitudes and values acquired in a diverse set of courses to produce graduates with the following specific competencies: An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering; An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data; An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs subject to constraints; An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams; An ability to identify, formulates, and solves engineering problems; An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility; An ability to think, listen and communicate effectively; An understanding of the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context; A recognition of the need for, and ability to engage in life-long learning; A knowledge of contemporary issues; An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS A total of 141 semester hours are required for the BS degree in manufacturing engineering: GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS: (42-46 hours): Thirteen (13) of these credits apply also to the manufacturing engineering (MFE) program requirements; see University General Education Requirements. MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS: The majority of the MFE courses emphasize design, the process of devising a system, component, or process to meet some desired need. The design course work provides experience in open-ended problem solving by combining decision making and creative thought with basic and engineering sciences. The design experience is incorporated across a variety of subject areas and increases in amount and complexity. MINOR Minor in Nuclear Engineering four (4) Nuclear Engineering courses (12 hours), and a NUE practicum (3 hours), while using two (2) additional courses (6 hours) to draw on current courses in the disciplines of science, mathematics, computer science, manufacturing engineering, environmental engineering, industrial technology, and business administration for a total of 21 semester hours beyond the student s requirement in the major. 123

124 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better plus CHM 1201, 1202, PHY 2211, 2212, 2213, 2214, MTH 2502, 2503, 3110; Technical & Other General Requirements: INT 1210; MFE 1110, and Manufacturing Engineering major requirements: MFE 1210, 2310, 2320, 2410, 2420, 2430, 2440, 3510, 3520, 3530, 3540, 3550, 3610, 3620, 3630, 3640, 4710, 4720, 4730, 4795, 4820, *Technical electives (3 hours) are selected with approval of the advisor from courses numbered 2000 or higher in the areas of accounting, biology, business, chemistry, computer science, finance, management, management information systems, manufacturing engineering, industrial technology, marketing, mathematics, physics, or water resources management. A grade of C or better is required in major requirements. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN CHM 1201 Chemistry I 4 CHM 1202 Chemistry II 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing & Researching the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 INT 1210 Engineering Computer Graphics 3 MFE 1210 Engineering Analysis I 3 MFE 1110 Principals of Manufacturing 3 MTH 2503 Calculus II 5 MTH 2502 Calculus I SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 PHY 2213 University Physics II 5 PHY 2212 University Physics Lab I 0 PHY 2214 University Physics Lab II 0 MTH 3110 Differential Equations 3 MFE 2410 Engineering Analysis II 4 MFE 2310 Statics 3 MFE 2420 Dynamics 3 MFE 2320 Computer-Aided-Design 3 MFE 2430 Design of Experiments 3 MFE 2440 Computer-Aided-Manufacturing 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR MFE 3510 Circuit Analysis 4 HPR 1000 Personal & Community health 2 MFE 3520 Microprocessors 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 MFE 3530 Strength of Materials 3 MFE 3610 Automatic Control Systems 3 MFE 3540 Material Science & processes 4 MFE 3620 Programmable Logic Controllers 3 MFE 3550 Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer 3 MFE 3630 Manufacturing Processes 4 MFE 3640 Machine & Tool Design SENIOR SENIOR MFE 4710 Measurements & Instrumentation 3 MFE 4810 Design for Assembly & System Int. 3 MFE 4720 Manufacturing Quality & Economy 4 MFE 4820 Manufacturing Planning, Control 4 MFE 4730 Hydraulic & Pneumatics 3 MFE 4895 Senior Design Project II 2 MFE 4795 Senior Design Project I 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Technical Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Manufacturing Engineering

125 INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM General Information Industrial technology is a field of study designed to prepare technical and/or management oriented professionals for employment in business, industry, education, and government. Industrial technology is primarily involved with the management, operation, and maintenance of complex technological systems, while engineering and engineering technology are primarily involved with the design and installation of these systems. TRENDS IN TECHNOLOGY The pervasive use of technology on a global scale has created a demand for management-oriented technical professionals with an understanding of fundamental technical principles and the practical skills required to apply those principles in the laboratory, manufacturing shop floor, and business office. These individuals must also understand the basic economic and business principles, which guide business and technology. The BS degree program in Industrial Technology has been designed to fulfill these requirements. Graduates of the program find diverse employment opportunities as production supervisors, information technology technicians. INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM OBJECTIVES The Bachelor of Science degree program in Industrial Technology addresses the need for technical professionals with specialized technical training. To achieve in-depth training in a selected discipline, students can choose from one of two concentrations: Computer Technology and Manufacturing Management. The selection of the concentration is normally based upon individual student interests, skills and career goals with input and guidance by a faculty advisor. The technology core of the curriculum builds upon a foundation of trigonometry and includes components of metals technology and machining principles, occupational safety and health, computer numericalcontrolled (CNC) machining, computer aided-design and computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM); electrical circuits, digital electronics, microprocessor and programmable logic controllers (PLC), and statistical analysis. Throughout the program, a heavy emphasis is placed upon hands-on laboratory experience and practical applications of the theory gained in the classroom lecture sessions. COOPERATIVE EDUCATION EXPERIENCES A student majoring in Industrial Technology may participate in the Cooperative Education program. All Industrial Technology majors are encouraged to take part in the Cooperative Education Program, which offers students an opportunity to integrate classroom theory with planned periods of practical real world work assignments. Each student may spend one to two semesters of his/her academic program working in an approved position. A total of 24 credit hours can be applied towards graduation and is included in the student s transcript under Earned Hours. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS A total of 130 semester hours are required for the BS degree in Industrial Technology with a concentration in Manufacturing Management or Computer Technology. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS (42-46 HOURS): see University General Education Requirements. 125

126 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY - Computer Technology Option ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All Industrial Technology Computer Technology majors must take the following major requirements: ACC 2210, 2220, BUS 1100, 2200, 2343, CPS 1191, 2215, 2236, 3316, 3320, 3325, INT 1110, 1210, 2310, 2410, 2420, 2430, 3520, 3540, 3630, 4720, 4795, 4895, MGT 4441, MKT 3456, MTH 2001, Technical Electives of (3 Cr. Hrs.) are required a grade of C or better is required in major requirement. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION IN COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1102 Writing & Researching the Essay 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing to College 4 INT 1210 Engineering Computer Graphics 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 MTH 2501 Trigonometry 3 INT 1110 Engineering Print Reading 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MFE 1110 Principals of Manufacturing 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE CPS 1191 Computer Science I 4 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 CPS 2215 Internet and Web Essentials 3 CPS 2236 Contemporary Operating Systems 2 INT 2310 Circuit Analysis 4 INT 2410 Industrial Safety & Health 3 MTH 2001 Probability and Statistics 3 INT 2420 Ind. Instrumentation & Process Ctrl 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 INT 2430 Electronic Devices & Circuits 4 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 CPS 3325 Java Programming 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 CPS 3320 Database Systems 3 CPS 3316 Computer Networks 3 INT 3520 Digital Systems 4 HIS 1110 African-American History 3 INT 3540 Programmable Logic Controllers 3 HPR 1000 Personal & Community health 2 INT 3630 Microprocessors SENIOR SENIOR HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 HIS 1121/2 Global History 3 INT 4720 Communication Systems 3 INT 4895 Senior Design Capstone II 2 INT 4795 Senior Design Capstone I 2 MGT 4441 Labor Management 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MKT 3456 Purchasing 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Industry Technology Computer Technology Option

127 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY - Manufacturing Management Option - ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122 and 3 elective credit hours from Humanities List A; Social and Behavioral Sciences List B - 9 semesters hours from 2 or more disciplines; Natural and Physical Sciences List C - 7 hours from 2 or more disciplines (one must include a lab); FYS 1101; Computer Skills List D - 2 to 4 credit hours from List D; Health List E - HPR 1000 and 1 semester credit from HPR ; pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All Industrial Technology Manufacturing Management majors must take the following major requirements: (86 Credit Hours) ACC 2240; BUS 1100, 2210, 2220, 2343, 2353, 3331; MKT 3456; INT 1110, 1210, 2310, 2320, 2410, 2420, 2460, 3510, 3530, 3540, 3550, 3610, 3620, 4710, 4730, 4795, 4895; MFE 1110; MGT 4441; MTH 2001, Technical Electives of (3 Credit Hours) are required. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY OPTION IN MANUFACTURING MANAGEMENT The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BUS 1100 Contemporary American Business 3 ENG 1102 Writing & Researching the Essay 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 INT 1210 Engineering Computer Graphics 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 MTH 2501 Trigonometry 3 INT 1110 Engineering Print Reading 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MFE 1110 Principals of Manufacturing 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE INT 2310 Circuit Analysis 4 ACC 2210 Financial Accounting 3 INT 2320 Advanced 3-D Modeling 3 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 MTH 2001 Probability and Statistics 3 HIS 1110 African-American History 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 INT 2410 Industrial Safety & Health 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 INT 2420 Ind. Instrumentation & Process Ctrl 3 Take English Proficiency Exam INT 2460 Applied Statics JUNIOR JUNIOR INT 3510 Materials & Machine Processes 3 ACC 2220 Managerial Accounting 3 INT 3530 Quality Control (SPS/DOE) 3 BUS 2343 Principles of Management 3 INT 3540 Programmable Logic Controllers 3 HPR 1000 Personal & Community health 2 INT 3550 Applied Strength of Materials 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 INT 3610 Plastic Technology 3 INT 3620 Computer Numerical Control SENIOR SENIOR INT 4710 Manufacturing processes 3 BUS 2353 Principles of Marketing 3 INT 4730 CAD/CAM/CAE 3 BUS 3331 Principles of Finance 3 INT 4795 Senior Design Capstone I 2 HIS 1121/2 Global History I or II 3 MGT 4441 Labor Management 3 INT 4895 Senior Design Capstone II 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MKT 3456 Purchasing 3 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology Manufacturing Management Option

128 Department of Water Resources Management Dr. Subramania I. Sritharan P.E., Chair C.J. McLin - Room 103 (937) Faculty - Professors: Dr. Subramania I. Sritharan, Dr. Samuel A. Okunade, Dr. Sam L. Laki, Dr. Krishakumar Nedunuri; Assistant Professors: Dr. Ramanitharan Kandiah, Dr. Xiaofang Wei, Dr. DeBonne N. Wishart The Department of Water Resources Management offers programs in Environmental Engineering (ENE), Geology (GEL), Geography (GEO) and Water Resources Management (WRM). In addition to its primary role of offering baccalaureate programs, the department also offers advanced short courses for practicing professionals in the field of water resources management and environmental engineering. The department engages in research and in outreach activities to attract high school students to pursue higher education in these fields. The programs in the department lead to Bachelor of Science degrees in Environmental Engineering, Geology Geography and Water Resources Management. They are structured to provide flexibility to students within the scope of each field to pursue different areas of emphasis. An internship is a requirement in environmental engineering and water resources management. It is also recommended for earth geology and geography. All majors in the department must fulfill the University General Education Requirements and the specific requirements of the program in which the student is enrolled. All majors are required to pass the Proficiency Examination in English and take the departmental comprehensive examination in the respective discipline. Students are responsible for knowing and adhering to published schedules for the administration of the above tests and for applying for graduation. GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR PROGRAMS IN THE DEPARTMENT The University General Education Requirements apply to the majors in the Department (please refer to the General Education Requirements in the University Course catalog). Students in WRM and ENE automatically fulfill the natural science requirements under general education by taking their major requirements. 128

129 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (ENE) PROGRAM -MISSIONS AND GOALS The overarching mission of the program is to prepare engineers who specialize in the field of environmental systems at the baccalaureate level, and who understand how to apply engineering principles to environmental problems. The program offers opportunities for students to gain additional knowledge in related areas such as policy, economics and legal aspects of environmental issues, and geo-spatial technologies as applied to environmental problems. The specific goals of the program are: 1. To impart knowledge of planning, designing, operating and optimally managing systems essential for human health and biodiversity. Such systems are designed for the abatement and control of pollution of eco systems comprising air, water and soils in residential, occupational, city and regional environments. 2. To provide education in the application of environmental engineering principles for environmental processes and systems at localized and distributed scales. 3. To provide training in the applications of principles to practical environmental problems. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM The curriculum relies on a strong foundation in sciences and mathematics by requiring students to take courses in rigorous college physics (calculus based), chemistry and mathematics to advanced levels of differential equations and linear algebra. The program also promotes holistic development of students through courses in humanities, and in social and behavioral sciences as required in the general education curriculum. Students take general engineering courses such as engineering drawing, statics, dynamics, strength of materials and other courses from the manufacturing engineering department (MFE). With this set of basic science and engineering courses, the program then provides background in applied hydraulics, wastewater treatment systems, soil and water pollution control, air quality engineering and other engineering-based courses. There is an internship requirement and students engage in a capstone project during the final year. The McLin Center, which houses the WRM Department, has excellent laboratory equipment in the areas of hydraulics, hydrology, water quality, and soils that is essential for the study of environmental engineering. The department has faculty with expertise in the areas of air quality engineering, hydraulics, environmental engineering, water quality, water policy and economics, earth science and geology. The uniqueness of the environmental engineering (ENE) program at CSU is the availability of interdisciplinary courses within the Water Resources Management (WRM), Geology (GEL), and Geography (GEO) programs. These courses cover important issues in water, such as policy, socio-economic impact, environmental regulations, remote sensing and GIS. Core Competencies for ENE Graduates The environmental engineering curriculum provides students with the following competencies upon successful completion of the program: 1. Application of mathematics, physics, chemistry, hydraulics and engineering to finding solutions for environmental problems. 2. Problem solving skills by using mathematical, logical, analytical and algorithmic constructs. 3. Effective communication with peers as well as the general public through reading, speaking and writing skills. 4. Capability to use technology tools in planning, design, operation, and management of environmental engineering systems and in the assessment of spatially distributed problems using geospatial tools such as GIS and remote sensing. 5. Ability to use appropriate laboratory and field instrumentation needed in environmental engineering work. 6. Understanding and appreciation of the need for accuracy in professional judgment, accountability, engineering ethics, and social responsibility. 7. Necessity to continuously update skills in the environmental engineering profession. The coursework, laboratory experiences, fieldwork, summer internship and a capstone design project are used to teach these competencies to hydraulic and environmental engineering students. Details are provided below as part of the degree requirements. 129

130 GEOLOGY PROGRAM The Bachelor of Science program in Geology is designed to give an understanding of the physical aspects of the earth and is intimately related to a number of other disciplines such as water resources management and biology. The course of study covers all the basic aspects of geology such as the formation of the earth, the oceanic environs, fossils and minerals. The program is ideal for students planning to seek jobs related to geology in the petroleum industry, state and federal natural resources agencies, environmental companies and agencies, and cartography. The program offers students sufficient flexibility to add to their courses in geology from other related disciplines. In addition to the university general education requirements, students must take a minimum of 36 credit hours in geology. GEOGRAPHY PROGRAM The Bachelor of Science program in Geography is designed to give an understanding of the relationship between the earth and the human environment. The impacts of climate and resources on the global distribution of human societies are covered in the curriculum. Students learn the importance of locale in human affairs in historical and in contemporary perspectives enabling themselves to see the present world in context. The program is designed to make students aware of the physical aspects of the earth, the intricate relationship of humans with the earth and of their complete dependence on earth and its environment. The program is ideal for students planning to seek careers as earth science teachers, urban planners, cartographers, meteorologists, industrial analysts and environmental specialists. The program offers sufficient flexibility to add to courses in earth science from other related disciplines. In addition to the University General Education Requirements, students must take a minimum of 61 credit hours in Geography. WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT The Bachelor of Science program in Water Resources Management educates students in interrelationship of the technical, social, political and economic aspects of the field. The objective of the program is to provide students with educational skills and background necessary for water resources management career positions in private industry, government, and nongovernmental organizations. Water resources management is intertwined with the environmental field and the curriculum offers courses that enable students to gain background in this field as well. As population expands and pressure on development increases, the need for water resources management professionals is felt at the state, national and international levels. The program responds to the critical need for water resources professionals who have an understanding of all phases of water resources management. These professionals help to identify the most effective solutions to water resources management problems, involving both technical and non-technical aspects. The curriculum emphasizes environmental subjects such as soil and water conservation, water chemistry, streams and lakes, and soil and water pollution. Many graduates of the program have progressed further by obtaining graduate degrees in specialized fields such as public works management and water resources/environmental engineering. Two options are available for those students interested in pursuing a minor in related fields. A minor in Water Resources Management is designed for students from other areas who desire knowledge in the field as it pertains to their major. In collaboration with Biology and Chemistry of the Department of Natural Sciences, Water Resources Management also offers an interdisciplinary minor in Environmental Science. This minor will be particularly helpful to students in biology, chemistry and water resources management seeking a career in environmental fields. MINORS Minor in Environmental Science Requirements for this minor include 26 credit hours of core courses BIO 1500, 3500 (7 Credit hours); CHM 2200, 2401, 2402 (12 credit hours) WRM 2200, and 3330 (7 credit hours) and from elective courses BIO 2050, 2650, 4100, 4200; CHM 4200, 4300; GEL 2205; MTH 2001; WRM 3306, 3308, 3370, and 4470 Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the prerequisites required for each course. A grade of C or better is required. Minor in Water Resources Management Coursework for the minor includes 14 credit hours of core courses WRM 2200, 3330, 3335, 4402 and a minimum of 6 credit hours of elective courses from other WRM courses. Students are expected to familiarize themselves with the prerequisites required for each course. A grade of C or better is required. 130

131 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours, and pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements: ENE 2200, 3305, 3309, 3315, 3320, 3325, 4405, 4415, 4430, 4435, 4440, 4495 (total of 33 credit hours); WRM 3308 (3 credit hours), Internship ENE/WRM 4596 (Internship - 3 credit hours); and course work from related areas with following distribution: INT 1210, 3650 ( 6 credit hours) MFE 1210, 2310, 2420, 3530, 3550 (15 credit hours); BIO 2650 (4 credit hours); CHM 1201, 1202 (8 credit hours); GEL 2205 (3 credit hours); PHY 2211/ /2214 (10 credit hours); MTH 2001, 2502, 2503, 3002, 3110 (19 credit hours) and ENE Electives from other ENE/WRM Courses (6 Credit Hours); Students must earn a grade of C or better in their ENE courses. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN CHM 1201 General Chemistry I 4 CHM 1202 General Chemistry II 4 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1110 Intro History of African in the U.S. 3 INT 1210 Engineering Computer Graphics 3 MTH 2001 Probability & Statistics I 3 MTH 2502 Calculus I 4 MTH 2503 Calculus II 5 Electives SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ENE 2200 Intro to Environ Engineering 3 INT 3650 Surveying 3 HIS 1121/2 Global History 3 MFE 1210 Engineering Analysis I 3 MFE 2310 Statics 3 MFE 2420 Dynamics 3 MTH 3110 Differential Equations 3 MTH 3002 Multivariate Calculus 4 PHY 1121/2 University Physics I w/ lab 5 PHY 2213/4 University Physics II w/ lab 5 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ENE 3305 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics 3 BIO 2650 Microbiology 4 ENE 3309 Water Chemistry 3 ENE 3315 Air Quality Engineering 3 HPR 1000 Health & Wellness 2 ENE 3320 Engineering Hydrology 3 MFE 3530 Strength of Materials 3 ENE 3325 Groundwater Hydraulics 3 MFE 3550 Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer 3 GEL 2205 Environmental Geology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B SENIOR SENIOR ENE 4415 Water Supply 3 ENE 4405 Applied Hydraulics 3 ENE 4440 Environmental Prof. Seminar 1 ENE 4430 Wastewater Treatment Systems 3 ENE xxxx Environmental Engineering Elec 3 ENE 4435 Soil and Water Pollution Control 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ENE 4495 Senior Design Project 2 WRM 3308 Water and Environmental Law 3 ENE xxxx Environmental Engineering Elect. 2 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering

132 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours, and pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements: GEL 1101, 1105, 1110, 2205, 3311, 3321, 4401, 4421, 4435, 4450 (total of 36 credit hours); requirements from related areas (40 credit hours) from the following; GEO 2202, 2204, 3313 (9 credit hours); WRM 2200, 3330, 3335, (10 credit hours); ENE (3), MTH 2001, 2501, 2502 (10 credit hours); WRM/GEL 3370, 4470 (6 credit hours); electives from related areas (20 credit hours or more). NOTE: GEL courses will not count as part of General Education Requirements. Students must earn a grade of C or better in each of the GEL courses. For obtaining a minor in Geology students would have to complete credit hours as required by the department. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN GEOLOGY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 GEL 1105 Historical Geology 4 GEL 1101 Physical Geology 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of African in the U.S. 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE BIO/CHM Biology/Chemistry Elective 4 GEL 2205 Environmental Geology 3 GEL 1110 Oceanography 3 GEO 2202 Economic Geology 3 GEO 2204 Geography of Angio America 3 MTH 2502 Calculus I 4 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 WRM 2200 Introduction to WRM 3 MTH 2501 Trigonometry 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR GEL 3311 Palentology 4 ENE 3325 Ground Water Hydraulics 3 GEL 3321 Mineralogy 4 GEL 3305 Introduction to Geophysics 3 GEL 3325 Irrigation and Drainage 3 MTH 2001 Probability & Statistics 3 GEO 3313 Weather and Climate 3 Electives 6 WRM 3370 Introduction to GIS SENIOR SENIOR GEL 4401 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation 3 GEL 4421 Petrology 3 GEL 4450 Special Problems in Geology 3 GEL 4435 Mineral Deposits 3 Electives 6 WRM 3330 Soil and Water Conservation 4 WRM 4470 Applied Remote Sensing Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Geology

133 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOGRAPHY ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours, and pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements: GEL 1101, 1110, 1103, 2203, 3313, 2202, 2204, 4414, 4411 (total of 29 credit hours); electives from Earth Science from the following; GEO 3323, 3302, 4404, 4405, 4406, 4413 (12 credit hours); WRM 3370, WRM 4470, ESC 4495 (8 cr. hr.); Electives from Related Areas (33 cr. hr. or more). NOTE: GEO courses will not count as part of General Education Requirements. Students must earn a grade of C or better in GEO course. For obtaining a minor in Geography students would have to complete credit hours as required by the department. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN GEOGRAPHY The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 GEO 1103 World Geography: Eastern Hemp. 3 GEO 1101 World Geo: Western Hemp. 4 GEO 1110 Fundamentals of Geography 4 HPR 1000 Health & Wellness 2 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HIS 1121 Global History I (or) 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 3 HIS 1122 Global History II SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE BIO/CHM Biology / Chemistry 4 GEO 2202 Economic Geography 3 GEO 2203 Geography of Latin America 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 GEO 2204 Geography of Anglo America 3 WRM 2200 Introduction to WRM 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B JUNIOR JUNIOR GEO 3313 Weather and Climate 3 GEO xxxx GEO Elective 3 GEO xxxx GEO Elective 3 GEL xxxx Geology Elective 4 WRM 3312 World Water Resources 3 GEL xxxx Geology Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 WRM 3370 Introduction to GIS 3 Electives 2 Electives SENIOR SENIOR BIO/CHM Biology/Chemistry Elective 4 GEL xxxx GEL Elective 3 GEO 4411 Urban Geography 3 GEO 4495 Senior Project in Earth Science 3 GEO 4414 The Geo of Africa & Its Problems 4 GEO xxxx GEO Elective 3 GEO xxxx ESC Elective 3 WRM 4470 Applied Remote Sensing 3 Elective Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Geography

134 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 3 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences and 3 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours, and pass the English Proficiency Examination or ENG 3000 with a C or better. All students must take the following major requirements: WRM 2200, 3302, 3308, 3310, 3311, 3330, 3335, 3340, 3370, 4402, 4470, 4495 (total of 36 credit hours), ENE 3309, WRM 4596 (Internship - 3 credit hours); electives from WRM (a minimum of 10 credit hours); and course work from related areas: BIO 1500, BIO 2050 (5 credit hours); CHM 1201, 1202 (8 credit hours); GEL 1110, 2205 (7 credit hours); MTH 2001, 2501 (6 credit hours); PHY 1181, 1182 ( 6 credit hours). Students must earn a grade of C or better in their WRM courses. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MAJOR IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BIO 1500 Environmental Science w/ lab 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of African in the U.S. 3 MTH 2001 Probability & Statistics I 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 MTH 2501 Trigonometry 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE CHM 1201 General Chemistry l 4 BIO 2050 Biology of the Environment w/ lab 2 HIS 1121/2 Global History 3 CHM 1202 General Chemistry II 4 HPR 1000 Health & Wellness 2 PHI 1182 Basic Physics II 3 PHI 1181 Basic Physics I 3 WRM 3302 Water Resources Policy 3 WRM 2200 Introduction to WRM 3 WRM 3308 Water and Environmental Law 3 Take English Proficiency Exam JUNIOR JUNIOR ENE 3309 Water Chemistry 3 GEL 2205 Environmental Geology 3 GEL 1110 Oceanography 3 WRM 3310 Streams and Lakes 3 WRM 3311 Water Resources Economics 3 WRM 3335 Irrigation and Drainage 3 WRM 3330 Soil and Water Conservation 4 WRM 4596 Internship (Summer Term) 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 WRM xxxx Elective 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B SENIOR SENIOR HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 WRM 3340 Hydrometry 2 WRM3370 Introduction to GIS 3 WRM 4470 Applied Remote Sensing 3 WRM4402 Urban Water Problems 4 WRM 4495 Senior Project in WRM 2 WRM xxxx WRM Elective 2 3 WRM xxxx WRM Elective 4 4 Electives 3 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Water Resources Management

135 COLLEGE OF EDUCATION College of Education Teaching Licensure Department of Professional Education AYA Integrated Language Arts B.S.E. 4-year plan AYA Integrated Mathematics B.S.E. 4-year plan AYA Integrated Social Studies B.S.E. 4-year plan. 142 AYA Life Science B.S.E. 4-year plan AYA Physical Science B.S.E. 4-year plan Early Childhood Education B.S.E. 4-year plan Intervention Specialist B.S.E. 4 year plan MCE Language Arts/Social Studies B.S.E. 4-year plan MCE Mathematics/Science B.S.E. 4-year plan Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation Minors Health Education B.A.E. 4-year plan Physical Education B.A.E. 4-year plan Recreation B.S.E. 4-year plan 152 Master of Education Program

136 College of Education Center for Education and Natural Sciences, Room 211A Dr. E. Jean Harper, Interim Dean (937) The College of Education is comprised of three departments: Professional Education; Health, Physical Education and Recreation; and Graduate Education. The College of Education is a professional and supportive department that encourages creative and critical thinking, student involvement and activity, and peak performance from all students. The teacher education program is accredited by the Ohio Board of Regents and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) to offer programs leading to the Bachelor of Science in Education (BSE) degree for undergraduates; initial licensure for post-baccalaureates; and the Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree for graduate students. These degree and licensure programs are designed to prepare teachers for pre k-12 school settings and careers in recreation and higher education. TEACHING LICENSURE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree and Post Baccalaureate (licensure only) The College of Education offers initial teacher licensure in the following areas and grade levels: Adolescent to Young Adult - Integrated Language Arts for grades 7-12 Adolescent to Young Adult Integrated Mathematics for grades 7-12 Adolescent to Young Adult - Integrated Social Studies for grades 7-12 Adolescent to Young Adult - Life Science for grades 7-12 Adolescent to Young Adult - Physical Science for grades 7-12 Early Childhood Education for grades PreK-3 Intervention Specialist - Mild/Moderate for grades Pre K-12 Middle Childhood - Language Arts and Social Studies for grades 4-9 Middle Childhood - Mathematics and Science for grades 4-9 Multi-Age Health Education for grades K-12 Multi-Age Music for grades K-12 Multi-Age Physical Education for grades K-12 Multi-Age Visual Arts for grades K-12 Programs in teacher education are designed to meet the state of Ohio requirements for licensure, including PRAXIS II testing requirements. Additional Degree Programs: RECREATION: Bachelor of Science Degree HIGHER EDUCATION: Master of Education Degree Department of Professional Education Dr. Hazel Latson, Interim Chair Center for Education and Natural Sciences, Room 213 (937) Professor: Dr. Lee Esprit; Associate Professors: Dr. E. Jean Harper, Dr. Hazel Latson, Dr. Rajeev Swami; Assistant Professors: Dr. David Childs, Ms. Anita Perymon, Ms. Tamra Ragland, Dr. Denise Sharp, Mr. James Stone THE VISION The vision of the College of Education is to be a community of learners committed to making the world a better place through action, collegiality, and collaboration. We work together to ensure social justice and to improve the quality of life of the students we serve. We prepare reflective practitioners to recognize the dialogic nature of theory and practice in our work. This vision is operationalized through our efforts to prepare urban educators to be outstanding teachers for ALL learners. 136

137 THE MISSION The mission of the College of Education is to prepare urban educators to be outstanding teachers for ALL learners. This mission is implemented through teaching, research, and service. Teacher educator effectiveness is the major factor in influencing student learning, therefore, effective teachers are essential. Our mission to prepare highly effective teachers emphasizes: High expectations for all students. In-depth learning of powerful concepts, emphasizing understanding, reasoning, and problem solving. Integration of inquiry with knowledge of concepts and principles, featuring appropriate, ongoing use of technology. Assessment for learning as an integral part of instruction. LEARNING OUTCOMES AND CANDIDATE PROFICIENCES In accordance with the vision and mission, candidate goals and proficiencies exemplify the institutional commitments of Central State University. The College of Education prepares urban educators to be outstanding teachers for ALL learners by assuring that the following goals and proficiencies are met. Goal 1: Candidates will achieve command of relevant content and pedagogical knowledge. Candidates will demonstrate the following Proficiencies: Command of subject matter they will teach and modes of inquiry related to that discipline. Knowledge of how students develop and learn within various social, historical and philosophical environments. Goal 2: Candidates will become competent in the knowledge and use of appropriate pedagogical practices. Candidates will demonstrate the following Proficiencies: Specific pedagogies associated with their content areas. Multiple strategies in teaching the content so that all students will learn. Understanding of learners and the ability to adjust teaching to meet the learning needs of all students. Knowledge of school, family, and community contexts with particular attention to urban settings. Connect concepts to students prior experience and apply the ideas to real world problems. Incorporation of learning style theories and technologies so their students will understand their learning styles. Understanding of the impact of student background on student learning. Creation of a safe environment that supports student development and learning. Proficiency in planning and organizing for student learning. Goal 3: Candidates will become competent in designing and using a variety of assessment strategies and instruments. Candidates will demonstrate the following Proficiencies: Command of a variety of assessment techniques appropriate to measure learning. Use of assessment results to inform instruction. Goal 4: Candidates will communicate effectively with a variety of audiences. Candidates will demonstrate the following Proficiencies: Collaborate and communicate with educators, administrators, students, parents and the community to enhance and support student learning. Model effective oral, written and non-verbal communication. Goal 5: Candidates will become competent in the knowledge and use of technology for teaching and learning. Candidates will demonstrate the following Proficiencies: Multiple teaching strategies in teaching the content so that all students will learn. Understanding of individual learners and the ability to adjust teaching, to meet the learning needs of all students. Incorporation of learning style theories and technologies so students will understand their learning styles. Goal 6: Candidates will exhibit the dispositions identified as essential to professional teaching practice. Candidates will demonstrate the following dispositions: The habits of mind associated with the content they will teach. Commitment to ongoing professional growth and development. The habits of mind associated with the teaching profession. 137

138 The core values of the university: excellence in caring, hard work, honesty and excellence. Commitment to high professional standards and behavior. Commitment to the expression and use of democratic practices in the classroom. Belief that all children will learn and that teachers must persist to help every student achieve success. Treating all students with dignity and respect; help students to demonstrate the same. IMPORTANT BENCHMARKS FOR THE BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN EDUCATION WITH LICENSURE FROM the STATE of OHIO Gate 1. (Pre-candidate): Prior to enrolling in any ECE, EDU or HPR 3000 or 4000-level course, students must meet the following requirements: Successfully complete 27 semester hours Successfully complete EDU 2300, EDU 2264 and EDU 2266 with a C or better. Have 2.5 GPA (cumulative) Pass PPST (basic skills examinations) in Reading, Mathematics and Writing with scores of 172 or higher in each Complete and submit an application for Admission to the College of Education Gate 2. (Admission to the College of Education) Maintain a 2.5 GPA (cumulative) Complete Reading Core Requirement Complete 75 % of Major/Concentration coursework Pass English Proficiency Exam and/or ENG 3000 Take PRAXIS II content examination Complete required content knowledge assessments Gate 3. (Admission to Student Teaching): Maintain a 2.5 GPA (cumulative) Successful completion of all courses except EDU 4491 and EDU 4895 Complete and submit application to student teach Complete required content knowledge assessments Submit Graduation Application Gate 4. (Student Teaching): Maintain a 2.5 GPA (cumulative) Complete student teaching and capstone seminar Take PRAXIS II, Principles of Learning and Teaching Complete Evaluation of University Supervisor Complete Evaluation of Clinical Faculty Gate 5: (Program Completion): Exit interview Complete Licensure Application Leave permanent contact data with Dean s Office Complete Employer Information Take PRAXIS II, Principles of Learning and Teaching PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION The Professional Education Department includes courses for licensure in all areas and content courses for early childhood and intervention specialist. All Professional Education courses and all content courses require a grade of C or better. Four-year plans are available for all programs and when followed will result in successful graduation in four years. RELATED INFORMATION Dual Enrollment Wilberforce University students are invited to pursue a degree in Teacher Education through dual enrollment. Wilberforce students, like all students must meet all requirements for admission to the college and for a teaching licensure at Central State University. The bachelor s degree will be awarded by Wilberforce University. Central State s College of Education will approve and process all applications for teaching license. 138

139 Transfer Students All transfer students must meet all of the requirements of the College of Education and complete the following as it applies: Central State University students, who have declared a major in an area other than Education, may transfer to the College of Education by completing and submitting the Change of Major form. Transfer students from other two and four-year institutions are welcome to the College of Education subject to university rules and regulations, including completion of the Transfer of Credit form. Transfer students who have an earned Associate s Degree are exempt from the PPST requirement for formal admission to the College of Education. Individuals with earned baccalaureate degrees who wish to pursue a teacher licensure are encouraged to consider the Post-Baccalaureate (non-degree licensure) program. Admittance to this program requires approval by the Chair of Professional Education. Student Organizations College of Education students have the opportunity to participate in several professional and honorary organizations, including: Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society Council for Exceptional Children Kappa Delta Pi Honor Society Pi Lambda Theta Professional Education Honorary Fraternity National Association for the Education of Young Children National Council of Teachers of English National Council of Teachers of Mathematics National Council for the Social Studies National Science Teachers Association Student Ohio Education Association LICENSURE PROGRAMS Adolescent to Young Adult The program in Adolescent to Young Adult education offers instruction and experiences leading to a license to teach integrated language arts, mathematics, social studies, life science or physical-sciences in grades Early Childhood Education The program in Early Childhood Education offers instruction and experiences leading to a license to teach grades PreK-3. Preparation is provided in all subject areas, with emphasis on reading, mathematics and science. Intervention Specialist Program The Intervention Specialist Program (Mild/Moderate) offers instruction and experiences leading to a license to teach individuals with mild/moderate disabilities in grades PreK-12. Middle Childhood Education The program in Middle Childhood Education offers instruction and experiences leading to a license to teach language arts and social studies OR mathematics and science in grades 4-9. Health Education, see Health, Physical Education and Recreation Department. Physical Education, see Health, Physical Education and Recreation Department. Music Education, see College of Arts and Sciences. Visual Arts Education, see College of Arts and Sciences. 139

140 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION AYA INTEGRATED LANGUAGE ARTS - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3330, 3361, 3510, 4491, 4895 and Content Requirements: COM 2204, 3310, 4447; ENG 3020, 3021, 3030, 3031, 3040, 3041, 3050, 3100, 3200, 3202, 4895; DRM *2201, *2202 and/or *2204 plus a three hour elective. NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. *Select 2 of the 3 DRM Courses. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN AYA INTEGRATED LANGUAGE ARTS The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing 4 DRM 2201 Development of Drama: Tragedy 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 ENG 1102 Writing & Researching the Essay 4 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 PSY 1200 Introduction to Psychology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE COM 2204 Introduction to Speech 3 COM 3310 Public Speaking (even years) 3 CPS 1110 Computer Literacy 3 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 EDU 2266 Exceptional Children 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 ENG 2200 Introduction to Literary Studies 3 EDU 2265 Educational Technology 3 ENG 3020 African American Lit I 3 ENG 3021 African American Lit II 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 17 Take English Prof or ENG JUNIOR COM 4447 Media Law and Ethics 3 JUNIOR EDU 2262 Educational Foundations/Field 3 DRM 2204 African American Theatre* 3* ENG 3030 American Literature I 3 ENG 3031 American Literature II 3 ENG 3100 Lit Criticism: Theory & Practice 3 ENG 3200 History of Eng Language (odd yrs.) 3 DRM 2202 Develop of Drama: Comedy ENG 4070 Forms of Genre: Drama* 3 (2 nd semester) 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ENG 3202 General Linguistics (2 nd even) 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 EDU 3361 Language Arts Methods/Field SENIOR SENIOR ENG 3040/1 British Literature I or II 3 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Areas 4 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 ENG 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 3 Take PRAXIS II Content Area 13 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education - AYA Integrated Language Arts 124 *Student make take either DRM 2204 (Spring semester odd years) or ENG 4070 (Fall semester even years) 140

141 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION AYA INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3330, 3362, 3510, 4491, 4895 and Content Requirements: CPS 1191, MTH 1750, 2002, 2501, 2502, 2503, 3000, 3001, 3002, 3110, 3520, 3610, 4030 plus a three hour elective. NOTE: Grade of C or better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN AYA INTEGRATED MATHEMATICS The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing & Research Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 MTH 2001 Probability & Stats I 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 PSY 1200 Introduction to Psychology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 16 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) 16 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE EDU 2266 Exceptional Children 3 CPS 1191 Computer Science I 3 MTH 2002 Probability & Stats II 3 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 MTH 2501 Trigonometry 3 EDU 2265 Educational Technology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MTH 2502 Calculus I 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 Take English Prof. or ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR EDU 2262 Educational Foundations/Field 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education (2 nd Sem) 3 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Areas 4 MTH 3002 Multivariate Calculus I 4 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 MTH 3110 Differential Equations (2 nd Sem) 3 MTH 2503 Calculus II 5 MTH 3620 Math Seminar (2 nd Sem) 2 MTH 3001 Linear Algebra 3 MTH 4030 History of Math (2 nd Sem) 3 MTH xxxx MTH Elective SENIOR SENIOR EDU 3362 Mathematics Methods/Field 4 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 MTH 3000 Geometry for Teachers 3 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 MTH 3520 Algebraic Structures 3 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 MTH 3610 Discrete Structures 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Take PRAXIS II Content Area 16 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education AYA Integrated Mathematics

142 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION AYA INTEGRATED SOCIAL STUDIES - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3330, 3371, 3510, 4491, 4895 and Content Requirements: HIS 1100, 1122, 3320, 3321, 4370, 4371, 4995; PSC 2202, 2205, 3304, 3310, 3325, 3343; ESC 1110 plus a three hour elective and a three hours Social Studies elective. NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN AYA INTEGRATED SOCIAL STUDIES The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing & Research Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS 2201 From General Education List B 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity (List E) 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 PSY 1200 Introduction to Psychology 3 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE CPS 1110 From General Education List D 2 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 HIS 1100 Ohio History (Fall Odd) 3 EDU 2265 Educational Technology 3 HIS 1121/2 Global History I or II 3 HIS 2202 History of the US Since 1877 (List B) 3 PSC 2202 International Politics (fall) 3 PSC 2220 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 PSC 3304 American State and Local Govt.(Fall even) 3 University Elective 3 JUNIOR Take Eng Proficiency or ENG JUNIOR EDU 2262 Educational Foundations/Field 3 EDU 3371 Social Studies Methods/Field 4 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Areas 4 HIS 3321 History Europe Since 1500 (Sp) 3 ESC 1110 Fundamentals of Geography 4 HIS 4371 Recent America 1941-Present (Sp) 3 HIS 3320 History Europe to 1500 (Fall) 3 HIS 4495 Global History Capstone Seminar 3 HIS 4370 Recent America (Fall) 3 PSC 3310 Public Policy Analysis (Spring Odd) 3 SENIOR SOC 3325 Race/Ethic Rel (Spring) or SOC 3343 Social Stratification (Fall) SENIOR ECO 2200 Introduction to Economics 3 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 PSC 2205 Introduction to Africa 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 4 University Elective 7 Take PRAXIS II Content Area 18 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education AYA Integrated Social Studies

143 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION AYA LIFE SCIENCE - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3330, 3372, 3510, 4491, 4895 and Content Requirements: BIO 1801, 1802, 2000, 2151, 2400, 2650, 2750, 2850, 3500, 4500; CHM 1201; ESC 3313; MTH 2001, 2502; PHY 1181 and plus three to five elective hours. NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN AYA LIFE SCIENCE The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN BIO 1801 Fund of Biology I w/lab 3 BIO 1802 Fund of Biology II w/lab 4 EDU 1200 Introduction to Psychology 3 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing & Research Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1121/22 Global History 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 17 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) 17 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE BIO 2750 Zoology (Fall) 2 BIO 2151 Human Anat & Phys I w/lab 3 EDU 2266 Exceptional Children 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 EDU 2265 Educational Technology 3 MTH 2201 Probability & Stats I 3 MTH 2502 Calculus I 4 Take English Profi Exam (or) ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ENG 3000 ELECTIVE From General Education List B JUNIOR JUNIOR BIO 2000 Evolution 2 BIO 2850 Plant Biology 2 BIO 2400 Molecular Genetics (Fall) 4 BIO 2650 Microbiology 4 CHM 1201 Chemistry I w/lab 4 BIO 3500 Ecology 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 GEO 3313 Weather & Climate 3 ELECTIVE from General Education List D 2 Electives SENIOR SENIOR BIO 4500 Undergrad Research in Biology 2 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Areas 3 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 EDU 3372 Science Methods/Field 4 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 Electives 3 Take PRAXIS II Content Area Take PRAXIS II PLT Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education - AYA Life Science

144 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION AYA PHYSICAL SCIENCE - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3330, 3372, 3510, 4491, 4895 and Content Requirements: CHM 1201, 1202, 2200, 2401, 4300, 4797; ESC 3313; MTH 2001, 2503; PHY 2211 & 2212, 2213 & 2214, 4421, 4431 plus a three to five hour elective. NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN AYA PHYSICAL SCIENCE The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 CHM 1201 From General Education List C 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing & Research Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1121 Global History I (or) 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS 1122 Global History II HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 16 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) 17 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE CHM 1202 Chemistry II w/lab 4 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 EDU 2266 Exceptional Children 3 EDU 2265 Educational Technology 3 MTH 2001 Probability & Stats I 3 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Areas 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MTH 2503 Calculus II 5 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 Take Eng. Proficiency or ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR CHM 2401 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHM 2200 Qualitative Analysis 4 CHM 4300 Biochemistry I 4 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 EDU 2262 Educational Foundations/Field 3 ESC 3313 Weather & Climate 3 PHY 2211/2 University Physics I w/lab 5 PHY 2213/14 University Physics II w/lab (Sp) 5 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D SENIOR SENIOR CHM 4797 Undergraduate Research 2 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 EDU 3372 Science Methods/ Fields 4 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 PHY 4421 Analytical Mechanics I 3 PHY 4431 Modern Physics ) 3 Take PRAXIS II Content 12 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education AYA Physical Science

145 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, EDU 2264, EDU 2266, EDU 2200, EDU 2300, EDU 2263, EDU 3310, EDU 3320, EDU 3315, EDU 2265, EDU 3665; ECE 2210, ECE 3220, ECE 3315, ECE 3302, ECE 3320, ECE 4420, ECE 4430, ART 1425 OR MUS 2215, HPR 3320, MTH 3000, EDU 4491, EDU NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 EDU 2265 Educational Technology 3 ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 ENG 1102 Writing & Research Essay 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 17 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) 17 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ECE 2210 Introduction to Early Childhood Edu 3 CPS 1110 Computer Literacy 3 ECE 3302 Learning Env. & Creative Play 3 ECE 3220 Child Growth & Development 3 EDU 2266 Education of Exceptional Children 3 EDU 2200 Introduction to Reading 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 University Elective 3 Take Eng. Proficiency or ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR ART 1415 Art for Early Childhood Education** 2 ECE 4430 Family & Community Relationships 3 ECE 4420 Professional Ethics 3 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 4 EDU 2262 Educational Foundations/Field 3 EDU 3315 Teaching Reading through 3 Children s Literature/Microteaching EDU 3320 Phonics/Microteaching 4 EDU 3665 Lang Arts/Soc Stud Meth/Field 4 HPR 3320 PE for Early Childhood Education** 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MUS 2215 Music for Early Childhood Education** SENIOR SENIOR ECE 3315 Curriculum & Inst in Math and Science 3 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 ECE 3320 Observe, Document & Assess Children 3 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 EDU 3310 Language & Literacy/Microteaching 4 MTH 3000 Geometry for Teachers 3 Take PRAXIS II Content 13 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education Early Childhood Education

146 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION INTERVENTION SPECIALIST - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2200, 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3310, 3320, 3330, 3665, 3775, 4491, 4895 and Content Requirements: MTH 3000; EDU 3340, 3341, 3342, 3343, 4442, 4443, 4444, NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN INTERVENTION SPECIALIST The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS1121/2 Global Civilization I or II 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 PSY 1200 Introduction to Psychology 3 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE EDU 2200 Introduction to Reading 3 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 EDU 3320 Phonics and Reading 4 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Areas 4 EDU 2265 Intro Educational Technology 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 EDU 2266 Education Exceptional Children 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 3 EDU 3310 Language and Literacy 3 Take English Proficiency Exam or ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR EDU 2262 Educational Foundations/Field 3 EDU 3665 LA/SS Methods/Field 5 EDU 3340 Special Education Law 3 EDU 4442 INS Curriculum and Assess 3 EDU 3341 Intro to Moderate/Intensive 3 EDU 4443 INS Behavior Management 3 EDU 3342 Instructional Strategies for INS 3 EDU 4444 INS Careers and Transitions 3 EDU 3343 Collaboration with Parents 3 EDU 4450 Communication Disorders, INS 3 Electives SENIOR SENIOR EDU 3775 Math/Sci Methods/Field 3 MTH 3000 Geometry for Teachers 3 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 Take PRAXIS II Content 13 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education Intervention Specialist

147 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MCE LANGUAGE ARTS/SOCIAL STUDIES - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3310, 3320, 3330, 3665, 3775, 4491, 4895; Language Art Content Requirements: COM 2200; ENG 3020, 3021, 3030, 3031, 3050, 3200, 3202, 4895 and Social Studies Content Requirements: ECO 2210; HIS 1100, 2202, 4371; PSC 2202, NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN MCE LANGUAGE ARTS/SOCIAL STUDIES The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 ENG 1102 Writing and Research the Essay 4 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 HIS1121/2 Global Civilization I or II 3 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 PSC 2202 International Politics 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 PSY 1200 Introduction to Psychology 4 16 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) 17 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE EDU 2200 Intro to Literary Studies 3 EDU 2265 Intro to Educational Technology 3 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 EDU 2266 Education Exceptional Children 3 EDU 3320 Phonics and Reading 4 EDU 3310 Language and Literacy 4 HIS 2201 History of US to ENG 3200 History of the English Language 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 HIS 1100 Ohio History 3 PSC 2202 Intro to Literary Studies 3 HIS 2202 History of U.S. Since 1877 (sp) 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C w/lab 3 Take English Proficiency Exam or ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR COM 2200 Intro to Mass Communication 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 DRM 2204 African American Theatre(odd, spring) or 3 EDU 3361 Integrated Lang Arts Meth (Field) 4 ENG 4070 Forms & Genres: Drama (even, fall) EDU 3371 Social Studies Methods (Field) 4 EDU 2262 Educational Foundations/Field 3 ENG 3020/31 African American Lit I or II 3 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Areas 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 ENG 4080 Shakespeare and His Influence 3 HIS 4371 Recent America Present 3 PSC 1100 American National Government SENIOR SENIOR ECO 2210 Principles of Microeconomics 3 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 ENG 3202 Gen. Linguistics/Amer. Grammar 3 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar in Education 3 ENG 4895 Senior Capstone Seminar in Eng. 3 SOC 1125 Social Problems 3 Take PRAXIS II Content 17 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education MCE Language Arts/Social Studies

148 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MCE MATHEMATICS/SCIENCE - all general education requirements and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: BIO 1100, BIO 1300, BIO 1500, CHM 1110, PHY 1181, PHY 1182, PHY 1183, GEL 1101 OR 1105; MTH 1750, MTH 2001, MTH 2002, MTH 2502, MTH 3000, MTH 3610, MTH NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN MCE MATHEMATICS/SCIENCE The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College 4 BIO 1100 Education List C 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar I 1 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 HIS 1110 Intro History of Africans in the U.S. 3 ENG 1102 Writing & Researching the Essay 4 HPR 1000 Health and Wellness 2 HIS1121/22 Global History I or II 3 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ELECTIVE Education List B 3 PSY 1200 Introduction to Psychology 3 16 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) 16 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE BIO 1300 Genetics and Diversity w/lab 3 BIO 1500 From General Education List C 3 CHM 1110 From General Education List C 3 EDU 2265 Educational Technology 3 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 EDU 3310 Language and Literacy 3 EDU 2266 Edu of Exceptional Children 3 GEL 1101 Physical (or) 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 GEL 1104 History Geology ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 Take English Proficiency Exam or MTH 2001 Probability & Statistics I 3 ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR EDU 2262 Educational Foundations/Field 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Areas 4 EDU 3320 Phonics and Reading 3 MTH 2002 Probability & Statistics II 3 MTH 2502 Calculus I 4 MTH 3000 Geometry for Teachers 3 MTH 3610 Discrete Structures 3 PHY 1181 Basic Physics I 3 PHY 1182 Basic Physics II SENIOR SENIOR EDU 3775 Math/Science Methods/Field 5 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 MTH 4030 History of Math 5 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 PHY 1183 Introductory Astronomy 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 Take PRAXIS II Content 15 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education MCE Mathematics/Science

149 Department of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (HPER) Dr. Daniel Shook, Chair Walker Gymnasium - Room 161 (937) Faculty - Professor: Dr. Kim A. Hitchcock; Assistant Professors: Dr. Joshua Searcy, Ms. Rosie A. Turner, Ms. Margaret White-Fitzpatrick The goals of the Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation are to provide: 1. The professional preparation of students for careers in health and physical education. 2. The professional preparation of students for careers in recreation. 3. A basic instruction program in health, lifetime sports, and activities that enables students to develop knowledge and skills leading to life-long wellness. The Health Education major consists of health, life and behavioral science courses, and department and professional education requirements. The Physical Education major consists of courses in life and behavioral sciences, sports skills, and department and professional education requirements. Professional preparation courses are supplemented by practical and laboratory experiences in fitness, basic instruction program activities, exercise physiology, and adapted physical education. An optional coaching module provides students an opportunity for an alternative career. Students completing requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Health or Physical Education degree qualify for multi-age K-12 licensure. The recreation major consists of professional and departmental-selected courses. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Students seeking licensure must apply for admission to teacher education. This procedure is described under the College of Education policy. The Praxis I is required for admission to Teacher Education, and passing Praxis II is required for Student Teaching. Students seeking licensure in health or physical education must satisfactorily complete the professional education core requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3330, 4491, and Licensure requires a minimum of 42 semester hours as listed on the major discipline checksheets in addition to the General Education requirements. General Education and major requirements may change because of state required mandates. MINOR REQUIREMENTS Health Education. A minimum of 20 semester hours including HPR 1130, 2230, 3310, 4410, 4430, and three additional health education courses, prerequisite not included. Physical Education. A minimum of 20 semester hours including HPR 1130, 1132, 2230, 3310, 3320, 3330, 3350, 4450 and all professional education requirements. Prerequisites not included must also be satisfied. HPR 2243 and 3343 are recommended. Recreation. A minimum of 20 semester hours including HPR 1130, 2222, 3322, 3361, 4470, Prerequisites must be satisfied. HPR 2243 and 3343 are recommended. 149

150 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION HEALTH EDUCATION - ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 9 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences ( 2 or more disciplines)and 7 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3510, 3320, 3330, 3665, 3775, 4491, HPR 4480; Content Requirements: HPR 1130, 1202, 2230, 2255, 3301, 3310, 3312, 3340, 3348, 3355, 4410, 4430, NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus be admitted to Teacher Education before taking 3000 and 4000 level core courses and pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. NOTE: HPR 3307, 4401, 4402, and 4408 are recommended as electives. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHLOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN HEALTH EDUCATION The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE# TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College* 4 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar 1 HPR 1130 Intro to HPER 2 HIS 1110 Intro History of African in the U.S. 3 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 HPR 1000 Health & Wellness 2 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 ENG 1102 Writing & Research Essay 4 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 Elective 2 15 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) 15 SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE 2 EDU 2262 Education Foundation 3 CHM 1050 Chemical Concepts** 3 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 EDU 2263 Classroom Management 3 HIS 1121/2 Global History I or II 3 EDU 2266 Education of Exceptional Children 3 HPR 2230 First Aid & Terminology 3 HPR 1202 Nutrition/Health & Weight Control 2 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 HPR 2255 Clinical Teaching I 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 Take English Prof or ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR BIO 2151 Human Anatomy & Physiology I** 3 BIO 2152 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 EDU 2265 Education Technology 3 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Area 3 EDU 3510 Praxis II (Elective) 3 ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 3 HPR 3310 School Health Program 2 HPR 3301 Mental, Substance, Stress Ed 4 HPR 3340 Physiology of Exercise 3 HPR 3355 Clinical Teaching II 1 HPR 3348 Family Life & Disease Education SENIOR SENIOR HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 HPR 4410 Org/Admin of Schl & Comm Hlth 3 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 HPR 4430 Foundation of Health 2 HPR 4455 Clinical Teaching III 1 HPR 4480 Method & Mater of Teaching Hlth 4 Electives 6 Take PRAXIS II Content Area 17 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education Health Education 124 *Student should select ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 based upon placement score **Natural/Physical Science General Education course 150

151 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION PHYSICAL EDUCATION ENG 1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 9 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences ( 2 or more disciplines)and 7 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours and the following major requirements and professional education requirements: EDU 2262, 2263, 2264, 2265, 2266, 2300, 3510, 3320, 3330, 3665, 3775, 4491, HPR 3325; Content Requirements: HPR 1108, 1110,1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, 2230, 2255, 3310, 3320, 3326, 3330, 3340,3350, 3355, 4432, 4450, 4455, NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus be admitted to Teacher Education before taking 3000 and 4000 level core courses and pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. NOTE: HPR 2243, 3312, 3343, and 4471 are recommended as electives. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College* 4 ENG 1102 Writing & Research Essay 4 HIS 1121/22 Global History I or II 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar 1 HPR 1108 Introduction to Swimming 1 HIS 1110 Intro History of African in the U.S. 3 HPR 1130 Intro to HPER 2 HPR 1000 Health & Wellness 2 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HPR 1110 Intermediate Swimming 1 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 HPR 1131 Skills I (Gymnastic & Dance) 2 HPR 2230 First Aid & Terminology 3 Take PPST (PRAXIS I) SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 EDU 2262 Education Foundation 3 HPR 1132 Skills II (Volleyball & Soccer) 2 HPR 1133 Skills III (Track & Field) 2 HPR 3310 School Health Program 2 HPR 2255 Clinical Teaching I 1 HPR 3326 Motor Development 3 HPR 3317 Sports Officiating ** 2 HPR 3350 History & Principles of PE 2 HPR 3320 PE for Elementary School 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 Take English Prof or ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR BIO 2151 Human Anatomy & Physiology I *** 3 BIO 2152 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 3 EDU 2264 Multicultural Education 3 EDU 2266 Education of Exceptional Children 3 EDU 2300 Educational Psychology 3 EDU 3330 Reading in the Content Area 3 EDU 3510 Praxis II (Elective) 3 HPR 3340 Physiology of Exercise 3 HPR 3330 Kinesiology 3 HPR 4432 Tests & Measurement of PE 2 HPR 3355 Clinical Teaching II 1 HPR 4460 Org. & Admin./ PE & Athletics SENIOR SENIOR EDU 2263 Classroom Management 4 EDU 4491 Student Teaching 9 EDU 2265 Education Technology 3 EDU 4895 Capstone Seminar 3 HPR 3318 Principles of Coaching** 2 HPR 3325 Materials & Methods of PE 4 HPR 4450 Adapted PE 3 HPR 4455 Clinical Teaching III 1 Take PRAXIS II Content Area 17 Take PRAXIS II PLT 12 Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education Physical Education 126 *Student should select ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 based upon placement score **HPR Elective ***Natural/Physical General Education course 151

152 BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION - RECREATION - ENG1100 or 1101, 1102; MTH 1750; HIS 1110, 1121 or 1122; FYS 1101; HPR 1000, 1 semester credit from HPR , 9 semesters hours from Social and Behavioral Sciences ( 2 or more disciplines)and 7 credit hours from Natural and Physical Sciences (must include a lab), and 3 Humanities Elective credit hours and the following major requirements: HPR 1110, 1130, 1131, 1132, 1133, 2220, 2230, 2243, 2255, 3312, 3320, 3322, 3355, 3361, 4455, 4470, 4471, 4472, 4486, 4490 or 4491; ART 2400, BUS 2200, MUS 2215, PSC 1120, SOC NOTE: Grade of C or Better in all EDU course and overall grade point average of a 2.5 plus be admitted to Teacher Education before taking 3000 and 4000 level core courses and pass PRAXIS II Content Exam prior to Student Teaching. NOTE: HPR 3317, 3318, and 3343 are recommended as electives. SUGGESTED CURRICULUM FOR THE DEGREE, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION MAJOR IN RECREATION The curriculum below is to be used in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must be familiar with the University requirements, the General Education Requirements and any Special Requirements for the above degree. FALL SEMESTER SPRING SEMESTER COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS COURSE # TITLE CREDIT HRS FRESHMAN FRESHMAN ENG 1101 Introduction to Writing for College* 4 ENG 1102 Writing & Research Essay 4 HIS 1121/2 Global History I or II 3 FYS 1101 First Year Seminar 1 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 HIS 1110 Intro History of African in the U.S. 3 HPR 1110 Intermediate Swimming 1 HPR 1xxx HPR Activity 1 HPR 1130 Intro to HPER 2 HPR 1000 Health & Wellness 2 MTH 1750 College Algebra 3 HPR 1131 Skills I (Gymnastic & Dance) 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List B SOPHOMORE SOPHOMORE ENG 3000 Advanced Composition 2 ART 2400 Beginning Ceramics 3 HPR 1132 Skills II (Volleyball & Soccer) 2 BUS 2200 Legal Environment of Business 3 HPR 2222 History & Principles of Recreation 2 HPR 1133 Skills III (Track & Field) 2 HPR 2255 Clinical Teaching I 1 HPR 2230 First Aid & Terminology 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List A 3 HPR 2243 Lifeguard Training 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 HPR 3317 Sports Officiating 2 ELECTIVE From General Education List C 4 MUS 2215 Music Methods/Materials 2 Take English Prof or ENG JUNIOR JUNIOR HPR 3312 Sports Psychology 2 HPR 3320 PE for Elementary School 3 HPR 3322 Rec Leadership Programming 3 HPR 4471 Outdoor Education 3 HPR 3355 Clinical Teaching II 1 SOC 2230 Intro to Gerontology 3 PSC 1120 Intro to Public Admin 3 ELECTIVE From General Educ List C /w lab 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List B 3 ELECTIVE From General Education List D 3 Electives 6 ELECTIVE From HPR SENIOR SENIOR HPR 4470 Org & Adm of Recreation 3 HPR 4490 Field Experience in Recreation 10 HPR 4472 Legal & Finance Aspects 2 HPR 4486 Senior Problems Rec/Sports 3 HPR 3361 Intro to Therapeutic Recreation 2 Electives Minimum hours needed to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Education - Recreation 124 *Student should select ENG 1100 or ENG 1101 based upon placement score 152

153 Students showing Marauder Pride during the Annual College of Education Honors Banquet Master of Education Program Dr. E. Jean Harper, Interim Dean Dr. Hazel Latson, Interim Chair, Graduate Program Ms. Jill Woods, Administrative Coordinator Center for Education and Natural Sciences (937) ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE The Graduate Program is one of three departments in the College of Education, and provides courses of instruction and experiences leading to the Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree. MASTER S DEGREE IN EDUCATION Program Purpose The Master of Education Degree prepares candidates for a variety of leadership positions in colleges and universities. Graduate programs in education provide a solid grounding in both professional education studies and in a number of leadership specializations. Graduate students are expected to demonstrate appropriate levels of competency, capacity and commitment to the acquisition of the professional knowledge, skills and dispositions necessary for leadership. Program Objective: 1. Candidates for the M.Ed. will demonstrate the professional knowledge and skills required to provide leadership and support for effective organizations. 2. Candidates for the M.Ed. will demonstrate professional competence and disposition in the generation and use of applied research and evaluation skills necessary for the facilitation and support of effective organizations. Program Options Currently there are three graduate programs available to candidates who wish to become administrative specialists in higher education organizations: Personnel Services, Student Services, and Research. Program Admission Requirements Prospective students must: 1. Complete an application. This can be obtained from the College of Education, Professional Education, College of Education and Natural Sciences Building. 2. Have a 2.5 GPA from an accredited 4-year institution. 3. Have transcripts sent to the Chair, Professional Education and Graduate Program from all previously attended colleges and universities. 153

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