Burkburnett High School Academic Planning Guide and Catalog of Courses For 2019 & 2020 Graduates

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1 Burkburnett High School Academic Planning Guide and Catalog of Courses For 2019 & 2020 Graduates

2 CONTRACTUAL DISCLAIMER The provisions and information set forth in this planning guide are intended to be informational and not contractual in nature. Thus, this planning guide is not intended, and shall not be construed, to constitute a contract between the Burkburnett Independent School District (District) and any student, prospective student, agency of the local, state, or federal government, or any other person or legal entity of any and every nature whatsoever. The District hereby reserves and retains the right to amend, alter, change, delete, or modify any of the provisions of this handbook at any time, from time to time, without notice, in any manner that the Administration or the Board of Trustees of the District deems to be in the best interest of the District. The contents of this planning guide apply to all students and programs in the District and do not amend, abridge, or replace Board Policies or Administrative Regulations established by the District. As necessary, principals may include supplementary regulations and directives pertinent to their individual campuses. i

3 Guidance Center Information HIGH SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION Brad Owen Principal Michael Baughman Sheri Booker Assistant Principals Gloria Bond-Stanford Shannon Johnston Melissa Hardman Counselors Tammy Gerstner Kristyn Cagle Diagnosticians Rhonda Simmons Attendance Clerk Debbie Smith Registrar Danny Nix Athletic Director The Burkburnett Independent School District does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or handicap in providing education services. Mr. Robert Underwood, Assistant Superintendent, has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements of Title IX. Mr. Robert Underwood, Title 1 Coordinator, has been designated to coordinate compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. This Guidance Handbook is designed to assist students and parents in planning course selections for the school year. A wide variety of courses is offered for high school students in the Burkburnett Independent School District (BISD). Each course is described along with the specific prerequisites to help in selecting appropriate courses. Elective courses may vary from year to year depending on student interest and enrollment. Course selections and planning for the high school years result in educational decisions which involve the student, counselor, teachers, and parents. It is important these decisions be made considering personal objectives, educational goals, and plans following graduation from high school. Certified counselors are available to oversee the needs of the students. The case load is divided alphabetically by the last name of the student. Counselors assist students with personal, educational, and vocational needs and goals. Each student will be given the opportunity to receive testing which determines aptitudes and abilities. Counselors will assist students in using test results to plan high school programs to meet their future vocational goals. The following services are provided by the counselors: Assist with the selection of appropriate courses for graduation requirements and future goals; Assist in selection of vocational training school or college and in preparing applications for admission; Assist with securing financial aid/scholarships for further education; Assist with exploring options for the non college bound and the at risk students; Assist with scheduling problems; Schedule conferences with parents to discuss student s needs, test scores, and/or vocational plans; Assist in establishment of personal, social and behavioral values; Provide opportunity for students to be enrolled in group counseling with high school counselors; Be available for individual counseling as needed by students; Coordinate visits with military, college and technical school recruiter; Assist in screening/referral of special need students (i.e. dyslexia, gifted/talented, special education, 504, etc.) Guidance and Testing calendar will be distributed at the beginning of each school year. BISD Website Click on High School and then Counseling Center for current information. 2

4 Table of Contents Contractual Disclaimer... i Graduation Requirements Graduation Requirements... 5 Advanced Placement Courses... 9 Dual Credit or Concurrent Enrollment... 9 Class Ranking Calculation and Grade Point Averages Alternate Methods to Earn Credit Summer School Correspondence Courses Tech Prep Articulated Courses Credit Recovery (Regular Education) Credit Recovery (Special Education) Credit by Examination (With Prior Instruction) Credit by Examination (Without Prior Instruction) Gateway Distance Learning Scheduling and Enrolling Schedule Load Enrollment Extracurricular Activities Tutorial Sessions Incomplete Grades Dropping a Course Academic Honors Awards Valedictory and Salutatory Honors Honor Roll Honor Students Top Ten Percent College Information College or Technical School Information Financial Aid ACT/SAT College Entrance Exams Scholarship Information College Readiness Exams Concurrent Enrollment through MSU or VC College Credits Earned from VC through BHS Courses Student Placement Criteria Sequencing of Courses Sequencing of English Courses Sequencing of Mathematics Courses Sequencing of Science Courses Sequencing of Social Studies Courses Clubs and Organizations Student Council Cheerleaders Mascot Class Officers and Other Elected Officers Drill Team Choir Marching and Concert Band AFJROTC - Co-curricular Activities Honor Societies National Honor Society Quill and Scroll International Thespian Society...20 General Organizations Annual Staff Career and Technology Education (CTE) Youth Organizations Crime Stoppers Drama Club Fund Raising Sample 4 Year Graduation Worksheet Course Description Information Language Arts Journalism Speech ALPS (GT) Mathematics Science Social Studies Health and Physical Education Fine Arts Air Force Junior ROTC Technology Applications Language Other than English Driver Education Peer Assistant Leadership Endorsements Endorsement FAQ Agriculture, Foods, & Natural Resource Cluster Architecture & Construction Arts, A/V Technology, & Communication Cluster Business Management & Administration Health Science Cluster Hospitality Cluster Human Services Cluster Manufacturing Cluster Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics Transportation, Distribution, & Logistics Cluster Special Education Academics NCAA Freshman-Eligibility Standards High School Maps... 68

5 House Bill (HB) 5, Regular Session, 2013 of the 83rd Texas Legislature, 2013, requires that a student entering Grade 9 in the school year and thereafter shall enroll in the courses necessary to complete the curriculum requirements for the foundation high school program specified in Texas Administrative Code TAC (relating to High School graduation) and the curriculum requirements for at least one endorsement specified in TAC (relating to Endorsements) unless the student, the student s parent or other persons standing in parental relation to the student, and a school counselor or school administrator agree that the student should be permitted to take courses under the Foundation High School Program specified in TAC of this title (relating to Foundation High School Program The chart below presents in brief summary form requirements for the Foundation and Endorsement programs. Complete descriptions are located on the pages that follow. With the STAAR program, students will be required to meet the Level II passing standard on five STAAR EOC assessments (English I, II, Algebra I, Biology, and U.S. History) in order to graduate. Foundation Plan +Endorsements Discipline Credits Credits English 4 Math 3 1 Science 3 1 Social Studies 4 Language other than English 2 Fine Arts 1 Physical Education 1 Health.5 Communication Applications.5 (Speech) Electives 3 2 Total Credits for Graduation: * BISD Requirements - 1/2 credit in Health, 1/2 Communication Application (Speech) and 4years of Social Studies.. Distinguished Level of Achievement: A student may earn a distinguished level of achievement by successfully completing: A total of four credits in mathematics, which must include Algebra II A total fo four credits in science The remaining curriculum requirements The curriculum requirements for at least one Endorsement A student must earn distinguished level of achievement to be eligible for top 10% automatic admission Performance Acknowledgement: A student may earn a performance acknowledgement for outstanding performance: In a dual credit course In bilingualism and bi-literacy On an AP test On the PSAT, the ACT-Plan, the SAT, or the ACT For earning a nationally or internationally recognized business or industry certification or license 4

6 Discipline Foundation High School Program Distinguished Level of Achievement * (Requires completion of at least one endorsement) English Language Arts Mathematics Science Graduation Credit Requirements Four credits: Four credits: English I, II, III, English I, II, III, and IV One Advanced English Course English I and II for Speakers of Other Languages may be English I and II for Speakers of Other Languages may by substituted for English I and limited English proficiency who are at the beginning or substituted for English I and II only for students with II only for students with limited English proficiency who are at the beginning or intermedi- intermediate levels of English language proficiency. ate levels of English language proficiency. Three credits: Four credits: Algebra I Algebra I Geometry Geometry Advanced Mathematics Course: Algebra II Algebra II The fourth credit may be selected from any of the following after successful completion of Algebra I, Algebra II, Mathematical Models with Applications * AQR and Geometry: Pre-calculus AQR AP Statistics Pre-calculus AP Calculus AB AP Statistics Robotics Programming and Design AP Calculus AB AP Computer Science * This course must be successfully completed prior to Algebra II Three credits: Four credits: Biology or AP Biology Biology or AP Biology IPC or Advanced Science Courses Chemistry or AP Chemistry Chemistry Physics or AP Physics AP Chemistry After successful completion of a biology course, a chemistry course, and a physics course, the fourth credit may be Physics AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based selected from any of the following: Advanced Science Courses Earth and Space Science Chemistry AP Biology Physics AP Chemistry Earth and Space Science AP Physics 1: Algebra AP Biology Anatomy and Physiology AP Chemistry AP Physics 1: Algebra-based Advanced Animal Science Anatomy and Physiology Social Studies Three credits: U.S. History U.S. Government (one-half credit) Economics (one-half credit) World Geography or World History or Combined World History/World Geography (course not developed yet) Three and one-half credits: World History Studies (one credit) World Geography Studies (one credit) U.S. History Studies Since reconstruction (one credit) U.S. Government (one-half credit) Languages Other Than English Two credits: The credits must consist of any two levels in the same language or Computer Science I, II language: Three credits: the credits must consist of any three levels in the same language. 5

7 Discipline Foundation High School Program Distinguished Level of Achievement Physical Education Speech Fine Arts Elective Courses One Credit: The required credit may be from any combination of the following one-half to one credit courses: Foundations of Personal Fitness Aerobics Team and Individual Sports In accordance with local district policy, credit for any of the courses listed above may be earned through participation in the following activities: Athletics JROTC Appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus In accordance with local district policy, up to one credit for any one of the courses listed above may be earned through participation in any of the following activities: Drill Team Marching Band Cheerleading All allowed substitution activities must include at least 100 minutes per five-day school week of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Credit may not be earned for any TEKSbased course more than once. No more than four substitution credits may be earned through any combination of substitutions. One-half credit: Communication Applications One credit from any of the following: Art Level I, II, III, or IV Dance Level I, II, III, or IV Music Level I, II, III, or IV Theatre Level I, II, III, or IV Five credits The list of courses approved by the SBOE for Grades 9-12 (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills) State-approved innovative courses JROTC (one to four credits) Driver Education (one-half credit) * BISD Requires one-half credit of Health which will be included in Elective requirements. One credit: The required credit may be from any combination of the following one-half to one credit courses: Foundations of Personal Fitness Aerobics Team and Individual Sports In accordance with local district policy, credit for any of the courses listed above may be earned through participation in the following activities: Athletics JROTC Appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus In accordance with local district policy, up to one credit for any one of the courses listed above may be earned through participation in any of the following activities: Drill Team Marching Band Cheerleading All allowed substitution activities must include at least 100 minutes per five-day school week of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Credit may not be earned for any TEKS-based course more than once. No more than four substitution credits may be earned through any combination of substitutions. One-half credit: Communication Applications One credit from any of the following: Art Level I, II, III, or IV Dance Level I, II, III, or IV Music Level I, II, III, or IV Theatre Level I, II, III, or IV Five credits: The list of courses approved by the SBOE for Grades 9-12 (relating to Essential Knowledge and Skills) State-approved innovative courses JROTC (one to four credits) Driver Education (one-half credit) * BISD Requires one-half credit of Health which will be included in Elective requirements. Total Credits 22 EOC Requirements must be met for completion of Recommended and Distinguished Programs. College Board advanced placement and college-level concurrent/dual enrollment courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas. * Distinguished Achievement Program requirements also include student achievement of four advanced measures 6

8 Discipline Endorsement Total Credits with Endorsements Foundation High School Program * with endorsements Curriculum requirements for the endorsement: Four credits in mathematics See Advanced Courses under Mathematics requirement Four credits in science See Advanced Courses under Science requirement Two additional elective credits See list under elective requirement Endorsements: STEM (Science, Technology, Education, & Mathematics) Coherent sequence of courses for 4 or more credits in CTE 2 in the same cluster with one advanced. Final course must be selected for the STEM career cluster. Coherent sequence of 4 credits in Computer science 5 credits in mathematics by completing Geometry, Algebra II and 2 courses which Algebra II is a prerequisite 5 credits in science by completing Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and two additional science courses. In addition to Algebra II, chemistry, and physics, a coherent sequence of three additional credits from no more than two areas above. Business & Industry Coherent sequence course for 4 or more credits in CTE - 2 courses in the same cluster with one advanced CTE course. The final course in sequence must be from the CTE career cluster. 4 English elective credits by selecting three levels in advanced journalism: yearbook. 4 technology applications (See counselor for list) Coherent sequence of four credits from the areas above Public Services Coherent sequence of courses for 4 or more credits in CTE 2 in the same cluster with one advanced. Final course must be selected from one CTE career cluster. 4 courses in Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) Arts & Humanities 5 social studies courses 4 levels of the same language in a LOTE 2 levels of the some language in a LOTE & 2 levels in a different LOTE 4 levels of ASL Coherent sequence in 4 credits from 1 or 2 categories or disciplines in fine arts 4 English elective credits (see counselor for list) Multidisciplinary Studies 4 advanced courses that prepare a student to enter the workforce or postsecondary education without remediation from within one endorsement area or among endorsement areas that are no in a coherent sequence. 4 credits in each of the four foundation subject areas to include English IV and chemistry and/or physics 4 credits in AP or dual credit selected from English, mathematics, science, social studies, economics, LOTE, or fine arts Distinguished level of Achievement Curriculum requirements for the endorsement: Four credits in mathematics See Advanced Courses under Mathematics requirement Four credits in science See Advanced Courses under Science requirement Two additional elective credits See list under elective requirement Endorsements: STEM (Science, Technology, Education, & Mathematics) Coherent sequence of courses for 4 or more credits in CTE 2 in the same cluster with one advanced. Final course must be selected for the STEM career cluster. Coherent sequence of 4 credits in Computer science 5 credits in mathematics by completing Geometry, Algebra II and 2 courses which Algebra II is a prerequisite 5 credits in science by completing Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and two additional science courses. In addition to Algebra II, chemistry, and physics, a coherent sequence of three additional credits form no more than two areas above. Business & Industry Coherent sequence course for 4 or more credits in CTE - 2 courses in the same cluster with one advanced CTE course. The final course in sequence must be from the CTE career cluster. 4 English elective credits by selection three selecting three levels in advanced journalism: yearbook. 4 technology applications (See counselor for list) Coherent sequence of four credits from the areas above Public Services Coherent sequence of courses for 4 or more credits in CTE 2 in the same cluster with one advanced. Final course must be selected from one CTE career cluster. 4 courses in Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) Arts & Humanities 5 social studies courses 4 levels of the same language in a LOTE 2 levels of the some language in a LOTE & w levels in a different LOTE Coherent sequence in 4 credits from 1 or 2 categories or disciplines in fine arts 4 English elective credits (see counselor for list) Multidisciplinary Studies 4 advanced courses that prepare a student to enter the workforce or postsecondary education without remediation from within one endorsement area or among endorsement areas that are no in a coherent sequence. 4 credits in each of the four foundation subject areas to include English IV and chemistry and/or physics 4 credits in AP or dual credit selectee from English, mathematics, science, social studies, economics, LOTE, or fine arts. Total of 4 credits in mathematics, which must include Algebra Total of 4 credits in science The remaining curriculum requirements Remaining curriculum requirements The curriculum requirements for a least one endorsement Must have three credits in the same LOTE A student must earn distinguished level of achievement to be eligible for top 10% automatic admission

9 Early High School Graduation In order to be eligible for graduation in three years, a student shall have completed all coursework and exit-level testing required of other District students for the same graduation program. [See policies at EIF] The student must also have on file in the counselor s office a completed early graduate declaration form signed by the student, the parent or guardian, the counselor, and the principal. Early graduates who have met the District s requirements shall be eligible for all graduation honors. Except for students in the top ten percent who qualify for automatic admission to a state four-year university, three-year graduates shall be allowed to tie in rank with a four-year graduate, but shall not be allowed to displace a four-year graduate. They shall be eligible to participate in commencement ceremonies. Summer Graduates Students who graduate during the summer shall be ranked with the class which graduated the previous spring. Summer graduates shall not be eligible to participate in spring commencement ceremonies and shall not be considered for local scholarships awarded during the spring. Mid-Year Graduates Students who graduate at the end of the fall semester shall be ranked with the class graduating in the following spring. Class rank for midyear graduates shall be based on grade point averages at the end of the fall semester. Midyear graduates shall be eligible to participate in spring commencement ceremonies and shall be considered for local scholarships awarded during the spring, providing the student has completed a local scholarship application form. Texas Grant Program The Texas Grant Program provides funding for well prepared, eligible students with a financial need who complete the Recommended or Distinguished Achievement Program and who graduate from a public or an accredited private high school in Texas and who are Texas residents. The Texas Grant will pay tuition and fees at a public college or university in Texas. Students who attend private, non-profit institutions will receive an award based on tuition and fee costs at public universities. More information is available at or Texas Financial Aid Information Center at For an initial award -Are Texas residents -Have not been convicted of a felony or crime involving a controlled substance -Show financial need -Have an EFC less than or equal to Register for the Selective Service or are exempt from this requirement -Be a graduate of an accredited high school in Texas not earlier than the school year -Complete the Recommended High School Program or Distinguished Achievement Program in high school -Enroll in a non-profit public college or university in Texas within 16 months of graduation from a public or accredited private high school in Texas and -Have accumulated no more than 30 semester credit hours, excluding those earned for dual or concurrent courses or awarded for credit by examination (AP, IB, or CLEP) Texas Scholars High School and Beyond program focuses students on education and career planning during middle and high school. To receive recognition as a TBEC Texas Scholar students are now required to : Graduate from high school having completed the Recommended High School Program (RHSP) or Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP), and Complete at least two courses while in high school eligible for college credit. 8

10 ENGLISH COURSES Pre-AP English I Pre-AP English II AP English III AP English IV MATHEMATICS COURSES Pre-AP Geometry Pre-AP Algebra II AP Statistics Pre-AP Pre-Calculus AP Calculus (AB) SCIENCE COURSES Pre-AP Biology AP Biology Pre-AP Chemistry I AP Chemistry AP Physics B SOCIAL STUDIES COURSES Pre-AP World Geography Pre-AP World History AP U.S. History AP U.S. Government FOREIGN LANGUAGE Pre-AP Spanish III III AP Spanish IV IV AP Spanish V Through AP classes, high school students can take demanding college-level courses in high school and, by receiving a satisfactory score on an AP exam at the end of the school year, receive advanced placement and/or college credit. Advanced Placement Courses AP courses require a strong commitment on the part of the student and the parent. Classes require self discipline and increased study time; therefore, careful consideration should be used in determining the number of advanced placement courses a student takes. Students may pick up applications for AP Courses from the counselor. A screening committee made up of a teacher from English, Math, Science, and Social Studies, a counselor, and an administrator will review the application to determine eligibility. AP teachers will provide a list of skills a student needs to have in order to be eligible to begin the AP classes. AP Advantages: * BISD will pay 1/2 of the registration fee for each AP exam taken * Students earn Tier 1 grade points for the class taken * Students scoring 3 will earn $100, 4 will earn $125, and 5 will earn $150 per exam and may receive college placement or college credit * Amounts are subject to available funding. Pre-AP Courses Advanced instruction is provided in Pre-AP courses for students who have demonstrated that they are not sufficiently challenged in regular classes. Enrollment in Pre-AP classes will be by application only and will be determined by past performance, test scores, and teacher recommendation. Pre- AP courses prepare students for advanced placement courses. For Pre-AP and AP Students: If the cumulative grade falls below 70, the student will be placed in the corresponding regular course. Students will not be allowed to change to a regular course unless the teacher recommends the change due to improper placement. Such changes should occur during the first grade reporting period of first semester. A student who cannot meet the challenges of a Pre-AP or AP course and transfers to a regular class during the first grading period of the first semester shall transfer with an average of 80 into the regular class. Students will not be allowed to change to a regular course unless the AP/Pre-AP teacher recommends the change due to improper placement. DUAL CREDIT OR CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Partnership Programs Eligible students may enroll in partnership programs with Texas colleges or universities in accordance with the agreement between the District and the college or university. These Partnership programs may include: 1. Award of High school credit only. 2. Award of concurrent course credit at community colleges. 3. Award of dual credit at universities. 4. Tech-prep programs. 9

11 5. Remedial or developmental instruction to pass state-mandated assessments or the Texas Higher Education Assessment (THEA) Test. Credit toward high school graduation for completed courses shall be earned in accordance with District regulations and guidelines. Other College-level Courses According to District criteria and guidelines, students may be awarded credit toward high school graduation for completing a college-level course in an accredited college or university that is not in a partnership program with the District. Dual Credit Qualifications, Guidelines: Qualifications: A or B student with a strong commitment to college level classes Strong study habits and work ethic Ability to finish what is started and complete the entire semester of the course taken Meet all college admission guidelines Guidelines: Students wishing to take dual credit courses must complete the appropriate application form and gain approval of the dual credit committee. District will pay for up to 12 hours of credit for approved courses. Students will repay the district for any course dropped past the college s refund deadline. Impact of Advanced Coursework on Extra-Curricular Eligibility: A student otherwise eligible to participate in an extracurricular activity or a UIL competition is not ineligible because the student is enrolled in a course offered for joint high school and college credit, or in a course offered under a concurrent enrollment program, regardless of the location at which the course is provided. Education Code The suspension and reinstatement provisions of Education Code (c) and (d) do not apply to an advanced placement or international baccalaureate course, or to an honors or dual credit course in the subject areas of English language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies, economics, or a language other than English. Education Code (d-1) The following are honors classes for purposes of eligibility to participate in extracurricular activities: 1. All College Board Advanced Placement courses and International Baccalaureate courses in all disciplines; 2. English language arts: high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One) ; 3. Languages other than English: high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One) and languages other than English courses Levels IV-VII; 4. Mathematics: high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One) and pre-calculus; 5. Science: high school/ college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One) and 6. Social Studies: Social studies Advanced Studies, Economics Advanced Studies, high school/college concurrent enrollment classes that are included in the Community College General Academic Course Guide Manual (Part One). 19 TAC Regular Courses The level of instruction in regular classes is designed for the majority of students, and the curriculum is structured to challenge most students and prepare them for college entrance. 10

12 Class Rank Calculation & Grade Point Averages (GPA) Class rank for senior students shall be calculated by averaging semester grades earned in grades 9-12 and any high school course taken in the eighth grade for which a student earned state graduation credit. The numeric semester average shall earn grade points according to the District weighted grade point scale. Class rank will be calculated at the end of the fifth six-week grading period. (Ranking and GPA may change based on final grade calculation.) For the purposes of class rank, courses designated AP shall be weighted as Tier 1; Pre-AP shall be weighted as a Tier 2 course; and all regular courses, and any high school course taken in eighth grade for which a student earned graduation credit, shall be Tier 3. For purposes of determining class rank for honor positions, courses that have been modified by the student s ARD committee as to methodology and reflected in the student s IEP shall earn the same number of grade points assigned to regular courses. Number Grade Tier 1 AP Tier 2 Pre-AP Tier 3 Regular

13 Alternate Methods To Earn Credit Whenever possible, required courses should be taken at school. However, in some cases it is necessary for students who lack the number of credits required for graduation to choose an alternate method of earning credit. Other students may wish to take alternative courses for the purpose of enrichment. The following methods have been approved for alternative credit: Summer School Correspondence Courses Tech Prep Articulated Courses Credit Recovery (Regular education) Credit Recovery (Special Education) Credit by Examination With Prior Instruction Credit by Examination Without Prior Instruction Dual Credit or Concurrent Enrollment or Spectrum Gateway Program Distance Learning CAUTION: Before selecting an alternate method of earning credit, a student must have approval of the principal. SUMMER SCHOOL: School classes are offered by the Wichita Falls Independent School District and Burkburnett students are allowed to attend with approval of Burkburnett school officials and by paying out-of-district tuition. Two semesters are offered during the summer. Burkburnett ISD will offer summer courses based on student interest and enrollment. See your counselor for further information, for permission to register, and for information on tuition costs. CORRESPONDENCE COURSES: Correspondence courses may be taken for credit. However, no more than two (2) credits for such courses will be allowed to count toward graduation. Correspondence courses may be secured through the Guidance Office. The cost is approximately $ per semester plus textbook expenses. All courses taken for graduation must be completed by April 1 of the graduating year. TECH PREP ARTICULATED COURSES: Students can earn college credit for high school courses that contain the same course content as the equivalent college course. The postsecondary institution will award college credit if the student meets requirements outlined in the course articulation agreement either through the Statewide Articulation Program (SWAP) or in a local articulation agreement. (See your counselor or teacher for more details.) CREDIT RECOVERY (REGULAR EDUCATION): Credit recovery classes are available for junior or senior students who have failed one or more core classes and are not expected to graduate on time. See your counselor for details. CREDIT RECOVERY (SPECIAL EDUCATION): Credit recovery classes are available for students who need to repeat a class to earn graduation credit. The ARD committee must approve all credit recovery requests. CREDIT BY EXAMINATION (With Prior Instruction): Students may use credit by examination to demonstrate mastery in any academic course at the secondary level, with the prior approval of the appropriate administrator. Such examinations shall assess the student s mastery of the essential knowledge and skills and shall be approved by the Superintendent or designee. To be eligible to earn credit by examinations, a student shall have had prior instruction in the subject or course, as determined by the District on the basis of a review of the student s educational records. On approval of the attendance committee, a student who has excessive absences may be permitted to earn or regain course credit through credit by examination. Credit by examination shall not be used to gain eligibility for participation in extracurricular activities. To receive credit, students shall score a grade of 70 or above on the exam. Tests shall be administered according to procedures approved by the Superintendent or designee. Credit by Exam for Credit Recovery is administered through Region 9 ESC at the expense of the student an/or family. Contact Region 9 ESC for more information. 12

14 CREDIT BY EXAM (Without Prior Instruction): Students will receive credit for an academic subject in which he or she has had no prior instruction if the student scores 80% or above on a criterion-referenced test for the applicable course. No fee shall be charged. Students are required to register with Region IX no later than 30 days prior to the scheduled testing date on which the student wishes to take the test. Test dates are as follows: TESTING DATE REGISTRATION DEADLINE (by 4:00 pm) June 4, 2016 April 29, 2016 June 18, 2015 May 6, 2016 July 8, 2015 May 27,2016 July 9, 2015 May 27, 2016 Oct 15, 2015 Sept 2, 2016 March 4, 2016 January 20, 2017 June 3, 2016 April 21, 2017 June 17, 2016 May 5, 2017 July 7, 2017 May 26, 2017 July 8, 2017 May 26, 2017 October 14, 2017 September 1, 2017 GATEWAY PROGRAM: The BISD Gateway Program is a computer-focused education and credit restoration program that is designed to allow students within BISD the opportunity to work toward mastering grade level requirements at their own pace. It is structured so that a student may have the chance to proceed at grade level for the remainder of their public school education. It may also provide students who have been identified as at-risk an opportunity to graduate with their peers, and allow increased chances for success in their post secondary endeavors. This is a program of choice that allows students the flexibility of open entry/open exit into the program. For details on the application process, see your counselor. DISTANCE LEARNING: Distance Learning is a learning experience where the instructor and the learner are physically separated by location but are linked by some form of telecommunicated medium or interactive video/audio exchanges. It provides opportunities for learners to participate in educational programs which otherwise may not be available to them. Distance Learning is seen both as a way to offer more equitable distribution of educational resources to special populations of students, and as a way to make instruction more cost effective by sharing teachers and instructional materials. 13

15 Scheduling and Enrolling Schedule Load: Each student in Grades 9 12 must be enrolled in eight classes each semester, six of which earn state credit. Courses will be selected by the student with guidance from the counselor during pre-registration in order to help the student reach graduation and career goals. Students in Co-op classes must be enrolled in 5 state credit courses. Enrollment: Class enrollment and class size are dependent on student requests. Therefore, a firm commitment for the entire year is essential to ensure the accurate scheduling of all courses. A course request validation list will be mailed to students during the month of April for review. Corrections due to computer errors can be made prior to May 1. No schedule changes will be made after the second week of school. Extracurricular Activities: A student may participate in extracurricular activities on or off campus at the beginning of the school year only if the student has earned the cumulative number of credits in the state-approved courses indicated below: Beginning of 10th grade earned 5 credits toward graduation Beginning of 11th grade earned 10 credits toward graduation, or earned 5 credits the previous year Beginning of 12th grade earned 15 credits toward graduation, or earned 5 credits the previous year In order to be eligible for participation in extracurricular activities for a three-weeks period following each grading period of a school year, a student must not have a recorded grade lower than 70 on a scale of in any course for the preceding grading period. A student whose recorded average in any course is lower than 70 at the end of a grading period shall be suspended from participation in any extracurricular activity during the succeeding grading period. The suspension will continue until the end of a three-weeks period during which such student achieves a course grade average for that three-weeks of at least 70 in each course. All extracurricular activities will follow UIL rules for no-pass, no-play. Tutorial Sessions: Burkburnett High School will provide free tutorial sessions in all subject areas. Teachers will provide students with tutorial schedules. Library Nights will be offered during the school year. There are core teachers available for help in core subjects. Times will be posted when available. Incomplete Grades: Any student with an excused absence must complete make-up work within three school days after the absence. Students are responsible to see their teacher(s) before or after school to obtain make-up assignments. Students with an excused absence the day of a semester exam must make up the test within the following prescribed periods of time: 1. Mid-term incompletes must be made up within three school days after the absence; 2. Second semester exams must be made up within one week after the absence. Only the principal can approve a longer period of make-up time. A student failing to make up an exam within the designated time will have a zero posted for the exam which will be averaged in for a semester grade. Dropping a Course: If a class is dropped after the first four weeks of the semester with a failing grade, the student becomes UIL ineligible at the end of the grading period. A student in this situation regains eligibility as previously stated. Academic Honors 14

16 AWARDS: A jacket will be awarded to any student who makes no grade lower than a 95 in a regular class and no grade lower than an 85 in an AP or Pre- AP class. This requirement must be obtained in all subjects (including band, drill team, physical education, etc.) and be maintained for each grading period. A letter will be awarded to any student who makes no grade lower than a 90 in a regular class and no grade lower than an 80 in an AP or Pre- AP class. This requirement must be obtained in all subjects (including band, drill team, physical education, etc.) and be maintained for each grading period. These awards are given to recognize individuals who have maintained excellence in all curriculum areas. VALEDICTORY AND SALUTATORY HONORS: The students with the highest and second-highest GPAs shall be designated as valedictorian and salutatorian, respectively, provided that they have completed their entire senior year at the District high school, and are either on the Recommended Program or the Distinguished Achievement Program for graduation. The grades calculated at the end of the fifth six weeks will determine who gives the Valedictory and Salutatory speeches at graduation. The Valedictory scholarship will be awarded to the student with the top GPA after final grades have been calculated. TIES: Effective after the school year, in cases of a tie in weighted grade averages among the top ranking students, the following methods shall be used to determine who shall be recognized as valedictorian: 1. Computing the weighted grade average to four decimal places. 2. If a tie still remains, the student with the most AP courses and with the highest numerical grade average of all AP courses taken shall be first. Should a tie develop for salutatorian, all those tying shall be recognized. HONOR ROLL: Students who make 80 or above in all credit subjects for the grading period will be placed on the Honor Roll. HONOR STUDENTS: New students to Burkburnett High School will be assigned a GPA according to BISD grading scale. See page 25 of this book. All students on the Recommended or Distinguished Achievement Plan who have a 3.5 GPA or above will be recognized at graduation as Honor Students, and those who have a 3.75 GPA or above will be recognized as High Honor Students. TOP TEN PERCENT: The top ten percent of the graduating class shall be selected from those students who have completed requirements under either the Recommended Program or the Distinguished Achievement graduation program. The valedictorian and salutatorian shall be included when calculating the composition of the top ten percent. Grade point averages shall be determined according to the District s weighted scale. The top ten percent will be calculated at the end of the final six-week grading period. College Information 15

17 COLLEGE OR TECHNICAL SCHOOL INFORMATION: College catalogs, a college computer search program, a college majors book and many other items to assist with selection of a college or technical school are available to the students in the Guidance Office. A Senior Newsletter will be distributed monthly to senior students through their English classes, mailed to the parents/guardians at home, and posted on the High School Counselor Section of the BISD Website. See your counselor for additional information and help. FINANCIAL AID: Application forms and information booklets are available in the Guidance Office. Select a college early in your senior year and work closely with the financial aid office of that school. The counselors will provide additional information through the Senior Newsletter. ACT/SAT COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMS: ACT/SAT scores are one basis of college admission and scholarship screening (see the college catalog). Statistics indicate that the best time to take the ACT or SAT is in June of the junior year. Seniors who have not taken the ACT or SAT should take the exam early in the senior year. The Guidance Office has registration packets for the ACT/SAT exams and computer programs for preparation to take the exams. Various ACT/SAT test preparation programs are offered at the high school. SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION: Each senior student will be asked to complete a scholarship information sheet. Sources of scholarship information are available in the Guidance Office ( in the scholarship box), the Senior Newsletter (are posted monthly on the Counselors website), and the High School Counselor Section of the BISD Website. Students hoping to earn scholarships should begin a portfolio by the 10th grade and update it regularly. Become informed, apply early and meet all deadlines. COLLEGE READINESS EXAMS: The Texas Success Initiative (TSI) is mandated by the State Legislature and is set up to assess a student s college readiness for first year college-level courses. It requires an assessment of the student s basic academic skills in math, reading and writing. Each college may choose which assessment they prefer to use. The available assessments are TSI exam. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT THROUGH MSU OR VC: These programs are for the college-bound student who wishes to earn college credit while attending high school. Students must meet college admission standards which include GPA, ACT or SAT scores, and meet TSI standards. See your counselor for details. COLLEGE CREDITS EARNED FROM VERNON COLLEGE THROUGH BHS COURSES: BHS students can receive credit through Tech Prep programs. See your counselor for details. Student Placement Criteria Teachers, counselors, administrators, and parents should accept, as a serious responsibility, the appropriate placement of students in high school courses, especially at Grade 9. The following entry criteria for high school courses have been developed to ensure that students are placed consistent with their abilities. Placement criteria includes mastery of state standards, achievement on standardized tests, performance on Texas Assessment of Knowledge & Skills (TAKS), classroom performance, and teacher observation. Placement decisions will be monitored closely, and provisions are available to move students to other courses whenever a placement error is detected. To meet the academic needs of each student, some courses in English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies are offered on different levels of difficulty: AP, Pre-AP, and regular. Approval for placement in Pre-AP or AP courses will be through an application process (see AP/Pre-AP Course Application Form in Guidance Office). 16

18 Sequencing of English Courses Sequencing of Courses Students must successfully complete four years (credits) of English to graduate from high school on the Foundation Plan. The fourth English language arts credit may be earned in English IIV, Journalism, or Humanities to include a research paper to. English I 9th Grade English II Journalism English III Humanities Adv. Journalism Sequencing of Mathematics Courses English IV Students must successfully complete three years (credits) to graduate from high school on the Foundation Plan. Algebra I and Geometry must be two of the three credits. Students must complete a total four years (credits) to earn an Endorsement. Students who took Algebra I in middle school will start the plan with Geometry. The grade for Algebra I in the 8th grade will be included in the student s GPA. Math Models Algebra I 9th Grade Geometry/ Pre-AP Geometry Algebra II/ Pre-AP Algebra II Math Models AQR Geometry/ Pre AP Geometry 9th Grade Algebra II/ Pre AP Algebra AQR Pre Calculus or Pre-AP Pre Calculus AP Statistics Pre Calculus or Pre-AP Pre Calculus AP Calculus AP Statistics AP Calculus 17

19 Sequencing of Science Courses Students must successfully complete three years (credits) of science to graduate on the Foundation Plan with Biology as a required course. Students must complete a total four years (credits) to earn an Endorsement. Students must have Physics for the STEM Endorsement. Biology Pre-AP Biology 9th Grade For students on the High School Graduation Plan (23 credits) Chemistry * Pre-AP Chemistry Integrated Physics & Chemistry IPC 9th Grade Biology I 10th Grade AP Chemistry AP Biology AP Physics Earth and Space Anatomy and Physiology Physics * Students not maintaining an 80 or above during the first six weeks will be required to drop Chemistry and enroll in IPC. Sequencing of Social Studies Courses Students must successfully complete Four years (credits) of Social Studies to graduate on the Foundation Plan and to earn an Endorsement. World Geography/ Pre-AP World Geography 9th Grade World History/ Pre-AP World History U.S. History/ AP U.S. History U.S. Government/ AP U.S. Government & Economics 18

20 Clubs and Organizations STUDENT COUNCIL: 1. The objectives of the BHS Student Council shall be to: (a) provide a democratic forum in which students can address those school related issues which affect their lives; (b) maintain a continuous communication channel from students to both faculty and administration, as well as among the students within the school; (c) offer a year-long program of social functions and community involvement projects for students; and (d) train students in the duties and responsibilities of good citizenship using the school environment as the primary training ground. 2. Membership in the Student Council: Application submitted in the spring for current 9th-11th grade students Two teacher recommendations New students and freshmen will submit an application in the fall with two teacher recommendations. CHEERLEADERS: Cheerleaders are selected by judges in the spring. The following requirements are used to select cheerleaders: Cannot have more than three administrative referrals on file Cannot have more absences than that stipulated by local policy Must be physically capable of participation in Physical Education Must have the number of credits required by state law Cheerleaders are governed by TEA sanctions in regard to grades. MASCOT: The MASCOT is selected based on teacher recommendations. Any person interested in becoming the mascot needs to see the cheerleading sponsor during the spring semester to obtain teacher forms. The selected mascot is expected to adhere to the mascot rules and expectations. CLASS OFFICERS AND OTHER ELECTED OFFICERS: 1. Students wishing to run for any class office or Student Council membership or office must have earned the cumulative number of state-approved credits. The student must get an application of eligibility from the Director of Student Activities. The request for application may be refused if the student has more than three administrative disciplinary referrals on file. CLASS OFFICERS MAY BE REMOVED FROM OFFICE FOR MAJOR DISCI- PLINE PROBLEMS. 2. Council members and officers may be removed according to provisions of the Student Council s Constitution. 3. Student officers and Student Council officers are elected in the spring for the following year with the exception of freshman officers. Candidates should check with the Activities Director for filing specifics. Campaigning is done according to rules of the Student Council. Election is by singular plurality. 4. Each club or organization reserves the right to establish guidelines with respect to the number of offices their respective officers may hold. DRILL TEAM: The Drill Team of Burkburnett High School consists of young ladies that are selected by judges at the end of each school year. They perform at football games and other functions. Requirements for membership are set forth in the constitution of the Boomtown Babes and may be obtained from the Drill Team sponsor. CHOIR: The UIL choir is composed of students from all grade levels who have auditioned and actively participate in UIL and TMEA competitions throughout the year. MARCHING AND CONCERT BAND: 1. The BHS Bulldog Brigade Marching Band performs at UIL Contest, football games, pep rallies and other activities. Membership is through audition/approval from the band directors. After marching season, two concert bands are formed. Membership in Concert Band is a prerequisite to Marching Band for the following year. 2. New students enrolling in BHS after marching season may be admitted to the top Concert Band or to the Marching Band through audition and approval of the director. 19

21 3. Drum majors and color guard members are chosen each year by audition. AFJROTC - Co-curricular Activities: These activities cadets help plan. The activity serves to augment AFJROTC classroom and Leadership Education requirements: 1. Drill Team competes in Drill and Ceremony events. 2. Color Guard presents Flags at various activities. 3. Rocketry, studies and launches rockets. 4. Awareness Presentation Team researches and presents discussions on various topics to middle schools and elementary schools. 5. Orienteering competes in Map & Compass. 6. Physical Fitness Team. HONOR SOCIETIES NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY: 1. Members will be chosen from the junior and senior classes who have attended Burkburnett High School a minimum of one semester. If, however, a student has already been inducted in a National Honor Society at another accredited high school, that student need only present a letter from the sponsor of that organization stating that he/she was a member in good standing. 2. Students must have a GPA of 4.0 to be considered for the organization. Selections will be considered upon the GPA of the students at the conclusion of their sophomore and junior years, respectively. A committee made up of five faculty members will select the new members based upon their scholarship, leadership abilities, character, and service to the school and the community. Members must maintain the minimum GPA, attend meetings, if graduating before 2018 they must be on either the Recommended or Distinguished Achievement graduation plans, and participate in the main activities of the organization: new member induction ceremony, school project, and a community project. In addition, members must be scheduled in at least one Pre-AP or AP class during their junior and senior year in high school. Senior students will also take a class schedule (minimum of 3 core classes) that is indicative of an honors student. Students that are found guilty of actions not becoming a member of such an organization will be removed, as will those members who fail to adhere to the by-laws of the organization. QUILL AND SCROLL: Quill and Scroll is an honorary organization made up of honored students from both the annual and the newspaper staff who are selected by the sponsor for their outstanding work. INTERNATIONAL THESPIAN SOCIETY: The International Thespian Society is an organization on the national level composed of dramaoriented students. A national point system is used to earn credit toward national recognition. GENERAL ORGANIZATIONS ANNUAL STAFF (DERRICK): The Derrick is staffed by persons selected by the sponsors on the basis of grades, dependability, and school citizenship. They spend one period a day in annual class producing The Derrick. CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (CTE) YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS: Youth organizations are considered an integral part of the total CTE program. Each CTE program has its own club organization designed to provide opportunities for the development of leadership, individual social and educational growth, activities related to the objectives of the program, competitive events on an area, state and national level, recognition of employers in cooperative programs, school and community projects. BPA Business Professionals of America (Office Education Lab and Co-op, Data/Word Processing, and Programming) FFA Future Farmers of America (Agriculture) FCS Family & Consumer Sciences Club (Cooperative Home Economics) ROBC Robotics Club 20

22 CRIME STOPPERS: BHS implemented a campus Crime Stoppers program in Since its inception, Burk Crime Stoppers has recovered over $6,000 in property, solved numerous crimes and paid out over $700 in rewards. Crime Stoppers Board is comprised of eight students, a teacher sponsor and an administrator. Persons are nominated and selected based on dependability and good citizenship. DRAMA CLUB: Drama Club is for those interested in theatre. Share your theatrical interests with your peers, attend local plays, field trips, and play theatre games. The Drama Club can help you earn points to be a member of the Thespian Honor Society. FUND RAISING: All fund raising activities will be scheduled with the Activities Director. 21

23 1 English I English II English III English IV 2 Algebra I Geometry Algebra II 3 Biology IPC Chemistry 4 World Geography World History US History Economics/Government 5 Communication App/Health Burkburnett High School Four Year Plan with Endorsement Name: ID #: Grade: Date Initiated: Date(s) Amended: The Four Year Plan is intended to give you and your parent(s) a guide to use as you progress through high school. You will want to review the plan each year to make sure you are taking the required courses for graduation. Your counselor will have sample Career Plans of Study for each of the Endorsements that are listed on this page. You may use these as guides to help you select courses that support your career goals. Make sure that you are taking the academic courses that support your post-secondary plans. Endorsement: STEM Business & Industry Arts & Humanities Public Services Multidisciplinary Studies Specialization Area: My Graduation Plan Type is: Foundation Distinguished Pds: 9 th Grade 10 th Grade 11 th Grade 12 th Grade My Post High School plans will take me to: (Check as many as apply) Two Year College Four Year College Technical Graduation Plans Foundation Plan +Endorsements Discipline Credits Credits English 4 Math 3 1 Science 3 1 Social Studies 4 Foreign Language 2 Fine Arts 1 Physical Education 1 Health.5 Communication Applications (Speech) Electives 3 2 Total Credits for Graduation: Student Signature: Parent Signature:.5 22

24 COURSE DESCRIPTION INFORMATION Course descriptions are listed by subject area. Each course description lists the official title, code number, grade level, prerequisite, credit to be earned, and information regarding course content. Code Number: Each course has a code number used for computer scheduling and grading. Grade Level: Approved grade level for students in the course. Prerequisite: The prior course(s) and/or entry criteria required for enrolling in the course. Credit: The amount of credit is designated, e.g., 1/2, 1, 2, 3. Full-year courses are not divided by semesters. Language Arts Reading Improvement Designed to improve reading comprehension and study skills. The reading program is individualized to meet each student s needs by using a variety of multi-level materials. The major emphasis of this course is to increase reading comprehension and other reading skills Reading Improvement I Credits: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Reading below grade level Reading Improvement II Credits: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Reading Improvement I Reading Improvement III Credits: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Reading Improvement II Reading Improvement Dyslexia Credit: 1-2 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Dyslexia Screening This is a two-year program that is individualized, multisensory, intensive phonetic, linguistic, meaning based, systematic, process oriented, sequential, and cumulative. This course teaches the functions of writing, spelling, reading comprehension, and composition as approved by T.E.C. in B. English as a Second Language This course is offered for those students who qualify according to the results of the Burkburnett ISD Language Survey and need assistance in the development of basic language arts skills. Instruction will include listening concepts and skills, vocabulary development, speaking concepts and skills, reading concepts and skills, and writing concepts and skills English as a Second Language I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Results of Language Survey English as a Second Language II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: English as a Second Language I 23

25 10373 English as a Second Language III Credit: Local Grade Level: Prerequisite: English as a Second Language II Counts as local credit only English English I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9 Prerequisite: At grade level This course content is divided into the three strands of language arts: language, composition, and literature. The student receives instruction in grammar concepts in writing skills which include the sentence through a multi-paragraph essay, and in literature by genre English II Credit: I Grade Level: 10 Prerequisite: English I This course content is divided into the three strands of language arts: language, composition, and literature. The student receives instruction in identified weaknesses, in writing skills from paragraph through multi-paragraph essays and research process, and in literature by genre English III Credit: 1 Grade Level: 11 Prerequisite: English I, II This course content is divided among the three strands of language arts: language, composition, and literature. The student receives instruction in identified weaknesses in writing skills from the multi-paragraph essays through the research process, and in literature by genre English IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: English I, II, III This course content is divided among the three strands of language arts: language, composition, and literature. The student receives instruction in identified weaknesses in writing skills from the paragraph through research paper/project, and in world literature. Students who elect this course are not eligible for advanced credit plan Pre-AP English I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9 Prerequisite: Pre-AP English in 8th grade or recommendation (at or above grade level) Students will read classical and contemporary literature. They learn how to discover meaning in literature by being attentive to language, image, character, action, argument, and the various techniques and strategies authors use to evoke emotional response from readers. Their writing assignments should reflect their ability to analyze literature. They will formulate an opinion about a writer s style, subject matter, characterization, etc., and support their opinions with relevant details from the work, eventually developing a structurally and mechanically correct multi-paragraph essay. This course provides opportunities for independent study through a research project and through long range assignments which require the students to pace themselves and assume responsibility for their understanding of the material assigned Pre-AP English II Credit: 1 Grade Level: 10 Prerequisite: Pre-AP English I or recommendation Students will read classical and contemporary literature. They learn how to discover meaning in literature by being attentive to language, image, character, action, argument, and the various techniques and strategies authors use to evoke emotional response from readers. Their writing assignments should reflect their ability to analyze literature. They will formulate an opinion about a writer s style, subject matter, characterization, etc., and support their opinions with relevant details from the work, eventually developing a structurally and mechanically correct multi-paragraph essay. This course provides opportunities for independent study through a research project and through long range assignments which require the students to pace themselves and assume responsibility for their understanding of the material assigned. 24

26 10353 AP English III Credit: 1 Grade Level: 11 Prerequisite: Pre-AP English I, II or recommendation Advanced Placement Junior English is a freshman-level college course with college-level requirements studying the development of American literature. Students will be expected to work with considerable independence at home and to contribute actively and frequently to class discussions. They will examine critical readings of fiction and nonfiction and practice the skills of effective writing, especially in the three required writing modes: the argument, rhetorical strategies, and synthesis essays. Students will be responsible for purchasing needed paperback books. In May, students can elect to take the Advanced Placement Examination in English Language and Composition. College hours earned by a successful score of 3-5 will depend upon the policies fo the individual universities AP English IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Pre-AP English I& II, AP English III or recommendation Advanced Placement Senior English is a sophomore-level college course with college-level requirements. In May, students can elect to sit for the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition. College hours earned by a successful score of 3-5 will depend upon the policies of individual universities. Students will be expected to work with considerable independence at home and to contribute actively and frequently to class discussions. They will write and revise critical essays that explicate poetry, short stories, novels, and plays, with special focus on how structure and style affect meaning. Students will be responsible for purchasing needed paperback books English (Literary Genre of Science Fiction) Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 9-12 This course is structured to provide an in-depth study of Science Fiction as a literary genre. The course is designed to encourage students to read, using science fiction to improve reading skills using vocabulary, sentence structure, and video critiques to improve student reading and writing skills. Various Science Fiction literature and films. Analytical and critical thinking skills are stressed. Students are also provided opportunities to give oral presentations from outside projects of science fiction works. Journalism Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production I Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Application This is a laboratory course in yearbook production which stresses yearbook layout, graphics and design, organization and format, copy preparation, and production finance Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Application Extension of Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production I Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production III Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Application Extension of Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production II Debate Debate I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Application This class is for beginning and advanced debaters. Students must complete an application process to be admitted into the program. The fall semester focuses on Cross Examination Debate and Congress. The spring semester focuses on Lincoln Douglas Debate, Informative Speaking and Persuasive Speaking. Students will not only learn strong speaking skills, but will also learn to research efficiently. Member of this class will represent BHS in UIL competition. 25

27 14543 Debate II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Application This class is for beginning and advanced debaters. Students must complete an application process to be admitted into the program. The fall semester focuses on Cross Examination Debate and Congress. The spring semester focuses on Lincoln Douglas Debate, Informative Speaking and Persuasive Speaking. Students will not only learn strong speaking skills, but will also learn to research efficiently. Member of this class will represent BHS in UIL competition. Speech One-half credit in Speech is required on all graduation plans. Communication Applications meets this requirement Communication Applications Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 9-12 For successful participation in professional and social life, students must develop effective communication skills. Rapidly expanding technologies and changing social and corporate systems demand that students send clear verbal messages, choose effective nonverbal behaviors, listen for desired results, and apply valid critical-thinking and problem solving processes. Students enrolled in Communication Applications will be expected to identify, analyze, develop, and evaluate communication skills needed for professional and social success in interpersonal situations, group interactions, and personal and professional presentations. For high school students whose first language is not English, the students native languages serve as a foundation for English language acquisition and language learning. Advanced Learner Programs (ALPS) The focus of the program is to encourage creative thinking, to practice problem solving skills, to develop skills used in group work, to allow exchange of ideas with their intellectual peers and to promote independent work/study habits. The ALPS classes consist of students who have accepted the district s nomination for the ALPS program. They have similar levels of academic potential and often learn the same material in a different style or manner. This class will follow the state guidelines for Gifted and Talented Programs Gifted & Talented Interdisciplinary Studies/Mentor Seminar 1 Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9 Prerequisite: Screened and Identified as GT Gifted & Talented Interdisciplinary Studies/Mentor Seminar II Credit: 1 Grade Level: 10 Prerequisite: Screened and Identified as GT Gifted & Talented Independent Study Mentorship III Credit: 1 Grade Level: 11 Prerequisite: Screened and Identified as GT Gifted & Talented Independent Study Mentorship IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Screened and Identified as GT Mathematics Algebra I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: At grade level, 8th grade math, or Pre-Algebra Algebra I is designed to expand the manipulative skills of arithmetic to algebraic skills. This course will develop the set of real numbers as a mathematical system, including the study of linear equations, inequalities, operations with polynomials, word problems, factoring, algebraic fractions, functions, graphing, systems of equations, and operations with radicals. 26

28 20243 Algebra II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Algebra I Algebra II reviews the concepts of Algebra I and extends these to a more formal level. The course of study is designed to extend the development of numbers to include a study of the complex numbers as a mathematical system. The course will expand the concept of functions to include quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions. Analysis of the conic sections and development of additional problem solving skills will also be presented. It is recommended that a student who has not made a 75 average in both Algebra I and Geometry or has not passed EOC, take Math Models prior to taking Algebra II. A parental permission form must be signed if the above criteria have not been met Pre-AP Algebra II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Algebra I, Pre-AP Geometry, or Geometry with recommendation The Honors level section of Algebra II covers the same course content as the regular section, plus units of study over the real number system and probability. The Honors course requires extensive application of learned skills in new settings (word problems). Conics are investigated exhaustively. An independent project may be required. Honors Algebra II is recommended for students with A s and high B s in previous math courseworks and who plan to take Pre-Calculus or even Calculus in high school Geometry Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I Geometry is designed to stimulate creative and logical thought processes, and to develop systematic reasoning by using postulates, definitions and theorems. Geometry will include the study of angles, perpendicular and parallel lines, congruent triangles, polygons, constructions, area and volume, trigonometric ratios, and coordinate geometry. Proofs will be emphasized to develop logical reasoning Pre-AP Geometry Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Algebra I and recommendation The students will cover the same material and ideas as regular Geometry, but a greater degree of rigor will be expected in the proofs and problems they do. The students will be given a more in-depth study of solid, transformational, and non-euclidean geometry. Special projects and assignments may be required throughout the year dealing with applied geometry. Trigonometry will be introduced. Honors Geometry is recommended for students who plan to take Pre-Calculus or Calculus Advanced Quantitative Reasoning (AQR) Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II This class is designed to be taken prior to Pre-Calculus This course s primary purpose is to prepare students for college majors that may not require calculus, for technical training, or for a range of career options. This course may also be useful to other students as a elective. The primary focal points of AQR include the analysis of information using statistical methods and probability, modeling change and mathematical relationships, mathematical decision making in finance, and spatial and geometric modeling for decision making. In AQR, students will learn to become critical consumers of the quantitative data that surrounds them in real world, knowledgeable decision makers who use logical reasoning, and mathematical thinkers who use their quantitative skills to solve problems in a wide range of situations. They will develop skills for success in college and careers, including investigation, research, collaboration, and both oral and written communication of their work, as they solve problems in many types of applied situations Pre-Calculus Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry This course prepares students to take either high school or college level calculus. The students learn concepts from trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary analysis. The trigonometry will emphasize real world problem solving. Analytic geometry applies algebraic concepts to geometric situations. Elementary analysis compares to college algebra Pre-AP Pre-Calculus Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry 27

29 This course prepares students to take either high school or college level calculus. The students learn concepts from trigonometry, analytic geometry, and elementary analysis. The trigonometry will emphasize real world problem solving. Analytic geometry applies algebraic concepts to geometric situations. Elementary analysis compares to college algebra. This course includes an introduction to limits and derivatives that will be more fully covered in Calculus AP Calculus (AB) Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus (Preferred Pre-AP Pre-Calculus) Calculus is designed for students who have a thorough knowledge of college preparatory mathematics, including algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and elementary analysis. The course includes a study of elementary functions, properties of limits, the derivative and applications, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite integral Mathematic Models with Applications Credit: 1 Grade Level: 11 Prerequisite: Algebra I and Geometry To count as credit, this course must be taken before Algebra II. Students continue to build on the K 8 and Algebra I foundations as they expand their understanding through other mathematical experiences. Students use algebraic, graphical, and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structure to model information and to solve problems with various disciplines. Students use mathematical methods to model and solve real-life applied problems involving money, data, chance, patterns, music, design, and science. Students use mathematical models from algebra, geometry, probability, statistics, and connections among these to solve problems from a wide variety of advanced applications in both mathematical and nonmathematical situations. Students use a variety of representations (concrete, numerical, algorithmic, graphical), tools, and technology to link modeling techniques and purely mathematical concepts and to solve applied problems AP Statistics Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Geometry and Algebra II AP Statistics is an excellent option for students who plan to continue their education at the post-secondary level as at least one statistics course is typically required for majors such as engineering, the social sciences, biology, business, mathematics, and the health sciences. The topics for AP Statistics are divided into four major themes. Under exploratory analysis, students will interpret graphical displays of distributions of univariate data, summarize distributions of univariate data, compare distributions of univariate data, explore bivariate data, and explore categorical data (frequency tables). Under planning a study, students will study the overview of methods of data collection, planning and conducting surveys, planning and conducting experiments, and generalizing the results from observational studies, experimental studies, and surveys. Under probability, students will study probability as relative frequency, combining independent random variables, the normal distribution, and sampling distributions. Under statistical inference, the student will explore confidence intervals, tests of significance, and special cases of normally distributed data. Science Any sophomore taking Chemistry that has not had Integrated Physics & Chemistry and is not making 75 or above the first grading period will be required to drop Chemistry and enroll in Integrated Physics & Chemistry before taking Chemistry. Students who have completed Chemistry or Physics may not take Integrated Physics & Chemistry as it is reserved for 9th/10th graders. Any student enrolled in a Pre-AP or AP class must maintain a 70 (for grading period) or above in that class or they must drop to a regular class (AP students may take some other class.) Integrated Physics & Chemistry Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-10 Prerequisite: At grade level In Integrated Physics & Chemistry, students conduct field and laboratory investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem-solving. This course integrates the disciplines of physics and chemistry in the following topics: motion, waves, energy transformations, properties of matter, changes in matter, and solution chemistry. This course does not count as a science credit on the Distinguished Plan Biology I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-10 Prerequisite: At or above grade level 28

30 Biology is the study of the interactions between life and the environment. This study includes cellular biology, biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, invertebrate and vertebrate zoology, human anatomy and physiology, botany, and ecology. This course provides laboratory experiences for the student in learning the basic concepts, hypotheses and theories by observation and participation. Students may be required to complete a class project Pre-AP Biology Credit: 1 Grade level: 9-10 Prerequisite: Algebra I required and Pre-AP Science in 8th grade recommended Pre-AP Biology is a more in-depth study of the same material presented in the regular Biology I course (see Biology I course description). The students are expected to develop and utilize higher level thinking skills. The students are also expected to conduct laboratory exercises with a minimum of assistance. Students are also required to complete a taxonomy project AP Biology Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Pre-AP Biology and Pre-AP Chemistry (or A in Chemistry ) The AP Biology course is the equivalent of Freshman level college biology. The AP Biology course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of Pre-AP Biology, as it is an extension of the course. Major emphasis will include biochemistry, statistics, human physiology, as well as the chemical and physical principles of living organisms, and metabolic processes. This course will require students to conduct independent laboratory exercises and utilize higher level thinking skills. Students must have the self-discipline required to spend time outside of class studying the material covered. Students taking AP Biology have the opportunity to earn between 4 to 8 hours of college biology credits by taking and passing the AP College Board Biology exam Chemistry Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Biology and at grade level in math Chemistry is the study of the composition and reactions of matter. Laboratory experiments complement the subject matter and stimulate thinking by the students in which observations of natural phenomena are used to develop terms, basic concepts, models and theories. Students should have a good understanding of algebraic skills prior to enrollment. Independent critical thinking skills are utilized in this course, and the student must have the self-discipline required to spend some time outside of class studying the material covered. Students not making satisfactory progress in the 1st six weeks of class weeks will be required to take Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) before taking Chemistry, if not already taken Pre-AP Chemistry Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Biology. Students should have high A s in regular science classes or A s in Pre-AP science course. At or above grade level in mathematics. Pre-AP Chemistry I is a course designed for students who will need to take chemistry in college. This includes all medical professions as well as some other scientific careers. Problem solving will be an integral part of the course and students will have opportunity to utilize algebra concepts. Concepts will cover periodic chart and its trends, atomic structure, solutions, chemical reactions, and other advanced topics. Pre-AP Chemistry I is recommended for all students who have high grades in their math and science courses. Independent critical thinking skills are utilized in this course, and the student must have the self-discipline required to spend time outside of class studying the material covered AP Chemistry Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Pre-AP Chemistry I Concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus or higher. AP Chemistry is the equivalent of a full year of freshman college-level chemistry. This course is a laboratory-oriented course requiring students to demonstrate advanced-level chemistry lab techniques. An in-depth study of inorganic chemistry will continue along with some organic chemistry. Topics such as the atomic theory, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, and equilibrium will be covered. AP Chemistry is a highly mathematical course. Students are expected to work independently with a minimum of assistance. Self-discipline and a true desire to learn chemistry are suggested. Independent critical thinking skills are utilized in this course, and the student must have the self-discipline required to spend time outside of class studying the material covered. Students are encouraged to take the AP exam to earn up to 10 hours of college credit at the end of this course. 29

31 30443 Physics Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Biology; Two semesters Algebra II or concurrent enrollment Physics is the science of matter and energy. Laboratory investigations involve the principles of mechanics, heat, sound, optics, electricity, magnetism, and atomic structure. Independent critical skills are utilized in this course, and the student must have the self-discipline required to spend time outside of class studying the material covered AP Physics 1: Algebra-Based Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Algebra II and Geometry; recommended completed Pre-AP Chemistry and currently enrolled in Calculus AP Physics is the equivalent is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; and mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: 3 units of science, one of which may be taken concurrently Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory oriented course in which students investigate the structures and functions of the components of the human body. The course presents investigation of the specialization of cells, how cells function cooperatively as tissue and organs, and the interrelationships of systems that result in a living organism. The course offers students opportunities to investigate anatomical structures and regulating mechanisms that influence how systems function. These concepts are designed to build a knowledge base for those students who wish to pursue a medically related career Earth and Space Science Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Three units of science, one of which may be taken concurrently. Earth and Space Science is designed to build on students prior scientific and academic knowledge and skills to develop an understanding of Earth s system in space and time. Students will develop a clear understanding of the dynamic forces at work in the world, and explore why Earth is unique in its place in the solar System. Students will investigate critical issues in the fields of Geology, Meteorology, Oceanography, and Astronomy. This course will use Laboratory investigations in addition to real-world projects as part of its curriculum. Social Studies World Geography Studies Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9 Students examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. Students will study the various customs and cultural characteristics of world societies. An emphasis will be given to environmental factors such as climate, topography, and natural resources throughout the world. Students will also explore population distribution and the effects of population growth/decline. Students will develop an understanding of the importance of applying geographic concepts and skills to their daily lives Pre-AP Geography Studies Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9 Prerequisite: Pre-AP History in 8th grade or recommendation Pre-AP World Geography course offers students the opportunity for in-depth study of the diversity of world s cultural regions at a faster pace of instruction. Students will use higher-level thinking skills to examine the patterns and processes that have shaped the human social organization and the use and modification of the Earth s surface. There is an emphasis on landforms and climates, political and economic systems, natural resources, environmental and ecological issues, and migration and settlement patterns that influence the lifestyles of people, both in the past and present. Students will be required to use primary and secondary resources, maps, charts, pictures, charts, and current events while examining the relationships between people and places while asking and answering geographic questions. Also, students will be required to research, analyze, and synthesize information for the completion of individual and group projects World History Studies Credit: 1 Grade Level: 10 Prerequisite: World Geography The World History course is the study of mankind from the prehistoric ages through present day. The course focuses upon the development of world 30

32 cultures, the experiences of people throughout history, and developmental patterns of civilizations. An emphasis is given to the development of world political, economic, and social issues that have influenced and impacted the development of the world today. Students will use their geographical and historical skills through the course Pre-AP World History Studies Credit: 1 Grade Level: 10 Prerequisites: Pre-AP Geography or recommendation The Pre-AP World History course offers students the opportunity for in-depth study of history of mankind. The course is designed to develop a greater understanding of the human processes that have shaped our world form prehistoric through modern times. There will be an emphasis on the political, social, economic, cultural and intellectual processes that have influenced the world in the past. Students are challenged to examine the history of the world and develop skills and knowledge through the examination of primary and secondary readings that will form a useful foundation for their continuing educational endeavors. Also, students will be required to research, analyze, and synthesize information through the completion of individual and group projects U.S. History Studies Since Reconstruction Credit: 1 Grade Level: 11 Prerequisite: World History, World Geography In this course, which is the second part of a two-year study of U.S. History that begins in 8th grade, students study the history of the United States since Reconstruction to the present. Historical content focuses on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to industrialization and urbanization, major wars, domestic and foreign policies of the Cold War and post-cold War eras, and reform movements including civil rights AP U. S. History Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: World History, World Geography This course covers the settlement of Jamestown in 1607 to the present, with more emphasis on outside reading, critical thinking, and development of writing skills. In addition to textbook reading assignments, the student will be expected to read primary source material as well as selected books and articles. This course will attempt to challenge the student with such activities as research projects, panel discussions, and debates. The Advanced Placement Program in U.S. History is designed to provide students with analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those in college Economics with Emphasis on Free Enterprise Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: World History, World Geography, U.S. History This course provides a mixture of theory and consumer economics in an effort to give students a better understanding of current economic problems while helping them gain some of the skills needed to be effective consumers and workers. One goal of the course is to give the students the theoretical tools necessary to investigate the causes of economic problems and determine the implications of proposed solutions. Another goal is to help the students acquire the skills necessary to function effectively as consumers and workers in today s complex society. Principles of our own free enterprise system will be stressed throughout the course. Students will be given opportunities to compare this system with other systems of today and the past U.S. Government Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: World History, World Geography, U.S. History This course attempts to provide students with both a factual background and conceptual understanding of the American political system. Topics included are: beginning governments in the early United States, development of our national constitution, the three branches of our national government and a unit on state government. Units on political parties, elections, and voting will also be covered in this course AP U.S. Government Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: World History, World Geography, U.S. History and application In addition to the work required of students in regular classes, students in AP U.S. Government will be asked to research current topics of national concern. Additional outside reading is required in each unit in place of more traditional forms of homework, for example excerpts from current political writing and from classical writing of the political philosophers. More is expected of the student in the area of current affairs including analyzing political cartoons and editorials. 31

33 40640 Sociology Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: Sociology is the study of human relationships. It provides an opportunity for a student to understand how the past has determined his or her behavior and personality. Students discuss the influence of parents, brothers, sisters, and friends. Students also discuss childhood, the family unit, dating, marriage, divorce, the world of work, and old age. Sociology concentrates on all subjects relevant to many relationships with others Psychology Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: This course is designed as a basic introduction to the scientific field of psychology. The student receives instruction in five specific areas: human growth and development; human behavior; learning and thinking; emotions and motivation; and social behavior and conflict. Specific topics will include heredity and environment, abnormal psychology, mental retardation, stress, and influences upon behavior. Career opportunities in the field of psychology will be explored. Health and Physical Education Personal Fitness Health BISD is requiring a 1/2 credit, which will be included in the elective requirements Health (boys) Health (girls) Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 9-12 This course is designed to provide knowledge and understanding of the following areas: lifetime fitness, nutrition, communicable diseases, mental health, drugs, safety and emergency procedures, family living, and environmental health Zero Hour Health Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: This course can serve as an alternative to the Health Education classes by taking advantage of innovative scheduling, independent study, performance assessment, and portfolios. The student must possess strong independent study skills. Enrollment in the class is by application and with the approval of the instructor and campus administrator. Students must be either juniors or first semester seniors who are losing a credit by being enrolled in a class that meets daily. The class will meet from 7:15 a.m. until 7:45 a.m. each Friday of a semester, unless specified otherwise by the teacher during weeks in which school is not in session on a Friday. Students may not miss more than 2 Health classes. A student will be dropped from the class and not receive credit if they miss more than 2 classes. A student cannot be enrolled in a zero hour class while enrolled in Health class. Physical Education A minimum of 1 credit of P.E. or P.E. equivalent is required Foundations of Personal Fitness Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 9-12 This course is designed to continually assist the student in attaining and maintaining a high level of physical fitness knowledge and skills through individual and group activities that are healthful and meaningful throughout a lifetime Individual Sports Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Foundations of Personal Fitness Students in Individual Sports are expected to participate in a wide range of individual sports that can be pursued for a lifetime. The continued development of health-related fitness and the selection of individual sport activities that are enjoyable is a major objective of this course Adventure/Outdoor Education Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Foundations of Personal Fitness 32

34 Students enrolled in adventure outdoor education are expected to develop competency in outdoor education activities that provide opportunities for enjoyment and challenge. Emphasis is placed upon student selection of activities that also promote a respect for the environment and that can be enjoyed for a lifetime Aerobics Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Foundations of Personal Fitness Students in aerobic activities are exposed to a variety of activities that promote health-related fitness. A major expectation of this course is for the student to design a personal fitness program that uses aerobic activities as a foundation. Activities include two or more aerobic activities such as aerobic dance, aqua aerobics, cycling, jogging, power walking, recreational dance, and step aerobics. Students will perform skills, strategies, and rules at a basic level of competency. Adapted and Remedial This course includes specific activities prescribed or prohibited for students so classified as directed by a member of the healing arts licensed to practice in the State of Texas Adapted and Remedial I Credit: 1/2-1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Doctor s prescription Adapted and Remedial II Credit: 1/2-1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Doctor s prescription Physical Education Equivalent Courses Equivalent Course for all the fall semester only. P.E. or Fine Arts (electives) Credit: 1/2 Cheerleading Spring auditions (grades 10-12) are held to determine the Varsity Cheerleaders. The P.E. credit is awarded for the fall semester only Cheerleading II, 10th grade Cheerleading III, 11th grade Cheerleading IV, 12th grade Drill Team I Credit : 1 Grade: 9-12 Auditions are held each spring for available positions for grades P.E. equivalent is awarded for one year. Band A P.E. equivalent course for the fall semester only each year. P.E., Fine Arts, or elective credit. JROTC I - IV Physical Education Equivalent Athletic Programs Credit: 1/2-1 1/2 The following sports are available at Burkburnett High School with physical education equivalent credit awarded for each semester of activity. (No more than 4 credits can be earned) These classes involve being on the school team, coach approval, the no pass no play guidelines Basketball Boys, 9th Basketball Boys, 10th Basketball Boys, 11th Basketball Boys, 12th 3-level team sport with games beginning in November; classes meet one class period each day 33

35 51743 Basketball Girls, 9th Basketball Girls, 10th Basketball Girls, 11th Basketball Girls, 12th 3-level team sport with games beginning in November; classes meet one class period each day Football Boys, 9th Football Boys, 10th Football Boys, 11th Football Boys, 12th (1st semester only) 3-level team sport (Freshman, Junior Varsity, and Varsity teams); practices begin in early August before school starts; classes meet one class period each day Golf 9th Golf 10th Golf 11th Golf 12th Golf is a year-round sport under the supervision of the golf coach for both male and female golfers. Competitions are held during the fall and spring. The school provides transportation to the course for scheduled practices and a storage facility at River Creek Golf Course is provided for clubs and shoes JV Tennis JV Tennis JV Tennis JV Tennis JV Tennis JV Tennis JV Tennis JV Tennis Varsity Tennis Boys & Girls, 9th Varsity Tennis Boys & Girls, 10th Varsity Tennis Boys & Girls, 11th Varsity Tennis Boys & Girls, 12th Tennis is a year-round sport, with team tennis in the fall and first half of the spring, and then individual tennis the last part of the spring. These classes are under the supervision of the tennis coach for both male and female tennis players. Tryouts are held in May. The Varsity team begins practices 2-3 weeks before the first day of school Volleyball Girls, 9th Volleyball Girls, 10th Volleyball Girls, 11th Volleyball Girls, 12th Volleyball is a Freshman, Junior Varsity, and Varsity program for female athletes. Competitive games and tournaments are held during the fall semester, and meets one class period each day. Tryouts are held in August, and practice begins in early August before school starts Soccer Boys, 9th Soccer Boys, 10th Soccer Boys, 11th Soccer Boys, 12th Soccer Girls, 9th Soccer Girls, 10th Soccer Girls, 11th Soccer Girls, 12th Soccer is a JV and Varsity sport with competitive events scheduled from January through March and workouts held after school beginning in December. Soccer meets one class period each day. 34

36 51863 Baseball Boys, 9th Baseball Boys, 10th Baseball Boys, 11th Baseball Boys, 12th Baseball is a JV and Varsity sport with competitive events scheduled from February through April and workouts held after school beginning in January. Baseball meets one class period each day Softball - Girls, 9th Softball - Girls, 10th Softball - Girls, 11th Softball - Girls, 12th Softball is a JV and Varsity sport with competitive events scheduled from February through April and workouts held after school beginning in February. Softball meets one class period each day Weight Training I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Technique building and skill building Weight Training II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Fundamental strength training. Fine Arts The Fine Arts course offerings foster creative and critical thinking skills, develop aesthetic literacy, and encourage artistic expression in both individual and group settings. Students on all graduation plans must complete at least one Fine Arts credit. Art Students will be instructed in various studio areas such as drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, commercial art, sculpture, and photography. Students will work in a variety of media focusing on the elements of line, form, shape, color, value, space, and texture. In the upper level courses, students will concentrate on advanced studio projects in their area of expertise. A nominal Art Fee is required Art I Credit: 1 Grade Level: Art II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Art I Art III Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Art II Art IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Art III Band The band functions primarily as a marching ensemble in the Fall and may split into as many as two concert bands in the Spring. The band participates in UIL Marching, Concert, and Sight-reading Competitions, various other festivals and competitions, concerts, parades, and community events. Band students are also able to compete individually in honor band auditions and solo& ensemble contests. Each year of band may be used as either a Fine Arts credit, and elective credit, or a P.E. equivalent credit. A nominal Band Fee is required, and a School-owned Instrument Rental Fee may apply. Extra rehearsal time outside the school day will be required. (Full year enrollment is required) Band I Credit: 1 Grade Level:

37 Prerequisite: previous middle school band experience or one year of private lessons and audition + 3 weeks summer band camp Band II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Band I + 3 weeks summer band camp Band III Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Band II + 3 weeks summer band camp Band IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Band III + 3 weeks summer band camp Guard Guard is a division of the band program that mixes athletic skill and coordination with the creative expression of theatre arts, dance, and music. In the Fall, the guard performs at UIL competitions, football games, parades, and various events with the band. During the Spring, the guard meets independently to prepare for competition in the North Texas Colorguard Association and performance at various concerts and community events. A nominal Guard Fee is required. Extra rehearsal time outside the school day will be required. (Full year enrollment is required) Band/Guard I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition+ 3 weeks summer Guard and Band Camp Band/Guard II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Audition+ 3 weeks summer Guard and Band Camp Band/Guard III Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Audition+ 3 weeks summer Guard and Band Camp Band/Guard IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Audition+ 3 weeks summer Guard and Band Camp Jazz Band Jazz band provides students with the opportunity to study various genres of music including Jazz, Swing, Blues, and Rock that are outside the general scope of the Band offerings. Students may have the opportunity to learn instruments other than their native ones. The Jazz Band will perform at pep rallies. Basketball games and at concerts at community events throughout the year. Students must audition to be selected for this class Jazz Band I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Jazz Band II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Jazz Band I Jazz Band III Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Jazz Band II 36

38 88443 Jazz Band IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Jazz Band III Instrumental Ensemble Students will learn basic music notation and demonstrate sound guitar techniques through performance. Students will perform at several concerts and various community events. A School-Owned instrument Rental Fee may apply. (Full year enrollment is required) Beginning Guitar Credit: 1 Grade Level: Advanced Guitar Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Audition + Beginning Guitar Choir The purpose of these courses is to increase student participation and understanding of vocal talent, vocal health, and vocal training. Students will be involved in several performances throughout the year. Placement is done by audition as determined by the director. Students must demonstrate superior music skill, vocal talent, and a consistent UIL eligibility record. Performances include on and off-campus concerts. Competitions include Solo & Ensemble, TMEA All-State Choir Auditions, UIL Contest and Sight-reading contest. Extra rehearsal time outside the school day will be required. (Full year enrollment is required) Varsity Choir I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Varsity Choir II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Audition + Varsity Choir I Varsity Choir III Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Audition + Varsity Choir II Varsity Choir IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Audition + Varsity Choir III JV Choir I Credit: 1 Grade Level: JV Choir II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: JV Choir I JV Choir III Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: JV Choir II JV Choir IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: JV Choir III 37

39 Dance Team Dance I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Tryout For those who are in Dance for the first time and have or are fulfilling their P.E. requirement through another P.E. equivalent course Dance II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Tryout + Drill Team Dance III Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Tryout + Dance II Dance IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Tryout + Dance II Modern/Contemporary Dance Modern/Contemporary Dance I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Introduction to the basic skills and terminology of Modern/Contemporary and Lyrical Dance. We will focus on basic tenants of stretching and conditioning our bodies in preparation for beginning/intermediate dance skills. We will explore the bone and muscle anatomy behind movements and learn dance terminology. Students will engage in learning group combinations that may also include partner weight sharing techniques. Several styles of music will be used to explore how mood affects choreography and performance aspects of dance. There will be a class recital for friends and family at the end of the school year. Students will need to dress out for class in athletic clothes. Full year enrollment required. Theatre Theatre Arts I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Theatre I is an introduction and overview of the art of Theatre. Subjects covered in this course include improvisation, voice, characterization, movement and fundamentals of play production Theatre Arts II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Theatre Arts I In Theatre II, the emphasis is on acting technique and historical acting styles. Students work on script analysis, performance skills and Theatre history. Students get a deeper understanding of the use of voice, characterization and play production Theatre Arts III Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Theatre Arts II In Theatre III, the emphasis is on acting and directing techniques. Students take on a deeper understanding of acting as a stagecraft and are introduced to the basics of directing through short scenes Theatre Arts IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Theatre Arts III In Theatre IV, the student focuses completely on direction. Students develop a deeper understand of what goes into directing a play. Students have the opportunity to direct a one-act play at the end of the course. 38

40 85943 Musical Theatre Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Instructor Approval Introduction to basic skills of performance theatre. Students will be learning how to tell story through acting, singing, and dance. Students will study Musicals and Broadway stage performances to identify key points in putting on quality stage performance. We will discuss proper technique in speaking versus singing and how to study music by sight/ear training. Students will learn selections from popular broadways and musicals while exploring staging and costuming construction. The goal of this course is to be able to stage and perform a Broadway/musical selection. Full year enrollment required Theatre Production I Credit: 1 Grade level: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Theatre Production provides practical hands-on experiences in acting and stagecraft through the rehearsal process and public performances. This course allows for better exploration of all elements of theatre by implementing the concepts and skills. Production work for this course is required. Only students involved in the UIL One Act Play will participate in second semester Theatre Production II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Audition + Theatre Production I Theatre Production III Credit: 1 Grade level: Prerequisite: Audition + Theatre Production II Theatre Production IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: Audition + Theatre Production III Air Force Junior ROTC The AFJROTC program encompasses four courses that enable a student to remain engaged in Cadet Corps activities throughout their high school tenure. Entry into the program can occur at any point in their high school career. Each course is comprised of two distinct academic components- aerospace and leadership and a physical fitness component. The mission of AFJROTC is to develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community through development of personal self competencies to include responsibility, integrity, and leadership skills while enhancing personal attributes of service to others and one s community through numerous cadet led activities. Students may also choose to participate in numerous extracurricular Cadet Corps clubs and activities to include drill teams, Color Guards, physical fitness challenges and marksmanship. The aerospace and leadership components are listed beside their respective course numbers in the following individual course descriptions. The general intent of the flow of courses for each student would be progression from the desired 9th grade entry level course (Course 41143) through the various other AFJROTC courses over the span of their high school tenure. The order of completion does not matter. Courses beyond will be offered individually over a three year cycle with no prerequisite linkages. In special cases, Independent Study courses may be arranged through coordination and approval by the BHS counseling staff and AFJROTC instructors. Progressive enrollment in AFJROTC will permit each student the opportunity to hold rising levels of leadership and responsibility within the various functions of the Cadet Corps. Students interested in joining the military after high school do gain critical insight into such a career choice by enrolling in AFJROTC. However, enrollment does not in any way obligate a student to military service. Enrollment in Air Force Junior ROTC (AFJROTC) may improve an applicant s chances of receipt of an officer s commission through an Air Force Senior ROTC or military academy scholarship. The Senior Aerospace Science Instructor s letter of recommendation regarding outstanding cadet performance plays an important role enhancing such an opportunity in the case of the college ROTC award. Successful completion of AFJROTC courses may also lead to prior credit for the first year of college level Air Force ROTC. Successful completion of two or more AFJROTC courses can result in higher pay in enlisted grades for those cadets who do join the military but do not seek an officer s commission. In restatement, enrollment in AFJROTC does not however obligate a student to subsequent enlistment in a military service. There is a mandatory graded requirement for wear of an issued AFJROTC uniform on specified weekly uniform wear days. Uniforms are issued free of charge to each cadet with the stipulation that they be properly maintained and be returned cleaned at the completion of enrollment in the program. As part of its program, AFJROTC students also participate in physical conditioning activities which can go toward award of physical education credit (up to 2 credits) at BHS AFJROTC I : Journey Into Aviation History/Traditions, Wellness, and Foundations of Citizenship 39

41 Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: None This is an entry-level course for students interested in AFJROTC. Being centered on basic skills and fundamentals, it is the preferred entry point for ninth grade students. This course provides an insight into aviation history, emphasizing key developmental aspects of flight and associated technology through the years as well as milestones and leaders involved with military aviation. Basic USAF organization, military culture, customs and courtesies are also covered. Additionally, students are taught the proper wear of the uniform and associated grooming standards, basic drill skills, and the fundamentals of Cadet Corps organization, activities and functions. Each student will also participate in physical fitness activities on a regular basis AFJROTC II: The Science of Flight/Communication, Awareness, and Leadership Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: None; however, prior completion of Course is desirable The aerospace portion of this course presents an insight into the basic four facets of aviation to include meteorology- the study of weather as it relates to flight, human flight physiology, aircraft structures, components and performance, and basic aeronautical navigation and map study skills. On the leadership side of the course, students gain experience in both the written and oral aspects of communication. Areas studied that enhance development of effective interpersonal communication skills include personal and group behavior, social values, and ethics. Students will receive instruction in Corps structure and function as well as wear of the uniform. Drill and physical conditioning components complete the course description AFJROTC III: Exploring Space/Life Skills and Career Opportunities Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: None; however, prior completion of Course is desirable The aerospace portion of this course examines the Earth, the Moon and planets, cosmology, and various facets of manned and interplanetary space exploration. Detailed discussion of astronautics includes orbits and trajectories, space probes, and man s future in space. The leadership portion of the course concentrates on life after high school and includes topics such as preparation for college and vocational schools, secondary school application processes, personal financial planning, as well as basic citizenship responsibilities such as voting, jury duty, and life on your own after high school. As with the other AFJROTC courses, drill and physical conditioning components complete the course description AFJROTC IV: Cultural Studies/Principles of Management Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: None; however, prior completion of Course is desirable This course is composed of two themes. The first involves a multidisciplinary study of various world regions to include geographic, historical, and cultural perspectives of each region. Each student will gain an awareness and insight into foreign affairs that affect our nation. Geopolitical aspects discussed will include terrorism, economics, politics, military issues, environmental concerns, human rights, and various other population and cultural issues. The remainder of the course will be geared toward understanding the basics of personal and organizational management. As with the other AFJROTC courses, drill and physical conditioning components complete the course description. Technology Applications Computer Science I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 This Course will foster students creativity and innovation by presenting opportunities to design, implement, and present meaningful programs through a variety of media. Students will collaborate with one another, their instructor, and various electronic communities to solve the problems presented throughout the course. Through data analysis, students will identify task requirements, plan search strategies, and use computer scienceconcepts to access, analysis, and evaluate information needed to solve problems. By using computer science knowledge and skills that support the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select he technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create solutions, and evaluate the results. Students will learn digital citizenship by researching current laws and regulations and by practicing integrity and respect. Students will gain and understanding of the principles of computer science through the study of technology operations, systems, and concepts Computer Science II Credit: 1 Grade Prerequisite: Algebra I and either Computer Science I or Fundamentals of Computer Science 40

42 Computer Science II will foster students' creativity and innovation by presenting opportunities to design, implement, and present meaningful programs through a variety of media. Through data analysis, students will identify task requirements, plan search strategies, and use computer science concepts to access, analyze, and evaluate information needed to solve problems. By using computer science knowledge and skills that support the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create solutions, and evaluate the results. Students will learn digital citizenship by researching current laws and regulations and by practicing integrity and respect. Students will gain an understanding of computer science through the study of technology operations, systems, and concepts Robotics Programming and Design Credit: 1 Grade Level : 9-12 Prerequisite: by application only This course will foster students creativity and innovation by presenting opportunities to design, implement, and present meaningful robotic programs through a variety of media. Students will collaborate with one another, their instructor, and various electronic communities to solve problems in designing and programming robots. Through data analysis, students will identify task requirements, plan search strategies, and use robotic concepts to access, analyze, and evaluate information needed to solve problems. By using robotic knowledge and skills that support the work of individuals and groups in solving problems, students will select the technology appropriate for the task, synthesize knowledge, create solutions, and evaluate the results. Students will learn digital citizenship by researching current laws and regulations and by practicing integrity and respect. Students will gain and understanding of the principles of robotics through the study of physics, robotics, automation, and engineering design concepts. Languages other than English Spanish I Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 It is strongly recommended that a student have 80 or above in the previous year s English to be successful. Spanish I is designed to help the student speak and understand basic Spanish, with an emphasis in grammar and vocabulary. Oral communication is stressed through question/answer periods and dialogues. An awareness of Spanish culture is encouraged through various classroom activities Spanish II Credit: 1 Grade Level: 9-12 It is strongly recommended that a student have 80 or above in Spanish I to be successful. Second year advances and extends the skills presented in the first-year course with the addition of more complex grammar and vocabulary. Students are challenged to begin thinking in the language so that their oral communication may be enhanced. Cultural studies move from simple dialogues to documentary readings. Much of the discussion will be conducted in Spanish Pre-AP Spanish III Credit: 1 Grade Level: It is strongly recommended that a student have 80 or above in Spanish II before attempting this upper-level course. Teacher approval required. This course progresses quickly into an all Spanish speaking class. Content includes grammar, literature, and the development of cultural awareness. Students further their speaking and understanding of the language. Field trips are incorporated depending on the size of the class and available funds AP Spanish IV Credit: 1 Grade Level: It is strongly recommended that a student have 85 or above in Pre-AP Spanish III before attempting this upper-level course. Teacher approval required. This course is taught exclusive in Spanish. One will develop an active vocabulary sufficient for reading newspaper and magazine articles, contemporary literature, and other non-technical writings (websites, letters and , advertisements, signs, and instructions) in Spanish without dependence on a dictionary; understand Spanish spoken by native speakers at a natural pace, with variety of regional pronunciations, in both informal (interpersonal) and formal (presentational) contexts. Self discipline and a true desire to learn Spanish is suggested. The student must have the self discipline required to spend time outside of class studying the material covered. Students are encouraged to take the AP exam to earn 10 hours of college credit at the end of the course American Sign Language I 41

43 Credit: 1 Grade Level: American Sign Language I is designed to help students learn basic ASL, with emphasis on grammar and vocabulary. ASL I will also provide instruction in receptive and expressive signing in one-to-one and group settings. Signing in front of a group is required throughout the year. Students will also study Deaf culture and history through videos, articles, books and visitors. This course will help provide valuable skills desired in the work force, as well as meet the requirement for a foreign language American Sign Language II Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: American Sign Language I - it is strongly recommended that a student have a 70 or above in ASL I to be successful. American Sign Language II is a continuation of American Sign Language I. This course will provide instruction in advanced receptive and expressive sign language skills. Students will also continue to study deaf culture and language. More class time will be conducted in a voices off environment. Signing in front of a group is required throughout the year American Sign Language III Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: American Sign Language II - It is strongly recommended that a student have an 80 or above in ASL II to be successful. American Sign Language III is a continuation of American Sign Language II and will be conducted in voices off environment. This course will provide additional instruction in advanced receptive and expressive sign language skills. Students will also continue to study deaf culture and language in greater depth. When possible, field trips are incorporated to utilize signing skills in a real world setting. This course sill provide valuable skills to work as an interpreter for the deaf as well as meet the requirements for a foreign language. Signing in front of a group is required throughout the year. Driver Education To enroll in this course, the student must be 15 years old before the end of the semester for which he/she is enrolled. Students enroll in the classroom phase either during the fall semester or spring semester and will perform the actual driving during the summer. Tuition for the course has been $250; 1/2 due at the beginning of the classroom phase and 1/2 due before the end of the classroom phase Driver Education (1st Semester) Credit: 1/2 Grade Level: 9-12 Prerequisite: At least 15 years old by the end of the semester taken Driver Education (2nd Semester) Peer Assistant Leadership These courses enhance communication, listening, decision making, problem solving and empathetic skills PAL I Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Selection based on nomination, application, recommendation and interview PAL II Credit: 1 Grade Level: 12 Prerequisite: PAL I 42

44 BHS Career Clusters Texas career clusters, offered at Burkburnett High School, are based on those developed by the U.S. Department of Education. Processing, production, distribution, financing, and development of agricultural commodities and natural recourses. Managing restaurants and other food services, lodging, attractions, recreation events, and travel-related services. Designing, planning, managing, building and maintaining the built environment. Providing for families and serving human needs. Creating, exhibiting, performing, and publishing multimedia content. Prepares learners for careers in planning, managing, and performing the processing of materials into intermediate or final products. Planning, organizing, directing and evaluating business funtions Managing movement of people, Prepares materials, learners and goods for careers by road, in pipeline, air, managing, rail, and water and providing planning, scientific research and professional and technical services. Providing diagnostic and therapeutic services, health information, support services, and biotechnology research and development. Managing movement of people, materials, and goods by road, pipeline, air, rail, and water. 43

45 ENDORSEMENTS STEM Math Science Computer Science Concepts of Engineering & Design Business & Industry ELA Journalism Career courses/ag Technology Public Service Career & Tech JROTC Nursing Arts & Humanities ELA Literature Social Studies Language Fine Arts Multidisciplinary 4 credits in foundation subjects to include English IV, chemistry and/or physics; or 4 advanced workforce ready CTE courses 4 AP courses from the foundation subjects 44

46 General Endorsements Frequently Asked Questions 1. Does every student have to graduate with an endorsement? No. A student may opt to graduate Foundation High School Program only without an endorsement if, after the student's sophomore year the student and the student's parent or guardian are advised by a school counselor of the specific benefits of graduating from high school with one or more endorsements and the student's parent or guardian files with a school counselor written permission, on a form adopted by the Texas Education Agency (TEA), allowing the student to graduate under the Foundation High School Program without earning an endorsement. 2. Can a student earn more than one endorsement? Yes. A district must allow a student to enroll in courses under more than one endorsement before the student's junior year. 3. Can a student change endorsements? When? Yes. While a district is not required to offer all endorsements, a district must allow a student to choose, at any time, to earn an endorsement other than the endorsement the student previously indicated from among the available endorsements. 4. I m concerned that my small district cannot offer endorsements. What endorsements should a district be able to offer? Without altering the courses that a school district is currently required by SBOE rule to offer, a district should be able to offer at least three of the five endorsements. Multidisciplinary (all districts are required to offer at least four courses in each foundation subject area, to include English IV, Chemistry, and Physics) Business and Industry (TAC, 74.3(b)(2)(G) requires a district to offer a coherent sequences of courses from at least three CTE career clusters) STEM (TAC, 74.3(b)(2)(C) requires a district to offer at least six science courses) 5. Will all high schools be required to offer multiple endorsements, even those that focus 100% on STEM/engineering? No. Statute requires each school district to make available to high school students courses that allow a student to complete the curriculum requirements for at least one endorsement. A school district that offers only one endorsement curriculum must offer the multidisciplinary studies endorsement curriculum. 6. The new graduation rules include the following statement, This section does not entitle a student to remain enrolled to earn more than 26 credits. Does this mean that a student cannot earn more than 26 credits? No. This statement means that a student is not entitled to continue earning credits to earn endorsements indefinitely. A district may permit a student to earn more than 26 credits, but has the authority to deny a student s request to continue earning credits beyond the 26 if the district determines that the student has sufficient credits to graduate with an endorsement. 7. May a course satisfy both a foundation and an endorsement requirement? Yes. A course completed as part of the set of four courses needed to satisfy an endorsement requirement may also satisfy a requirement under the Foundation High School Program, including an elective requirement. A student must still earn a total of 26 credits to graduate on the Foundation High 45

47 School Program with an endorsement. 8. Do districts have the authority to require Algebra II or other specific courses for all endorsements? Yes. School districts have the authority to establish requirements in addition to what the state requires of students for graduation. This is a local decision. 9. Who decides what constitutes a coherent sequence of courses? Each local school district has the authority to determine a coherent sequence of courses and identify courses within that sequence as advanced courses for the purposes of satisfying an endorsement requirement, provided that prerequisites are followed. 10. In some endorsement options there doesn t seem to be a clear sequence. Will the district determine the sequence in these cases? Yes. A school district determines the specific set of courses each student must complete to earn an endorsement, provided that prerequisites are followed and that the set of courses meets the requirements of the options listed for an endorsement in SBOE rule. 11. Should planning be approached by picking an endorsement and then planning the courses necessary to obtain that particular endorsement, or should it be approached by first picking courses and then discovering which endorsement area the sequence fits (at a later time)? This is a local decision. 12. Are students required to meet each of the options listed under an endorsement area, or they required to only meet one of the options? To earn an endorsement a student must complete any specific course requirements and one set of requirements identified in the endorsement rules. For example, to earn a business and industry endorsement, a student must complete the course requirements for CTE or the course requirements for English language arts electives, but not both. 13. Under the endorsements for which CTE courses are an option, is there a list of advanced CTE courses that are the third or higher course in a sequence? There is not a list of such courses. A school district may define advanced CTE courses keeping in mind the requirement that the course be the third or higher course in a sequence. 14. Can Career Preparation be used as the final course in a sequence for an endorsement for which there are CTE course options? No. Career Preparation may be used as one of the courses in the coherent sequence, but the final course must come from one of the career clusters listed in the rule. 15. If a student takes two CTE courses in his/her final semester, each from a different endorsement area, which endorsement would the student earn? If a student takes two CTE courses that align with two different endorsement areas, the local school district must determine which course is part of the coherent sequence of courses for that student. The career cluster of that course would determine which endorsement the student earns. This is a local decision. STEM 1. Can AP Physics I satisfy the physics requirement for the STEM endorsement? Yes. College Board Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted as 46

48 appropriate for required courses. 2. Can Principles of Technology satisfy the physics requirement in the STEM endorsement? Yes. Principles of Technology addresses all of the TEKS for physics and credit may not be earned for both physics and Principles of Technology to satisfy science credit requirements. 3. The fifth option under the STEM endorsement says a coherent sequence of three additional credits. What does this mean? Students may earn a STEM endorsement by successfully completing Algebra II and three additional credits from no more than two of the following categories: the STEM CTE career cluster, computer science courses that may satisfy a STEM endorsement, mathematics courses beyond Algebra II, or science courses. The three additional credits must be a coherent sequence of courses as determined by the local district. 4. Which science courses may satisfy the science option under the STEM endorsement? The list of science courses that may satisfy a STEM endorsement are identified in TAC 74.13(e)(5). 5. Why is there a discrepancy between the number of courses required to earn a math STEM endorsement and the number of courses required to earn a science STEM endorsement? There is not a discrepancy in the number of courses. To earn a STEM endorsement in mathematics, a student must successfully complete a total of five courses: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, and two additional math courses for which Algebra II is a prerequisite. To earn a STEM endorsement in science, a student must successfully complete a total of five courses: biology, chemistry, physics, and two additional science courses. Business and Industry If a student on a business and industry endorsement program chooses a computer programming language to meet the foundation program Languages Other Than English (LOTE) requirement, will these courses satisfy both the LOTE requirement and the endorsement requirement under the Information Technology career cluster? No. The computer programming courses that are part of CTE are not options for satisfying the LOTE requirement. The only courses that are currently approved to satisfy the LOTE requirement are Computer Science I, II, and III. These courses may satisfy the LOTE requirement and may count toward a STEM endorsement, but not a business and industry endorsement. A student must still earn a total of 26 credits to graduate on the Foundation High School Program with an endorsement. Public Services May a student seeking a public services endorsement who is taking a sequence of courses in the Human Services career cluster use a course from another career cluster as part of the coherent sequence of courses? Yes. A coherent sequence of courses may include courses from any CTE career cluster provided that the final course in the sequence is obtained from one of the CTE career clusters identified under the public services endorsement. Districts must determine locally that courses from different career clusters create a coherent sequence of courses. Arts and Humanities 1. Is it permissible to substitute an additional arts and humanities course for the fourth science requirement if the student is pursuing an arts and humanities endorsement? 47

49 A student pursuing an arts and humanities endorsement who has the written permission of the student s parent may substitute an English language arts course, a social studies course, a LOTE course, or a fine arts course for the additional science credit required to earn an endorsement. 2. Under the arts and humanities endorsement, if a student has taken English IV, can it count as part of the four English elective credits? Yes. A course completed as part of the set of four courses needed to satisfy an endorsement requirement may also satisfy a requirement under the Foundation High School Program, including an elective requirement. A student must still earn a total of 26 credits to graduate Foundation High School Program with an endorsement. 3. How many social studies courses are required for a student to earn an arts and humanities endorsement? The social studies option under arts and humanities requires that a student complete five credits in social studies. Multidisciplinary Studies Under the multidisciplinary studies endorsement, what courses will satisfy the requirement for four advanced courses that prepare a student to enter the workforce successfully or postsecondary education without remediation? Each local school district has the authority to identify advanced courses for the purposes of satisfying an endorsement requirement, provided that they meet the definition above. 48

50 AGRICULTURE, FOOD, AND NATURAL RESOURCES CLUSTER Falls under Business and Industry Endorsement Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Livestock Production Equine Science Small Animal Management Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology Management Range Ecology and Management Professional Standards in Agribusiness Agribusiness Management and Marketing Advanced Animal Science Horticulture Course Descriptions: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Credit: 1/2 Grades: 9-12 To be prepared for careers in agriculture, food, and natural resources, students must attain academic skills and knowledge in agriculture. This course allows students to develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, personal development, globalization, industry standards, details, practices, and expectations. To prepare for success, students need to have opportunities to learn, reinforce, experience, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This class requires a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) that is on outside of the classroom experience Livestock Production Credit: 1/2 Grades: Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Animal species to be addressed in this course may include, but are not limited to, beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine, sheep, goats, and poultry. This class requires a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) that is on outside of the classroom experience Equine Science (Rotating class, not offered every year) Credit: 1/2 Grades: Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources & Livestock Production To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to enhance academic knowledge and skills, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Suggested animals which may be included in the course of study include, but are not limited to horses, donkeys, and mules. This class requires a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) that is on outside of the classroom experience Small Animal Management Credit: 1/2 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to enhance academic knowledge and skills, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Suggested small animals which may be included in the course of study include, but are not limited to small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, avian, dogs, and cats. This class requires a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) that is on outside of the classroom experience. 49

51 21540 Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology Management Credit: 1/2 Grades: 9-12 Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources To be prepared for careers in natural resource systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to natural resources, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course examines the management of game and non-game wildlife species, fish, and aqua crops and their ecological needs as related to current agricultural practices. This class requires a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) that is on outside of the classroom experience Professional Standard in Agribusiness (Only offered 1st semester) Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources To be prepared for careers in agribusiness systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to leadership development and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills requiring agricultural career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course primarily focuses on leadership, communication, employer-employee relations, and problem solving as they relate to agribusiness Agribusiness Management and Marketing (Only offered 2nd semester) Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources To be prepared for careers in agribusiness systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to agribusiness marketing and management and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course is designed to provide a foundation to agribusiness management and the free enterprise system. Instruction includes the use of economic principles such as supply and demand, budgeting, record keeping, finance, risk management, business law, marketing, and careers in agribusiness Advanced Animal Science (Only offered 2nd semester) Credit: 1 Grade: * Under certain circumstances, may count for a 4th year science credit. Prerequisite: Biology and [,] Chemistry [,] or Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC); Algebra I and Geometry; and either Small Animal Management, Equine Science, or Livestock Production. Advanced Animal Science examines the interrelatedness of human, scientific, and technological dimensions of livestock production. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through field and laboratory experiences Horticulture Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Prepares for careers in horticultural systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to horticulture and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply and transfer knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop an understanding of common horticultural management practices as they related to food and ornamental plant production Career Preparation I Credit: 3 Grades: Provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business, and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student s individual program of study. This class requires a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) that is on outside of the classroom experience Career Preparation II Credit: 3 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Career Preparation I Develops essential knowledge and skills through classroom technical instruction and on-the-job training in an approved business and industry train- 50

52 ing area. Students will develop skills for lifelong learning, employability, leadership, management, work ethics, safety, and communication as a group; however, each student will have an individual training plan that will address job-specific knowledge and skills. This class requires a Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) that is on outside of the classroom experience. 51

53 ARCHITECTURE AND CONSTRUCTION CLUSTER Falls under STEM, Business and Industry, and Multidisciplinary Endorsement areas Principles of Architecture Interior Design Fashion Design Course Descriptions: Principles of Architecture and Construction Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Principles of Architecture provides an overview to the various fields of architecture, interior design, and construction management. Achieving proficiency in decision making and problem solving is an essential skill for career planning and lifelong learning. Students use self-knowledge, education, and career information to set and achieve realistic career and educational goals. Job- specific training can be provided through training modules that identify career goals in trade and industry areas. Classroom studies include topics such as safety, work ethics, communication, information technology applications, systems, health, environment, leadership, teamwork, ethical and legal responsibility, employability, and career development and include skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, and reading technical drawings Fashion Design Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Careers in fashion span all aspects of the textile and apparel industries. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the fashion industry with an emphasis on design and construction Interior Design Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Architecture Interior Design I is a technical course that addresses psychological, physiological, and sociological needs of individuals by enhancing the environments in which they live and work. Students will use knowledge and skills related to interior and exterior environments, construction, and furnishings to make wise consumer decisions, increase productivity, promote sustainability, and compete in industry. 52

54 ARTS, A/V TECHNOLOGY, AND COMMUNICATIONS CLUSTER Fall under all endorsements except Public Services (Focusing on Media Technology, Animation, Performing, & Visual Arts) Media Tech: Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, & Communication Audio Video Production Advanced Audio Video Production Animation: Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, & Communication Graphic Design (working with computers) Advanced Graphic Design Animation Advanced Animation Video Game Design Performing Arts: Band I-IV Choir I-IV Dance (by tryouts only) Theatre Arts Technical Theater AP Music Theory Modern/Contemporary Dance Musical Theatre Visual Arts: Art I-IV Journalism (yearbook) Commercial Photography Course Descriptions: Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Careers in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster require, in addition to creative aptitude, and strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong academic foundation, and a proficiency in oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop and understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in this cluster and the knowledge, skills and educational requirements for those opportunities Audio Video Production Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the AAVTC cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities Advanced Audio Video Production Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Audio Video Production Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio video communications industry. Within this context, in addi- 53

55 tion to developing advanced knowledge and skills needed for success in the AAVTC cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry with a focus on pre-production, production, and post-production activities. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio format or an advanced format, including both audio and video Graphic Design (working with computers) Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design Advanced Graphic Design Credit: 1 Prerequisite: Graphic Design Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry with a focus on mastery of content knowledge and skills Animation Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications Careers in animation span all aspects of motion graphics. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the AAVTC career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the history and techniques of the animation industry Advanced Animation Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Animation Careers in animation span all aspects of motion graphics. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced knowledge and skills needed for success in the AAVTC career cluster, students will be expected to create two-and three-dimensional animations. The instruction also assists students seeking careers in the animation industry Commercial Photography Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Careers in commercial photography require skills that span all aspects of the industry from setting up a shot to delivering products in a competitive market. In addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications Career Cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the commercial photography industry with a focus on creating quality photographs Video Gaming Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Video Game Design will allow students to explore one of the largest industries in the global marketplace and the new emerging careers it provides in the field of technology. Students will learn gaming, computerized gaming, evolution of gaming, artistic aspects of perspective, design, animation, technical concepts of collision theory, and programming logic. Students will participate in a simulation of a real video game design team while developing technical proficiency in constructing an original game design. Course Description for Performing & Visual Arts: See descriptions in the Fine Arts section of the handbook on page 33. For Journalism see the English section on page Career Preparation I Credit: 3 Grades: Provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business, and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student s individual program of study. 54

56 23083 Career Preparation II Credit: 3 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Career Preparation I Develops essential knowledge and skills through classroom technical instruction and on-the-job training in an approved business and industry training area. Students will develop skills for lifelong learning, employability, leadership, management, work ethics, safety, and communication as a group; however, each student will have an individual training plan that will address job-specific knowledge and skills. 55

57 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION CLUSTER Falls under STEM, Business and Industry, and Multidisciplinary Endorsement areas Touch Data Systems Course Description: Touch Data Systems Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 The Business Management and Administration Career Cluster focuses on careers in planning, organizing, directing, and evaluating business functions essential to efficient and productive business operations. In Touch System Data Entry, students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies. 56

58 HEALTH SCIENCE CLUSTER Falls under the Public Services Endorsement (Focusing on CNA and LVN certification) Principles of Health Science Health Science Practicum in Health Science Pre LVN- Lic Voc Nursing Anatomy and Physiology Course Descriptions: Principles of Health Science Credit: 1 Grade: The Principles of Health Science provides an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems of the health care industry. Students will learn medical terminology and be able to apply it to the classroom; reasoning, critical thinking, decision making, problem solving, and communicating effectively; ethical and legal responsibilities; and the ability to work well with others Health Science Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Health Science The Health Science course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will have hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development; learn CPR and first aid; and the principles of certified nursing assistants and do clinical work. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities, recognize limitations, and understand the implications of their actions Practicum in Health Science Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Principles of Health Science The Practicum is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. The student will be instructed in four Vernon college LVN courses, two per semester. Credits for these courses at the college level will be awarded upon successful acceptance in the LVN program a Vernon College Anatomy and Physiology of Human Systems Credit: 1 Grade Level: Prerequisite: Pre-AP Biology I, or A in Biology I and Chemistry Anatomy and Physiology is a laboratory oriented course in which students investigate the structures and functions of the components of the human body. The course presents investigation of the specialization of cells, how cells function cooperatively as tissue and organs, and the interrelationships of systems that result in a living organism. The course offers students opportunities to investigate anatomical structures and regulating mechanisms that influence how systems function. These concepts are designed to build a knowledge base for those students who wish to pursue a medically related career. This course only counts as a 4th year science Career Preparation I Credit: 3 Grades: Provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business, and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student s individual program of study Career Preparation II 57

59 Credit: 3 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Career Preparation I Develops essential knowledge and skills through classroom technical instruction and on-the-job training in an approved business and industry training area. Students will develop skills for lifelong learning, employability, leadership, management, work ethics, safety, and communication as a group; however, each student will have an individual training plan that will address job-specific knowledge and skills. 58

60 HOSPITALITY CLUSTER Falls under the Business and Industry Endorsement (Focusing on Culinary Arts) Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Restaurant Management Culinary Arts Practicum in Culinary Arts Course Descriptions: Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 The hospitality and tourism industry encompasses lodging; travel and tourism; recreation, amusements, attractions, and resorts; and restaurants an food beverage service. Our focus will be on the restaurant portion of this industry. Students use knowledge and skills that meet industry standards to extended learning experiences Restaurant Management Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Hospitality and Tourism This course will emphasize the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the management of a variety of food service operations. The course will provide insight into the operation of a well-run restaurant Culinary Arts Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisite: Restaurant Management or Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Culinary Arts begins with the fundamentals and principles of the art of cooking and the science of baking and includes management and production skills and techniques. Students must pass the ServSafe exam, given at the beginning of the semester, in order to continue with this course. ServSafe is a National Restaurant Association sanitation and safety curriculum and certification program developed for the foodservice industry. This course is offered as a laboratory-based or internship course Practicum in Culinary Arts Credit: 2-3 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Culinary Arts This course is a unique practicum that provides occupationally specific opportunities for the student to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. The course also prepares students with a variety of skills in a fast -changing workplace. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training and job development plan. The goal is for students to participate in the Texas Restaurant Association s annual ProStart Culinary/Restaurant Management competition. This competition showcases students with proven skills and a commitment to the industry and gives them a chance to apply their abilities through regional competitions and then state finals Career Preparation I Credit: 3 Grades: Provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business, and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student s individual program of study Career Preparation II Credit: 3 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Career Preparation I Develops essential knowledge and skills through classroom technical instruction and on-the-job training in an approved business and industry training area. Students will develop skills for lifelong learning, employability, leadership, management, work ethics, safety, and communication as a group; however, each student will have an individual training plan that will address job-specific knowledge and skills. 59

61 HUMAN SERVICES CLUSTER Falls under the Public Services Endorsement (Focusing on Family and Community Services) Principles of Human Services Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Dollars and Sense Interpersonal Studies Counseling and Mental Health Child Development Child Guidance Air Force Junior ROTC Course Descriptions: Principles of Human Services (Only offered 1st semester) Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 This laboratory course will enable students to investigate careers in the human ser ices career cluster including counseling and mental health, early childhood development, family and community, and personal care services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand human services careers Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness (Only offered 2nd semester) Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Principles of Human Services This laboratory course allows student to use principles of lifetime wellness and nutrition to help them make informed choices that promote wellness as well as pursue careers related to hospitality and tourism, human services and health sciences Dollars and Sense Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Human Services Dollar and Sense focuses on consumer practices and responsibilities, the money management process, decision-making skills, impact of technology, and preparation for human services careers Interpersonal Studies Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Human Services This course examines how the relationships between individuals and among family members significantly affect the quality of life. Students use knowledge and skills in family studies and human development to enhance personal development, foster quality relationships, promote wellness of family members, manage multiple adult roles, and pursue careers related to counseling and mental health services Counseling and Mental Health Credit: 1 (Semester Class) Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Human Services Students model the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a counseling and mental health career through simulated environments.. Students are expected to apply knowledge of ethical and legal responsibilities, limitations, and the implications of their actions. Professional integrity in counseling and mental health care is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities Child Development Credit: 1/2 Grade:10-12 Prerequisite: Principles of Human Services This technical laboratory course addresses knowledge and skills related to child growth and development form prenatal through school-age children, equipping students with child development skills. Students use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children and investigate careers related to the care and education of children. 60

62 23060 Child Guidance Credit: 1 (Semester Class) Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Human Services & Child Development This technical laboratory course addresses the knowledge and skills related to child growth and guidance equipping students to develop positive relationships with children and effective caregiver skills. Students use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children, strengthen a culturally diverse society, and pursue careers related to the care, guidance, and education of children, including those with special needs. Course Description for AFJROTC: (found on page 36 in this handbook) Career Preparation I Credit: 3 Grades: Provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business, and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student s individual program of study Career Preparation II Credit: 3 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Career Preparation I Develops essential knowledge and skills through classroom technical instruction and on-the-job training in an approved business and industry training area. Students will develop skills for lifelong learning, employability, leadership, management, work ethics, safety, and communication as a group; however, each student will have an individual training plan that will address job-specific knowledge and skills. 61

63 Manufacturing Falls under Business and Industry Endorsement (Focusing on Welding) Principles of Manufacturing Welding I Precision Metal Manufacturing Advanced Welding I Course Descriptions: Principles of Manufacturing Credit: 1(2 periods, one semester) Grades: In Principles of Manufacturing, students gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems and how those knowledge and skills are applied to manufacturing. Knowledge and skills in the proper application of principles of manufacturing, the design of technology, the efficient production of technology, and the assessment of the effects of technology prepare students for success in the modern world. The study of technology allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings in a manufacturing setting. In addition to general academic and technical knowledge and skills, students gain an understanding of career opportunities available in manufacturing and what employers require to gain and maintain employment in these careers Welding I (ARC) Credit: 1 (2 periods, one semester) Grades: Prerequisites: Principles of Manufacturing & Algebra I An introduction to shielded metal arc welding process. Emphasis placed o power sources, electrode selection, oxy-fuel cutting, and various joint designs. Instruction provided in Welding I fillet welds in various positions. This course is equivalent to the Vernon College Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) Precision Metal Manufacturing (Mig) Credit: 1 (2 periods, one semester) Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Welding I & Algebra I or Geometry A study of the principles of gas metal arc welding setup and use of Welding II equipment, and safe use of tools/equipment. Introduction in various joint designs. This course is equivalent to the Vernon College Introduction to Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Advanced Welding (Tig) Credit: 1 Grades: Prerequisite: Principles Manufacturing An introduction to the principles of gas tungsten arc welding, setup/use of equipment, and safe use of tools and equipment. Welding instruction in various positions on joint design. This course is equivalent to the Vernon College Into to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. (GTAW) 62

64 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Falls under STEM Endorsement Concepts of Engineering and Technology Course Descriptions: Concepts of Engineering and Technology Credit: 1 Grades: 9-10 Prerequisites: Algebra I In Concepts of Engineering and Technology provides and overview of the various fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and their interrelationships. Students will use a variety of computer hardware and software applications to complete assignments and projects. Upon completing this course, students will have an understanding of the various fields and will be able to make informed decisions regarding a coherent sequence of subsequent courses. Further, students will have worked on a design team to develop a product or system. Students will use multiple software applications to prepare and present course assignments. **BHS will be adding additional courses to this cluster in the following school years. 63

65 TRANSPORTATION, DISTRIBUTION, & LOGISTICS CLUSTER Falls under (Focusing Business on Automotive and Industry Technology) Endorsement (Focusing on Automotive Technology) Principle of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Automotive Principle of Transportation, Technology Distribution, and Logistics Advanced Automotive Automotive Technology technology Advanced Automotive Technology - Electrical - Brakes Course Descriptions: Principle of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 In Principles of Transportation, Distribution, and logistics, students gain knowledge and skills in the safe application, design, production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Students should apply knowledge and skills in the application, design and production of technology as it Course Descriptions: relates to the transportation, distribution, and logistics industries. This course allows students to reinforce, apply and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings Principle of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Safety Credit: 1/2 (1 periods, one semester) Grade: Automotive Technology In this course, students gain knowledge and skills in the safe application, design production, and assessment of products, services, and systems. Credit: 2 Students should apply knowledge and skills in the application, design and production of technology as it relates to the transportation, distribution, Prerequisite: Principles of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Grade: and logistics industries. This course allows students to reinforce, apply and transfer their academic knowledge and skills to a variety if interesting Automotive services include knowledge of the function of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. In Automotive Technology, students gain knowledge and skills in the repair and maintenance of vehicle systems. This study allows students and relevant activities, problems, and settings. to reinforce, Automotive apply, and transfer Technology academic - Engines knowledge and skills to a variety of operation of automotive vehicle systems and associated repair practices. Credit: 1(2 periods, one semester) Prerequisite: Principles of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Grade: An overview Advanced of automotive Automotive electrical Technology systems including topics in operational theory, testing diagnosis, and repair of charging and starting systems, and electrical Credit: accessories. 2 Emphasis on electrical schematic diagrams and service manuals. May be taught manufacturer specific. This course is equivalent Prerequisite: to Vernon College Automotive Technology Electrical Systems. Grade: Automotive services include knowledge of the function of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems A In Advanced Automotive Technology, Technology students - Electrical expand their knowledge and skills in the repair and maintenance of vehicle systems. This study allows Credit: students 1(2 to periods, reinforce, one apply, semester) and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of operation of automotive vehicle systems and associated Prerequisite: repair practices Grade: B Advanced Automotive Technology - Brakes Credit: 1(2 periods, one semester) Prerequisite: Grade: Operation and repair of drum/disc type brake systems. Topics include brake theory, diagnosis, and repair of power, manual, anti-lock brake systems, and parking brakes. May be taught with manufacture specific instructions. This course is equivalent to Vernon College Automotive Brake Systems Career Preparation I Credit: 3 Grades: Provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business, and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student s individual program of study Career Preparation II Credit: 3 Grades: 12 Prerequisite: Career Preparation I Develops essential knowledge and skills through classroom technical instruction and on-the-job training in an approved business and industry training area. Students will develop skills for lifelong learning, employability, leadership, management, work ethics, safety, and communication as a group; however, each student will have an individual training plan that will address job-specific knowledge and skills. 64

66 Special Education Services BISD offers special education services for students from age Placement in any special-education class depends on eligibility and the decision and placement of the Admission, Review and Dismissal (ARD) Committee. A number of special education programs and classes are offered at the high school level. All special education courses are taken for credit, as are general education courses. 65

67 Becoming a Student-Athlete Initial Eligibility Division I Academic Eligibility If you enroll BEFORE August 1, 2016 Graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements: Complete the 16 core-course requirement in eight semesters: 4 years of English 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher) 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by the high school) 1 extra year of English, math or natural or physical science 2 years of social science 4 additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy Earn at least 2.0 GPA in your core courses Earn a SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA. If you have a low test score, you need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible. If you have a low core-course GPA, you need a higher test score to be eligible. If you enroll AFTER August 1, 2016 Graduate high school and meet ALL the following requirements: Complete the 16 core-course requirement in eight semesters: 4 years of English 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher) 2 years of natural or physical science (including one year of lab science if offered by the high school) 1 extra year of English, math or natural or physical science 2 years of social science 4 additional years of English, math, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy Earn at least 2.0 GPA in your core courses Complete 10 core courses, including seven in English, math or natural/physical science, before your seventh semester. Once you begin your seventh semester, you may not repeat or replace any of those 10 courses to improve you core-course GPA. Earn at least a 2.3 GPA in your core courses Earn a SAT combined score or ACT sum score matching your core-course GPA on the Division I sliding scale, which balances your test score and core-course GPA to be elgible. If you have a low test score, you need a higher core-course GPA to be eligible. If you have a low core-course GPA, you need a higher test score to be eligible. 66

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