Planning for the Future... High School Course Catalog

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1 Planning for the Future... High School Course Catalog Leander Independent School District Leander High School 3301 S. Bagdad Road Leander, TX Tiffany Spicer, Principal Mascot: Lions Established 1899 Cedar Park High School 2150 Cypress Creek Road Cedar Park, TX John Sloan, Principal Mascot: Timberwolves Established 1998 Vista Ridge High School 200 S. Vista Ridge Blvd. Cedar Park, TX Paul Johnson, Principal Mascot: Rangers Established 2003 Rouse High School 1222 Raider Way Leander, TX John Graham, Principal Mascot: Raiders Established 2008 Vandegrift High School 9500 McNeil Drive Austin, TX Charlie Little, Principal Mascot: Vipers Established 2009 Welcome To Leander ISD Dear Parents and Students: As you examine this very important document, consider mapping out your future.do not think about next year: think about where you want to be in five years. In LISD our goal is to empower students to reach their academic potential in order to create a globally competitive work force. Our district prides itself on providing an academically rigorous and challenging program for all students. Ours is a college-going culture, where students aspire to academic excellence and personal best, positioning themselves for success in college and careers beyond. Each decision you make now will affect the options you will have later. Challenge yourself fully and develop a plan that keeps your options open, rather than one that may limit you later. Research shows that students who take more challenging courses in math, science, and the humanities, participate in advanced programs, and earn college credit while in high school are more likely to be successful in college and in their careers. For that reason, it is important to plan a challenging academic program and strongly pursue your interests. Understanding the rich array of courses available to you and the planning required is the first step in making these important decisions. DEVELOPING A 4-YEAR PLAN To ensure all students complete a challenging course of study and reach their potential, students begin the planning process during their 8th grade year. In addition all students are enrolled in Professional Communications during their 9th grade year. This course provides in-depth information about planning for college and careers. The Student-led Parent Conference is a culminating activity in this class where students share their 4-year high school plan with their parents. PROVIDING AN EDGE An important goal at each of our high schools is to set our graduates apart from students in other districts. We want to give you an edge. Opportunities include: AP, IB, and Pre-AP/IB Programs A rich array of internationally recognized college-preparatory courses in math, science, language, social sciences, arts, and technology. Texas Scholars Program Encouragement and recognition of those students who enroll and complete rigorous graduation plans. Based on their interests, aptitudes, and goals, students choose specific areas of study to create a program combining academically challenging courses and electives in their areas of interest. This strategy yields more in-depth knowledge and interrelated skills in their area of interest, and heightened preparation to continue their study in this field in post secondary education. Course selections determine how the master schedule is developed. Because the choices you make are extremely important to the planning of our school year, we ask that you honor your selections. Effort will be made to schedule you with your course choices, though some conflicts are unavoidable. List alternative electives as you complete your course selections. In Leander ISD, we want students to make informed decisions about course selections and to realize the impact these decisions have on their futures. The faculty and staff look forward to the coming year of opportunities and remain committed to excellence. Sincerely, John Sloan, Principal Cedar Park High School Tiffany Spicer, Principal Leander High School John Graham, Principal Rouse High School Charlie Little, Principal Vandegrift High School Paul Johnson, Principal Vista Ridge High School It is the policy of Leander ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex or handicap in its career and technology education programs, services, or activities. Leander ISD will take steps to assure that lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and vocational programs. Es norma de Leander ISD de no discriminar por motivos de raza, color, origen nacional, sexo o impedimento, en sus programas, servicios o actividades vocacionales. Leander ISD tomará las medidas necesarias para asegurar que la falta de habilidad en el uso de la lengua inglés no sea un obstáculo para la admisión o participación en todos los programas educativos y vocacionales.

2 Table of Contents LISD High School Graduation... Requirements Required High School Assessments... for Graduation...7 STAAR End of Course Requirements...7 Suggested Course Sequence Options Math & Science Course Sequences...10 Four Year Planning Document High School Graduation... Requirements I. High School Graduation Programs II. Recommended High School Plan and Distinguished Achievement Program...13 III. Foundation High School Program...13 IV. Performance Acknowledgments V. Texas Scholars...14 VI. Grade Level Classification...14 VII. Required State Assessments for Graduation...14 General Information I. Schedule Changes...15 II. Courses for Gifted and Talented Students (QUEST)...15 III. Special Education Services...15 IV. Section 504 Services...15 V. Career and Technical Education (CTE)...16 VI. Physical Education Substitutes...16 VII. World Language Substitutes VIII. Early Graduation...17 Alternative Methods for High... School Credit...17 I. High School Courses Taken in Middle School...17 II. Correspondence, Distance & Virtual Courses...17 III. Credit by Examination IV. Summer School...17 College and Career Readiness Program I. College Preparatory Courses and Programs...18 II. College Board Advanced Placement Program...18 III. International Baccalaureate Program...18 IV. Early College Start ACC Dual Credit Enrollment...19 Co-Enrollment...19 V. Articulated College Credit Courses...19 VI. College Connection...19 VII. COOL Week...20 VIII. Naviance...20 IX. College Entrance Exams PSAT, SAT and ACT...20 X. Automatic Admission to Texas... Public Colleges and Universities...20 XI. FAFSA/TASFA...20 XII. GPA Calculation and Reporting Planning for the Future College & Career Readiness Standard LISD Courses Approved for Dual Credit...23 Specialized Programs...24 Course Selections English English I...25 English I Pre-AP...25 English I Pre-AP QUEST...25 English I Pre-IB...25 English II...25 English II Pre-AP...25 English II Pre-AP QUEST...25 English II Pre-IB...25 English III English III AP...26 English III IB...26 English III - ACC Dual Credit...26 English IV...26 English IV - College Prep...26 English IV AP...26 English IV IB...26 English IV - ACC Dual Credit...26 English IV - British Literature - ACC Dual Credit Creative and Imaginative Writing...26 English for Speakers of Other Languages I...26 English for Speakers of Other Languages II...26 English I-III Sheltered Instruction Basic English English Transition Applied English Basic Writing Improvement Speech Communication Applications...27 Introduction to Speech... Communications Theory of Knowledge IB...27 Basic Communication Applications...27 Applied Communication Applications...27 Debate I-III...27 Public Speaking I-III Oral Interpretation I-III...28 Journalism...28 Analysis of Visual Media...28 Photojournalism I...28 Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production I-III...28 Newspaper Production I-III...28 Journalism Independent Study - Internship...28 Reading...28 ESL Reading I-III...28 Basic Reading Improvement Math Algebra I...28 Geometry...28 Geometry Pre-AP...28 Geometry Pre-IB...28 Math Models with Applications...29 Algebra II...29 Algebra II Pre-AP...29 Algebra II Pre-IB...29 Advanced Quantitative Reasoning...29 Math Independent Study - Intermediate College Algebra...29 College Preparatory Mathematics...29 Pre-Calculus...29 Pre-Cal Pre-AP...29 Pre-Cal Pre-IB...29 Calculus AB AP...29 Calculus BC AP...29 Mathematics SL IB...29 Mathematics HL IB...29 Statistics AP...29 Basic Algebra Basic Geometry Basic Math Models...30 Dollars and Cents...30 Applied Alg.,Geo., MM, D&C...30 Science Biology...30 Biology Pre-AP...30 Biology Pre-IB...30 Biology AP...30 Biology I IB...30 Biology II IB...30 Basic Biology...30 Integrated Physics & Chemistry...30 Basic Integrated Physics & Chemistry...30 Chemistry...30 Chemistry Pre-AP...30 Chemistry Pre-IB...30 Chemistry I IB Chemistry AP...31 Chemistry II IB...31 Physics...31 Physics Pre-AP...31 Physics Pre-IB...31 Physics I IB...31 Physics II IB...31 Physics C AP...31 Fourth Year Science Course Options Anatomy & Physiology...31 Scientific Research & Design I-II...31 Environmental Science AP...31 Environmental Systems...31 Earth and Space Science...32 Medical Microbiology...32 Basic Environmental Systems...32 Basic Earth and Space Science...32 Applied Biology, IPC, ES and PT...32 Social Studies World Geography...32 Human Geography AP...32 World History...32 World History AP...32 U.S. History...32 U.S. History AP...32 U.S. History II - ACC Dual Credit...32 History of the Americas I IB...32 History of the Americas II IB...32 Government...32 U.S. Government AP...32 U.S. Government - ACC Dual Credit Economics Macroeconomics AP...33 Principles of Macroeconomics - ACC Dual Credit...33 Basic World Geography...33 Basic World History...33 Basic US History...33 Basic Government...33 Basic Economics...33 Applied World Geo and Hist Applied US History & Government Applied Economics - FE...33 Elective Social Studies Program Psychology I IB...33 Psychology II IB...33 Investigations in Psychology...33 Psychology AP...33 European History AP...33 U.S. History I - ACC Dual Credit...33 Influence of the Old Testament Bible on American Civilization Influence of the New Testament... Bible on American Civilization Languages Other Than English American Sign Language I...34 American Sign Language II...34 American Sign Language III...34 American Sign Language IV...34 Basic American Sign Language I-II...34 Applied American Sign Language I-IV...34 French I...34 French II...34 French II Pre-AP/IB...34 French III Pre-AP...34 French III Pre-IB French IV AP...35 French IV IB...35 French V...35 Basic French I...35 Applied French I...35 German IV AP...35 German IV IB...35 Latin I...35 Latin II...35 Latin II Pre-AP/IB...35 Latin III Pre-AP...35 Latin III Pre-IB...35 Latin IV AP...35 Latin IV IB...35 Basic Latin I-II...35 Spanish I...35 Spanish II...36 Spanish II Pre-AP/IB...36 Spanish III...36 Spanish III Pre-AP...36 Spanish III Pre-IB...36 Spanish IV AP...36 Spanish IV IB...36 Spanish V AP...36 Spanish V IB...36 Basic Spanish I...36 Applied Spanish I...36 Fine Arts

3 Visual Arts Art I...36 Art II-IV: Drawing...36 Basic Art II-IV: Drawing Art II-IV: Painting...37 Basic Art II-IV: Painting Art II-IV: Sculpture...37 Basic Art II-IV: Sculpture Art II-IV: Ceramics...37 Basic Art II-IV: Ceramics Art II-IV: Photography...37 Art AP - Portfolio Art AP - Art History...37 Art I-II IB...38 Basic Art I...38 Performing Arts Band...38 Color Guard...38 Music I IB...38 Music Theory AP...38 Choir...38 Dance I-IV Dance Team Prep I-II...39 Dance Team...39 Dance Team JV...39 Dance Composition I-II...39 Theatre I-IV...39 Theatre Productions I-IV...39 Theatre Arts I-II IB...39 Technical Theatre I-IV Basic Choir I-IV...40 Basic Theatre I...40 Basic Technical Theatre I-IV...40 Health/Physical Education...40 Health...40 Basic Health...40 Applied Health Foundations of Personal Fitness...40 Aerobic Activity...40 Team or Individual Sport...40 Adapted Physical Education Cheerleading...40 Athletics...40 Sports Medicine I-IV...40 College & Career Development AVID I-IV College Transition...41 PSAT Team...41 QUEST...41 Leadership & Development...41 Leadership...41 PALs I-II...41 Basic Leadership...41 Basic Teen Leadership...41 Applied Leadership...41 Applied Teen Leadership Basic Study Lab Junior Reserve Officer s Training Corps (JROTC) Air Force JROTC I-IV Navy JROTC I-IV...42 Technology Applications...42 Robotics Programming and Design Computer Science I Pre-AP...42 Computer Science AP...42 Mobile Application Development...42 Technology Applications... Independent Study...42 Career and Technical Career Course Selections Career Development...43 Career Preparation I...43 Problems and Solutions I-II...43 Basic Career Preparation I-II...43 Basic Problems and Solutions I-II...43 Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Principles of Agriculture, Food, Natural Resources...43 Basic Principles of Agriculture, Food, Natural Resources...43 Principles & Elements of Floral Design...43 Basic Principles & Elements of Floral Design...43 Horticulture Science...43 Landscape Design & Turf Management...43 Wildlife, Fisheries & Ecology Management...43 Small Animal Management...43 Basic Wildlife, Fisheries & Ecology Management...43 Basic Small Animal Management...43 Livestock Production...43 Advanced Animal Science Veterinary Medical Applications...44 Practicum in Veterinary Medical Applications...44 Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies...44 Agricultural Facilities Design & Fabrication...44 Practicum in Agricultural Mechanics...44 Basic Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies...44 Architecture and Construction...44 Interior Design...44 Architectural Design...44 Advanced Architectural Design...44 Construction Technology...44 Advanced Construction Technology Practicum in Building Construction Management...44 Basic Construction Technology Electrical Technology...44 Advanced Electrical Technology...44 Practicum in Electrical Construction Management...44 Arts, A/V Technology and Communication.45 Professional Communications...45 Professional Communications (ACE)...45 Basic Professional Communications Applied Professional Communications...45 Graphic Design and Illustration...45 Animation...45 Video Game Design...45 Audio/Video Production...45 Advanced Audio/Video Production...45 Education & Training...45 Instructional Practice in Education & Training (Ready, Set, Teach! 1)..45 Practicum in Education & Training (Ready, Set, Teach! 2)..45 Business Management & Administration Principles of Information Tech...46 Business Information Management I-II...46 Business Management -... Entrepreneurship...46 Global Business...46 Virtual Business...46 Basic BIM...46 Applied BIM...46 Finance...46 Accounting I-II...46 Health Science Health Science...46 Practicum in Health Science Medical Terminology...46 Pharmacology...46 Anatomy & Physiology...47 Medical Microbiology...47 Principles of Biomedical Sciences...47 Human Body Systems...47 Medical Interventions...47 Biomedical Innovation...47 Hospitality & Tourism Culinary Arts Prep...47 Practicum in Culinary Arts I - II Restaurant Management...47 Basic Culinary Arts Prep...47 Hotel Management...47 Travel and Tourism Management...47 Hospitality Services: Hotel Management Human Services...48 Principles of Human Services...48 Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness...48 Child Development...48 Counseling and Mental Health...48 Basic Principles of Human Services...48 Basic Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness...48 Basic Child Development...48 Applied PC, TL, LN&W, CA...48 Applied PHS, IS, CD, FCS...48 Cosmetology I-II...48 Marketing Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance...48 Advertising and Sales Promotion Sports and Entertainment Marketing Fashion Marketing...49 Retailing and E-tailing...49 Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Introduction to Engineering Design Principles of Engineering...49 Aerospace Engineering...49 Civil Engineering and Architecture...49 Engineering Design and Development...49 Transportation, Distribution & Logistics...49 Automotive Technology...49 Advanced Auto Technology...49 Practicum in Auto Technology...49 Programs of Study Arts and Communication Academy Communications Cluster...51 Performing Arts Cluster...52 Humanities Cluster...52 Visual Arts Cluster...53 Business & Computer Technology Academy Information Tech Cluster...54 Finance, Business Management... & Administration Cluster...54 Marketing, Sales and Services Cluster...55 Hospitality and Tourism Cluster...55 Engineering & Industrial Technology Academy Architecture and Construction Cluster...56 Manufacturing Cluster...56 Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Cluster...57 Transportation Cluster...57 Human Services, Health & Agriculture Academy Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Cluster...58 Education & Training Cluster...58 Law, Public Safety & Security Cluster...58 Human Services Cluster...59 Health Science Cluster...60 Endorsement Areas - Programs of Study Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Endorsement...62 Business and Industry Endorsement Public Service Endorsement Multidisclipinary Endorsement...69 Arts and Humanities Endorsement...70 Catalog Index...71 College & Career Ready Chart...72 For updates to this catalog, please see the online version at Planning for the Future...3

4 Leander ISD High School Graduation Requirements Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014 or later During the 83rd Texas Legislature, House Bill 5 was signed into law, which changes high school graduation requirements for students who entered 9th grade in Fall 2014 or later. The bill provides more flexibility for high school students. Qualification for Automatic Admission (top 10%) to Texas state colleges and universities requires students to complete the Distinguished Level of Achievement or the LISD Distinguished with Honors. Leander ISD students will start on the LISD Distinguished with Honors graduation plan and the multi-disciplinary endorsement area. Students who entered 9th grade in the Fall of 2012 or 2013 may switch to the New State Foundation Plan. Students who switch will still be required to satisfy the Communication Applications requirements from their previous plan. Students should contact their counselor for more information. Foundation + Endorsements 26 CREDITS English... 4 Credits ELA I, II, III, one credit in any authorized English course** Math... 4 Credits Algebra I, Geometry, two credits in any authorized math course** Science...4 Credits Biology; IPC, Chemistry and/or Physics; and two credits in any authorized Science course** Social Studies...3 Credits World Geography or World History; U.S. History; U.S. Government (.5 credit); Economics (.5 credit) World Language...2 Credits See counselor for state approved Level II World Language substitutions Physical Education...1 Credit See counselor for state approved physical education substitutions Fine Arts...1 Credit Professional Communication*...1 Credit Electives...6 Credits Credit requirements specific to at least one endorsement. Distinguished Level of Achievement 26 CREDITS English... 4 Credits ELA I, II, III, one credit in any authorized English course** Math... 4 Credits Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, one credit in any authorized math course** Science...4 Credits Biology; IPC, Chemistry and/or Physics; and two credits in any authorized Science course** Social Studies...3 Credits World Geography or World History; U.S. History; U.S. Government (.5 credit); Economics (.5 credit) World Language...2 Credits See counselor for state approved Level II World Language substitutions Physical Education...1 Credit See counselor for state approved physical education substitutions Fine Arts...1 Credit Professional Communication*...1 Credit Electives...6 Credits Credit requirements specific to at least one endorsement. LISD Distinguished with Honors 26 CREDITS English... 4 Credits ELA I, II, III, & IV Math... 4 Credits Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, 4th credit of Mathematics must have Algebra II as a minimum prerequisite Science...4 Credits Biology; Chemistry, Physics, one credit in any authorized Science course** Social Studies...4 Credits World Geography, World History; U.S. History; U.S. Government (.5 credit); Economics (.5 credit) World Language...3 Credits Must consist of three credits of the same language. Physical Education...1 Credit See counselor for state approved physical education substitutions Fine Arts...1 Credit Professional Communication*...1 Credit Electives...4 Credits Credit requirements specific to at least one endorsement. *All LISD freshmen are required to take Professional Communications or AVID as a year-long state elective. Students entering after the freshman year must replace this requirement with an approved substitution. Approved substitutions are AVID, Debate, Public Speaking, Oral Interpretation or Communication Applications. ** See specific graduation requirement charts options. Pre-AP/IB, AP, IB or dual credit courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas; check with your counselor for available options. The Foundation High School Program (22 credits) is available, however, this requires that you see your counselor for discussion of this plan after the completion of the 10th grade year. 4...Planning for the Future

5 Leander ISD High School Graduation Requirements Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014 or later Students must choose an Endorsement, or area of concentration, upon entering the ninth grade. Each student can choose more than one endorsement area. Achieved endorsements will be noted on high school diplomas. Students can earn an endorsement by successfully completing at least one of the requirements in the endorsement areas listed below. Please see the specific course requirements for each area listed in the course catalog. Courses chosen during high school become the foundation for the future; therefore, careful selection of courses will form a related to a chosen post-secondary educational goal. Endorsement Areas STEM Business/Industry Public Service Arts/Humanities Multidisciplinary Programs of Study Programs of Study Programs of Study Programs of Study Programs of Study Advanced Math Advanced Science Computer Science Engineering (PLTW) STEM Studies Agriculture - Plant Science* Agriculture - Animal Science Agriculture - Ag Mechanics Agriculture Studies Architecture and Interior Design* Art, Audio/Video and Communications Automotive Technology* Business Management and Administration Construction Technology* Culinary Arts* Electrical Technology* English Electives: Debate Newspaper Oral Interpretation Public Speaking Yearbook Finance Hospitality* Marketing Education Biomedical Science (PLTW) Cosmetology* Education/Training Health Science Human Services JROTC: Air Force JROTC* Navy JROTC* Fine Arts: Art Dance Music - Band and Choir Technical Theatre Theatre Languages Other Than English: ASL French Latin Spanish Social Studies Four advanced courses that prepare a student to enter the workforce successfully or postsecondary education without remediation from within one endorsement area or among endorsement areas that are not in a coherent sequence Four credits in each of the four foundation subject areas to include English IV, and Chemistry and/or Physics Four credits in AP, IB or dual credit selected from English, mathematics, science, social studies, economics, LOTE and Fine Arts. *offered at designated campuses only State Assessments Required for Graduation English I, II; Algebra I; U.S. History; Biology Performance Acknowledgements Questions? Outstanding performance: Dual credit, IB, AP, PSAT, bilingualism/bi-literacy; SAT, ACT or industry certifications Contact your student s campus or org Planning for the Future...5

6 Recommended High School Plan English... 4 Credits English I, II, III, IV Mathematics...4 Credits Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II Fourth Credit: See list of approved 4th year math courses. Science...4 Credits Biology, Chemistry and Physics Fourth Credit: See list of approved 4th year science courses. Note: IPC will count as a 4th science credit if completed prior to Chemistry and Physics Social Studies...4 Credits World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government/Economics Languages Other Than English...2 Credits Must consist of two credits of the same language. Physical Education...1 Credit See counselor for state approved physical education substitutions. Leander ISD High School Graduation Requirements Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 & 2013 New State Foundation Plan option available See Counselor for more information. Distinguished Achievement Program 26 CREDITS 26 CREDITS English Credits English I, II, III, IV Mathematics...4 Credits Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II The 4th credit of mathematics must have Algebra II as a minimum prerequisite. See list of approved 4th year math courses. Science...4 Credits Biology, Chemistry and Physics Fourth Credit: See list of approved 4th year science courses. Social Studies... 4 Credits World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government/Economics Languages Other Than English... 3 Credits Must consist of three credits of the same language. Physical Education... 1 Credit See counselor for state approved physical education substitutions. Health Education... ½ Credit 4th Year Mathematics Course Options* Recommended: Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Calculus AB Advanced Placement Calculus BC Advanced Placement Independent Study in Mathematics Mathematical Models only if taken prior to Algebra II, Recommended Graduation Plan only Mathematics HL International Baccalaureate Mathematics SL International Baccalaureate Pre-Calculus Statistics Advanced Placement The State Board of Education (SBOE) has approved courses to substitute for math credits. Leander ISD offers the following approved math substitution courses on the Recommended HSP only: AP Computer Science (Technology Applications) and Robotics Programming and Design (Technology Applications). Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Distinguished Achievement Program Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Calculus AB Advanced Placement Calculus BC Advanced Placement Independent Study in Mathematics Mathematics HL International Baccalaureate Mathematics SL International Baccalaureate Pre-Calculus Statistics Advanced Placement 4th Year Science Course Options* Health Education...½ Credit Communication Applications...½ Credit ACE-SL... ½ Credit Required of all LISD freshmen. Students entering after the freshman year must replace this requirement with a state approved elective. Fine Arts...1 Credit Electives (must be state approved)...4½ Credits Advanced Measures...NONE Communication Applications... ½ Credit ACE-SL... ½ Credit Required of all LISD freshmen. Students entering after the freshman year must replace this requirement with a state approved elective. Fine Arts... 1 Credit Electives (must be state approved)...3½ Credits Advanced Measures...FOUR Description of Advanced Measures can be found in the Counseling Office and on page 6. Pre-AP/IB, AP, IB or dual credit courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas; check with your counselor for available options. A Minimum High School Graduation Plan is available, however, this requires that you see your counselor for discussion of this plan. Recommended & Distinguished Achievement Program: Anatomy & Physiology Biology Advanced Placement Biology International Baccalaureate Chemistry Advanced Placement Chemistry International Baccalaureate Earth and Space Science Environmental Science Advanced Placement Environmental Systems Medical Microbiology Physics C Advanced Placement Physics International Baccalaureate Scientific Research & Design The State Board of Educations (SBOE) has approved courses to substitute for science credits. Leander ISD offers the following approved science substitution courses: Advanced Animal Science (CTE) and Principles of Engineering (CTE). Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. *Other credits approved by State Board of Education may be added 6...Planning for the Future

7 Required High School Assessments for Graduation Students first entering 9th grade during or later Students who entered 9th grade in , and subsequent years thereafter, will take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR). STAAR End-of-Course (EOC) assessments replaced the high school Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS). The STAAR EOC assessments will be administered in English I, English II, Algebra I, Biology, and U.S. History. Students take the assessments at the end of each course. In order to graduate, a student must meet the Level II Satisfactory scale score on each STAAR EOC assessment. The chart below lists the different phases of cut scores. To find what scale scores are expected on your STAAR EOC assessments, find the phase column that corresponds to the school year in which you took your first STAAR EOC (ex: If you took Algebra I STAAR EOC as an 8th grader in Spring 2012, all your subsequent STAAR scores would need to meet the Phase One score requirements listed below.). In addition, Algebra II and English III EOC STAAR exams are being developed and will have College and Career Readiness Standards ( school year). Please check the district website at for the latest information on STAAR. STAAR EOC retest opportunities will be available for students needing to retest. Retests will be offered during the summer, fall and spring administrations of STAAR. STAAR EOC Scale Score/Graduation Requirements (Based on TEA STAAR EOC Performance Standards) PHASE ONE 1st EOC Content Area , , , PHASE TWO 1st EOC Content Area , , PHASE THREE 1st EOC Content Area , , FINAL PHASE 1st EOC Content Area & beyond Subject Satisfactory Level II Advanced Level III Satisfactory Level II Advanced Level III Satisfactory Level II Advanced Level III Satisfactory Level II Advanced Level III ELA English I English II Mathematics Algebra I Science Biology Social Studies U.S. History Planning for the Future...7

8 Suggested Course Sequence Options The chart below is a guide to help students in creating their four-year plan. Not all courses listed in the suggested sequence are required for an endorsement. Additional course substitution options for completing an endorsement are located in the section of the catalog. Courses may be moved or skipped in the suggested sequence, but specific course prerequisites and grade level requirements must be met. *Indicates that the course has a required prerequisite. STEM Endorsement First/Second Course Second/Third Course Third/Fourth Course Fourth/Fifth Course Advanced Math (7 credits required - courses in bold required) Advanced Science (6 credits required - courses in bold required) Computer Science (7 credits required - courses in bold required) Engineering (PLTW) (7 credits required - courses in bold required) Algebra I Biology I or Biology Pre-AP/IB Robotics Programming and Design Professional Communications, Introduction to Engineering Design Geometry or Geometry Pre-AP/IB, Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP/IB Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP/IB Computer Science I, Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP/IB *Principles of Engineering, Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP/IB Business and Industry Endorsement Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP/IB, Physics or Physics Pre-AP/IB Physics or Physics Pre-AP/IB, Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP/IB, Anatomy and Physiology, AP Environmental Sciences, Environmental Systems *AP Computer Science, Physics or Physics Pre-AP/IB, Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP/IB *Aerospace Engineering,*Civil Engineering and Architecture, Physics or Physics Pre-AP/IB, Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP/IB AQR, Pre-Calculus, Pre-Calculus, Pre-AP/IB, AP Calculus AB/BC, AP Statistics, IB Math SL/HL Medical Microbiology, AP/IB Biology, AP/IB Chemistry, AP/IB Physics, Earth and Space Science, Scientific Research and Design *Mobile Application, *CS Independent Study *Engineering Design and Development First/Second Course Second/Third Course Third/Fourth Course Fourth/Fifth Course Agriculture - Animal Science (4 credits required - 2 credits from courses in bold) Agriculture - Plant Science (4 credits required - courses in bold required) Agriculture - Agricultural Mechanics (4 credits required - courses in bold required) Architecture and Interior Design (4 credits required - 2 credits from courses in bold) Arts, Audio/Video Technology (4 credits required - 2 credits from courses in bold) Automotive Technology (4 credits required - courses in bold required) Business Management and Administration Construction Technology (4 credits required - courses in bold required) Culinary Arts: Restaurant Management (4 credits required - courses in bold required) English Electives - Advanced Journalism: Newspaper (4 credits required - courses in bold required) English Electives - Advanced Journalism: Yearbook (4 credits required - courses in bold required) English Electives - Debate (4 credits required - courses in bold required) English Electives - Oral Interpretation (4 credits required - courses in bold required) English Electives - Public Speaking (4 credits required - courses in bold required) Finance (4 credits required -courses in bold required) Hospitality: Hotel Management (4 credits required -courses in bold required) Marketing (4 credits required - courses in bold required) 8...Planning for the Future Professional Communications, Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Professional Communications, Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Professional Communications, Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources Small Animal/Wildlife Fisheries & Ecology Management, Livestock Productions Floral Design Agriculture Mechanics and Metal Technologies *Veterinary Medical Applications Horticulture Science/Landscape Design *Agricultural Facilities Design and Fabrication *Advanced Animal Science, *Practicum in Veterinary Medical Applications Interior Design and/or Architecture Design *Practicum in Agricultural Mechanics Professional Communications Interior Design Architecture Design *Advanced Architecture Design Professional Communications Audio Video Productions, Graphic Design and Illustration *Advanced Audio Video Productions, *Animation Professional Communications Automotive Technology *Advanced Automotive Technology Professional Communications, Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance Business Information Management I, Business Management Business Information Management II, Global Business/Virtual Business Professional Communications Construction Technology *Advanced Construction Technology Professional Communications, Principles of Human Services Professional Communications, Journalism/Analysis of Visual Media Professional Communications, Journalism/Analysis of Visual Media Culinary Arts Prep, Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Advanced Journalism: Newspaper I, Photojournalism I Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I, Photojournalism I *Practicum in Culinary Arts *Advanced Journalism: Newspaper II *Advanced Journalism: Yearbook II Professional Communications Debate I *Debate II *Debate III *Video Game Design, *Problems and Solutions *Practicum in Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Business/Marketing Elective *Practicum in Building Construction Management *Practicum in Culinary Arts II *Advanced Journalism: Newspaper III *Advanced Journalism: Yearbook III Professional Communications Oral Interpretations I *Oral Interpretations II *Oral Interpretations III Professional Communications Public Speaking I *Public Speaking II *Public Speaking III Professional Communications, Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance Professional Communications, Principles of Human Services Professional Communications, Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance Accounting I *Accounting II Business/Marketing Elective Hotel Management/Travel and Tourism Retailing and E-tailing/Fashion Marketing *Hospitality Services Advertising and Sales Promotion/ Sports Marketing *Practicum in Hospitality and Tourism *Problems and Solutions, Business/ Marketing Elective

9 Suggested Course Sequence Options (Continued) The chart below is a guide to help students in creating their four-year plan. Not all courses listed in the suggested sequence are required for an endorsement. Additional course substitution options for completing an endorsement are located in the section of the catalog. Courses may be moved or skipped in the suggested sequence, but specific course prerequisites and grade level requirements must be met. *Indicates that the course has a required prerequisite. Public Service Endorsement First/Second Course Second/Third Course Third/Fourth Course Fourth/Fifth Course Biomedical Science (PLTW) (4 credits - 3 credits from courses in bold) Professional Communications, Principles of Biomedical Science *Human Body Systems *Medical Interventions, Health Science, Anatomy and Physiology, *Biomedical Innovation Cosmetology (4 credits - courses in bold required) Professional Communications, Principles of Human Services Cosmetology I *Cosmetology II Education and Training (4 credits - courses in bold required) Professional Communications, Principles of Human Services Child Development Instructional Practice in Education and Training *Practicum in Education and Training Health Science (4 credits - 3 credits from courses in bold) Junior Reserve Office Training Corp (JROTC) Air Force () or Navy (VRHS) (4 credits - Levels I-IV required) Professional Communications, Principles of Biomedical Sciences Medical Terminology/Pharmacology, *Human Body Systems Health Science, Anatomy and Physiology, Practicum in Health Science, Medical Microbiology AFJROTC I or NJROTC I *AFJROTC II or *NJROTC II *AFJROTC III or *NJROTC III *AFJROTC IV or *NJROTC IV Arts and Humanities Endorsement First/Second Course Second/Third Course Third/Fourth Course Fourth/Fifth Course Fine Arts - Visual Arts (4 credits) Art I, *Art I Studio *Art II (Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, Photography, *AP Art History *Art III: (Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, Photography), *Art AP - 2D; *Art AP Drawing Portfolio, *IB Art I *Art IV: (Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Ceramics, Photography), *Art AP - 3D, *IB Art II, *AP Art History Fine Arts - Dance (4 credits) Fine Arts I: Dance I Fine Arts II: *Dance II or *Dance Team I Fine Arts III: *Dance I II or *Dance Team II, *Dance Composition I Fine Arts IV: *Dance I IV or *Dance Team III, *Dance Composition II Fine Arts - Music Band (4 credits) Fine Arts I: Band I Fine Arts II: *Band II, Fine Arts III: *Band III, AP *Music Theory, IB Music I Fine Arts IV: *Band IV Fine Arts - Music Choir (4 credits) Fine Arts I: Choir I, Fine Arts II: *Choir II Fine Arts III: *Choir III, *AP Music Theory, IB Music I Fine Arts IV: *Choir IV Fine Arts - Technical Theatre (4 credits - Levels I-IV required) Fine Arts I: Technical Theatre I Fine Arts II: *Technical Theatre II Fine Arts III: *Technical Theatre III Fine Arts IV: *Technical Theatre IV Fine Arts - Theatre (4 credits - Levels I-IV required) Fine Arts I: Theatre I, *Theatre Production I Fine Arts II: *Theatre II, *Theatre Production II Fine Arts III: *Theatre III, *Theatre Production III, *IB Theatre Arts I Fine Arts IV: *Theatre IV, *Theatre Productions IV, *IB Theatre Arts II Languages Other Than English (LOTE) (4 credits - Levels I-IV required in same language) Social Studies (5 credits) Spanish I, *Spanish II, French I, Latin I, ASL I World Geography or AP Human Geography *Spanish III, *French II, *Latin II, *ASL II World History or AP World History Multidisciplinary Endorsement *Spanish IV AP/IB, *French III, *Latin III, *ASL III US History, AP US History, IB History of Americas I, *AP/IB Psychology I, Influence of the Old/New Testament *Spanish IV or V AP/IB, *French IV AP/IB, *Latin IV AP/IB or *ASL IV Government/Economics, AP Government/AP Economics, *IB Psychology II, AP European History, *IB History of Americas II First/Second Course Second/Third Course Third/Fourth Course Fourth/Fifth Course Multidisciplinary (16 credits - Four credits in each of the foundation areas to include English IV, Chemistry and/or Physics) English I or English I Pre-AP/IB, Algebra I, Biology I or Biology Pre-AP/IB, World Geography or AP Human Geography English II or English II Pre-AP/IB, Geometry or Geometry Pre-AP/IB, IPC (Chemistry or Physics must be taken afterwards), Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP/IB, World History or AP World History English III or English III AP/IB, Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP/IB or 3rd math course, Physics or Physics Pre-AP/IB or 3rd science course US History or AP US History or IB History of Americas English IV or English IV AP/IB, 4th math course, 4th Science course, Government/Economics or AP Government/AP Economics Planning for the Future...9

10 Math & Science Course Sequences Math Course Sequence Algebra I LISD Honors Math Course Sequence Algebra I Geometry Geometry Credit for Algebra I and Geometry with grade better than minimal passing Credit for Algebra I and Geometry with minimal passing Algebra II Algebra II Math Models* Pre-Calculus AP Statistics Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Pre-Calculus AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC IB Math Standard Level IB Math Higher Level AP Statistics Math IS - ICA Advanced Quantitative Reasoning College Prep Math *Math Models may NOT be taken concurrently with Algebra II. However, the prerequisite for Math Models is Algebra I, so Math Models could be taken concurrently with Geometry. AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC IB Math Standard Level IB Math Higher Level The State Board of Education (SBOE) has approved courses to substitute for math credits. Leander ISD offers the following approved math substitution courses: AP Computer Science (Technology Applications) and Robotics Programming and Design (Technology Applications). Geometry and Algebra II may also be taken concurrently. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/ requirements. Science Course Sequence Biology LISD Honors Science Course Sequence Biology Credit for Algebra I with grade better than minimal passing Credit for Algebra I with minimal passing Chemistry Chemistry Physics AP or IB Physics Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) Anatomy & Physiology Environmental Systems AP or IB Chemistry AP or IB Biology Medical Microbiology Scientific Research and Design Earth and Space Science AP Environmental Science Environmental Systems Physics AP or IB Physics Anatomy & Physiology Environmental Systems AP or IB Chemistry AP or IB Biology Medical Microbiology Scientific Research and Design Earth and Space Science AP Environmental Science The State Board of Education (SBOE) has approved courses to substitute for science credits. Leander ISD offers the following approved science substitution courses: Advanced Animal Science (CTE) and Principles of Engineering (CTE). Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements Planning for the Future

11 Four Year Planning Document (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Name: Date: : 9th 10th Summer 11th Summer 12th English I English II English III English IV Math Math Math Math Science Science Science Science World Geography World History U.S. History Government/ Economics ACE/Health P.E. Recommended (26 credits): Students must add ½ credit in Communication Applications, 2 credits of the same foreign language, 1 credit in fine arts, and elective credits. See specific graduation requirement charts for math, science, and elective requirements. Distinguished Achievement Program DAP (26 credits): Additional requirements to the Recommended Plan above include a 3rd credit in the same foreign language & 4 advanced measures as explained in course catalog. Fourth-year credits in Math and Science must be selected from the DAP lists in the course catalog. Pre-AP/IB, College Board Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas. A Minimum High School Graduation Plan is available, however, this requires that you see your counselor for discussion of this plan. Required state assessments for graduation: English I, II; Algebra I; U.S. History; Biology Notes: Planning for the Future...11

12 Four Year Planning Document (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014 and beyond) Name: Date: Endorsement Area: STEM; Business and Industry; Public Service; Arts and Humanities; Multidisciplinary (Please check at least one endorsement area) : (Please list all that apply) 9th 10th Summer 11th Summer 12th English I English II English III English IV Math Math Math Math Science Science Science Science World Geography World History U.S. History Government/ Economics Professional Communications P.E. Foundation High School Program + Endorsements (26 credits): Students must add 2 credits of World Language, 1 credit in fine arts, and elective credits. See specific graduation requirement charts for math, science, and elective requirements. Distinguished Level of Achievement (26 credits): Foundation High School Program + Endorsements must include Algebra II. LISD Distinguished With Honors (26 credits): Additional requirements to the Distinguished Level of Achievement are English IV; 4th math course for which Algebra II is a prerequisite; Biology, Chemistry, Physics and a 4th science credit; 4 credits in social studies; and 3 credits in the same World Language. Pre-AP/IB, College Board Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses may be substituted for requirements in appropriate areas. The Foundation High School Program (22 credits) is available, however, this requires that you see your counselor for discussion of this plan. Students may opt to the Foundation only plan after completing their sophomore year. Required state assessments for graduation: English I, II; Algebra I; U.S. History; Biology Notes: 12...Planning for the Future

13 High School Graduation Requirements The information in this catalog is subject to change based on new information mandated through the Texas Legislature, the Texas Education Agency or the State Board of Education. This course catalog will be updated periodically online as new information is received. All changes will be noted on the last page of the document. I. High School Graduation Programs LISD has graduation plans to serve the needs of all students. Since entrance requirements vary greatly from college to college and employers have varying needs and requirements, students should carefully consider high school course selections and investigate post-secondary entrance requirements prior to selecting their graduation plan. Research has consistently shown students who take more challenging courses in math and science and participate in advanced programs while in high school are more likely to be successful in post-secondary education. In addition, students in LISD are strongly encouraged to complete a Program of Study. It is important for you to plan as challenging a program as you can. If your career plans should change, then it will not be as difficult to move into another program. While it may sometimes seem tempting to schedule a less demanding combination of courses, choosing courses that meet your needs or interests is the best way to prepare for your future. II. Recommended High School Plan (RHSP) and Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP) Graduation requirements for students first entering 9th grade during the fall of 2012 or Students have the option of graduating under the new Foundation High School Program (FHSP) developed as a result of HB 5. Students should see their counselor for more information. The Recommended High School Plan (RHSP) fulfills basic entrance requirements for colleges and universities in the state of Texas and provides challenging academic courses. The Distinguished Achievement Program is a course of study that requires high performance beyond what is usually expected of students in high school. The DAP recognizes students who demonstrate levels of performance equivalent to college students or work done by professionals in the arts, sciences, business, industry, or in community service. These measures are judged by external sources of evaluation. To become a DAP Graduate, students must complete the requirements found in 19 TAC and complete four of the advanced measures detailed below. Students who have not completed these measures by the spring of their senior year may still be designated a DAP candidate. DAP scholars and candidates will be recognized at Senior Awards Night and will be denoted in the commencement program with this designation. Advanced measures include: Test data: a score of three or above on The College Board Advanced Placement examination; a score of four or above on an International Baccalaureate examination; a score on the PSAT that qualifies a student for recognition as a Commended Scholar or higher by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation; as part of the National Hispanic Scholar Program of the College Board; or as a part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program. College Courses: a grade of B or higher on courses that count for college credit, including articulated courses, dual credit, and co-enrollment courses. Original research/project: (Original research/projects may not be used for more than two of the four advanced measures.) judged by a panel of professionals in the field that is the focus of the project; or conducted under the direction of mentor(s) and reported to an appropriate audience; related to the required curriculum set forth in TAC 74.1 (relating to Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills) Examples: Student completes DAP requirements and: four AP exams with grades of three or higher Student completes DAP requirements and: one AP exam with a grade of three or higher two college courses with a 3.0 GPA a one-year mentorship program conducting a school-approved research product Student completes DAP requirements and: a two-year science project reviewed by hospital board one college science course with a 3.4 GPA National Merit Scholar III. Foundation High School Program (FHSP) Graduation requirements for students first entering 9th grade during the fall of 2014 and after. This program replaces the Recommended and Distinguished Achievement Program. During the 83rd Texas Legislature, House Bill 5 was signed into law, which changed high school graduation requirements for students who were freshmen during the school year. The bill provides more flexibility for high school students. Qualification for Automatic Admission (Top 10%) to Texas state colleges and universities requires students to complete the Distinguished Level of Achievement or the LISD Distinguished with Honors graduation plan. In addition, students will begin their high school 4-year planning process during the 8th grade school year. The plan will be updated annually and parents will be required to sign-off on this plan, (which a part of the personal graduation plan), by the end of the student s 9th grade school year. The FHSP with an endorsement requires a minimum of 26 credits. A student can graduate under a Distinguished Level of Achievement if they complete the FHSP with an endorsement and have achieved a math level of Algebra II. The FHSP without an endorsement (22 credits) can be considered at the beginning of the junior year. However, this requires that a meeting be held with the counselor, parent/ guardian and student to discuss post-secondary implications. LISD has also added a graduation plan option, The LISD Distinguished with Honors. This program requires a more rigorous course of study in English, mathematics, science, social studies and World Language and best prepares students for college admission and success. IV. Performance Acknowledgements Students graduating on the Foundation High School Program can earn Performance Acknowledgements on their transcript and diploma for outstanding performance in a dual credit course; in bilingualism and bi-literacy; on a college AP test or IB exam; on the PSAT, ACT-PLAN, SAT or ACT; and by earning a nationally or internationally recognized business or industry certification or license. Please see below for specific Performance Acknowledgement requirements. Bilingualism and Bi-literacy Performance Acknowledgement A student may earn a Performance Acknowledgement on the student s diploma and transcript for outstanding performance in bilingualism and bi-literacy by demonstrating proficiency in accordance with LISD grading policy in two or more languages by: (1) Completing all English language arts requirements and maintaining a minimum grade point average (GPA) of the equivalent of 80 on a scale of 100, and (2) Satisfying one of the following: Completion of a minimum of 3 credits in the same language in a language other than English with a minimum GPA of the equivalent of 80 on a scale of 100; or Demonstrated proficiency in the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Level IV or higher in a language other than English with a minimum GPA of the equivalent of 80 on a scale of 100; or Completion of at least 3 credits in a foundation subject area course in a language other than English with a minimum of 80 on a scale of 100; or Demonstrated proficiency in one or more languages other than English through one of the following methods: A score of 3 or higher on a College Board AP exam for a language other than English; or A score of 4 or higher on an IB exam for a higher-level language other than English course; or Performance on a national assessment of language proficiency in a language other than English of at least Intermediate High or its equivalent. Planning for the Future...13

14 High School Graduation Requirements Continued In addition to meeting the requirements to earn a Performance Acknowledgement in bilingualism and bi-literacy, an English language learner must also have participated in and met the exit criteria for a bilingual or English as a second language (ESL) program and scored at the Advanced High level on the TELPAS. Dual Credit Performance Acknowledgement A student may earn a Performance Acknowledgement on the student s diploma and transcript for outstanding performance in a dual credit course by successfully completing: (1) At least 12 hours of college academic courses, including those taken for dual credit as part of the Texas core curriculum, and advanced technical credit courses, including locally articulated courses, with a grade of 3.0 or higher on a scale of 4.0, or (2) An associate degree while in high school. AP or IB Performance Acknowledgement A student may earn a Performance Acknowledgement on the student s diploma and transcript for outstanding performance on a College Board advanced placement (AP) test or International Baccalaureate (IB) exam by earning: (1) A score of 3 or above on an AP exam, or (2) A score of 4 or above on an IB exam. PSAT, the ACT-PLAN, the SAT, or the ACT Performance Acknowledgement A student may earn a Performance Acknowledgement on the student s diploma and transcript for outstanding performance on the PSAT, the ACT-PLAN, the SAT, or the ACT by (1) Earning a score on the PSAT that qualifies the student for recognition as a commended scholar or higher by the College Board and National merit Scholarship Corporation, as part of the National Hispanic Recognition Program of the College Board, or as part of the National Achievement Scholarship Program of the National Merit Scholarship Corporation; (2) Achieving the college readiness benchmark score on at least two of the four subtests on the ACT-PLAN exam; (3) Earning a combined reading and mathematics score of at least 1250 on the SAT; or (4) Earning a composite score on the ACT exam of 28 (excluding the writing sub-score). Business or Industry Certification or License Performance Acknowledgement A student may earn a Performance Acknowledgement on the student s diploma and transcript for earning a nationally or internationally recognized business or industry certification or license with: (1) Performance on an exam or series of exams sufficient to obtain a nationally or internationally recognized business or industry certification, or 14...Planning for the Future (2) Performance on an exam sufficient to obtain a government-required credential to practice a profession. Nationally or internationally recognized business of industry certification shall be defined as an industry validated credential that complies with knowledge and skill standards promulgated by a nationally or internationally recognized business, industry, professional, or governmental entity representing a particular profession or occupation that is issued by or endorsed by: A national or international business, industry, or professional organization, or A state agency or other governmental entity, or A state-based industry association. Certifications or licensures for performance acknowledgements shall: Be age appropriate for high school students, Represent a student s substantial course of study and/ or end-of-program knowledge and skills, Include an industry recognized exam or series of exams, an industry validated skill test, or demonstrated proficiency through documented, supervised field experience, and Represent substantial knowledge and multiple skills needed for successful entry into a high skill occupation. V. Texas Scholars Texas Scholars is the collective name for a community s incentives and strategies to motivate all of its students to complete the Recommended High School Plan or Distinguished Achievement Program. LISD is devoted to promoting academic achievement and rigor for all students. Recognition is given to seniors who graduate as Texas Scholars. Currently students are recognized with a frameready certificate and a Texas Scholar medal to be worn at graduation. Requirements for students first entering 9th grade during the fall of 2012 or Gold Medal Requirements Graduate on Recommended High School Plan or Distinguished Achievement Program Complete two courses eligible for college credit Meet Texas Success Initiative (TSI) college readiness standards Complete a LISD Silver Medal Requirements Graduate on Recommended High School Plan or Distinguished Achievement Program Completion of two courses eligible for college credit Requirements for students first entering 9th grade during the fall of 2014 Gold Medal Requirements Graduate on The LISD Distinguished with Honors graduation plan VI. Grade Level Classifications For the purpose of classifying students: (Exception: A student who has filed an Early Graduation Plan.) Freshman: Must have been promoted from the 8 th grade. Sophomore: Must have satisfactorily completed 5 credits. Junior: Must have satisfactorily completed 11 credits. Senior: Must have satisfactorily completed 18 credits. This classification is based on the number of credits actually completed. Credits earned through summer school, credit-by-exam, competency-based, or correspondence should be on file in the registrar s office before the first day of school for classification purposes. A correspondence course is not considered completed until the final grade is recorded in the registrar s office. Please consult the campus principal for further clarification regarding extracurricular eligibility requirements. VII. Required State Assessments for Graduation STAAR (State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness) End of Course Requirements for Graduation: Students will take the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR) exam at the end of English I, English II, Algebra I, Biology, and U.S. History. In order to graduate, a student must meet or exceed the Level II Satisfactory scale score on each STAAR EOC assessment. The performance standard needed to meet the testing requirement for graduation is based on the performance standard in place when students take their first EOC test and will apply to all five EOC assessments. For example, for students who took STAAR Algebra I in spring 2013, the first phase-in standard for Level II: Satisfactory Performance would apply to Algebra I, STAAR English I, English II, biology, and U.S. History. STAAR EOC retest opportunities will be available for students needing to retest. Students who, upon completion of Grade 11, are unlikely to pass one or more EOCs shall be required to enroll in a corresponding content-area preparatory class and take an end-of-course assessment for that course. Retests will be offered during the summer, fall and spring administrations of STAAR. Specific substitutions for EOCs are allowed and include AP, IB, PSAT, ACT-PLAN, SAT and ACT scores. It is the student s responsibility to check with their counselor to determine if they are eligible for a substitution. The ARD committees shall determine whether students receiving special education services are required to pass EOCs to receive a high school diploma. *Please check the district website at for the latest information on STAAR. The power of imagination makes us infinite. -John Muir

15 General Information I. Schedule Changes It is very important that students and parents give careful consideration to selecting appropriate courses. The choices students make on the course selection sheets determine the master schedule of course offerings available. The master schedule determines teacher assignments. Though never perfect, it is designed to maximize student opportunities and minimize scheduling conflicts. Master schedule changes may be affected by insufficient course enrollment or instructor availability. Students should pay particular attention to the alternate electives they select during the course selection process. To avoid schedule conflicts, a student may be placed in one or more of his or her alternate selections. In order to schedule efficiently and effectively, student schedules will not be changed to select different teachers, lunch periods, or any different elective or alternate elective. Schedule corrections will be considered during the first five class meeting days for the following reasons only: The student is a senior and does not have a course required for graduation. The student does not have the prerequisites for a course. Course credit was previously received (i.e. - through summer school, correspondence courses, Examination for Acceleration. etc.) A data entry error made by the school (i.e.- two firstperiod classes, or a schedule that does not contain the full number of classes.) Student has been dismissed from a program where approval must be granted for placement. Student has previously failed this course with the same teacher. Schedule correction requests do not require a parent signature. Schedule change requests: Any requests to change a schedule for reasons other than those listed will be considered only for a compelling educational circumstance and will require a parent signature. These requests will be considered during the first two weeks of school. A request to drop an advanced course with no corresponding on-level course, such as Advanced Placement Calculus, Advanced Placement Drawing, etc., will be considered a schedule change request and will be made only for compelling educational circumstances. Such requests must be made in the summer by August 1 or within the first two weeks of school. Course Level Changes: Course level changes may be requested in the summer, no later than August 1. Contact the campus Counseling Office. After the start of school, course level changes for advanced courses with a corresponding on-level class will be considered only at the end of the first progress reporting period. In order to be considered for a transfer from a Pre- AP, Pre-IB, AP or IB course, the student must have made a sincere effort to succeed by attending tutorials, completing his or her work, and by conferencing with the teacher. The parent must conference with the teacher before a course level change will be considered. An appeals process exists to request a course level change after the time frame listed. II. Courses for Gifted and Talented Students (QUEST) In addition to the IB program, the QUEST Program provides services for students identified as gifted and talented in the areas of General Intellectual Ability and Creative and Productive Thinking. Students must score in the 95th percentile on two measures of general intellectual ability to participate in this program. Qualified students may enroll in the GT Independent Study Mentorship (ISM) QUEST class. Students may also receive support for their interests and needs through the QUEST Lab. Ninth and tenth grade QUEST students are expected to take Pre-AP English QUEST classes. Please contact the campus guidance office or the campus QUEST teacher for additional information. III. Special Education Services Each local school has the responsibility for providing educational and related services to eligible students in the least restrictive environment, and ensuring students with disabilities have the opportunity to participate in educational programs and activities with students without disabilities to the extent appropriate. If a student has or is suspected of having a disability and requires special services, parents, teacher, administrators or any other district employee should contact a campus counselor for information concerning the special education referral process. The school district curriculum enables each student with disabilities to acquire knowledge and skills in the basic areas of learning commensurate with the student s needs and abilities. These skills may be attained in the general program of instruction or through special education modification or instruction and related services, as determined by the admission, review, and dismissal (ARD) committee. Students with disabilities shall have available an instructional day commensurate with that of students without disabilities. The ARD committee shall determine the appropriate instructional setting for each student, and these shall be specified in the student s Individual Educational Plan (IEP). The secondary program of a student receiving special education services shall terminate either with graduation or when the student no longer meets the age requirement for eligibility. Graduation constitutes a release from services and is a change in placement. A student receiving special education services may graduate and be awarded a high school diploma if: Option I: A student has satisfactorily completed the academic credit requirements for graduation applicable to students in general education, including satisfactory performance on the exit-level assessment instrument modifications and accommodations provided during Option II*: A student has satisfactorily completed the minimum academic credit requirements for graduation applicable to students in general education and has been exempted from passing the exit-level state assessment instrument by ARD committee decision. Option III* (a) full-time employment, based on the student s abilities and local employment opportunities, in addition to sufficient self-help skills to enable the student to maintain the employment without direct and on-going educational support of the local school district; or (b) demonstrated mastery of specific employ ability skills and self-help skills which do not require direct on-going educational support of the local school district; or (c) access to services which are not within the legal responsibility of public education, or employment or educational options for which the student has been prepared by the academic program. Option IV: A student receiving special education services may also graduate upon the ARD committee determining that the student no longer meets age eligibility requirements and has completed the requirements specified in the IEP. *For students who receive a diploma under Option 3 of this section, the ARD committee shall determine needed educational services upon the request of the student or parent to resume services, as long as the student meets the age eligibility requirements. All Special Education Graduation programs for students beginning 9th grade during the 2014/2015 school year are subject to change pursuant to forthcoming changes to Chapter 89 of the Commissioner s Rules. IV. Section 504 Services Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination and assures that disabled students have educational opportunities and benefits equal to those provided to non-disabled students. Section 504 and the ADA cover three types of students: (1) those who have a disability (2) those who have a record of a disability and; (3) those who are regarded as having a disability. Only students in group 1 (they have a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits a major life activity, thus a disability) are eligible for services under Sec. 504 and the ADA. Parents, Teachers, Administrators or any other district employees who know of or suspect a student may have a disability, or may require special services, should contact the campus Sec. 504 Coordinator for information regarding evaluation and services. Learning is a treasure that will follow its owner everywhere. Planning for the Future...15

16 General Information Continued V. Career and Technical Education (CTE) All students have the opportunity to enroll in Career and Technical Education courses along with the more traditional core academic courses. Ideally, students create balanced 4-year plans that include the best of both academic and CTE classes. Enrollment in CTE courses is open to all qualified students without regard to race, color, creed, religious affiliation, sex, or handicapping conditions. Each student enrolled in a CTE course shall have the opportunity to participate in a student leadership training organization appropriate to the course in which he/she is enrolled. In addition, students can earn a performance acknowledgement under the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) by earning a recognized business or industry certification or license. See Performance Acknowledge section of the catalog for more specific details. VI. Physical Education Substitutes Physical Education substitution credit may be awarded for successful completion of certain courses based on the physical activity in the courses. Students may earn Physical Education substitution credits through participation in the following physical activities; drill team (one credit maximum), Cheerleading (one credit maximum), Marching Band (one credit maximum), Athletics (four credit maximum), JROTC (one credit maximum) and Private/Commercially sponsored activities (four credit maximum). Credits may not be earned for a PE course more than once and no more than four substitutions may be earned through any combination of allowable substitutions. In order for a student to earn credit for one of these activities, the activity must include at least 100 minutes per five-day school week of moderate to vigorous physical activity. Upon completion of one semester s participation in one of these activities, the student is awarded a PE substitution credit. In accordance with local district policy, a school district may award up to four credits for physical education for appropriate private or commercially-sponsored physical activity programs conducted on or off campus. The district must apply to the commissioner of education for approval of such programs, which may be substituted for state graduation credit in physical education. Such approval may be granted under the following conditions: Category (1) Olympic-level participation and/or competition including a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intensive, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education; Category (2) Private or commerciallysponsored physical activities including those certified by the superintendent to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least 5 hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day. For more information in regards to Off Campus PE, please contact your guidance counselor or the district coordinator for physical education. VII. World Language Substitutes The Foundation High School Program (FHSP) requires a student to have two levels in the same world language. If a student, in completing the first credit in LOTE with a 70- or above, demonstrates that he/she is unlikely to be able to complete the second level, a committee consisting of the LOTE Level 1 teacher, the principal or designee, and the LISD s 10 Ethical Principles Honesty - Telling the truth Integrity - Doing the right thing Promise-keeping - Doing what you say you are going to do Loyalty - Supporting someone or something Concern for Others - Caring for and helping others Law-abidance/Civic duty - Obeying the rules/making the world a better place Respect for Others - Being polite and kind to everyone and everything Fairness - Treating everyone equally Pursuit of Excellence - Doing everything the best you can; looking for ways to improve Accountability - Taking responsibility for your actions and taking pride in what you do right 16...Planning for the Future

17 General Information Continued student s parent/guardian will be formed to determine if one of the following substitutions will be allowed: Level I of a different LOTE course World Geography (cannot fulfill another graduation requirement under the FHSP) World History (cannot fulfill another graduation requirement under the FHSP) Computer Science (If course is offered and there is availability). If a substitution is granted then it will ONLY satisfy the credit required for the LOTE Level II course and will not be considered as part of a coherent sequence of LOTE courses required for any endorsement. In addition, it may not fulfill the requirement for admissions into the college/university for which the student is applying, as most universities want two years of the same foreign language (LOTE class); and the substitution course does not fulfill this requirement. It is the student s responsibility to check with the college/university to determine admission requirements. A student, who due to a disability, is unable to complete two credits in the same language in LOTE, may substitute a combination of two credits from: English language arts, Mathematics, Science, Social studies, Career and technical education, Technology applications. The determination regarding a student s disability to complete the LOTE credit requirements will be made by: The student s ARD committee if the student receives special education services, or The committee established for the student under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of VIII. Early Graduation A LISD student may choose to graduate from high school in fewer than four years. To pursue early graduation, a student must make a written request. Early graduation requirements include parent approval, principal approval, and a meeting with the counselor to file a written early graduation plan. Specific details about the program are available in the guidance office. Alternative Methods for High School Credit I. High School Courses Taken in Middle School LISD offers some courses designated for grades 9-12 in grades 7 and 8. Students who take these courses must show satisfactory completion of the prerequisite grade 7 and Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills as well as state and district requirements for the high school course taken. Satisfactory completion of high school courses in grades 7 and/or 8 shall be reflected on the student s academic achievement record, and the student will be awarded state graduation credit. Grades earned in high school courses taken in middle school will not be included in the student s high school Grade Point Average (GPA). Students who satisfactorily complete Algebra I and/or Geometry in middle school should plan to continue with higher-level mathematics courses in grades Students who successfully complete Spanish I in middle school may use this unit earned to satisfy one credit of the language requirement in grades 9-12 II. Correspondence, Distance & Virtual Courses All high school students may take correspondence, distance and virtual courses and earn credit toward graduation. Students may choose to take correspondence, distance and virtual courses outside the school day at their own expense. Prior to enrollment in these courses, students must make written request for approval to enroll in the course through their guidance counselor. Credit toward state graduation requirements shall be granted under the following conditions: 1. The institution offering the course is The University of Texas, Texas Tech University, Texas Virtual School Network, or other public institution of higher education approved by the Commissioner of Education. 2. The course includes the state-required Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for such a course. 3. LISD will consider granting credit for courses taken through entities not named above. Prior approval must be sought, and the campus counselor should be provided with syllabi and other course information. The counselor will submit the documentation to the District Curriculum office for approval. Families should allow at least two weeks for this process. Grades earned in correspondence, distance and virtual courses are not used to determine grade point average (GPA). Leander ISD Virtual School, TxVSN and MyLanguage are exceptions and will be calculated in GPA. Seniors who are enrolled in correspondence, distance or virtual courses to earn units required for graduation shall complete the course and submit the grade for recording at least 30 days prior to the graduation date in order to be eligible for graduation at the end of the term. Student athletes who are considering correspondence, distance or virtual courses must check with the NCAA to inquire if a course of this type is acceptable as part of the NCAA core curriculum requirements. See or A correspondence, distance, or virtual course is not considered completed until the final grade is recorded in the campus registrar s office. In certain circumstances, Texas Virtual School Network may be provided free of charge. III. Credit by Examination Credit by Examination for Courses Failed A student who has had sufficient prior formal instruction as determined by the district on the basis of a review of the student s educational records and who has failed a course may gain credit for the course by passing a proficiency examination on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills of the course. Students must score 70% or better on the test, although it is not used to determine grade point average (GPA). A student may not use this examination to regain eligibility to participate in extracurricular activities. Students assume the cost of the examination. Examination for Acceleration Examination for Acceleration (EA) allows students who, without prior instruction, have already mastered content and skills in a particular course, to advance to the next level. Students take a designated criterion-referenced test which covers the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills and major learning for the course for which they wish credit. EA registration forms are available through the campus counselor. The district provides four EA testing windows at no cost to students. Specific testing windows and registration deadlines for EA are posted on District and Campus websites. Parents and students may get additional information about EA from campus counselors or by ing or Students must score 80% or higher on the Exam for Acceleration, although it is not used to determine grade point average (GPA). The campus will notify the parents and students upon receiving results of the tests. At the beginning of the semester after EA testing, students will be scheduled into appropriate classes based upon EA results, recommendations of District staff and written parental permission. IV. Summer School Certain courses are offered during summer school for credit recovery and to gain original credits. The number of students who enroll determines actual courses offered. Tuition is set by the district and is charged for each summer course. Contact the campus guidance department for more information. Information should also be available on the district website as early as April prior to June start. All LISD summer school courses are included in the student s GPA. Planning for the Future...17

18 College & Career Readiness Program I. College Preparatory Courses and Programs College preparatory courses are offered to students in subject areas at every grade level. These courses are designed for any and all students who have a desire to pursue a rigorous curriculum in any subject area and who want the best preparation for college. Courses are designated with Pre-AP/IB, AP, or IB in the course name. In addition to all Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills, subject matter is extended both in breadth and depth and aligned with the expectations of college-readiness from both the Advanced Placement Program and the International Baccalaureate Program. Pre-AP/IB courses in the 9 th and 10 th grade are designed to prepare students to be successful in future AP and/or IB courses. In accordance with the philosophy espoused by the College Board and the International Baccalaureate program, enrollment in Pre-AP/IB, AP courses, and the International Baccalaureate program at the high school level is open to all students who wish to undertake a rigorous course of study. AP Classes Offered Art History Biology Calculus AB Calculus BC Chemistry Computer Science A English Language English Literature Environmental Science European History French Language German Language Human Geography Latin Macroeconomics Music Theory Physics C Electricity and Magnetism Physics C Mechanics Psychology Spanish Language Spanish Literature Statistics Studio Art Drawing Studio Art 2-D Design Studio Art 3-D Design U.S. Government/Politics U.S. History World History II. College Board Advanced Placement Program The College Board s Advanced Placement Program offers high school students an opportunity to take collegelevel courses at LISD campuses. If the student takes the AP exam and scores in an acceptable range, advanced placement, credit, or both may be awarded upon college entrance. Before taking AP exams, students are encouraged to refer to the website of their college/university of choice as well as the College Board website for specific credit and/ or placement information. In addition, students can earn a performance acknowledgement under the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) by earning a qualifying score. See Performance Acknowledgement section of the catalog for more specific details. The College Board provides course descriptions and examinations, prepared by committees of high school and college teachers. These course descriptions are used by high school teachers in helping to prepare students to take an Advanced Placement examination at the end of the course. Although not required, LISD students enrolled in AP courses are highly encouraged to take the AP exam(s). Although college credit is a potential benefit of the AP course and exam, the experience of the AP Program is beneficial to the college-bound student. Costs of these exams must be borne by the student; however, financial assistance is available. For further information regarding the College Board AP Program at your high school, see a school counselor or Dean of Instruction. It is recommended, but not required, that students wishing to take AP courses participate in Pre-AP courses in 9 th and 10 th grade. III. International Baccalaureate Program The International Baccalaureate (IB) program is a rigorous and comprehensive curriculum designed to meet the challenge of college-bound and highly motivated students. Successful completion of course work and examinations at the junior/senior level may earn students credit at colleges and universities around the world. The IB program is a part of the district s gifted programs. The IB program is currently offered at Leander High School, yet is open to students from any of the district high schools. In addition, students can earn a performance acknowledgement under the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) by earning a qualifying score. See Performance Acknowledgement section of the catalog for more specific details. IB s broad range of subjects accommodates diverse student interests and intentions while adhering to the objectives of a cohesive liberal arts education. The program motivates students to develop their academic talents fully. Each student will become proficient in language, science, and mathematics, the three most important tools of communication and analysis, and participate in an in-depth exploration of the study of human behavior and the process of educational inquiry. Thus, the student is provided with a well-rounded, advanced academic course of study emphasizing the development of the total individual. IB courses are offered IB Classes Offered Art I IB Art II IB Biology I IB Biology II IB Chemistry I IB Chemistry II IB English III IB English IV IB French IV IB German IV IB History of Americas I IB History of Americas II IB Latin IV IB Mathematics HL IB Mathematics SL IB Music I IB Physics I IB Physics II IB Psychology I IB Psychology II IB Spanish IV IB Spanish V IB Theatre Arts I IB Theatre Arts II IB Theory of Knowledge beginning in the 11 th grade in the following areas: English Foreign Language: French, German, Latin, and Spanish Individuals and Society: History of the Americas Experimental Sciences: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Mathematics: Math Studies and Standard-Level Mathematics Arts and Electives: Art, Psychology, Theatre Arts, or a second experimental science In order for a student to obtain a full IB Diploma a student must minimally have four years of foreign language in high school and preferably had Algebra I in the 8 th grade. In addition, the student must take the Theory of Knowledge (TOK) course, complete Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) hours, and complete an extended essay on a topic of their choice. It is recommended that students interested in IB courses or the diploma participate in Pre-IB Courses in the 9 th and 10 th grade. For further information on the IB program, please call the Leander High School International Baccalaureate Program Coordinator. IV. Early College Start ACC Early College Start at Austin Community College allows juniors and seniors the opportunity to earn college credit while in high school. These courses are dual credit 18...Planning for the Future

19 College & Career Readiness Program Continued if used to satisfy the high school graduation requirement, co-enrollment if taken for college credit only, or creditin-escrow if part of an approved Articulation Agreement. Why is Early College Start a good thing to consider? Students get a head start on earning college credit. Tuition is waived for core credit transfer and workforce/certificate courses. College-level work can enhance self-esteem, education, and career goals. Many courses are transferable to other public colleges and universities. Students may enroll in college while still enrolled in high school to extend learning or accumulate college hours. To take college courses (co-enrollment or dual enrollment), students must receive counselor, Transition Coordinator and parent prior approval. Students must be considered full-time high school students. Students must meet the entrance requirements including college entrance exams and are responsible for the application and registration process. This process is time sensitive and may take one to four weeks to complete. Students may enroll in two courses per college semester beginning the summer following their sophomore year. Students pay all costs associated with the courses except tuition for core credit transfer and workforce/certificate courses. Students should check with colleges to be sure that they will accept dual or co-enrollment courses. All co-enrollment credit, dual credit and articulated courses may meet advanced measures criteria for the Distinguished Achievement Program. Dual Credit Enrollment Credit earned through dual credit enrollment counts for both college and high school credit in a core content area or an elective and fulfills high school graduation requirements. Students must submit an official transcript to the district in order to receive high school credit if they do not allow ACC to report the credit for them. To receive high school credit, the grade in the course must be a C or better; and to receive Distinguished Achievement Program credit the grade must be a B or better. If all conditions are met, credit is given for the course but is not used to determine grade point average (GPA). Students may also be eligible to receive a performance acknowledgement for the Foundation High School Plan (FHSP) be obtaining 12 credit hours of dual/articulate college credit with a grade of a 3.0 or higher. The courses that are currently approved for dual credit with Austin Community College and included in this catalog on a separate page. This list is subject to change. Students should check with the campus guidance office for the most recent list of approved courses. Co-Enrollment Credit earned through co-enrollment courses counts only for college credit. Students who are granted release time for co-enrollment must meet all district requirements for graduation. Co-enrollment courses do not appear on a student s high school transcript, do not count for high school graduation, and are not used to determine grade point average (GPA). The Texas Legislature has approved 42 core lower-division course credit hours that will transfer to any Texas public college or university. This list can be found on the Austin Community College website. V. Articulated College Credit Courses ACC Tech Articulated college credit courses are a way to start a college technical major while in high school. In an articulated program, students begin a course of study in high school and continue in a community/technical college or university. LISD currently has technical courses taught at the high school which are aligned with Austin Community College courses for articulated college credit. The program is referred to as ACC Tech. Once a student enrolls in ACC and completes at least one course, the student can request the credit earned while in high school (credit in escrow). Students will register for articulated college credit courses during their Career and Technical Education classes through the on-line CATEMA (Career and Technology Education Management Application) system. With a grade of 80 or above, these credits are held in escrow and then placed on the student s college transcript, free-of-charge. Students who plan to transfer should check other post-secondary institutions to ensure that they will accept articulated college credit courses. Articulated college credit courses focus on academic, technical, problem-solving, and critical-thinking skills to prepare students to be qualified technicians in America s highly competitive work force. The abstract learning process also prepares students for advanced course work required at the college level. Articulated college credit courses may be applied towards the Distinguished Achievement Graduation Program as advanced measures with a grade of 80 or above and may count as a performance acknowledgement on the Foundation High School Program (FHSP). Through the articulation process, students are enrolled in a course of study that prepares them to obtain a fouryear degree, an associate degree, a two-year vocational certificate, or to directly enter the work force better prepared to be successful employees. See Articulated College Credit Courses in LISD* chart for the courses which currently have articulation agreements in place with ACC. This list is subject to change. Students should check with the campus guidance office for the most up to date list of approved courses. VI. College Connection College Connection is a partnership between Austin Community College and Leander ISD that promotes college access and success. College Connection increases the number of LISD graduates entering college by taking all LISD seniors through the college enrollment process at ACC. The college enrollment process can be intimidating for students. The goal is to remove the mystery of how college entrance works. Students will be given the opportunity to participate in events that include assistance with the ACC admission application, financial aid, TSI Assessment placement testing, tours of ACC campuses, orientation and advising. Graduating seniors will receive their letter of acceptance to ACC as part of their graduation portfolio packet. Articulated College Credit Courses in LISD* Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources Agricultural Facilities Design and Fabrication (11-12) Practicum in Agriculture Mechanics (12) Architecture and Construction Architectural Design (10-12) Arts, Communication, and Journalism Graphic Design and Illustration (10-12) Advanced Journalism II: Yearbook, Newspaper (11-12) Business Management & Administration Accounting I (10-12) Business Information Management (9-12) Business Management - Entrepreneurship (10-12) Global Business (11-12) Education and Training Instructional Practice in Education and Training (11-12) Health Science Medical Terminology (11-12) Practicum in Health Science (12) Hospitality and Tourism Hospitality Services: Hotel Management (11-12) Hotel Management (10-12) Practicum in Culinary Arts: Restaurant Management (11-12) Information Technology Computer Science II AP (11-12) Video Game Design ( 11-12) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Advanced Biotechnology (11-12) Principles of Engineering (10-12) Transportation Advanced Automotive Technology (11-12) Practicum in Automotive Technology (12) Planning for the Future...19

20 College & Career Readiness Program Continued VII. COOL Week Career Opportunities on Location (COOL) Week is a partnership program in which seniors attend a business site, in a chosen field, to job shadow and to learn the connection between education and the world of work. This experience culminates in a presentation, which involves problem-solving and teamwork skills. The major goal of COOL Week is for students to learn the way specific occupations are performed and to become aware of the aptitudes, education, and training required to be successful in their chosen profession. For more information, contact the campus Transition Coordinator. VIII. Naviance Naviance Family Connection is a communication and information portal. Through Naviance, teachers, counselors, transition coordinators,and other school personnel can communicate with students and parents. In addition, through Naviance, families will have access to pertinent student information, such as SAT and ACT scores, current transcript, grade point average and rank. In addition, students complete their electronic four-year high school plan via the Naviance portal. All high school students have access to a Naviance Login. Parents are encouraged to use the system through the student account. Contact your campus counseling office for further information or view the Naviance website at IX. College Entrance Exams PSAT, SAT, and ACT In addition to taking rigorous courses in high school, students should prepare themselves for college entrance exams. College entrance exams include the College Board s SAT and the ACT. In addition, students can earn a performance acknowledgement under the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) by earning a qualifying score. See Performance Acknowledgement section of the catalog for more specific details. The SAT assesses verbal and mathematical reasoning skills students have developed over time and skills they need to be successful in college. Preparation for the SAT begins with the PSAT or Preliminary SAT. In October, LISD administers the PSAT free of charge during the school day to all 9th, 10th and 11th grade students. By taking the PSAT in 9th, 10th and 11th grades, students have three opportunities to practice for the SAT. Students may receive information from potential colleges through the Student Search Service. In addition, the 11th grade PSAT is used for qualification for the National Merit Scholarship Competition. Both the PSAT and the SAT measure verbal reasoning skills, critical reading skills, and math problem-solving skills. Students receive feedback on their PSAT results that can help them identify strengths and weaknesses in preparing for the SAT. Information about the PSAT and the SAT can be found on LISD s College and Career Readiness website under Academic Readiness, Another college entrance exam, the ACT, assesses high school students general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. The multiple-choice tests cover four skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science. Writing is not a component of the general ACT exam. There is an optional writing test that measures skill in planning and writing a short essay. More information about ACT can be found on LISD s College and Career Readiness website under Academic Readiness, Note: See College Readiness Chart for additional information. X. Automatic Admission to Texas Public Colleges and Universities Under the Automatic Admission policy (Texas Education Code ), Texas students may be eligible for automatic admission to a state college or university as an undergraduate student if they meet certain criteria. To qualify for automatic admission, a student must: 1. Earn a grade point average in the top 10 percent* of his/her high school graduating class, 2. Graduate from a Texas public or private high school, 3. Successfully complete the requirements for the Recommended High School Program (RHSP) or the Distinguished Achievement Program (DAP) or Distinguished Level of Achievement on the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) OR satisfy ACT s College Readiness Benchmarks on the ACT college entrance exam OR earn a score of at least 1500 out of 2400 on the SAT college entrance exam, AND 4. Apply for admission to a state college or university within the first two school years after graduation from high school. *Beginning with admission for the school year, The University of Texas at Austin (UT) is no longer required to automatically admit applicants in excess of 75% of its enrollment capacity for first time resident undergraduate students. The university has determined that it will automatically admit all eligible 2016 summer/fall freshman applicants who rank within the top 8 percent of their high school. Please note that students admitted to UT under the Automatic Admission policy will be required to complete at least 6 semester credit hours during evening or other low-demand hours in order to ensure the efficient use of available classrooms. In accordance with Title 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC), 5.5(e), high school rank for students seeking automatic admission to a general academic teaching institution on the basis of class rank is determined and reported as follows: (1) Class rank shall be based on the end of the 11th grade, middle of the 12th grade, or at high school graduation, whichever is most recent at the application deadline. (2) The top 10 percent of a high school class shall not contain more than 10 percent of the total class size. (3) The student s rank shall be reported by the applicant s high school or school district as a specific number out of a specific number total class size. (4) Class rank shall be determined by the school or school district from which the student graduated or is expected to graduate. To qualify for automatic admission an applicant must: (1) Submit an application before the deadline established by the college or university to which the student seeks admission AND (2) Provide a high school transcript or diploma that indicates whether the student has satisfied, or is on schedule to satisfy, the requirements of the RHSP, DAP, or Distinguished Level of Achievement on the Foundation Program. (3) Take the required (SAT or ACT) college entrance exams; AND submit the scores to the college(s) to which they are seeking admission. XI. Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) The FAFSA is the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. It is an online form that should be filled out (based on your income and/ or tax information) during your child s senior year in high school, that may qualify them for federal student loans, grants, the work-study program, scholarships and student/ parent loans (subsidized & unsubsidized). Additionally, many universities require the FAFSA be filled out in order to be eligible for scholarship opportunities at the college or university. The FAFSA should be completed if you are a: U.S. Citizen Permanent U.S. resident with an Alien Registration Card (I-551) Conditional permanent U.S. resident with visa type I- 551C Eligible noncitizen with an Arrival/Departure Record (I-94) showing you as a: (a) Refugee (b) Asylum granted (c) Parolee (d) Cuban-Haitian entrant. Additional information can be found at ed.gov/. The TASFA is the Texas Application for State Financial Aid for undocumented students in Texas. Texas allows undocumented students to apply for state financial aid and state tuition under certain conditions. The TASFA needs to be filled out during the senior year in high school. It is currently only available in paper form at College for All Texan s website ( See your counselor for additional information on FAF- SA and TASFA Planning for the Future

21 College & Career Readiness Program Continued XII. GPA Calculation and Reporting A student s cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) is calculated at the end of each semester beginning with the end of the first semester of a student s freshman year. The student s GPA is updated at the end of each semester and is calculated by averaging the final grades for each course taken. The final average in any course is calculated with each six weeks carrying a weight of two-sevenths and the final exam carrying a weight of one-seventh. If a student is enrolled in a course considered by the district to meet advanced measures, the course receives an additional grade point for calculating the GPA. Listed below are the courses that currently receive the additional grade point. The list is subject to change. Please contact the LISD Executive Director of Secondary Curriculum for the most recent list. Classes receiving additional grade point Algebra II Pre-AP Algebra II Pre-IB Anatomy & Physiology Art 2-D AP Art 3-D AP Art Drawing AP Art History AP Art I IB Art II IB Biology AP Biology I IB Biology II IB Biology Pre-AP Biology Pre-IB Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Chemistry AP Chemistry I IB Chemistry II IB Chemistry Pre-AP Chemistry Pre-IB Computer Science I Pre-AP Computer Science I AP English I Pre-AP English I Pre-AP QUEST English I Pre-IB English II Pre-AP English II Pre-AP QUEST English II Pre-IB English III AP English III IB English IV AP English IV IB Environmental Science AP European History AP French II Pre-AP/IB French III Pre-AP French III Pre-IB French IV AP French IV IB French V Geometry Pre-AP Geometry Pre-IB German III Pre-AP German III Pre-IB German IV AP German IV IB History of the Americas I IB History of the Americas II IB Human Geography AP Latin II Pre-AP/IB Latin III Pre-AP Latin III Pre-IB Latin IV AP Latin IV IB Macroeconomics AP Mathematics HL IB Mathematics SL IB Music I IB Music Theory AP Physics B AP Physics C AP Physics I IB Physics II IB Physics Pre-AP Physics Pre-IB Pre-Calculus Pre-AP Pre-Calculus Pre-IB Psychology AP Psychology I IB Psychology II IB Spanish II Pre-AP/IB Spanish III Pre-AP Spanish III Pre-IB Spanish IV AP Spanish IV IB Spanish V AP Spanish V IB Statistics AP Theatre Arts I IB Theatre Arts II IB Theory of Knowledge IB U.S. History AP U.S. Government AP World History AP Average Modified Regular Pre-AP/IB Content & AP/IB GPA Calculation Example: (1) Look at the semester average for each course. (2) Find that grade on the chart above. (3) Determine whether the course is Modified Content, Regular or Advanced and use the appropriate grade point for that course. (4) Total the grade points and divide by the number of semester courses counted. (5) This will give you the GPA. Example: Course Semester Average GPA Calculation Pre-AP/IB Sem English I Sem Pre-AP/IB Sem Biology Sem Human Sem Geography Sem Geometry Sem Sem Professional Sem Comm Sem BIM I Sem Sem Band Sem Sem Total Points: 66.5 GPA Credits: 14 GPA = Total Points 66.5 = 4.75 GPA GPA Credits 14 The policy related to GPA states, for purposes of class rank and GPA a six-point system shall be used. Students receiving credit for advanced courses will receive an additional grade point. This is reflected in the chart in the column labeled Pre-AP/IB and AP/IB. Courses that have been modified by the student s ARD committee as to the required content of the TEKS shall not earn the same number of grade points as regular or advanced. This is reflected in the chart in the column labeled modified content. Please see chart for a calculation example. Grades from the following courses or sources shall not be considered in the determination of class rank: correspondence, home school, non-accredited schools, distance learning, online courses taken outside of Leander ISD with the exception of TxVSN/MyLanguage, locally developed courses, courses taken prior to ninth grade, dual/ co-enrollment, credit by exam, foreign countries, summer school courses taken outside of Leander ISD, and credit recovery. Planning for the Future...21

22 College & Career Readiness Standard Texas Success Initiative (TSI): Texas law requires all entering college students, who wish to enroll in college level courses at colleges and universities in Texas after high school graduation meet college readiness standards in reading, writing, and math. TSI standards must be met in order to take college level course work at any Texas public higher education institution. Students who do not meet TSI standards upon graduation will be required to pass developmental courses at the college they are attending in order to start college-level course work. Developmental courses are costly and do not count towards graduation. The same TSI standards are also required for student who participate in Austin Community College s Early College Start program. TSI standards for available assessments are listed below: TSI Qualifying Tests: STAAR (EOC)* English II scale score (combined Reading and Wring test) Alg I scale score AND 70+ on high school Algebra II course *for Early College Start Program only PSAT* 50 Critical Reading 50 Math Composite 107 *for Early College Start Program only STAAR (EOC) Level 2+ English III Level 2+ Algebra II SAT 500 Critical Reading 500 Math Composite 1070 ACT 19 English 19 Math 23 Composite TSI Assessment 351 Reading 350 Math 5 on Writing or 4 with 363 on Multiple Choice Details about the qualifying tests: PSAT/NMSQT - Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test TSI for PSAT/NMSQT is a 107 composite score with a minimum of 50 on both critical reading and math. The composite score does not include writing. PSAT is used for preliminary admission into the Early College Start program and cannot be used for TSI exemption into colleges and universities after graduation. Freshmen, sophomores and juniors are eligible to take this test, which is offered in October. Only juniors are eligible for National Merit Scholarship consideration. The PSAT/NMSQT is a timed test which covers mathematics, reading, and writing. Registration is handled by the school. Freshmen, sophomores and juniors take the test free during the school day in Leander ISD. Information and test prep materials are available online (check the College Readiness button on your campus home page for details) or in the Counseling Office. The SAT TSI for SAT is a composite score of 1070 with a minimum of 500 on both critical reading and math. The composite score does not include writing. The SAT is one of two entrance exams most commonly accepted by fouryear colleges and universities. The SAT is typically taken by juniors (2 nd semester after PSAT results are received and reviewed) and seniors and may be taken multiple times. The SAT measures critical thinking skills and includes three sections: critical reading, mathematics, and writing. The writing portion is not optional. Students can register online at (registration is required approximately six weeks in advance of each test date). Fee waivers are available for students receiving free or reduced lunch services. Information and test prep materials are available online (check the College Readiness button on your campus home page for details) or in the Counseling Office. The ACT TSI for ACT is a composite score of 23 with a minimum of 19 on both English and math. The ACT is one of two entrance exams most commonly accepted by fouryear colleges and universities. The ACT is typically taken by juniors (2 nd semester after PSAT results are received) and seniors and may be taken multiple times. The ACT assesses general educational development and covers four skill areas: English, mathematics, reading, and science. The writing test is optional, but many colleges and universities now require it for students submitting ACT scores. Students can register online at (registration is required approximately six weeks in advance of each test date). Fee waivers are available for students receiving free/reduced lunch services. Information and test prep materials are available online (check the College Readiness button on your campus home page for details) or in the Counseling Office. TSI Assessment TSI Assessment is a minimum score of 351 on reading, 350 on mathematics with an essay sample of 5 or a 4 with a 363 on the writing multiple choice. TSI Assessment is the program designed to help Texas institutions determine if you are ready for college level course work in reading, writing, and math unless you are already exempt. Students may receive a voucher to take the test once through the Early College Start (ECS) program at Austin Community College (ACC) for the first time in the spring of their sophomore year. Based on how you perform, you may either be enrolled in college-level courses that match your skill level or be placed in the appropriate developmental course or intervention to improve your skills and prepare you for success in college-level courses. Where necessary, you may be given an additional diagnostic test in a particular subject. The college or university at which you take the test is require to provide a Pre- Assessment Activity as well as documentation of your completion before you take the test. TSI Assessment scores are accepted at every Texas public institution regardless of where you take the test Planning for the Future

23 LISD Courses Approved for Dual Credit ACC # Core Credit Transfer List Austin Community College Title LISD High School Course Title Credit Program Area: English Language Arts ENGL Creative Writing* Creative Writing 1/2 ENGL 1301 ENGL 1302 ENGL 2328 x x x English Composition I English Composition II* American Literature: Civil War to the Present* English III Option 1: Take ENGL 1301, 1302 & ENGL 2328 to receive credit** Option 2: Take ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 on an LISD campus with approved faculty/ curriculum. Note: 1301 & 1302 are prerequisites for American Literature (2328) ENGL 1301 ENGL 1302 ENGL 2322 x x x English Composition I English Composition II* British Literature: Anglo-Saxon Through 18th Century* English IV - Option 1: Take ENGL 1301, 1302, & 2322 to receive credit. *** Option 2: Take ENGL 1301 & ENGL 1302 on an LISD campus with approved faculty/ curriculum. Note: 1301 & 1302 are prerequisites for British Literature (2322) Program Area: Communications SPCH 1311 x Intro to Speech Communication Communication Applications 1/2*** SPCH 1315 x Fundamentals of Public Speaking Public Speaking 1/2 Program Area: Mathematics MATH 1314 x College Algebra* Math Independent Study 1** MATH 1316 x Trigonometry* Pre-Calculus 1** MATH 2412 x Pre-Calculus - Functions and Graphs* MATH 2413 x Calculus* Math Independent Study 1/2 Program Area: Natural Sciences 1** 1*** ACC # Core Credit Transfer List Austin Community College Title LISD High School Course Title Credit Program Area: Languages Other Than English CHIN 1511 x Chinese I Chinese I 1 CHIN 1512 x Chinese II* Chinese II 1** FREN 1511 x French I French I 1 FREN 1512 x French II* French II 1** GERM 1511 x German I German I 1 GERM 1512 x German II* German II 1** JAPN 1511 x Japanese I Japanese I 1 JAPN 1512 x Japanese II* Japanese II 1** JAPN 2311 x Japanese III* Japanese III 1 JAPN 2312 x Japanese IV* Japanese IV 1 LATI 1511 x Latin I Latin I 1 LATI 1512 x Latin II* Latin II 1** RUSS 1511 x Russian I Russian I 1 RUSS 1512 x Russian II* Russian II 1** RUSS 2311 x Russian III* Russian III 1** RUSS 2312 x Russian IV* Russian IV 1** SGNL 1401 x American Sign Language: Beginning I American Sign Language I 1 BIOL 1408 x Intro to Biology Scientific Research and Design 1 BIOL Environmental Biology, Lab Environmental Systems (Must take both courses 1 to receive credit) BIOL 2206 x Environmental Biology, Lecture SGNL 1402 x American Sign Language: Beginning II* SGNL 2301 x American Sign Language: Beginning III* American Sign Language II 1** American Sign Language III 1** CHEM 1105 x Intro to Chemistry I - Lab Chemistry (Must take both courses to receive credit) CHEM 1305 x Intro to Chemistry I - Lecture 1 SPAN 1511 x Spanish I Spanish I 1 SPAN 1512 x Spanish II* Spanish II 1** PHYS 1401 x General College Physics I* Physics 1 ASTR 1403 x Stellar Astronomy with Lab Astronomy 1 Program Area: Government and History GOVT 2305 x U.S. Government Government 1/2*** HIST 1302 x U.S. History II (from 1877) U.S. History 1** HIST 1301 x U.S. History I (before 1877) Special Topics in Social Studies 1/2 Program Area: Social and Behavioral Sciences ECON 2301 x Principles of Macroeconomics Economics 1/2*** GEOG 1301 x Intro to Physical Geography World Geography (Must take both courses to 1 receive credit) GEOG 1302 x Intro to Cultural Geography PSYC 2301 x Intro to Psychology Psychology 1/2 SOCI 1301 x Intro to Sociology Sociology 1/2 Program Area: Humanities HUMA 1301 x Intro to Humanities Humanities 1/2 Program Area: Visual and Performing Arts ARTS Drawing I Art II-Drawing 1** ARTS Drawing II* Art III-Drawing 1 ARTS Painting I* Art II Painting 1** ARTS Painting II* Art III-Painting 1 ARTS Sculpture I Art II-Sculpture 1** ARTS Sculpture II* Art III-Sculpture 1 ARTS Ceramics I Art II-Ceramics 1** ARTS Ceramics II* Art III-Ceramics 1 SPAN 2311 x Spanish III* Spanish III 1 Program Area: Health and Physical Education KINE 1305 Community Health Health 1/2*** KINE Aerobics I Aerobics Activity (1st semester) 1/2*** KINE Aerobics II Aerobics Activity (2nd semester) 1/2*** Program Area: Business & Computer Courses ACCT 2301 Principles of Financial Accounting* Accounting I 1 ARTC 1402 Digital Imaging I Graphic Design and Illustration 1 ARTV 1302 Introduction to Technical Animation and Rendering Digital Art and Animation 1** BUSI 2301 Business Law Business Law 1/2 COMM Intro to Mass Communication Journalism 1/2 COSC 1301 Personal Computing BIM I 1** COSC 1315 Fundamentals of Programming Computer Science I 1** COSC 1320 C++ Programming* Computer Science II (1st semester) 1/2 COSC 2415 Data Structures* Computer Science II (2nd semester) 1/2 IBUS 1305 Intro to International Business & Trade Global Business 1/2 MRKG 1302 Principles of Retailing Retailing & E-tailing 1/2 Program Area: Technical Electives BITC 1311 Introduction to Biotechnology Advanced Biotechnology 1 CETT 1409 DC-AC Circuits Electronics 1 CRIJ 1301 Introduction to Criminal Justice Law Enforcement I 1 CRIJ 1306 Court Systems and Practices Court Systems and Practices 1 ARTS Photography I* Art II-Photography 1** DANC Modern Dance Dance I 1** DFTG 1405 Technical Drafting Architectural Design (Must take both courses to receive credit) DFTG 1417 Architectural-Residential* 1 DRAM Stagecraft Technical Theater 1** DRAM Acting I Theater Arts I 1** DRAM Acting II* Theater Arts II 1 MUSI Piano 1 Instrumental Ensemble I 1** MUSI Music Theory I* Music Theory 1** This list is subject to change. Contact Instructional Services with questions or for necessary approvals. HPRS 1206 Medical Terminology Medical Terminology 1/2 *Has prerequisites: See current ACC Catalog. **Must be completed prior to the 2nd to last semester in the year in which the student plans to graduate in order to ensure recovery time of credit before expected graduation. ***Must be completed prior to the last semester in the year in which the student plans to graduate in order to ensure recovery time of credit before expected graduation. Any courses not listed must be approved. +Indicates that tuition is not waived for this course. Planning for the Future...23

24 Specialized Programs at Leander ISD High Schools Leander ISD offers a variety of programs at all high school campuses. Due to the characteristics and facility requirements of specialized programs, not all programs are offered on each campus. All programs at the high school level are offered in the campus course catalog. Students from all campuses are encouraged to enroll in specialized programs at another campus if the program meets their postsecondary education plans or career choice. Students generally enroll in specialized programs in one of three ways: 1) transfer completely to another campus, 2) complete an A day on one campus and B day on another campus, or 3) schedule classes at the sub-campus and travel during the day. Students who wish to use option #1 must go through the district transfer process. Please note that specific high school campus moratoria on transfers into or out of a campus supersede option #1. If a student chooses to participate in a specialized program, it is the responsibility of the parents to ensure that the student s transportation needs are met. Leander ISD encourages parents and students to use Options #1 and #2 and provide their own transportation. A limited transportation service is provided for students using Option #3 for specialized programs. Students using Option #3 and seeking to provide their own transportation to travel during the school day must have assistant principal approval prior to enrolling. Students who choose specialized programs will be expected to maintain their attendance. If difficulties with transportation occur that lead to attendance issues, students will be subject to removal from the programs and transferred back to their home campus. Specialized programs require special scheduling and commitment on the part of the parents, students, teachers, and counselors. Parents and students are urged to contact their counselor early to start investigating benefits and options for participating in a specialized program. Transportation Provided LISD has established district transportation stops for International Baccalaureate (IB) students throughout the district for, as IB requires that students must be fulltime students on the campus. Stops are limited and require parents to make sure students arrive at the stop and back home again. LISD has transportation routes scheduled for JROTC leaving CPHS (to ) and RHS (to VRHS) at 8:00 a.m. and returning during the lunch hour. Transportation for VHS students is provided via the IB bus for AFJROTC at. Note: Regular bus routes do not arrive at each campus until after 8:00 a.m. Parents must ensure that student arrives at home campus prior to 8:00 a.m. Current Specialized Programs on LISD High School Campuses The programs or courses listed here are specialized programs located on specified high school campuses. This list is not intended for use with issues involving transfers and UIL eligibility. Please contact the District Athletic Director or District Fine Arts Director for information concerning transferring for academic purposes and UIL eligibility. Cedar Park High School Leander High School Rouse High School Vandegrift High School Vista Ridge High School Horticulture & Landscape Design Horticulture & Landscape Design **** **** **** **** **** Automotive Technology **** **** Construction Technology Construction Technology **** **** **** **** Cosmetology **** **** **** Culinary Arts: Restaurant Management **** **** **** **** **** Electrical Technology **** **** **** Architectural Design Architectural Design Aerospace Engineering Architectural Design/Civil Engineering Aerospace Engineering/Engineering Design and Development Aerospace Engineering Hospitality: Hotel Management **** Hospitality: Hotel Management **** **** **** International Baccalaureate Diploma Program **** **** **** **** Air Force Junior ROTC **** **** Navy Junior ROTC 24...Planning for the Future

25 Course Selections How to use the Leander ISD Course Catalog: 1) Identify courses needed to complete the desired graduation program. 2) Courses that are only offered at certain high school campuses are designated along with the course title. If there is no campus designation, the course may be offered at all high school campuses. 3) For elective courses, see the Elective Course Selection section. All electives have been arranged by Program of Study and Career Cluster to assist the user in finding the correct course descriptions. Some course descriptions have been repeated for your convenience. It is the intent of Leander ISD to offer all courses in this catalog unless otherwise stated. However, some courses may not be offered if sufficient student interest/enrollment is not evident. Instructor availability will also be a factor in course offerings. Advanced Programs Pre-AP/IB Pre-AP/IB courses are designed to challenge as well as prepare students for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses. Advanced courses prepare students for college-level work while in high school. Participation requires: Ability to go above and beyond what is asked Good time management skills Reading and writing skills above average High interest in subject matter Advanced Placement AP courses are equivalent to first-year college courses. Students enrolled in AP courses are encouraged to take the AP exam to potentially receive college credit. International Baccalaureate Program The IB Program is a comprehensive and rigorous two-year curriculum, demanding strong commitment from both students and their families. Although the program does not begin until the junior year, advanced courses in the 9th and 10th grades are the best preparation for IB. The IB student takes IB courses in six different subject areas. Students interested in pursuing the IB program should contact the IB Coordinator at. Students must be enrolled as full-time students at Leander High School to be enrolled in the IB program. Denotes courses receiving additional points towards GPA calculations. English For students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014 or later the State Board of Educations (SBOE) has approved the following courses to substitute for the 4th English/Language arts credit. Substitution options are only available for students graduating on the Foundation High School Program (FHSP), FHSP + Endorsement or Distinguished Level of Achievement. Leander ISD offers the following approved courses: English IV, AP English Literature and Composition, IB Languages Studies, Public Speaking III, Debate III, Oral Interpretation III, Advanced Journalism Newspaper III and Advanced Journalism Yearbook III. English I Course #1110 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 English I increases and refines students communication skills with a study of reading, writing, speaking, listening, research, and oral/ written conventions. Students practice a variety of writing forms and genres, as they plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis. They edit these papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. In addition, they read extensively in multiple genres from world literature, analyzing the works, and interpreting the possible influences of historical context. English I Pre-AP Course #1112 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 English I Pre-AP covers the regular English I curriculum, but emphasizes the higher-level and critical thinking skills of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis in preparation for the Advanced Placement courses. Students study grammar and SAT vocabulary at an accelerated rate and cover more material. They write longer and more challenging compositions and read more challenging literature than those assigned in regular classes. A variety of projects involving individual and cooperative work encourages creative, productive thinking and accommodates different learning styles. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English I Pre-AP QUEST Course #: 1113 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 Prerequisite: Identified QUEST students English I Pre-AP QUEST follows the same curricula standards and requisite Pre-AP English skills as regular Pre-AP English classes. It is developmental in scope and focused on instruction in and application of critical and creative thinking skills, oral and written communication skills, literary analysis skills, affective skills and social skills. English Pre-AP QUEST is structured to provide a culture similar to the QUEST elementary and middle school programs that meet the learning and affective needs of QUEST students. Please note this is a Pre-AP English curriculum and is not project-based like middle school or elementary QUEST. It does not include the QUEST independent study. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English I Pre-IB Course #1162 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 English I Pre-IB covers the regular English I curriculum, but stresses the higher-level and critical thinking skills of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis in preparation for the International Baccalaureate Program. Students study grammar and SAT vocabulary at an accelerated rate and cover more material. They write longer and more challenging compositions and read more challenging literature than those assigned in regular classes. A variety of projects involving individual and cooperative work encourages creative, productive thinking, and accommodates different learning styles. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English II Course #1210 Credit: 1 Grade: 10 English II continues to increase and refine students communication skills, building on the skills they developed in English I in reading, writing, speaking, listening, research, and oral/written conventions. Students practice a variety of writing forms and genres, as they plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis. They edit these papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. In addition, they read extensively in multiple genres from world literature, analyzing the works, and interpreting the possible influences of historical context. English II Pre-AP Course #1212 Credit: 1 Grade: 10 English II Pre-AP provides an enriched version of the English II curriculum in preparation for Advanced Placement courses. Students work independently and collaboratively to hone critical thinking skills, especially skills involved in literary analysis. The literature studied represents diverse cultures. Reading and vocabulary skills, specifically those required for the SAT and STAAR exams, are reinforced through the literary and informational text selections. Students write papers that are of a more difficult nature and longer length and study grammar and SAT vocabulary at an accelerated rate. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English II Pre-AP QUEST Course #: 1213 Credit: 1 Grade: 10 Prerequisite: Identified QUEST students English II Pre-AP QUEST follows the same curricula standards and requisite Pre-AP English skills as regular Pre-AP English classes. It is developmental in scope and focused on instruction in and application of critical and creative thinking skills, oral and written communication skills, literary analysis skills, affective skills and social skills. English Pre-AP QUEST is structured to provide a culture similar to the QUEST elementary and middle school programs that meet the learning and affective needs of QUEST students. Please note this is a Pre-AP English curriculum and is not project-based like middle school or elementary QUEST. It does not include the QUEST independent study. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English II Pre-IB Course #1262 Credit: 1 Grade: 10 English II Pre-IB provides an enriched version of the English II curriculum in preparation for the International Baccalaureate Program. Students work independently and collaboratively to hone critical thinking skills, especially skills involved in literary analysis. The literature studied represents diverse cultures. Reading and vocabulary skills, specifically those required for the SAT and STAAR exams, are reinforced through the literary selections. Students write papers of a more difficult nature and longer length and study grammar and SAT vocabulary at an accelerated rate. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English III Course #1312 Credit: 1 Grade: 11 English III continues to increase and refine students communication skills. Students study reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing. They practice a variety of writing forms, as they plan, draft, and complete written compositions on a regular basis. They edit these papers for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. In addition, they read extensively in multiple genres from American and other world literature, analyzing the Planning for the Future...25

26 works and interpreting the possible influences of historical context. English III Advanced Placement Course #1330 Credit: 1 Grade: 11 English III AP begins with a summer reading assignment, which becomes the basis for the first several weeks study. Students will submit typed final drafts of their work and will develop college-level reading, writing, and speaking skills. This course allows students to continue at an accelerated pace in their growth of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis in the study of American and other world literature. It also introduces the elements and dynamics of rhetorical theory. College credit can be achieved by demonstrating competence in the Advanced Placement Exam. Note: This course is designed to be the equivalent of freshman English programs at most colleges and universities. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English III International Baccalaureate Course #1340 Credit: 1 Grade: 11 English III IB begins with a summer reading assignment, which becomes the basis for the first several weeks study. Students will submit typed final drafts of their work and develop college-level reading, writing, and speaking skills. This course allows students to continue at an accelerated pace in their growth of analysis, evaluation, and synthesis in the study of American and other world literature. It also introduces the elements and dynamics of rhetorical theory. College credit can be achieved by demonstrating competence in the International Baccalaureate Exam. Note: This course is designed to be the equivalent of freshman English programs at most colleges and universities. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English III - ACC Dual Credit Course #1380 Credit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisite: ACC Early College Start Enrollment Process English III dual credit is taught by an adjunct ACC professor and is scheduled during the regular school day or evenings. The course consists of ENGL 1301 fall semester and ENGL 1302 spring semester with an American Literature overlay. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive high school English III credit. Students must make at least a 70 in both semesters to receive high school credit. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA) at the high school level. English IV Course #1410 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 English IV continues to increase and refine the necessary skills for effective reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing. Students write for varied audiences and purposes. As they revise their writing, they focus on the development of precision in meaning through sophisticated language and rhetorical choices that keep audience and purpose in mind. The students study major works in a variety of genres to explore the development of the English language and the historical content, major themes, and authors of representative British and other world literature. A balance of literary and informational text analysis and writing tasks offer students multiple opportunities to produce products for authentic audiences and purposes. English IV - College Prep Course #1411 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: See counselor for eligibility requirements English IV is designed to prepare students for college level reading 26...Planning for the Future and writing intensive courses including freshman composition and other introductory college courses. Students will learn to use critical writing and reading to develop and represent the processes and products of their critical thinking. Through critical writing and reading, writers think through ideas, problems, and issues; identify and challenge assumptions; and explore multiple ways of understanding. This is important in college as writers are asked to move past obvious or surface-level interpretations and use writing to make sense of and respond to written, visual, verbal, and other texts that they encounter. Writers learn to move back and forth through different stages of writing, adapting those stages to the situation to independently produce final, polished texts. English IV Advanced Placement Course #1430 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 English IV AP is designed to allow students to develop analytical skills in critical reading and writing that demonstrate college level achievement in the study of world literature. Instruction emphasizes developing skills in composition and literary analysis through various activities. College credit can be achieved by demonstrating competence in the Advanced Placement Exam in English Literature and Composition. Note: This course is designed to be the equivalent of sophomore English programs at most colleges and universities. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English IV International Baccalaureate Course #1440 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 English IV IB is designed to allow students to develop analytical skills in critical reading and writing that demonstrate college level achievement in the study of world literature. Instruction emphasizes developing skills in composition and literary analysis through various activities. The Extended Essay is a 3,000-4,000 word independent research project completed by IB students with the assistance of a faculty advisor. College credit can be achieved by demonstrating competence in the International Baccalaureate Exam. Note: This course is designed to be the equivalent of sophomore English programs at most colleges and universities. All students enrolled will have a summer reading assignment. English IV - ACC Dual Credit Course #1480 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: ACC Early College Start Enrollment Process English IV dual credit is taught by an adjunct ACC professor and is scheduled during the regular school day or evenings. The course consists of ENGL 1301 fall semester and ENGL 1302 spring semester with a British Literature overlay. Upon successful completion of the course, students will receive high school English IV credit. Students must make at least a 70 in both semesters to receive high school credit. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA) at the high school level. English IV - British Literature ACC Dual Credit Course #1486 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: ACC Early College Start Enrollment Process, ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 British Literature (ENGL 2322) is taught by an adjunct ACC professor and is scheduled during the regular school day or evenings. Upon successful completion of the ENGL 2322, ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 students will receive high school English IV credit. Students must make at least a 70 in all three courses to receive high school credit. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA) at the high school level. Creative and Imaginative Writing Course #1552 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of English I A class for serious, committed writers, Creative Writing explores forms of creative writing including short story, poetry, and play, and the specific elements of each, including character, plot, dialogue, language, and theme. Students are expected to do outside reading, and participate in the writing process continually, from pre-writing to finished projects. All works produced are eligible for publication in the school literary magazine, and students are encouraged to submit their works for publication in other media as well. English for Speakers of Other Languages I Course #1156 Credit: 1 Grade 9-12 Prerequisite: Recent immigrants only This course develops an understanding of English. Students engage in numerous language and culture activities that build on their prior knowledge and skills in order to strengthen their listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Note: English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL) I may be substituted for English I for recent immigrants. English for Speakers of Other Languages II Course #1256 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Evidence of satisfactory completion of ESOL I This course develops an increased understanding of basic core vocabulary, expressions and American customs. Emphasis is placed on acquisition of English through listening, speaking, reading and writing. Note: English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL) II may be substituted for English II for recent immigrants. English I Sheltered Instruction Course # 1153 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-10 Prerequisite: Students who lack English language proficiency for placement in a general education English I class, but do not need as many linguistic accommodations as those found in ESOL I. English I sheltered Instruction follows the same TEKS, curriculum, and materials as any other English I course. However, sheltered instruction strategies, pacing, and reading level materials are used in order to make the content of the course more comprehensible. English II Sheltered Instruction Course # 1253 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Students who completed ESOL I or students who lack English language proficiency for placement in a general education English II class, but do not need as many linguistic accommodations as those found in ESOL II. English II sheltered Instruction follows the same TEKS, sheltered and materials as any other English II course. However, sheltered instruction strategies, pacing, and reading level materials are used in order to make the content of the course more comprehensible. English III Sheltered Instruction Course # 1353 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Students who completed ESOL I and/or ESOL II or students who lack English language proficiency for placement in a general education English III class. English III sheltered Instruction follows the same TEKS, curriculum, and materials as any other English III course. However, sheltered instruction strategies, pacing, and reading level materials are used in order to make the content more comprehensible.

27 Basic English 1-4 Course # 1010, 1020, 2030, 1040 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic English is modified to meet the individual learning requirements of students; focus on integrated language arts study in language/writing, literature/reading, speaking/listening, and viewing/representing. Students will integrate correct language skills within the reading and writing processes; plan, draft, and complete written compositions from all writing forms on a regular basis; read and respond to multiple genres from world literature translated to English from various cultures; understand basic literary concepts. Some variation in course content/emphasis may occur on campus depending on the individual learning needs of the students. English Transition 4 Course #1045 Credit: 1 Grade:12 Transition English 4 is designed to not only fulfill the requirement for English 4, but also to prepare students for a successful transition to the world of college and careers. Components of the course include an extensive research project (Senior Project), research on post-secondary options (College, Certificate Programs, Military, Job Training) including Community college admissions and test preparation. In addition, students will expand their self-knowledge and practice self-advocacy skills. Applied English 1-4 Course #1019, 1029, 1039, 1049 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied English courses are based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Students develop skills in the areas of expressive, receptive, written and/or symbolic representations of language. Attention is given to effective communication within the range of the student s abilities (direct or through assistive devices). Students integrate language in order to understand oral, written, and/or symbolic communication. Oral, written, and/or symbolic language will be used to express ideas, demands, and needs, and to make inquiries. Communication emphasized in regard to social appropriateness, environmental cues and prompts, understanding generalizations to real-life situations, and the responsibilities of independent living skills that relate directly to employment. Students may explore job-related language use as seen in employment services, interview skills, interpersonal skills, job search, and the application process. Basic Writing Improvement 1-3 Course #1055, 1056, 1057 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Committee Determination Writing Improvement offers students instruction in the components of the writing process and precursor skills. The course is designed to support students in their content-area writing, as well as integrate the use of writing skills into their daily lives. Speech Communication Applications (one-half credit) is a state graduation requirements for students entering 9th grade in 2012 and 2013 that are graduating on the Recommended or DAP graduation plans. The State Board of Educations (SBOE) has approved Professional Communications (CTE) as a substitute for Communications Applications. Other speech courses listed in this section do not fulfill this requirement. Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014 or later are required to take Professional Communications as a yearlong state elective during their freshman year. Students entering after the freshman year must replace this requirement with an approved substitution. Approved substitutions are AVID, Debate, Public Speaking, Oral Interpretation or Communication Applications. Communication Applications Course #1505 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Communication Applications is designed to develop effective communications skills for students to successfully participate in professional and social life. Rapidly expanding technologies and changing social and corporate systems demand that students send clear verbal messages, choose effective nonverbal behaviors, listen for desired results, and apply valid critical-thinking and problem solving processes. Students enrolled in Communication Applications will be expected to identify, analyze, develop, and evaluate communication skills needed for professional and social success in interpersonal situations, group interactions, and personal and professional presentations. Introduction to Speech Communications (SPCH 1311) - ACC Dual Credit Course #1504 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: ACC Early College Start Enrollment Process Introduction to Speech Communications (SPCH 1311) is taught by an adjunct ACC professor and is scheduled during the regular school day or evenings. Students who complete SPCH 1311 will receive high school speech credit. Students must make at least a 70 to receive high school credit. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA) at the high school level. Theory of Knowledge International Baccalaureate Course #1562 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Theory of Knowledge is a thoughtful inquiry into different kinds of knowledge. Students are encouraged to share ideas about many subjects, including ethics, the arts (aesthetics), history, human sciences, natural sciences, and mathematics. Students are required to write essays and make presentations to the class. Students in the class are seniors enrolled in the IB Diploma Program. Note: Students enrolled in Theory of Knowledge will receive credit for Communication Applications. Basic Communication Applications Course #1050 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Basic Communications Applications has modified content addressing basic oral communications dealing with all levels of human interaction. Students understand concepts and processes involved in sending and receiving oral messages, evaluation, and using nonverbal communication, and listening for a variety of purposes. Students develop communication competence in interpersonal, group, and public interaction to establish and maintain productive relationships and function effectively in social, academic, and citizenship roles. Some variation in course content/emphasis may occur on campus depending on the individual learning needs of the students. Applied Communication Applications Course #1059 Credit: ½-1 Grade: 9-12 Communications, based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) of the general education Communication Applications course aligned to alternate academic achievement standards, is designed to meet the individual learning requirements of students by focusing on the prerequisite skills bridging to enrolled grade level. The Communications course deals with developing skills in the areas of expressive, receptive, written, and/or symbolic representations of language. Attention is given to the ability to communicate effectively within the range of the student s abilities (direct or through assistive devices). Students will integrate language in order to understand oral, written, and/or symbolic communication. Oral, written, and/or symbolic language will be used to express ideas, demands, and needs, and to make inquiries. Communication will be examined in regard to social appropriateness, environmental cues and prompts, understanding generalizations in a real-life context. Students will explore jobrelated language related to employment services, interview skills, interpersonal skills, job search, and the application process. Debate I Course #1511 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Student Information Request may apply Debate I is formalized public speaking in which participants prepare and present speeches on opposite sides of an issue to determine which side has the stronger arguments. Students will improve knowledge and understanding of important social issues of our time, develop and use valid approaches for affirmative and negative cases based on research and /or philosophy, and use skills to debate propositions of value and policy. UIL and Texas Forensic Association competition is required. Debate II - III Course #1512, #1513 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Previous debate course and Student Information Request Debate II-III students will continue to expand and improve knowledge and skills of debate. Students will learn to use a variety of approaches to analyze and construct logical affirmative and negative cases for both value and policy debate. Students will increase refutation skills, burden of proof skills, and evaluation skills. UIL and Texas Forensic Association competition is required. Public Speaking I Course #1521 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Student Information Request may apply Students will learn the concepts and skills related to preparing and presenting public messages. Students will analyze and evaluate the messages of others. Within this process, students will gain skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and thinking and will examine areas such as invention, organization, style, memory, and delivery. This course will cover a variety of speech styles following guidelines established by UIL and Texas Forensic Associations. Public Speaking II - III Course #1522, #1523 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Public Speaking I and Student Information Request Continuation of Public Speaking I. UIL and Texas Forensic Planning for the Future...27

28 Association competition is required. Note: Public Speaking I-III will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Oral Interpretation I Course #1501 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Student Information Request may apply Oral Interpretation I will cover interpretation of a wide variety of literature including prose, poetry, and drama. This course will cover a variety of speech styles following guidelines established by UIL and Texas Forensic Associations. Oral Interpretation II & III Course #1502 & #1503 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Oral Interpretation I and Student Information Request Continuation of Oral Interpretation I. UIL and Texas Forensic Association competition is required. Note: Oral Interpretation I-III will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Journalism Journalism Course #1530 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-11 Analysis of Visual Media Course #1532 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-11 Prerequisite: Journalism Journalism/Analysis of Visual Media provides an overview of the fundamentals of journalism including how to write news stories, features, editorials, sports stories, and captions. Other topics to be covered include the elements of dynamic journalism, photography, advertising, essentials of layout, design, style, and typography. Students will also be given an opportunity to examine the roles of radio, TV, and film through changing times and produce original work relating to their special fields of interest. Photojournalism I Course #1546 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Student Information Request Photojournalism I is all digital. Students in this class will learn the basics of photojournalism: history, techniques, caption writing, how to use a digital camera and how to use desktop publishing software to correct photos. Students will complete class projects as well as take photos at events for yearbook and newspaper. Advanced Journalism: Yearbook Production I III Course #1534/1535/1536 Credit: 1 Grade: Recommended Prerequisite: Journalism/Analysis of Visual or Audio/Video Production I Prerequisites: Student Information Request Students in Yearbook Productions will produce the school yearbook. Duties/assignments may include planning, writing, producing, selling, and distributing the yearbook. Students will also be responsible for working as part of the yearbook staff, creating thematic concepts, communicating with various school personnel and students, writing copy, shooting photos, designing pages, efficiently using computer desktop publishing programs, and meeting 28...Planning for the Future deadlines. Objectives include management and production of the yearbook, using editorial judgment and journalistic integrity, as well as working within time constraints and budget limitations. Note: Articulated college credit course Advanced Journalism: Newspaper Production I III Course #1537/1538/1539 Credit: 1 Grade: Recommended Prerequisite: Journalism/Analysis of Visual or Audio/Video Production I Prerequisites: Student Information Request Students in Newspaper Productions produce the school newspaper. Duties/assignments may include advanced writing, interviewing, in-depth research for news stories and features, photography, photo editing, page layout and design, ad design, implementing an advertising campaign, and meeting deadlines. Objectives include management and production of the school newspaper, using editorial judgment and journalistic integrity, as well as working with time constraints and budget limitations. Note: Articulated college credit course Journalism Independent Study - Internship Course #1547 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Student Information Request Journalism Independent Study is an opportunity for advanced students in yearbook, newspaper, and photojournalism. These students serve as editors or lab assistants. Internships provide hands-on, in-depth learning experiences for individuals who are considering careers in the fields of communications. Reading ESL Reading I Course # 1591 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Current ESL Student ESL Reading I provides instruction in word recognition, comprehension strategies, and vocabulary that encompasses reading across all content areas to ensure students have an opportunity to read with competence, confidence, and understanding. ESL Reading II Course # 1592 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Current ESL Student ESL Reading II provides instruction in word recognition, comprehension strategies, and vocabulary that encompasses reading across all content areas to ensure students have an opportunity to read with competence, confidence, and understanding. ESL Reading III Course # 1593 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Current ESL Student ESL Reading III provides instruction in word recognition, comprehension strategies, and vocabulary that encompasses reading across all content areas to ensure students have an opportunity to read with competence, confidence, and understanding. Basic Reading Improvement 1-3 Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Reading Improvement is based on best practices for teaching reading to secondary level students, this reading course is modified to complement the learning requirement of students whose difficulty in reading significantly impacts their acquisition of knowledge and skills. Students may read orally and/or silently to develop accuracy, fluency, and adequate reading rate to build comprehension skills. Students receive instruction in word recognition, comprehension strategies, vocabulary, and are given opportunities to read with competence, confidence, and understand. Some variation in course content/emphasis may occur on campus depending on the individual learning needs of the students. Math The State Board of Educations (SBOE) has approved courses to substitute for math credits. Leander ISD offers the following approved math substitution courses: AP Computer Science (Technology Applications) and Robotics Programming and Design (Technology Applications). Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/ requirements. Algebra I Course #2110 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 Students will build on the knowledge and skills of 6-8 mathematics which provided a foundation in linear relationships, number and operations, and proportionality. Students will study linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and connect functions and their associated solutions in both mathematical and real-world situations. Students will use technology to collect and explore data and analyze statistical relationships. In addition, students will study polynomials of degree one and two, radical expressions, sequences, and laws of exponents. Students will generate and solve linear systems with two equations and two variables and will create new functions through transformations. Students may be required to take Algebra Lab concurrently. Geometry Course #2210 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-10 Prerequisite: Credit for Algebra I Students will strengthen their mathematical reasoning skills in geometric contexts. Within the course, students will begin to focus on more precise terminology, symbolic representations, and the development of proofs. Students will explore concepts covering coordinate and transformational geometry; logical argument and constructions; congruence; similarity, trigonometry; two- and three-dimensional figures; circles; and probability. Due to the emphasis of probability and statistics in the college and career readiness standards, probability standards have been added to the geometry curriculum. Geometry Pre-AP Course #2230 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-10 Prerequisite: Credit for Algebra I Geometry Pre-AP elaborates and extends the curriculum of the Geometry course with greater depth and complexity than the regular course. Independent topic assignments are part of the curriculum. Geometry Pre-IB Course #2240 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-10 Prerequisite: Credit for Algebra I Geometry Pre-IB elaborates and extends the curriculum of the Geometry course with greater depth and complexity than the regular course. Independent topic assignments are part of the curriculum.

29 Math Models with Applications Course #2310 Credit: 1 Grade: 11 Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra I, must take prior to Algebra 2 Mathematical Models with Applications is designed to build on the knowledge and skills for mathematics in Kindergarten-Grade 8 and Algebra I. This mathematics course provides a path for students to succeed in Algebra II and prepares them for various post-secondary choices. Students learn to apply mathematics through experiences in personal finance, science, engineering, fine arts, and social sciences. Students use algebraic, graphical, and geometric reasoning to recognize patterns and structure, model information, solve problems, and communicate solutions. Students will select from tools such as physical objects; manipulatives; technology, including graphing calculators, data collection devices, and computers; and paper and pencil and from methods such as algebraic techniques, geometric reasoning, patterns, and mental math to solve problems. Algebra II Course #2212 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra I, Recommended Prerequisite: Credit for Geometry I In Algebra II, students will broaden their knowledge of quadratic functions, exponential functions, and systems of equations. Students will study logarithmic, square root, cubic, cube root, absolute value, rational functions, and their related equations. Students will connect functions to their inverses and associated equations and solutions in both mathematical and real-world situations. In addition, students will extend their knowledge of data analysis and numeric and algebraic methods. Algebra II is a course required by most major universities. Algebra II Pre-AP Course #2231 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra I, Recommended Prerequisite: Credit for Geometry Algebra II Pre-AP elaborates and extends the curriculum of the Algebra II course with greater depth and complexity than the regular course. Independent topic assignments are part of the curriculum. Algebra II Pre-IB Course #2260 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra I, Recommended Prerequisite: Credit for Geometry Algebra II Pre-IB elaborates and extends the curriculum of the Algebra II course with greater depth and complexity than the regular course. Independent topic assignments are part of the curriculum. Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Course #2311 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Credit for Algebra II In Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, students will develop and apply skills necessary for college, careers, and life. Course content consists primarily of applications of high school mathematics concepts to prepare students to become well-educated and highly informed 21st century citizens. Students will develop and apply reasoning, planning, and communication to make decisions and solve problems in applied situations involving numerical reasoning, probability, statistical analysis, finance, mathematical selection, and modeling with algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and discrete mathematics. Advanced Quantitative Reasoning is a good fit for students pursuing a non-mathematics-intensive major in business, social sciences or the arts at the post-secondary level. Math Independent Study - Intermediate College Algebra Course #2314 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Credit for Algebra II, see counselor for additional eligibility requirements Mathematics Independent Study - Intermediate College Algebra is designed to prepare students for entry level college mathematics, most typically college algebra. The course will focus on the Mathematics topics of: Elementary Algebra; Intermediate Algebra and Functions; Geometry and Measurement; Data Analysis, Statistics, and Probability. This course offers an alternative for students who need to earn a fourth year of mathematics credit to satisfy high school graduation requirements. College Preparatory Mathematics Course #2316 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: See counselor for eligibility requirements, recommended prerequisite is Algebra II As part of the Texas Success Initiative (TSI), Texas law requires students entering college to have readiness in reading and math. Various assessments determine if a student needs reinforcement of specific skills. This course will help students to become college ready in mathematics. Note: This course will satisfy the fourth mathematics credit requirement on the FHSP. Although College Preparatory Mathematics is a state approved mathematics elective credit, most colleges and universities will not accept it for admission purposes. Pre-Calculus Course #2312 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra II Pre-Calculus is the preparation for calculus. The course is designed to strengthen and enhance conceptual understanding and mathematical reasoning used when modeling and solving mathematical and real-world problems. Students systematically work with functions and their multiple representations. The study of Pre-Calculus deepens students mathematical understanding and fluency with algebra and trigonometry and extends their ability to make connections and apply concepts and procedures at higher levels. Students investigate and explore mathematical ideas, develop multiple strategies for analyzing complex situations, and use technology to build understanding, make connections between representations, and provide support in solving problems. Pre-Calculus Pre-AP Course #2332 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra II Pre-Calculus Pre-AP elaborates and extends the curriculum of the Pre-Calculus course with greater depth and complexity than the regular course. Independent topic assignments are part of the curriculum. This course is not open to students with credit in trigonometry, elementary analysis or Pre-Calculus. Pre-Calculus Pre-IB Course #2341 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra II Pre-Calculus IB elaborates and extends the curriculum of the Pre- Calculus course with greater depth and complexity than the regular course. Independent topic assignments are part of the curriculum. This course is not open to students with credit in trigonometry, elementary analysis or Pre-Calculus. This course is required for any IB student planning to take an IB Math Exam. Calculus AB Advanced Placement Course #2430 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Credit for Pre-calculus Calculus AB Advanced Placement will develop the student s understanding of the concepts of calculus including functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, integrals, and their applications. College credit can be achieved by demonstrating competence on the Advanced Placement exam. Calculus BC Advanced Placement Course #2431 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Credit for Pre-Calculus Calculus BC Advanced Placement will develop the student s understanding of the concepts of calculus including functions, graphs, limits, derivatives, integrals and their applications, and polynomial approximations and series. College credit can be achieved by demonstrating competence on the Advanced Placement exam. Mathematics SL International Baccalaureate Course #2342 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Credit for Pre-Calculus IB IB Math SL consists of seven core topics including circular and trigonometric functions, vectors, matrices, statistics and probability, and calculus. Students also complete a portfolio representing mathematical investigation and mathematical modeling. This course prepares student to take the International Baccalaureate Math SL exam. Mathematics HL International Baccalaureate Course #2440 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Credit for AP Calculus BC IB Math HL consists of all core content of the SL course as well as additional advanced topics in each area such as further vector, statistics and calculus applications. HL students must also complete an optional topic as well as submit a portfolio. This course prepares students to take the International Baccalaureate math HL exam. Statistics Advanced Placement Course #2432 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit in Algebra II is required, and Pre-Calculus is recommended Statistics Advanced Placement topics include real world applications used daily in most businesses and required by most business and scientific programs. Students are expected to take the Advanced Placement Exam. Note: At, this course is strongly recommended to prepare students for the IB Math Studies Exam. Basic Algebra 1 Course #2071 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Algebra uses modified Algebra 1 content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Geometry Course #2080 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Planning for the Future...29

30 Basic Geometry uses modified Geometry content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Math Models Course #2090 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Mathematical Models with Applications uses modified Mathematical Models with Applications content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Dollars and Cents Course #2040 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Dollars and Cents focuses on consumer practices and responsibilities, the money management process, decision-making skills, impact on technology, and preparation for employment and independent living. Students are encouraged to participate in career, technical and student leadership organizations. Applied Algebra, Geometry, Math Models and Dollars & Cents Course #2019, 2029, 2039, 2049 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied Mathematics courses are based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Instruction reinforces basic math operations (+ - x ) in a variety of practical, real-life situations that assist in understanding of using math in daily living exercises. The emphasis is on the use of money, personal finances, and solving home and work problems by using the concepts of fundamental mathematics. Students practice these strategies within the context of simulations designed to reinforce the understanding of basic math operations as well as the application of these operations with technological tools that enhance understanding and accuracy. Science Biology Biology Course #3210 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 Biology investigates the relationship that living organisms have with one another and the world around them. The topics covered in Biology will include cellular biology and microbiology; biochemistry; energy transfer; ecosystems; and taxonomy; as well as many others. This course will also incorporate the latest findings in the fields of molecular biology and biotechnology. Laboratory investigations are used to provide concrete experiences in order for students to gain a better understanding of the topics being covered. Biology Pre-AP Course #3212 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 Biology Pre-AP investigates the relationship that living organisms have with one another and the world around them. The topics covered in Biology will include cellular biology and microbiology; biochemistry; energy transfer; ecosystems; and taxonomy; as well as many others. This course will also incorporate the latest findings in the fields of molecular biology and biotechnology. Laboratory investigations are used to provide concrete experiences in order for students to gain a better understanding of the topics being covered. Biology Pre-AP will involve a more in-depth study of topics, including higher-level thinking skills in both laboratory exercises and assessment. Independent research of topics throughout the year is also a part of this course and will include an independent science project to be completed during the second semester of the course Planning for the Future Biology Pre-IB Course #3262 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 Biology Pre-IB investigates the relationship that living organisms have with one another and the world around them. The topics covered in Biology will include cellular biology and microbiology; biochemistry; energy transfer; ecosystems; and taxonomy; as well as many others. This course will also incorporate the latest findings in the fields of molecular biology and biotechnology. Laboratory investigations are used to provide concrete experiences in order for students to gain a better understanding of the topics being covered. Biology Pre-IB will involve a more in-depth study of topics, including higher-level thinking skills in both laboratory exercises and assessment. Independent research of topics throughout the year is also a part of this course and will include an independent science project to be completed during the second semester of the course. Biology Advanced Placement Course #3230 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Biology and Chemistry Biology AP is designed to be the equivalent of a first-year college biology course with laboratory investigations recommended by the College Board. The goal is to enable the student to develop a solid understanding of the principal concepts in Biology such as molecules and cells; genetics, reproduction, and change; and organisms and populations; and to provide the student with the analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapid changing science of biology. This course prepares students to take the AP Biology exam. Biology I International Baccalaureate Course #3240 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Biology and Chemistry Biology IB I is designed to be the equivalent of a first-year college biology course. The goal is to enable the student to develop a solid understanding of the principal concepts in Biology such as molecules and cells; genetics, reproduction, and change; and organisms and populations; and to provide the student with the analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapid changing science of biology. This course prepares students to take the International Baccalaureate exam. Biology II International Baccalaureate Course #3242 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Biology IB I Biology IB II is a continuation of Biology IB I involving a more in-depth study of the topics of human anatomy, evolution, ecology, plants and animals. Laboratory exercises will be inquiry-based to compliment the topics studied. Students who complete this course are eligible to sit for the International Baccalaureate exam. Basic Biology Course #3020 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Biology uses modified Biology content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Integrated Physics and Chemistry Integrated Physics and Chemistry (IPC) Course #3106 Credit: 1 Grade: 10 Integrated Physics and Chemistry is an introduction to the science disciplines of physics and chemistry. There are several topics covered throughout the year, including: motion, waves, energy, properties of matter, and chemical reactions. An emphasis is placed on laboratory techniques and procedures that will be used to illustrate the concepts that are covered within the course. Basic Integrated Physics and Chemistry Course #3010 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 Basic Integrated Physics and Chemistry uses modified Integrated Physics and Chemistry content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Chemistry Chemistry Course #3310 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Biology and Algebra I Chemistry uses laboratory investigations to study the basic principles of chemistry. Topics to be covered include properties and changes of matter; states of matter; nuclear chemistry, and solution chemistry. An emphasis is placed upon chemical calculations and mathematical formulations. A student enrolling in chemistry as a sophomore should have strong math and reading skills. Chemistry Pre-AP Course #3314 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Biology. Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. Chemistry Pre-AP is designed to be a laboratory preparatory course for a first year, general chemistry course (AP/IB II Chemistry) at the college level. Basic concepts of chemistry are covered using a high level of thinking and problem solving skills. An emphasis is placed on chemical calculation and the mathematical formulation of principles. Pre-AP Chemistry will involve a more in-depth study of topics, including higher-level thinking skills in both laboratory exercises and assessment. The student should expect to complete research tasks involving chemistry topics throughout the year. Chemistry Pre-IB Course #3364 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology. Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. Chemistry Pre-IB is designed to be a laboratory preparatory course for a first year, general chemistry course (IB Chemistry) at the college level. Basic concepts of chemistry are covered using a high level of thinking and problem solving skills. An emphasis is placed on chemical calculation and the mathematical formulation of principles. The basis of this class is the study of the nature of matter, how matter is represented, and how matter interacts. The focus in Pre-IB Chemistry is the behavior and significance of some important groups of compounds and specific elements. Additionally, important chemical concepts such as the mechanism of chemical reactions; energy rates and rates of reaction, and organic chemistry are detailed. Chemistry I International Baccalaureate Course #3244 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry. Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. Chemistry IB is designed to be a laboratory preparatory course

31 for a first year, general chemistry course (Chemistry II IB) at the college level. Basic concepts of chemistry are covered using a high level of thinking and problem solving skills. An emphasis is placed on chemical calculation and the mathematical formulation of principles. Chemistry IB will involve a more in-depth study of topics, including higher-level thinking skills in both laboratory exercises and assessment. The student will be expected to conduct research involving chemistry topics throughout the year. This course prepares students to take the standard level IB Exam. Chemistry Advanced Placement Course #3330 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra II and Chemistry Chemistry AP is designed to be the equivalent to a college chemistry course concentrating on the concepts of molecular structure and bonding, chemical equations, and quantitative analysis which include stoichiometry, chemical equilibria, redox, and electrochemistry. This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Chemistry exam. Chemistry II International Baccalaureate Course #3340 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Algebra II and Chemistry Chemistry IB II is designed to be the equivalent to a college chemistry course concentrating on the concepts of molecular structure and bonding, chemical equations, and quantitative analysis which includes stoichiometry, chemical equilibria, redox, and electrochemistry. In addition to these topics, organic chemistry and environmental chemistry will be discussed. This course prepares students to take the standard or higher level IB Exam. Physics Physics Course #3410 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Successful completion of two years of science. Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II is recommended. Physics includes laboratory investigations designed to introduce students to the practical application of physics. Basic physics concepts such as mechanics, dynamics, kinematics, heat, waves and electricity will be covered through the year. The modern physics of nuclear phenomena and astronomy are also addressed within this course. Physics Pre-AP Course #3412 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Successful completion of two years of science and credit for or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. Physics Pre-AP includes laboratory investigations designed to introduce students to the practical application of physics. Basic concepts of physics are covered using a high level of thinking and problem solving skills. Concepts such as mechanics, dynamics, kinematics, heat, waves, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, and the modern physics of nuclear phenomena will be studied. Physics Pre-AP will involve a more in-depth study of topics, including higher-level thinking skills in both laboratory exercises and assessment. Physics Pre-IB Course #3413 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry. Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. Physics Pre-IB is designed to be a laboratory preparatory course for a first year, general physics course at the college level either Standard Level IB Physics (IB Physics SL) or Higher Level IB Physics (IB Physics HL). Basic concepts of physics are covered using higher levels of thinking and problem solving skills in both coursework and lab work. An emphasis is placed on mechanics, dynamics, kinematics, heat, waves, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, the modern physics of nuclear phenomena, and astrophysics. Physics I International Baccalaureate Course #3440 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Three years of high school science including Chemistry and Physics. Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II. Physics I IB includes laboratory investigations designed to introduce students to the practical application of physics. Basic physics concepts such as mechanics, dynamics, kinematics, heat, waves and electricity will be covered, including the modern physics of nuclear phenomena and astronomy. Physics IB will involve a more in-depth study of topics begun in Pre-IB Physics, including higher-level thinking skills in both laboratory exercises and assessment. This course requires students to complete a laboratory notebook, which will be used as one of the measures of their performance in the course. This course prepares students to take the Standard Level IB Physics (IB Physics SL) IB Exam. Physics II International Baccalaureate Course #3441 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Three years of high school science including Chemistry and Physics. Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Precalculus. Physics II IB continues the studies learned in Pre-IB Physics. Practical applications and higher level thinking skills are emphasized. Topics included in Physics II IB include: motions in fields, thermal physics (thermodynamics), wave phenomena, electromagnetic induction, quantum physics and nuclear physics, digital technology and options such as astrophysics and particle physics. This course prepares students to take the Higher Level IB Physics (IB Physics HL) IB Exam. Physics C Advanced Placement Course #3431 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Credit for Biology, Chemistry, Physics and credit or concurrent enrollment in Calculus Physics C AP is a college calculus-based physics course that includes the study of mechanics, electricity, and magnetism. Emphasis is on content, critical thinking as well as problemsolving techniques. The course is intended for students who plan on studying engineering or the physical sciences in college. This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Physics C exam in Mechanics and/or Electricity and Magnetism. Fourth Year Science Course Options The following science elective courses are state approved; however, not all are accepted by colleges/universities for admission purposes. Students should contact the prospective college/ university for specific guidelines on admission requirements. In addition, The State Board of Educations (SBOE) has approved courses to substitute for science credits. Leander ISD offers the following approved science substitution courses: Advanced Animal Science (CTE) and Principles of Engineering (CTE). Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Anatomy & Physiology Course #3550 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Biology and Chemistry Anatomy and Physiology is designed for students interested in biological, medical, and health oriented programs. Students will study the structures and functions of the human body. The body s systems will be investigated as to the body s responses to forces, maintenance of homeostasis, electrical interactions, transport systems, and energy systems. The topics will be presented through an integration of biology, chemistry and physics. In this laboratory course, the students conduct laboratory investigations, perform dissections, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and problem solving. Anatomy and Physiology will involve the in-depth study of topics, including high level thinking skills in both laboratory exercises and assessment. The student will be expected to conduct research. Scientific Research and Design I Course #3565 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Credit for a science course Scientific Research and Design II Course #3566 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Scientific Research and Design I Scientific Research and Design allows students to conduct laboratory investigations and fieldwork, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and problem solving. The student actively formulates a problem related to science, designs the research and procedures to be used, and plans a final product that will involve a formal presentation to representatives of the scientific community. Note: Scientific Research and Design will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Environmental Science Advanced Placement Course #3556 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology, and either Chemistry or IPC Environmental Science AP is a science based, relevant, interdisciplinary course that combines ideas from the natural and social sciences. Students will study the interconnections between the environmental and societal systems. The content areas addressed are: interdependence of earth s systems, human population dynamics, renewable/nonrenewable resources (distribution, ownership, use, degradation), environmental quality, global changes/consequences, and environment/society. This course prepares students to take the Advanced Placement Environmental Science exam. Environmental Systems Course #3558 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology, and either Chemistry or IPC Environmental Systems is a science class that uses topics introduced in Biology and Chemistry classes to study the environments that exist on Earth. The course focuses on a variety of topics including: biotic and abiotic factors in habitats; ecosystems and biomes; interrelationships among resources and an environmental system; sources and flow of energy through an environmental system; relationships between carrying capacity and changes in populations and changes in ecosystems; and changes in Earth environments. Planning for the Future...31

32 Earth and Space Science Course #3560 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Three units of science, one of which may be taken concurrently and three units of math, one of which may be taken concurrently. Earth and Space Science is a science class that uses topics introduced in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics classes to study themes that affect the Earth, other plants and stars. These themes include: space and time, components, space systems, internal and external energy, and the effects of natural and human-influenced processes Planning for the Future Medical Microbiology Course #3562 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Biology and credit or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry Medical Microbiology is a course in which students will conduct laboratory investigations to study the relationships of microorganisms to wellness and disease. Students will develop knowledge and skills related to disease prevention by learning the chain of infection, asepsis, and standard precautions. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms will be identified to assist in the understanding of specific diseases, causative agents, and treatment options. Basic Environmental Systems Course #3030 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Environmental Systems uses modified Environmental Systems content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Earth and Space Science Course #3050 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Earth and Space Science uses modified Earth and Space Science content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied Biology, IPC, and Environmental Systems Course #3019, 3029, 3039 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied Science courses are based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Study focuses on science-based concepts related specifically to independent daily living skills and employment. Attention is given to relating science to home and job practices. Activities foster student understanding of their roles and responsibilities in adult life. Experiences are hands-on with an emphasis on cooperative learning strategies. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living. Social Studies World Geography Course #4110 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 World Geography Studies includes physical, political, cultural, and historical perspectives of the world, examining the physical and human aspects of our world and people and their cultures. Students will gather and analyze information that will help them understand our complex world. Human Geography AP Course #4163 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 Human Geography Advanced Placement introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of Earth s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. This college level, cutting edge course is one of College Board s fastest growing courses and includes applications of new technology, increased rigor, and another option for advanced course work. Note: Students who have received credit for World Geography are not eligible to take this course. World History Course #4210 Credit: 1 Grade: 10 World History is the only course offering students an overview of the entire history of humankind. The major emphasis is on the study of significant people, events, and issues from the earliest times to the present. Traditional historical points of reference in world history are identified as students analyze important events and issues in western civilization as well as in civilizations in other parts of the world. World History Advanced Placement Course #4263 Credit: 1 Grade: 10 World History Advanced Placement requires students to develop mastery over the assigned content while developing the ability to practice the skills of a historian. Students will learn to develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing and interpreting both primary documents and writings by respected historians. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies. The focus is on the last 1000 years of the global experience. Upon completion of the course, students have the opportunity to take the AP exam to receive up to six hours of college credit. This course may be used to substitute for World History. U.S. History Course #4310 Credit: 1 Grade: 11 U.S. History traces the emergence and growth of the United States following Reconstruction to the present. Crises, wars, victories, defeats, and peace are studied, using the examples of the World Wars, Korea, Cuba, Vietnam, and the Persian Gulf to understand how people and events of history have shaped the present and will continue to affect the future. Domestic issues are also emphasized. U.S. History Advanced Placement Course #4330 Credit: 1 Grade: 11 U.S. History AP is equivalent to college-level survey American History. The topics considered in this study follow the chronology of U.S. History from colonization to the present. Additional focus is placed on document analysis and timed analytical writing. Upon completion of the course, students have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam to receive up to six hours of college credit. U.S. History II (HIST 1302) - ACC Dual Credit Course #4483 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: ACC Early College Start Enrollment Process U.S. History (HIST 1302) is taught by an adjunct ACC professor and is scheduled during the regular school day or evenings. Students who complete HIST 1302 will receive high school U.S. History credit. Students must make at least a 70 to receive high school credit. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA) at the high school level. History of the Americas I IB Course #4340 Credit: 1 Grade: 11 History of the Americas I IB is equivalent to college-level survey American History. The topics considered in this study follow the chronology of U.S. History from colonization to the present. Additional focus is placed on document analysis and timed analytical writing. History of the Americas II IB Course #4440 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: IB History of Americas I History of the Americas II IB is a more focused study of the roles of the American nations (North, Central and South America) in the twentieth century. Special emphasis will be placed upon broad topics including war, nationalism and independence movements, rise and rule of single-party states, establishment and work of international organizations, the Cold War, and the state and its relationship with minorities. At the completion of the senior level of this course, a student would be prepared for the IB History of the Americas exam (Higher Level). Government Course #4410 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 12 The goal of Government is for the students to understand world issues, to identify the rights and obligations of citizens and to become active participants in the democratic process. U.S. Government Advanced Placement Course #4430 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 12 U.S. Government AP is the equivalent to college-level survey U.S. Government. Upon completion of the course, students have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam to receive college credit. U.S. Government (GOVT 2305) - ACC Dual Credit Course #4480 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: ACC Early College Start Enrollment Process U.S. Government (GOVT 2305) is taught by an adjunct ACC professor and is scheduled during the regular school day or evenings. Students who complete GOVT 2305 will receive high school U.S. Government credit. Students must make at least a 70 to receive high school credit. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA) at the high school level. Economics Course #4412 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 12 Economics and the Free Enterprise System focuses on the impact of economics on the lives of people. Economics emphasizes on the basic principles of production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services in the United States and a comparison with

33 those of other countries. Macroeconomics Advanced Placement Course #4432 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 12 Macroeconomics AP is the equivalent to college-level survey economics. Upon completion of the course, students have the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement exam to receive college credit. Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 2301) - ACC Dual Credit Course #4482 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: ACC Early College Start Enrollment Process Principles of Macroeconomics (ECON 2301) is taught by an adjunct ACC professor and is scheduled during the regular school day or evenings. Students who complete ECON 2301 will receive high school economics credit. Students must make at least a 70 to receive high school credit. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA) at the high school level. Basic World Geography Course #4010 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic World Geography uses modified World Geography content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic World History Course #4020 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic World History uses modified World History content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic U.S. History Course #4030 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic United States History uses modified U.S. History content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Government Course #4040 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Basic United States Government uses modified Government content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Economics Course #4050 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Basic Economics uses modified Economics content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied World Geography and World History Course #4019, 4029 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied Social Studies courses are based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Study focuses on relationships of consumer practices and financial responsibilities of independent workers. Based on their individual needs and assessments, students are exposed to skills related to banking, purchasing goods and services, taxes, credit, and general money management. Accessing consumer and emergency services through the use of locally available plans is explored. Students may develop newspaper skills and develop skills to meet transportation needs for independent living. Attention is given to consumer protection services (to avoid things such as the abuse of consumers through phone solicitation and scams) and the need for and use of legal aid. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living; 1) introduce, teacher-model, ample practice opportunities, 2) project-based instruction/learning, 3) real-world simulations, 4) community and real-world applications. Applied US History and Government Course #4039, 4049 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied US History and Government courses are based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Students explore rights, privileges, and responsibilities of students within their school, community, and place of employment. Concepts include voting, laws and consequences of unlawful behavior, honesty, integrity, community volunteerism, and rules and regulations. Students are instructed on how to be productive and safe in a variety of community situations. Students will become familiar with the basic concepts of personal responsibility related to being productive, contributing members of society. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living; 1) introduce, teachermodel, ample practice opportunities, 2) project-based instruction/ learning, 3) real-world simulations, 4) community and real-world applications. Applied Economics - Free Enterprise Course #4059 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 The Applied Economics-FE course is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). This course introduces the student to the relationship between the student and her/his community such as involvement through public service, voluntary organizations, and a variety of community activities in which the student may participate. The ability to communicate and access community businesses, services, and resources including emergency services is explored through practical experiences and development of individual interpersonal communication skills. Community-based instruction focuses on transportation, directionality, local landmarks, and other information related to access to the community. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living; 1) introduce, teacher-model, ample practice opportunities, 2) project-based instruction/learning, 3) real-world simulations, 4) community and real-world applications. Elective Social Studies Program Psychology I International Baccalaureate Course #4552 Credit: 1 Grade: Psychology I IB is the study of our behavior and its relationship to our day to day experiences. Students will examine the biological, cognitive, and learning perspectives of psychology, as well as one of the following sub-topics: cultural, dysfunctional, lifespan, psychodynamic or social psychology. During the spring semester, students will learn research methods and apply their knowledge to a simple experimental study using quantitative methods. This course prepares students to take the IB Exam. Psychology II International Baccalaureate Course #4554 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Psychology I IB Psychology II IB will cover the three perspectives addressed at the standard level, in addition to the humanistic perspective. Two of the sub-topics listed under the standard level will also be addressed. Students will complete an independent research project using both quantitative and qualitative methods during the spring semester. CPHS, VRHS, RHS, VHS Investigations in Psychology Course #4493 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Psychology Advanced Placement Course #4492 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: Investigations in Psychology Investigations in Psychology is a first semester course introducing students to the scientific method as applied in behavioral sciences including application of methodology and ethics in behavioral science research, learning theory, the processes of sensation and perception, studies in social psychology, and descriptive statistics. Students will have the opportunity to delve more deeply into areas of particular interest including the possibility of developing a research project on human behavior or mental processes. AP Psychology is a second semester course that introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of humans and other animals. Students learn the terminology, facts, principles, and theories of each major subfield within psychology. College credit can be achieved by demonstrating competence on the AP Psychology Exam. European History Advanced Placement Course #4332 Credit: 1 Grade: European History Advanced Placement requires students to develop mastery over the assigned content while developing the ability to practice the skills of a historian. Students will learn to develop their critical thinking skills by analyzing and interpreting both primary documents and writings by respected historians. The content will include the artistic and intellectual, religious, and political developments of the early 16th century and includes events up to the 1990 s. Upon completion of this course, students have the opportunity to take the AP exam to receive college credit. This course may not be used to substitute for World History. Note: European History AP will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. U.S. History I (HIST 1301) - ACC Dual Credit Course #4485 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisite: ACC Early College Start Enrollment Process U.S. History (HIST 1301) is taught by an adjunct ACC professor and is scheduled during the regular school day or evenings. Students who complete HIST 1301 will receive high school Special Topics in Social Studies credit. Students must make at least a 70 to receive high school credit. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA) at the high school level. Influence of the Old Testament Bible on American Civilization Course #4555 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Influence of the New Testament Bible on American Civilization Course #4556 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Influence of the Old Testament (OT) Bible on American Civilization will examine OT Bible stories and teachings that have influenced the development of the United States. In the course, Planning for the Future...33

34 students will reflect on their knowledge of American civilization as they read and study from the course text and from their own translation of the OT Bible. Students will learn the language, literary forms, plot lines, characters, and contents of the Bible so they have a better understanding of its influences on literature, art, and culture. Focus will be placed on analytical writing. Influence of the New Testament (NT) Bible on American Civilization will examine New Testament Bible letters and teachings that have influenced the development of the United States. In the course, students will reflect on their knowledge of American civilization as they read and study from the course text and from their own translation of the NT Bible. Students will analyze literary forms and contents of the Bible so they have a better understanding of its influences on literature, art, and culture. Focus will be placed on analytical writing. The course will be taught in an objective, academic manner with the focus on the Bible s role in American life, language, and culture. The course will neither promote nor disparage religion and will not be taught from a particular sectarian point of view. Instructional materials and lessons that are of a devotional nature will not be used. Note: Influence of the OT/NT Bible on American Civilization will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Languages Other Than English Chinese, German, Japanese, and Russian are available through online/virtual options. Online/virtual options are intense and require self-discipline, organization, and commitment. Please see your counselor for more information. In addition, students can earn a performance acknowledgement under the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) by completing all requirements. See Performance Acknowledgement section of the catalog for more specific details. Certain programs may substitute for World Language credit. Please see the World Language substitution section of the course catalog for detailed substitution information. American Sign Language Note: Although American Sign Language is a state approved foreign language elective credit, not all colleges and universities accept ASL for admission purposes. Many colleges/universities do not offer ASL, which means that students must change languages if a language is required for college graduation. Interested students should contact the prospective college or university for specific admission requirements and course offerings/requirements. Student who wish to pursue an Endorsement in Arts and Humanities through a in ASL should see your counselor for additional information concerning options/ requirements for ASL IV. American Sign Language I Course #5101 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 ASL I is an introductory course of the study of the receptive and expressive aspect of signs, non-manual communication, and grammatical features of ASL in everyday situations and other meaningful contexts. The course also explores the cultural perspective of the deaf community and the interrelationship of languages. Note: ASL will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability Planning for the Future American Sign Language II Course #5102 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of ASL I ASL II builds on the language skills acquired in ASL I. Students will develop their signing skills in various everyday situations and further explore the cultural perspective of the deaf community. Note: ASL will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. American Sign Language III Course #5103 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of ASL II ASL III provides extensive vocabulary development combined with interpreter training. Students will spend class time developing sign to voice and voice to sign interpreting skills. This class is designed to develop confidence in communicating with deaf people in a variety of situations, and to prepare students that may be interested in pursuing a degree in deaf related careers. Note: ASL will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. American Sign Language IV Course #5104 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of ASL III ASL IV provides advanced interpreter training, independent community exploration as well as continued advancement in upper level vocabulary and classifiers. Students will spend class time developing a portfolio of a variety of interpreting scenarios (doctors visit, VRS call, etc.). This class is designed to develop confidence in interpreting as well as communicating effectively with deaf people in a variety of situations, and to further prepare students interested in enrolling in a bachelor s degree program in interpreting. Note: ASL will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Basic American Sign Language I Course #5034 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic ASL I uses modified ASL I content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic American Sign Language II Course #5035 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic ASL II uses modified ASL II content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied American Sign Language I-IV Course #5030, 5031, 5032, 5033, Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied ASL 1-4 is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Study focuses on offering hands-on experience with the receptive and expressive aspect of sign language in everyday situations and other meaningful contexts. The course also explores the cultural perspective of the deaf and non-verbal community and the interrelationship of languages. Students may explore the use of sign language as a means for increasing independence levels in the areas of employment, adult living, social/recreation and leisure and lifelong learning. French French I Course #5201 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 French I introduces the basic language skills of viewing, showing, listening, speaking, reading, and writing. French I stresses oral communication while learning basic grammar structures to reduce the risk of miscommunication. Elementary creative writing projects reinforce language skills and students will be expected to take an active role in all oral and written activities. French II Course #5202 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of French I French II begins with a review of French I and continues with additional structures, functions, and vocabulary to increase language proficiency. Continued development of basic conversation skills is an important part of the class and is evaluated through creative oral activities. Students will begin writing paragraphs in French in order to prepare for the intermediate level. French II Pre-AP/IB Course #5206 Credit: 1 Grade: Recommended overall average of 85 or above in French 1 or through District Placement Exam. French II Pre-AP/IB is an accelerated course which focuses on continued language study with greater depth and range of subject matter necessary for success in advanced French courses. This course is designed for students who have a strong interest in learning French, who already know some French, or who are college-bound. Students continue to develop proficiency in all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - with a strong emphasis on the ability to communicate and interact orally and in writing. Students will also explore the customs and traditions of French-speaking peoples through the use of authentic materials. Students planning to continue to Pre-AP French III are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. Note: This course is only available for students entering 9th grade in the Fall of 2013 and beyond. French III Pre-AP Course #5203 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of French II French III Pre-AP continues to emphasize the communication skills established in levels I and II. Students will learn complex grammar structures and vocabulary necessary to exchange information, persuade, socialize, and express attitudes, opinions, feelings, and emotions. The study of Francophone culture is highlighted through films, art, literature, and authentic readings. French III Pre-IB Course #5205 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of French II French III Pre-IB continues to build communication skills established in levels I and II. Students will learn complex grammar and vocabulary necessary to read, write, understand, and speak

35 authentic, contemporary French. Individual topics vary among IB core and option subjects. Writing focuses on IB text types. The emphasis is preparation for IB assessments which may begin at the end of Pre-IB III and which continue throughout French IV IB. French IV Advanced Placement Course #5230 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of French III Pre-AP French IV AP stresses oral skills, written composition, and grammar while emphasizing the use of French for active communication. Students will develop the following skills: expression of ideas orally with accuracy and fluency, acquisition of vocabulary and a grasp of structure to allow the easy, accurate reading of a variety of genres and registers. This course will prepare students for the Advanced Placement French Language. French IV International Baccalaureate Course #5240 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of French III Pre-IB French IV IB is designed to prepare students for success in the IB French Exam. Areas of concentration are based on IB core and option subjects. Reading and writing authentic contemporary French, using IB text types, is a primary objective. Students will develop fluency in individual and interactive speaking skills. They will use individual and group inquiry to examine global issues, and to support continued language acquisition. The five components of the International Baccalaureate Language B Exam in French are administered over the course of the academic year. French V Course #5233 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of French IV Pre-AP French V is designed for students who wish to continue their study of French beyond the fourth year. Level V students will read in the target language as well as study advanced grammatical concepts and the culture and civilization of the speakers of the target language. Basic French I Course #5020 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic French I uses modified French I content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied French I Course #5029 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied French I is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Study focuses on basic French language skills at a participatory level to introduce the student to various aspects of French culture. German Note: German IV will be offered during the school year only. German IV Advanced Placement Course #5330 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of German III Pre-AP German IV AP reviews structures learned in German I-III and continues to develop language skills. Special emphasis is placed on reading mature, original selections representing a variety of genres. Selections from German literature, newspaper, letters, interviews, etc., are studied. Students will be further trained to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. This course will prepare students for the AP German Language Exam. German IV International Baccalaureate Course #5340 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of German III Pre-IB German IV IB reviews structures learned in German I-III and continues to develop language skills. Special emphasis is placed on reading mature, original selections representing a variety of genres. Selections from German literature, newspaper, letters, interviews, etc., are studied. Students will be further trained to express ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. This course will prepare students for the IB German Language Exam. Latin Latin I Course #5401 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Latin I introduces students to the language and culture that is the basis of Western civilization. In addition to vocabulary and grammar studies, students will explore ancient Roman daily life through a variety of projects and presentations. Students will study Roman contributions to Western man such as mythology and architecture. Latin II Course #5402 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin I Latin II extends the student s knowledge of Roman language, grammar, vocabulary, etymology and culture through readings and translations. Students will explore Roman history, its armies, and political intrigue through research projects and presentations. Latin II Pre-AP/IB Course #5406 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Recommended overall average of 85 or above in Latin 1 or through District Placement Exam. Latin II Pre-AP is a course which focuses on continued language study with greater depth and range of subject matter necessary for success in upper level Latin courses. This course is designed for students who have a strong interest in learning Latin and who are college-bound. Students planning to continue to Pre-AP Latin III are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. Note: This course is only available for students entering 9th grade in the Fall of 2013 and beyond. Latin III Pre-AP Course #5403 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin II Latin III Pre-AP offers the student opportunities to refine comprehension and independent thinking skills. Translation practice and literary analysis encourage creativity with the language and provide an investigation into the lives and literature of the Romans. Latin III Pre-IB Course #5404 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin II Latin III Pre-IB offers the student opportunities to refine comprehension and independent thinking skills. Translation practice and literary analysis encourage creativity with the language and provide an investigation into the lives and literature of the Romans. Latin IV Advanced Placement Course #5430 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin III Pre-AP Latin IV AP builds on Latin III and offers students opportunities to refine comprehension skills by providing an advanced study of two authors or more incorporating extensive translation practice and literary analysis. Students read, understand, and appreciate authentic Latin literature. This is designed for students interested in taking the AP Latin Language Exam. Latin IV International Baccalaureate Course #5440 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Latin III Pre-IB Latin IV IB builds on Latin III and offers students opportunities to refine comprehension skills by providing an advanced study of two authors or more incorporating extensive translation practice and literary analysis. Students read, understand, and appreciate authentic Latin literature. This is designed for students interested in taking the IB Latin Language Exam. Basic Latin I Course #5036 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Latin I uses modified Latin I content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Latin II Course #5037 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Latin II uses modified Latin II content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Spanish Note: Students who plan to register for a Spanish course and already have some knowledge and skills in the language have the opportunity to advance to the upper level Spanish courses. Leander ISD offers a proficiency and placement exam to determine knowledge and skill level required for entry into an upper Spanish course. The student may skip levels based on the outcomes of the exam which includes an objective exam, writing, and speaking sample. No credit is awarded for the courses skipped. However, credit for courses skipped may be awarded through a Credit-by- Exam. A student may also receive credit for Levels 1 and 2 by taking AP Spanish IV and receiving a score of 3 or better on the AP Spanish language exam. The proficiency exam is offered each spring. To register for the exam, please see your counselor. Spanish I Course #5501 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Spanish I introduces the basic language skills of showing, viewing, listening, reading, speaking, and writing in Spanish. Students will learn vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate in everyday situations. A variety of videos, student presentations, projects, and dramatizations will reinforce language skills and introduce various aspects of Hispanic culture. Students are expected to take an active role in all oral activities to enhance proper pronunciation. Planning for the Future...35

36 Spanish II Course #5502 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I Spanish II renews the basic structures, functions and vocabulary learned in Spanish I and continues with advanced structures and vocabulary to increase language proficiency. Oral and written communication skills are practiced and evaluated through a variety of activities including dramatizations. Emphasis on Hispanic culture continues through videos and readings. Spanish II Pre-AP/IB Course # 5506 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 only Prerequisite: Recommended overall average of 85 or above in Spanish 1 or through District Placement Exam. Spanish II Pre-AP is an accelerated course which focuses on continued language study with greater depth and range of subject matter necessary for success in advanced Spanish courses. This course is designed for students who have a strong interest in learning Spanish, who already know some Spanish, or who are college-bound. Students continue to develop proficiency in all four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, and writing - with a strong emphasis on the ability to communicate and interact orally and in writing. Students will also explore the customs and traditions of Spanish-speaking peoples through the use of authentic materials. Students planning to continue to Pre-AP Spanish III are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. Note: This course is only available for students entering 9th grade in the Fall of 2013 and beyond. Spanish III Course #5505 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish II Spanish III continues to emphasize the communication skills established in levels I and II to increase proficiency. Students will learn advanced structures and vocabulary necessary to interact socially, communicate ideas, feelings and attitudes, and to provide and request information. The study of Hispanic culture will be highlighted through videos, art, literature, and authentic readings. Spanish III Pre-AP Course #5503 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish II Spanish III Pre-AP is a college preparatory course. It continues to emphasize the communication skills established in levels I and II to increase proficiency. Students will learn advanced structures and vocabulary necessary to interact socially, communicate ideas, feelings and attitudes, and to provide and request information. Students will further develop reading, writing, and analysis skills through authentic materials. The study of Hispanic culture will be highlighted through videos, art, literature, and authentic readings. Course will be primarily in Spanish. Students planning on taking AP Spanish are strongly encouraged to take this course. Spanish III Pre-IB Course #5504 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish II Spanish III IB is a college preparatory course. It continues to emphasize the communication skills established in levels I and II to increase proficiency. Students will learn advanced structures and vocabulary necessary to interact socially, communicate ideas, feelings and attitudes, and to provide and request information. Students will further develop reading, writing, and analysis skills through authentic materials. The study of Hispanic culture will be 36...Planning for the Future highlighted through videos, art, literature, and authentic readings. Course will be primarily in Spanish. Spanish IV Advanced Placement Course #5530 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish III Pre-AP Spanish IV AP stresses oral skills, composition, and grammar while emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication. The students will develop the following skills: comprehension of a variety of registers, acquisition of vocabulary and structure to allow the easy, accurate reading of newspaper and magazine articles as well as modern Hispanic literature, composition of expository passages, expression of ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. This course will prepare students for the AP Spanish Language Exam. Spanish IV International Baccalaureate Course #5540 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish III Spanish IV IB stresses oral skills, composition, and grammar while emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication. The students will develop the following skills: comprehension of a variety of registers, acquisition of vocabulary and structure to allow the easy, accurate reading of newspaper and magazine articles as well as modern Hispanic literature, composition of expository passages, expression of ideas orally with accuracy and fluency. This course will prepare students for the IB Spanish Language Exam. Spanish V Advanced Placement Course #5532 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish IV AP Spanish V AP is a survey of Hispanic Literature. This course stresses oral skills, composition, and grammar while emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication. The students will develop the following skills: comprehension of formal and informal spoken and written Spanish, acquisition of vocabulary and a deeper grasp of the structure to allow the student to analyze literary works. Spanish V is an introduction of Hispanic literature in all genres and epochs. This course prepares the student for the AP Spanish Literature Exam. Spanish V International Baccalaureate Course #5542 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish IV IB Spanish V IB is a survey of Hispanic Literature. This course stresses oral skills, composition, and grammar while emphasizing the use of Spanish for active communication. The students will develop the following skills: comprehension of formal and informal spoken and written Spanish, acquisition of vocabulary and a deeper grasp of the structure to allow the student to analyze literary works. Spanish V is an introduction of Hispanic literature in all genres and epochs. This course prepares students to take the IB Exam. Basic Spanish I Course #5010 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Spanish I uses modified Spanish I content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied Spanish I Course #5019 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied Spanish I is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Study focuses on basic Spanish language skills at a participatory level to introduce the student to various aspects of Spanish culture. Fine Arts All of the following courses meet the state fine arts graduation requirement. In addition,the State Board of Education (SBOE) has approved courses to substitute for fine arts credits. Leander ISD offers the following approved fine arts substitution course: Principles and Elements of Floral Design (CTE) Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/ requirements. Visual Arts Art I (General) Course #6101 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Students will work with a variety of drawing, painting, and sculpting media while developing the elements and principles of art. Art I (Studio) Course #6102 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-10 Prerequisite: Previous art instruction and portfolio review Art I Studio is designed for the first-time high school student who has a serious interest in Art. Students will work with a variety of drawing painting, and sculpting media while developing the elements and principles of art. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art II: Drawing Course #6122 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art I and Portfolio Review Students will interpret and organize multiple solutions between natural and man-made environments. Students will become familiar with different drawing styles and techniques by expanding on personal themes, applying design skills, and studying and analyzing artwork. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art III: Drawing Course #6123 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art II: Drawing and Portfolio Review Students will become familiar with different cultural drawing styles and apply a variety of drawing techniques. Students will apply design skills in creating their artwork. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art IV: Drawing Course #6124 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Art III: Drawing and Portfolio Review Students will use problem-solving techniques to create multiple solutions through imaginative thinking to artwork that demonstrates personal intent. Students will create work singularly and/or in a series using a variety of media in their area of concentration. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Basic Art II-IV: Drawing Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 10-12

37 Basic Art II-IV uses modified Art II-IV content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Art II: Painting Course #6132 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art I and Portfolio Review Students will interpret and organize multiple solutions between natural and man-made environments. Students will become familiar with different painting styles and techniques by expanding on personal themes, applying design skills, and studying and analyzing artwork. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art III: Painting Course #6133 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art II: Painting and Portfolio Review Students will become familiar with different cultural painting styles and apply a variety of paining techniques. Students will apply design skills in creating their artwork. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art IV: Painting Course #6134 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Art III: Painting and Portfolio Review Students will use problem-solving techniques to create multiple solutions through imaginative thinking to artwork that demonstrates personal intent. Students will create work singularly and/or in a series using a variety of media in their area of concentration. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Basic Art II-IV: Painting Course # Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Art II-IV uses modified Art II-IV content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Art II: Sculpture Course #6152 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art I and Portfolio Review Students will interpret and organize multiple solutions between natural and man-made environments. Students will become familiar with different sculpting styles and techniques by expanding on personal themes, applying design skills, and studying and analyzing artwork. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art III: Sculpture Course #6153 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art II: Sculpture and Portfolio Review Students will become familiar with different cultural sculpting styles and apply a variety of sculpting techniques. Students will apply design skills in creating their artwork. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art IV: Sculpture Course #6154 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Art III: Sculpture and Portfolio Review Students will use problem-solving techniques to create multiple solutions through imaginative thinking to artwork that demonstrates personal intent. Students will create work singularly and/or in a series using a variety of media in their area of concentration. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Basic Art II-IV: Sculpture Course # Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Art II-IV uses modified Art II-IV content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Art II: Ceramics Course #6142 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art I and Portfolio Review Students will interpret and organize multiple solutions between natural and man-made environments. Students will become familiar with different ceramic styles and techniques by expanding on personal themes, applying design skills, and studying and analyzing artwork. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art III: Ceramics Course #6143 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art II: Ceramics and Portfolio Review Students will become familiar with different cultural clay motif styles and apply a variety of ceramic building techniques. Students will apply design skills in creating their artwork. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art IV: Ceramics Course #6144 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Art III: Ceramics and Portfolio Review Students will use problem-solving techniques to create multiple solutions through imaginative thinking to artwork that demonstrates personal intent. Students will create work singularly and/or in a series using a variety of media in their area of concentration. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Basic Art II-IV: Ceramics Course #6019, 6024, 6025 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Art II-IV uses modified Art II-IV content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. CPHS, VRHS, RHS, VHS Art II: Photography Course #6162 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art I and Portfolio Review Students will learn basic, technical and aesthetic skills of photography that include camera manipulation, film processing and printing. The focus will be on both black and white photography and color (digital) photography. Students will gain an understanding of different cameras, lenses, editing software, file organization and printing techniques.. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. CPHS, VRHS, RHS, VHS Art III: Photography Course #6163 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Art II: Photography and Portfolio Review This class will focus on advanced skills in digital photography in conjunction with Adobe Photoshop, film photography, and the traditional wet darkroom. Learners will also learn how to matt photographs and prepare for exhibition. Participation in art competitions is expected each semester. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. CPHS, VRHS, RHS, VHS Art IV: Photography Course #6164 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Art III: Photography and Portfolio Review This class will focus on advanced skills in digital photography in conjunction with Adobe Photoshop, film photography, and the traditional wet darkroom. Learners will also learn how to matt photographs and prepare for exhibition. Participation in art competitions is expected each semester. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art Advanced Placement - Drawing Portfolio Course #6105 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Portfolio Review Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth are drawing issues that can be addressed through a variety of means, which could include painting, printmaking, mixed media, etc. A variety of approaches to representation, abstraction and expression may be part of the student s portfolio. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art AP - Two Dimensional Design Portfolio Course #6109 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Portfolio Review Two-Dimensional Design portfolio is intended to address a very broad interpretation of two-dimensional design issues. This type of design involves purposeful decision-making about how to use the elements of art and principles of design in an integrative way. A variety of approaches to representation, abstraction and expression may be part of the student s design portfolio. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art AP - Three Dimensional Design Portfolio Course #6110 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Portfolio Review Three-Dimensional Design portfolio is intended to address a broad interpretation of sculptural issues in-depth and space. These may include mass, volume, form, plan, light, and texture. Such elements and/or concepts may be articulated through additive, subtractive, and/or fabrication processes. A variety of approaches to representation, abstraction, and expression may be part of the student s design portfolio. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art AP - Art History Course #6111 Credit: 1 Grade: Students learn to observe and critically assess art through verbal and written expression. Social, political, economic, and religious influences as well as the formal elements of art and principles of design are considered. Painting, sculpture, and architecture from and beyond the European tradition are studied. College credit may be earned by demonstrating competence on the AP Art History Examination. Note: Art History AP will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Planning for the Future...37

38 Art I International Baccalaureate Course #6107 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Audition Students will work on developing portfolios that comply with the criteria set by International Baccalaureate working toward possible college credit. Students must be accepted into this program. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Art II International Baccalaureate Course # 6108 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Art International Baccalaureate I, Audition Students will work on developing portfolios that comply with the criteria set by International Baccalaureate working toward possible college credit. Students must be accepted into this program. There may be a cost associated with taking this course. Basic Art I Course #6010 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Art I uses modified Art I content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Band Course # (See Counselor) Performing Arts Band: Wind Ensemble Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Band: Symphonic Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Band: Concert Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Band: Cadet Band Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Band: Jazz Ensemble Credit: 1/2 (Spring semester only) Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition and concurrent enrollment in choir or a performing concert band Participation in all bands is subject to instructor placement determined by an audition to assess the student s instrumental technique and music reading skill. All band students are required to participate in rehearsals and performances before and after school. Band students are expected to rent or purchase their own instruments, except for certain instruments provided by the school and to purchase their own mouthpieces, reeds, and other accessories. Band is a full year course. All students enrolled in the Wind Ensemble, Symphonic Band, Concert Band or the Cadet Band will participate in marching band unless excused by the band director. Marching band rehearsals begin near the end of July and continue through the fall semester. These rehearsals occur either before or after school. These bands march at varsity football games and compete in marching contests sponsored by the University Interscholastic League (UIL) and 38...Planning for the Future other organizations. During the spring semester, all students enrolled in the band program participate in concert band according to their proficiency, as determined earlier in the year by audition and instructor placement. During this semester, all students will participate in UIL sponsored events including solo and ensemble contest and concert and sight-reading contests. Contests through other organizations may be entered as well. Wind Ensemble selection into this group is by audition, director recommendation, and demonstration of academic proficiency. Members in this ensemble will participate in the TMEA Region Band process, UIL Marching Contest, Solo and Ensemble, and Concert and Sightreading Contest. Members of this group will have a one-hour section rehearsal and an assigned hearing time outside of the school day for grading purposes. The Wind Ensemble will give numerous performances both on and off campus. This group will be considered the Varsity band. Symphonic, Concert, and Cadet Band selection into any of these groups is by audition. These groups, at varying levels, will participate in the UIL Marching Contest, Solo and Ensemble Contest, and Concert and Sight-Reading Contest. Members of the Symphonic Band will participate in the TMEA Region Band process. Members in these groups will have one or more section rehearsal and may have an assigned hearing time outside of the school day for grading purposes. These groups will give a variety of performances. For UIL purposes, these groups will be listed as the Non-Varsity and Sub non-varsity band. Jazz Ensemble selection into this group is by audition, director recommendation, and demonstration of academic proficiency. Members of the Jazz Ensemble must be concurrently enrolled in one of the parent musical organizations (choir or concert band) at the discretion of the director. This class meets on an A/B rotation, and may only meet during the spring semester. The Jazz Ensemble will give numerous performances both on and off campus. Note: Students will receive an additional physical education substitution credit for the fall semester of marching band not to exceed one full credit. Band: Color Guard Course #6261, 1st year Course #6262, 2nd year Course #6263, 3rd year Course #6264, 4th year Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Selection into Color Guard is by audition only. Students in the color guard will perform with the marching band. Individual members will use a variety of auxiliary equipment and dance to visually enhance the marching band. The Color Guard performs in conjunction with the marching band. In the spring semester, the Color Guard continues performance through the Winter Guard program. Note: Students will receive an additional physical education substitution credit for the fall semester of color guard not to exceed one full credit. Music I International Baccalaureate Course #6347 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Instructor approval, current active participation in a music ensemble or private lessons, music reading ability and advanced instrumental or vocal performance skills. Music I IB is designed for music students with varied backgrounds in music performance. The aim of the IB music program is to give music students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world by enabling them to creatively develop their knowledge, abilities and understanding through performance and composition. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of music by performing, by using appropriate musical language and terminology in analyzing musical works from many and varied cultures and periods, and by exploring music through music theory, sight singing, composition, and so on. IB students must take this course in conjunction with one of the school s large ensembles (Band, Choir). Students are expected to complete the IB Music and/or the AP Music Theory Exam in May. Music Theory Advanced Placement Course #6348 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Instructor approval, current active participation in a music ensemble or private lessons, music reading ability and advanced instrumental or vocal performance skills. Music Theory AP is an advanced course for students who will be majoring in music at the university level. The goal of this course is to develop a student s ability to recognize, understand, and describe the basic materials of music. The study is by the development of the student s aural, sight-singing, written, compositional, and analytical skills through the use of music literature. Students are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Examination in Music Theory. Note: Music Theory AP will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Choir: Men s, Women s, and Mixed Choir I - IV Course # (See Counselor) Credit 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisites: None for level I, Audition for levels II - IV Beginning Choir classes provide students who are new to music the opportunity to learn about the elements of music and their application in real life situations - no experience required. Intermediate and Advanced Choir classes provide experienced vocal students with the opportunity to further their singing, music reading, and listening skills while working on self-discipline, team-building, and leadership skills. In all classes there is a strong emphasis on music reading, vocal technique, positive attitudes, responsibility, and strong a work ethic in a fun atmosphere. Students will perform in a variety of musical styles in large ensembles and small ensembles and have the opportunity to perform as soloists if they choose. Performance opportunities include: Choir Concerts, UIL Choir Contests, UIL Solo Contests and state auditions. Choir: Vocal Ensemble I - IV Course # (See Counselor) Credit 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisites: Audition Required This is a small, select choir with membership determined by the director on each campus, and limited to those students of the highest level of musicianship. Students can expect auditions for this group to be more rigorous than those for the other choirs on their campus. Students can also expect a heavier time commitment for extra rehearsals, performances, and contests as a member of a small ensemble. A variety of factors are used to determine choir placement. See your campus Choir Director for details regarding auditions and specific ensembles available. Dance I Course #6351 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 This is an introduction to the terminology and general principles of dance. Students learn how to perform beginning and intermediate movements in a variety of dance forms, although jazz dance is

39 emphasized. They will also study choreography and develop artistic judgment and self-discipline. This class is open to students who wish to participate in the fall tryouts for Dance Team. Students will learn basic dance and kick movements, stretching techniques, and participate in individual and group routines and projects. There will be a required performance both fall and spring semesters. Dance class uniform is required. Note: Students will receive an additional credit in physical education when taking this course. Dance Team Preparation I Course #6353 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Dance Team Preparation II Course #6363 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Dance Team Preparation I or placement by instructor This course is designed to prepare students for fall auditions for the Dance Team. Elements that will be included in the audition process will be addressed. All dancers at any skill level are welcome and will be grouped by ability in order to meet each performer s needs to advance through the semester. Dance class uniform is required. Note: Students will receive an additional credit in physical education when taking Dance Team Preparation I only. Dance II Course #6361 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Dance I or placement by instructor In addition to more advanced applications of the styles and concepts studied in Dance I, students will apply what they have learned to develop a personal plan for conditioning and demonstrate an understanding of the physiology of dance and movement. Students will be provided opportunities to create expressive dance phrases, practice choreographic forms, explore the role of dance in diverse cultures, and analyze dance performances. Recitals and performances by the entire class are required. Dance class uniform is required. Dance III Course #6383 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Dance II or placement by instructor This course further extends development in styles and concepts listed for Dance II and provides opportunities for students to develop group and individual projects, explore the relationship between dance and the other arts, and to create longer phrases or complete dances. Students will also conduct research into dance history, culture, and develop performance evaluation skills. Recitals and performances by the entire class are required. Dance class uniform is required. Dance IV Course #6384 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Dance III or placement by instructor This course is for the advanced dancer who has mastered the elements of Dance I-III. Students will have opportunities to participate in the process of developing and assessing their artistic growth; create, produce, and perform dance works; design costumes; relate dance to culture and contemporary society; and serve as a rehearsal director or assistant. Dance Team Course #6372, 2nd year Course #6373, 3rd year Course #6374, 4th year Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Audition The Dance Team is available to students who participate in the annual auditions and are chosen to be on the team. This group rehearses extensively outside regular class hours. Performances are given regularly for athletic events, pep rallies, contests, community events, and shows throughout the year. The Dance Team meets daily. Note: Students will receive an additional physical education substitution credit for the fall semester of dance team not to exceed one full credit. Dance Team JV Course #6396, 2nd year Course #6397, 3rd year Course #6398, 4th year Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Audition The JV Dance Team is available to students who audition for Dance Team, but are selected for the JV level. This group rehearses during regular class hours. Performances are given regularly for athletic events, community events, and shows throughout the year. The JV Dance Team meets on an A/B rotation. Note: Students will receive an additional physical education substitution credit for the fall semester of JV dance team not to exceed one full credit. Dance Composition I Course #6504 Credit: 1 Grade: Dance Composition II Course #6506 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Current Officer for Dance Team Dance Composition is designed to prepare students who have been selected as officers in the Dance Team or are interested in pursuing leadership opportunities in Dance. Students are provided the opportunity to study, practice and develop group leadership and organizational skills, as well as their creativity in choreography and dance techniques. These skills include, but are not limited to: decision making, problem solving, communication, leadership, human relations and understanding the need for social intelligence and civic responsibility. Dance class uniform is required. Theatre I Course #6401 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Theater I is an introduction to the elements of theatre, including basic acting techniques, technical theatre, and interpretation of dramatic literature. Students explore stage movement, mime, voice and diction, improvisation, and scene presentation. They also practice relaxation and preparatory techniques, examine dramatic structure, and develop audience appreciation skills by attending live theatrical performances. Theatre II - IV Course #6402, 2nd year Course #6403, 3rd year Course #6404, 4th year Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Previous Theatre Class Theater II-IV is a continuation of learning the elements of theatre, including basic acting techniques, technical theatre, and interpretation of dramatic literature. Elements of Theatre I classes will be reviewed. Students will learn more about theatre history, basic stage makeup techniques, reader s theatre, and duet acting. They will participate in performances during class as an actor or part of a crew numerous times throughout the year. Theater IV students in this class may be placed with students in a production class without outside commitments. Theatre Productions I - IV Course #6411, 1st year Course #6412, 2nd year Course #6413, 3rd year Course #6414, 4th year Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisites: Audition Theatre Production classes are geared toward learning through production work. Outside commitment is required. There is an emphasis on directing and students will learn how to make a production notebook. In theatre production classes, students are provided opportunities to learn about and participate in all aspects of theatre production. Students will learn increasingly more difficult performance and technical skills and are required to participate in productions for the community and school. Theatre Arts I International Baccalaureate Course #6431 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Audition IB theatre arts provides students with the opportunity to analyze, interpret and criticize play scripts and other theatrical texts; investigate cultural and historical movements in the theatrical arts; direct, perform, and learn technical skills. IB Theatre Arts students complete a 2500 word research commission, make an oral presentation, compile an extensive portfolio of reflection on performance skills and technical skills, and produce an independent project. Students will be required to participate in productions for the community and school. Theatre Arts II International Baccalaureate Course # 6432 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Theater Arts International Baccalaureate I, Audition IB Theatre Arts provides students with the opportunity to analyze, interpret and criticize play scripts and other theatrical texts; investigate cultural and historical movements in the theatrical arts; direct, perform, and learn technical skills. Students complete a 2500 word research commission, make an oral presentation, compile an extensive portfolio of reflection on performance skills and technical skills, and produce an independent project. Students will be required to participate in productions for the community and school. This course prepares students to take the IB Exam. Technical Theatre I Course #6421 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Portfolio Review may be required Fundamentals of stage design, set and property construction, costumes and make-up, as well as the principles of stage lighting and sound will be presented through this course. Each student will be encouraged to attend play rehearsals and serve on production crews. Students will learn all responsibilities of a production crew including the job of stage manager, director, and assistant director. Technical Theatre II - IV Course #6422, 2nd year Course #6423, 3rd year Course #6424, 4th year Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Portfolio Review may be required Technical Theater II-IV is a continuation of learning the elements of theatre including fundamentals of stage design, set and property construction, costumes and make-up, as well as the principles of Planning for the Future...39

40 stage lighting and sound will be presented. Each student will be encouraged to attend play rehearsals and serve on production crews. Students will also learn all responsibilities of a production crew including the job of stage manager, director, and assistant director. Basic Choir I-IV Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Choir uses modified Choir content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Theatre I Course #6034 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Theatre uses modified Theatre content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Technical Theatre I-IV Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Technical Theatre uses modified Technical Theatre content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Health/Physical Education Certain programs may substitute for physical education credit. Substitutions are noted in the appropriate course descriptions. Approved substitution credits are: Drill Team, Cheerleading, Marching Band and JROTC for a maximum of one credit. Athletics or Private/Commercially sponsored activities can be substituted up to four credits. Students in Dance I and Dance Team Preparation I can also earn a credit of PE. Credit may not be earned for any PE course more than once and no more than four substitutions may be earned through any combination of allowable substitutions. Health Course #7510 Credit: 1/2 Grade: This is a comprehensive course of study of the concepts and skills that foster individual personal health and safety. Current and relevant topics such as environmental health, the influence of media on health consumerism, current health issues, and health care finances will be examined. Basic Health Course #7020 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Basic Health uses modified Health content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied Health Course #7029 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 The Applied Health course relates individual health and hygiene behaviors to issues of wellness, disease prevention, interpersonal skill enhancement, and basic employability standards. Students examine the concepts of human growth and development, emergency and first aid, diet, exercise, and daily hygiene practices as each relates to a healthy lifestyle, job performance, and/or age appropriate environment. Students will define the possible consequences of failing to adhere to these health and hygiene practices. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, 40...Planning for the Future skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living; 1) introduce, teacher-model, ample practice opportunities, 2) project-based instruction/learning, 3) real-world simulations, 4) community and real-world applications. Foundations of Personal Fitness Course #7116 Credit: 1/2-1 Grade: 9-12 The major purpose of Foundations of Personal Fitness is to motivate students to strive for lifetime fitness with an emphasis on the health-related components of physical fitness. Aerobic Activity Course #7118 Credit: 1/2-1 Grade: 9-12 Students in aerobic activities are exposed to a variety of activities that promote health-related fitness. A major expectation of this course is for the student to design a personal fitness program that uses aerobic activities as a foundation. Team or Individual Sport Course #7119 Credit: 1/2-1 Grade: 9-12 In Team or Individual Sports, students are expected to participate in a wide variety of sports that promote health-related fitness, develop an appreciation for teamwork and fair play, and gain competency in two or more sports. Adapted Physical Education 1-4 Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Adapted Physical Education is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS), and is a specially designed program of motor activities. The motor activities focus on the development of fundamental motor skills, which lead to the acquisition of physical fitness, enabling each child to participate to the maximum extent possible in body management, group games and sports. Cheerleading Course # (See Counselor) Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Audition Cheerleaders promote participation in and support the athletic teams and student body. In addition to kinesthetic fundamentals of dance, stunting, and tumbling, cheerleaders will develop skills of leadership, cooperation, self-discipline, and sportsmanship. There are a limited number of participants selected and tryouts are in the spring following a week long tryout clinic. Note: Students receive one physical education substitution credit for the first year of cheerleading. Remaining credits in cheerleading will either be local credits or state PE credits depending upon the teacher certification. Local credits will not be counted toward the state recommended graduation plan of 26 credits. Athletics Students may be enrolled in only one section during the regular school day for practice of inter-school competitive athletics and for programs in which body conditioning, training, and other activities in one of the team sports is the objective of the teacher and students. Students who enroll in an athletic class will be subject to removal and placed in a Physical Education class for the remainder of the semester if they do not meet the athletic standard required for participation on a competitive team. All students must pass a physical examination each year of athletics and complete all other appropriate forms. Athletic team classes meet every day. Note: Students receive one PE substitution credit for each year of successful completion of Athletics for a maximum of four credits. All remaining Athletic credits are local credits and will not be counted toward the state recommended graduation plan of 26 credits. Athletics Course # (See Counselor) Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisites: Member of the athletic team, Coach s recommendation and approval Boys Athletics Girls Athletics Coed Athletics Baseball Basketball Cross Country Basketball Soccer Golf Football Softball Swimming Soccer Volleyball Tennis Track Wrestling Sports Medicine I Course #7201 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-10 Prerequisite: Instructor Approval Sports Medicine II Course #7203 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Sports Medicine I and Instructor Approval Sports Medicine I and II will take a detailed approach to the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. This class requires strenuous physical activity. Students will learn how to use different modalities in the rehab process. Students are expected to cover assigned sports by being present at games and practices. Note: Students receive one physical education substitution credit for each year of successful completion of Sports Medicine I & II. Sports Medicine III Course #7205 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Sports Medicine II and Instructor Approval Sports Medicine IV Course #7206 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Sports Medicine III and Instructor Approval Sports Medicine III and IV will take a more detailed hands-on approach to the prevention treatment and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Students will learn how to use different modalities in the rehab process. They will take athletes through rehab exercises after certain injuries. Junior and senior students will mentor the underclassmen and be responsible for daily tasks. Students are expected to cover assigned sports by being present at games and practices. College & Career Development Course in the College and Career Development section of this catalog are not included in endorsement requirements. Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) I - IV Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisites: Application process, oral and written interview process Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) is an inschool academic support program that prepares students for university eligibility and success. The AVID elective class is intended to be an elective choice for all four years of a student s high school career. AVID places identified students in a rigorous curriculum and gives them the support to succeed therein. The

41 AVID curriculum focuses on writing, inquiry, collaboration and reading (WICR) and includes specific strategies for note taking, test preparation, and research. The three main components of the program are academic instruction, tutorial support and motivational activities. Note: AVID replaces the Professional Communication requirement for 9th grade students. College Transition Course #8524 Credit: 1/2 Grade: College Transition prepares students for the transition from high school to college. Instruction focuses on exploration of college options, research of admission requirements and procedures, preparation for entrance exams, as well as a review of critical college survival skills. This course will culminate with the completion of a college application portfolio. PSAT Team Course #8506 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 11 Prerequisites: Admission criteria determined by individual campus PSAT Team is a class designed to provide additional preparation for those students performing at high levels on the PSAT prior to their junior year. This course will provide an intense review over critical reading, writing and math skills prior to the mid-october PSAT test date. After the PSAT, students will then focus on college and career readiness skills. Note: This is a locally developed course and does not meet state credit requirements for graduation. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA). QUEST Course #8536 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Identified QUEST students QUEST is a program designed to provide learning experiences for academic challenge and personal growth for identified gifted students. Students may enroll in the QUEST class and participate in group projects and/or independent study. Students may attend the QUEST Lab during lunch, before, or after school to work on projects, research summer gifted programs, scholarship and college opportunities, and participate in focus groups, competitions, and other activities. Note: This is a locally developed course and does not meet state credit requirements for graduation. This course is not used to determine grade point average (GPA). Leadership & Development Course in the Leadership and Development section of this catalog are not included in endorsement requirements. CPHS,, VHS Leadership Course #8522 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Leadership provides students with an opportunity to study, practice and develop group leadership and organizational skills. These skills include, but are not limited to: decision making skills, problem solving techniques, communication skills, leadership roles, human relations skills, and understanding the need for social intelligence and civic responsibility. Peer Assistance and Leadership I (PALs) Course #8531 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Nomination and Student Information Request Peer Assistance and Leadership II (PALs) Course #8532 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: PALs I, nomination and Student Information Request Peer Assistance and Leadership allows specially trained students to serve as role models and mentors for students in our district. PALs are trained in listening, communication, facilitation, problem solving, and decision making skills. In addition, PALs participate in various community service projects. Basic Leadership Course #8001 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisites: Nomination and Student Information Request Basic Teen Leadership Course #8002 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisites: Nomination and Student Information Request Basic Leadership and Basic Teen Leadership use modified Leadership content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied Leadership Course #8006 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisites: Nomination and Student Information Request Applied Teen Leadership Course #8007 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisites: Nomination and Student Information Request Applied Leadership and Applied Teen Leadership use modified Leadership content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Study Lab 1-4 Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Study Lab courses are designed to assist students with strategies that can aid the students successes in the classroom. Students introduced to skills associated with test-taking techniques, analysis of key words, highlighting, note taking, outlining, study tips, use of time, and ways to stage study sessions for optimal results. Organizational skills are accented with emphasis on practical ways to develop organized approaches to studying, completing assignments, addressing homework, and facilitating increased self-responsibility for classroom activities. Students use research to access information and learn how their learning styles impact the acquisition of knowledge. Learning to apply these strategies in a systemic manner is the focus of these courses. Some variation in course content/emphasis may occur on campus depending on the individual learning needs of the students. Note: This course is for local credit only. Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (JROTC) Through the JROTC, students will become better citizens and leaders more confident, self-reliant, and self-disciplined. Careerminded high school students will learn about jobs in the military that will open important opportunities for the future. Collegebound students may receive a military academy nomination or ROTC scholarship, if qualified. Or, they may receive credit for the first year of an ROTC four-year college program. If students participate in the color guard or drill team, they will perform at athletic events and other activities. The JROTC unit will also sponsor other activities for cadets. JROTC is both a curricular and extra-curricular program. As an elective course, it provides ½ credit for each semester completed. LISD has transportation routes scheduled for JROTC leaving CPHS (to ) and RHS (to VRHS) at 8:00 a.m. and returning during the lunch hour. Transportation for VHS students is provided via the IB bus for AFJROTC at. Note: Regular bus routes do not arrive at each campus until after 8:00 a.m. Parents must ensure that student arrives at home campus prior to 8:00 a.m. Air Force Junior ROTC I Course #8541 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 This course is designed to acquaint the student with the historical development of flight and the role of the military in history. The course will review development of flight from ancient legends through the Persian Gulf War and cover the role of the military throughout the history of the United States. The leadership studies relate directly to military traditions, core values and self-control. The wellness program focuses on nutrition, exercise and physical activities designed to motivate JROTC cadets to lead active, healthy lifestyles beyond program requirements and into their adult lives. Additionally, wearing of the uniform, Air Force customs and courtesies, and basic drill skills are introduced. Note: Students receive one physical education substitution credit for the first year of JROTC. Air Force Junior ROTC II Course #8542 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Air Force JROTC I This course is designed to acquaint the student with the aerospace environment, the human requirements of flight, principles of aircraft flight, and principles of navigation. The course begins with Planning for the Future...41

42 a study of the atmosphere and weather, followed by the effects of weather on flight. Fundamentals of lift, weight, thrust and drag, what makes an airplane fly, is followed with map reading, course plotting and the effects of wind. The portion on the human requirements of flight is a survey course on human physiology, discussing the circulatory system, effects of acceleration and protective equipment. The leadership course places an emphasis on communications skills and cadet corps activities. Written reports and speeches compliment academic materials. Cadet corps activities include holding positions of greater responsibility in the planning and execution of corps projects. The wellness program focuses on nutrition, exercise and physical activities designed to motivate JROTC cadets to lead active, healthy lifestyles beyond program requirements and into their adult lives. Additionally, wearing of the uniform, Air Force customs and courtesies, and basic drill skills are continued. Air Force Junior ROTC III Course #8543 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Air Force JROTC II This course is designed to examine earth, the moon, and the planets, the latest advances in space technology, and continuing challenges of space and manned spaceflight. An introduction to astronomy explores the history of astronomy to include prehistoric astronomy. An in-depth study of the solar system, the terrestrial planets, and the outer planets is covered as well. The leadership unit of the course will be helpful to students deciding which path to take after high school. Information on how to apply for admission to college or to a vocational or technical school is included as well has how to begin the job search for students who decide not to go to college or vocational school. Students are informed about real life issues such as understanding contracts, leases, wills, warranties, legal notices, and personal bills. There is information on how to prepare a resume and the importance of good interviewing skills. The wellness program focuses on nutrition, exercise and physical activities designed to motivate JROTC cadets to lead active, healthy lifestyles beyond program requirements and into their adult lives. Additionally, wearing of the uniform, Air Force customs and courtesies, and basic drill skills are continued. Air Force Junior ROTC IV Course #8544 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Air Force JROTC III Global and Cultural Studies is a multidisciplinary course that introduces students to various regions of the world from a geographic, historical and cultural perspective. The course provides increased international awareness and insight into foreign affairs, geopolitical issues such as terrorism, economics, politics, military issues, religion, environmental concerns, human rights, disease, over population, literacy, and the migration of people. The leadership unit of the course is a guide to understanding the fundamentals of management, managing oneself, and others. Emphasis is placed on allowing the student to see himself/herself as a manager and form a strong foundation for the capability to lead others. The wellness program focuses on nutrition, exercise and physical activities designed to motivate JROTC cadets to lead active, healthy lifestyles beyond program requirements and into their adult lives. Additionally, wearing of the uniform, Air Force customs and courtesies, and basic drill skills are introduced. VRHS Navy Junior ROTC I Course #8537 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Naval Science I introduces students the precepts of citizenship, 42...Planning for the Future leadership and the value of scholarship and academics in attaining life goals while emphasizing each person s responsibilities in American society. The course is designed to engender a sound appreciation of the heritage and tradition of the United States with a focus on the historical significance of sea power. This course includes classroom instruction, physical fitness, military drill, wearing the uniform and practicing military customs and courtesies. Note: Students receive one physical education substitution credit for the first year of JROTC. VRHS Navy Junior ROTC II Course #8538 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Naval Science I Naval Science II builds on the foundation begun during Naval Science I, to further develop the traits of leadership, citizenship, discipline, and self-confidence that form the basis of the NJROTC program. This course examines United States Navy and Marine Corps History from 1775 to 2006 and United States Government concepts that are related to a citizen s rights and responsibilities. Technical aspects of the course include oceanography, meteorology, astronomy, physical science of the oceans, and maritime geography. VRHS Navy Junior ROTC III Course #8539 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Naval Science II Naval Science III builds on the foundation begun during Naval Science I, to further develop the traits of leadership and selfdiscipline. Leadership is the paramount topic in Naval Science III. In addition to continued stress on the Fundamentals of Democracy and United States Naval history, students are introduced to the vital importance of military justice, international law, national security, Navy and Marine Corps operations, ship construction, basic seamanship, marine navigation, and naval weapons and aircraft. VRHS Navy Junior ROTC IV Course #8540 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Naval Science III Naval Science IV is the culmination of the Naval Science Program. Leadership is the primary emphasis in Naval Science IV. Students will pursue a rigorous course of study in leadership techniques, effective communications, and group dynamics. The course will include reading, writing, and practical exercises. Technology Applications Computer Science Program Robotics Programming and Design Course #8458 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-10 Prerequisite: Algebra I Robotics Programming and Design provides students with opportunities to design, implement, and present meaningful robotic programs through a variety of media. Students will identify task requirements, plan search strategies, and use robotic concepts to access, analyze, and evaluate information needed to solve problems. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of robotics through the study of physics, automation and engineering design concepts. Note: This course can substitute for a mathematics graduation requirement. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Computer Science I Pre-AP Course #8450 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Pre-AP/IB Geometry or Algebra II Pre-AP Computer Science 1 is a survey course that explores problem solving from a logical perspective. Students will learn how to dissect complex problems into manageable parts and implement solutions using a variety of tools. Students will also gain a broad knowledge of Computer Science by being introduced to a variety of concepts such as programming, gaming and cryptology. Computer Science Advanced Placement Course #8451 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Computer Science I Pre-AP Computer Science II AP offers advanced programming in JAVA to prepare for the Advanced Placement Computer Science A exam. Topics covered include in-depth object-oriented concepts such as polymorphism and inheritance, searching and sorting algorithms, and recursion. Note: This course can substitute for a mathematics graduation requirement. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Note: Articulated college credit course Mobile Application Development Course #8459 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Computer Science II AP Mobile Application Development provides students with opportunities to design, implement, and deliver meaningful projects using mobile computing devices. Students will identify task requirements, plan search strategies, and use software development concepts to access, analyze, and evaluate information needed to program mobile devices. Students will gain an understanding of the principles of mobile application development through the study of development platforms, programming languages, and software design standards. Technology Applications Independent Study Course #8499 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Computer Science I Pre-AP or Computer Science AP, Student Information Request Students develop a project on a topic related to their career interests in computer science. To attain academic success, students must have opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge, skills, and technologies in a variety of settings.

43 Career and Technical Education Course Selections Students can earn a performance acknowledgement under the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) by earning a recognized business or industry certification or license. See Performance Acknowledge section of the catalog for more specific details. Career Development Career Preparation I Course #8344 Credit: 3 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Student Information Request Career Preparation provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with paid business and industry employment experiences and supports strong partnerships among school, business, and community stakeholders. The goal is to prepare students with a variety of skills for a fast-changing workplace. This instructional arrangement should be an advanced component of a student s individual program of study. Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training station, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations, and portfolio development. Career preparation is relevant and rigorous, supports student attainment of academic standards, and effectively prepares students for college and career success. Problems and Solutions I Course #8346 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: CTE Instructor Approval Agricultural, Food & Natural Resources Principles of Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Course #8050 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-11 Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources is designed to enhance understanding of the agriculture industry. Students will develop technical knowledge and skills related to plant and animal systems, food production, mechanical systems, entrepreneurship, leadership, and environmental sciences. This course is strongly encouraged for freshmen planning an Agriculture Science Program of Study or a career in Agriculture. Basic Principles of Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources Course #8034 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-11 Basic Principles of Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources uses modified Principles of Agriculture, Food, & Natural Resources content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Plant Science Principles & Elements of Floral Design Course #8064 Credit: 1 Grade: propagation and identification processes will be studied to prepare students for the horticulture industry. Hands-on experiences will occur in a greenhouse with class time dedicated to growing plants. Landscape Design and Turf Grass Management is a secondsemester course in which students will learn to design, develop, manage, and maintain landscapes. Installation practices will be included with in-class hands-on experiences. Proper management of trees, shrubs, and grasses will be taught with emphasis on lawn and yard care, landscape tools, and equipment. Animal Science Wildlife, Fisheries, & Ecology Management Course #8051 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Small Animal Management Course #8071 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology Management is a first semester course designed to examine the important of wildlife, outdoor recreation, and ecological concepts with emphasis on using wildlife and natural resources. Small Animal Management is a second semester course that is an overview of the small animal industry, including the pet and exotic animal industry. Topics include species, breeds, animal health, reproduction, genetics, facilities, equipment, and marketing. Note: Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology Management/Small Animal Management will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Problems and Solutions II Course #8347 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Problems and Solutions I, CTE Instructor Approval Problems and Solutions is a project-based research course for Career and Technical Education students who have the ability to research a real-world problem. Students develop a project on a topic related to their career interests, use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, are matched with a mentor from the business or professional community, compile findings, and present their findings to an audience. To attain academic success, students must have opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge, skills, and technologies in a variety of settings. Basic Career Preparation I-II Course # Credit: 3 Grade: Basic Career Preparation I-II uses modified Career Preparation content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Basic Problems and Solutions I-II Course # Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Problems and Solutions I-II uses modified Problem and Solutions content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Floral Design prepares students to design and arrange flowers, foliage, and related plant materials for interior locations. They will learn to handle, care for, and identify flowers and foliage plants; create contemporary and specialty floral items; develop knowledge of sound business management practices; and explore careers in the floral industry. Note: This course can substitute for a fine arts graduation requirement. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Basic Principles & Elements of Floral Design Course #6012 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Principles & Elements of Floral Design uses modified Principles & Elements of Floral Design content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. CPHS/ Horticulture Science Course #8065 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Landscape Design & Turf Grass Management Course #8066 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Horticulture Science is a first-semester course with emphasis on technical skills, entrepreneurship and career opportunities in the production of greenhouse and nursery plants. Plant growth, Basic Wildlife, Fisheries, & Ecology Management Course #8035 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Basic Small Animal Management Course #8036 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Basic Wildlife, Fisheries, & Ecology Management/Small Animal Management uses modified Wildlife, Fisheries, & Ecology Management/Small Animal Management content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Livestock Production Course #8058 Credit: 1 Grade: Livestock Production is designed to develop knowledge and skills pertaining to the selection, nutrition, reproduction, health, and management of horses and cattle. Advanced Animal Science Course # 8060 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology, and either Chemistry or IPC and Livestock Production/Small Animal Management Advanced Animal Science is a course in which students will acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems. Topics will include animal reproduction, selection and grading, anatomy and physiology, growth and development, and industry standards, as well as career exploration and employability skills related to animal science. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through hands-on field and laboratory experiences. Opportunities for Planning for the Future...43

44 leadership and entrepreneurship development will be included in this course. Note: This course can substitute for a science graduation requirement. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Note: Advanced Animal Science will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. Veterinary Medical Applications Course #8072 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Credit for Livestock Production or Small Animal Management Veterinary Medical Applications is designed to introduce students to a career in Veterinary Science and the basic concepts and skills related to the veterinary science industry. Such skills include safety and sanitation, terminology, hospital management, and proper handling and restraining techniques. During this one year course students will obtain the knowledge and skills that are essential in any veterinarians hospital. Note: Veterinary Medical Applications will be offered on campuses where there is sufficient student interest and instructor availability. only Practicum in Veterinary Medical Applications Course #8073 Credit: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Credit for Veterinary Medical Applications Practicum in Veterinary Medical Applications is designed to facilitate the skills and internship hours that are required to obtain a Certified Veterinary Assistant (CVA). Student are required to complete 300 hours under the supervision of a veterinarians in addition to 200 hours under the supervision of the classroom instructor. Student who have the necessary hours will be eligible to take the exam for Certified Veterinary Assistant (CVA). Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Agriculture Mechanics Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies Course #8054 Credit: 1 Grade: Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technology is designed to introduce career opportunities in the agricultural power, structural, and technical systems. Skills to be developed include an understanding of agricultural mechanics as it relates to safety and skills in tool operation, and metal working techniques. This course will include skills in welding and metal fabrication. Note: Certification available Agricultural Facilities Design & Fabrication Course #8056 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies Agricultural Facilities Design & Fabrication is a pre-employment lab course designed to prepare students for careers in mechanized agriculture and technical systems. Student will have the opportunity to develop skills related to agricultural facilities design, planning, and fabrication in a variety of settings. Note: Articulated college credit course Practicum in Agricultural Mechanics Course #8057 Credit: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Agricultural Facilities Design & Fabrication Practicum in Agricultural Mechanics is a third year agricultural mechanics class that immerses the student in the welding industry. Students plan, budget, acquire materials and build metal projects. Students also have the opportunity to participate in agriculture 44...Planning for the Future mechanics project shows. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Basic Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies Course #8022 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies uses modified Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Architecture & Construction Architecture and Interior Design Interior Design Course #8161 Credit: 1 Grade: Interior Design will focus on the design of residential and nonresidential interior environments. Content addresses housing wants vs. needs, housing costs and budgeting, home safety, furniture materials, construction and consumer skills, history of furniture, elements and principles of design, lighting, house zones and traffic patterns, history of housing, architecture and major architects, site planning, kitchen and bath design. CPHS//RHS Architectural Design Course #8307 Credit: 1 Grade: Architectural Design introduces students to architecture, construction science, and architectural drafting. Students will use AutoCAD software to produce a full set of residential architectural plans. Note: Articulated college credit course CPHS/ Advanced Architectural Design Course #8308 Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisite: Architectural Design Advanced Architectural Design is a continuation of Architectural Design providing an opportunity for students to advance their skills in architectural drafting utilizing AutoCAD, Architectural Desktop, and Revit software. Students will use software to create plans and renderings. Construction Technology /CPHS Construction Technology Course #8354 Credit: 1 Grade: Advanced Construction Technology Course #8355 Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisite: Construction Technology Construction Technology is a two-year sequence of classroom and laboratory instruction designed to provide job-specific training for entry-level employment skills in construction-related careers. Instruction is provided in carpentry, painting, dry wall, roofing, and basic plumbing. Second-year instruction is designed to enhance entry-level training and employment through theoretical teaching and real life application. CPHS/ Practicum in Building Construction Management Course #8356 Credit: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Advanced Construction Technology Instruction is designed to enhance entry-level training and employment through theoretical teaching and real life application. This course requires two class periods. This is an apprenticeship certification program offering students certification for Level I and Level II. The curriculum is a modular, competency-based program for certification. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available Basic Construction Technology Course #8026 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Construction Technology uses modified Construction Technology content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Electrical Technology Electrical Technology Course #8350 Credit: 1 Grade: Advanced Electrical Technology Course #8351 Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisite: Electrical Technology Electrical Technology is a two-year sequence of classroom and laboratory instruction designed to provide job-specific training for entry-level employment in residential and commercial/industrial electrical careers. Instruction includes installation and servicing and safety skills and knowledge. Second-year instruction is designed to enhance job specific training for entry-level employment. Practicum in Electrical Construction Management Course #8352 Credit: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Advanced Electrical Technology Instruction is designed to enhance entry-level training and employment through theoretical teaching and real life application. Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available.

45 Arts, A/V Technology and Communication Professional Communications Course #1500 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Professional Communications Course #8074 Credit: 1 Grade: Professional Communications is designed to develop effective communication for careers in leadership development systems. Students will develop creative methods to write, read, edit, speak, listen, apply software applications, manipulate computer graphics, and conduct Internet research in a professional manner. Various processes such as verbal and non verbal communication will be demonstrated. Students will also have the opportunity to learn effective communication strategies through leadership roles. Note: This course can substitute for Communication Applications graduation requirement for students entering 9th grade in,2012, and 2013 that are graduating on the Recommended or DAP graduation plans. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Professional Communications (ACE) Course #8069 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 The Professional Communications course is designed to blend the development of well-rounded communication skills with tools for academic success, academic and career planning, as well as health and social-emotional well-being. The global economy requires individuals to be creative and have a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong and solid academic foundation, and a proficiency in professional oral and written communication. This course combines the development of communication skills (writing, reading, editing, speaking, listening, applying software applications, conducting Internet research, etc.) with an emphasis on tools and strategies for academic success, such as time management, organization, and study skills. Furthermore, the course will allow students to develop a greater understanding of educational and career opportunities while exploring their interests, aptitude, personality, and learning styles. Students will use the Naviance software to assist in the exploration of career and educational opportunities, develop a four-year high school plan, and explore the LISD Programs of Study. A Student-led Parent Conference is held during the year to allow parents an opportunity to review four-year high school plans. Note: Professional Communications is a graduation requirement for all 9th grade students entering in the fall of 2014 or later. Students entering after the freshman year must replace this requirement with an approved substitution. Approved substitutions are AVID, Debate, Public Speaking, Oral Interpretation or Communication Applications. Basic Professional Communications Course #8020 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 Basic Professional Communications uses modified Professional Communications content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied Professional Communications Course #8021 Credit: 1 Grade: 9 The Applied Professional Communications course is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills. This course is designed to blend the development of well-rounded communication skills with tools for success in the areas of lifelong learning and employment. Students will explore their strengths, interests, preferences and needs as they develop an understanding of their educational and career opportunities. Graphic Design and Illustration Course #8456 Credit: 1 Grade: Graphic Design and Illustration is a hands-on, lab-based class where students are introduced to various Graphic Design & Illustration applications. Students will study image editing, sound editing, animation and graphic design, and digital color. Portfolio development is required. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Animation Course #8455 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Graphic Design and Illustration Animation will allow students to demonstrate creative thinking and develop innovative projects by specializing in graphic design, image editing and/or 2D and 3D animation. Students will work independently as well as collaboratively to produce communications projects. Students will develop an electronic portfolio to document their skills. Note: Digital Art and Animation will satisfy the fine arts graduation requirement for students entering 9th grade in 2012, and 2013 that are graduating on the Recommended or DAP graduation plans. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Video Game Design Course #8463 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Computer Science I Pre-AP or Graphic Design and Illustration Video Game Design serves as an introduction for any student to the role of the programmer in the development of a game, what games look like from a programmer s viewpoint, and how programmers translate game designs, artistic specification and production requirements into code. Cross-discipline collaboration, communication and compromise are key concepts in game development. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Audio/Video Production Course # 8470 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Student Information Request Advanced Audio/Video Production Course #8471 Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisites: Student Information Request, Students who have taken Journalism/Analysis of Visual Media, Graphic Design & Illustration or Audio/Video Production will be given preference. Students in Audio/Video Productions will produce the school s daily TV or Web newscast. Duties/assignments may include news casting, advanced writing, interviewing, in-depth research for news stories and features, photography, photo editing, video photography, production of on-air graphic designs, and video editing. Students will also be responsible for meeting deadlines. Objectives include management and production of the broadcast, using editorial judgment and journalistic integrity, as well as working within time constraints and budget limitations. Note: Student who are scheduled into additional periods of Audio/ Video Production may earn credit for Broadcast Journalism. Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Education & Training Instructional Practice in Education and Training (Ready, Set, Teach 1) Course #8179 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Student Information Request Ready, Set, Teach 1 covers a variety of topics including learning processes, education theory, classroom management, child development and lesson planning. Students will research topics in education including teacher training, interview processes and ethics in the workplace. Students will experience a field-based internship during this course with a highly-qualified cooperating teacher in local elementary schools. A portfolio that will serve as a resource for teaching will be completed throughout the year. An interview and application process may be required for this class. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Practicum in Education and Training (Ready, Set, Teach 2) Course #8180 Credit: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Ready, Set, Teach! 1, Student Information Request Ready, Set, Teach 2 is a field-based internship that provides students background knowledge of principles of effective teaching practices. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare and present lessons and related materials, assist with record keeping, make physical arrangements, and complete other responsibilities of classroom teachers. An interview, application and background check may be required for RST 2 students. Students may need to provide their own transportation. Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Planning for the Future...45

46 Business Management & Administration Principles of Information Technology Course #8101 Credit: 1/2 Grade: 9-12 Principles of Information Technology helps student develop computer literacy skills to adapt to emerging technologies used in the global marketplace. Students apply technical skills to create word-processing documents, develop a spreadsheet, formulate a database, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate software. Business Information Management I (BIM I) Course #8104 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 BIM I teaches students to coordinate information management and business management to aid in business planning. Students will apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create word-processing documents, develop a spreadsheet, formulate a database, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate software. Students will develop personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce and postsecondary education. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Business Information Management II (BIM II) Course #8105 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Business Information Management I BIM II teaches students concepts and advanced technology skills required in the business environment. Special emphasis will be placed on developing technology skills with applications to personal situations and use workplace standard technologies in creating complex word processing documents, sophisticated spreadsheets using charts and graphs, database, telecommunications, desktop publishing, presentation management, networking, operating systems, internet research, and emerging technologies. Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Business Management - Entrepreneurship Course #8107 Credit: 1 Grade: Business Management introduces basic management concepts and leadership styles; explores managerial function, economic and social components of productivity, international business, and human relations; understands the changing nature of the business environment; concepts of business integrity; and develops and implements a business plan. Additional emphasis is placed on entrepreneurship, human resource management and business law. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Global Business Course #8109 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Virtual Business Course #8108 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Global Business is a first-semester course that introduces concepts of the global market and economy and international trade; examines operations in a global market; provides an opportunity to study cultural differences and effects of differences on managerial processes and international law; the impact of international trade on the domestic and global economy; and examines planning, organizational structure, finance, marketing, and foreign governmental practices. Note: Articulated college credit course 46...Planning for the Future Virtual Business is a second-semester course that incorporates a broad base of knowledge including the legal, managerial, marketing, financial, ethical, and international dimensions of business to make appropriate business decisions. Students will be able to identify steps needed to locate customers, set fees, and develop client contracts. Student will be able to provide administrative, creative, and technical services using advanced technological modes of communication and data delivery. The student builds a functional website that incorporates the essentials of a Virtual Business. Basic Business Information Management Course #8008 Credit: 1 Grade: Basic Business Information Management uses modified BIM content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Applied Business Information Management Course #8009 Credit: 1 Grade: Applied BIM is based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Students will develop technical computer skills to develop personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and participation in the community to make a successful transition after high school. Finance Accounting I Course #8102 Credit: 1 Grade: Accounting I provides students with a thorough background in the basic accounting procedures used to operate a business. The complete accounting cycle is covered for a proprietorship and partnership. Journalizing, posting, payroll procedures, and preparation of financial statements are a few of the areas studied. The course develops skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary for individuals to conduct personal business or to further their education in the field of accounting. Students will work with an automated accounting software program. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Accounting II Course #8103 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Accounting I Accounting II expands on the topics covered in Accounting I. Management accounting, cost accounting, not-for-profit accounting, and financial analysis will also be covered. Students will work with an automated accounting software program. This course is recommended for students who plan to major in accounting or some other area of business or law. Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Health Science Health Science Course #8201 Credit: 1 Grade: Health Science introduces various health careers and basic concepts and skills related to the health care industry. Course content includes interpersonal relationships, anatomy and physiology, ethical/legal responsibilities, health care team concept, Medical Terminology, and investigation of various health careers. Skills will include taking vital signs, performing CPR, First Aid, and demonstrating proper body mechanics. Certifications are available in both CPR and First Aid. Note: This course satisfies the health graduation requirement. Practicum in Health Science Course #8202 Credit: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Principles of Health Science, Student Information Request Practicum in Health Science is designed for the student planning to enter a health care career. Students are provided hands-on training in a clinical setting. Class instruction includes entry-level skills needed in health fields and the applications of physical and biological sciences. There is an emphasis on phlebotomy, nursing skills, pharmacy technician skills and community service. All students will have opportunity to participate in Clinical Rotations at various hospitals and physician offices. This course requires two class periods. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Medical Terminology Course #3563 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisites: Biology and IPC or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry Pharmacology (Problems and Solutions) Course #8208 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Prerequisites: Biology and IPC or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry Medical Terminology is a first-semester course that uses the human body as a guide to familiarize students with vocabulary concerning medical procedures and pathological conditions. Students will gain experiences in identifying the language of clinical, surgical, and laboratory procedures. This course is only one semester and therefore it is fast paced for students with a high interest in the subject. This course may be used to balance the other semester of the school year with the course Pharmacology. Class available through ACC for dual credit. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Pharmacology is a second-semester course that provides students with knowledge and skills in the classification and study of pharmacological agents to understand the treatment, care, and restoration of the client s health. Students will explore the practical applications of mathematics related to the disease process, dosage calculations, and interaction in therapeutic care. This course may be used to balance the other semester of the school year with the course Medical Terminology.

47 Anatomy and Physiology Course #3550 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Biology and Chemistry Anatomy and Physiology is designed for students interested in biological, medical, and health oriented programs. Students will study the structures and functions of the human body. The body s systems will be investigated as to the body s responses to forces, maintenance of homeostasis, electrical interactions, transport systems, and energy systems. The topics will be presented through an integration of biology, chemistry, and physics. In this laboratory course, the students conduct laboratory investigations, perform dissections, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and problem solving. Anatomy and Physiology will involve the in-depth study of topics, including high level thinking skills in both laboratory exercises and assessment. The student will be expected to conduct research. Note: This course is an approved science course and can count towards a graduation requirement. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning options/requirements. Medical Microbiology Course #3562 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Credit for Biology and credit or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry In Medical Microbiology is a course in which students will conduct laboratory investigations to study the relationships of microorganisms to wellness and disease. Students will develop knowledge and skills related to disease prevention by learning the chain of infection, asepsis, and standard precautions. Pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms will be identified to assist in the understanding of specific diseases, causative agents, and treatment options. Note: This course is an approved science course and can count towards a graduation requirement. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning options/requirements. Principles of Biomedical Sciences (PLTW) Course # 8321 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Prerequisite: Credit for or concurrent enrollment in Biology Principles of Biomedical Sciences allows students to investigate various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. They determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person, and investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person s life. The activities and projects introduce students to human physiology, medicine, and research processes. This course provides an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and lay the scientific foundation for subsequent courses. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Human Body Systems (PLTW) Course #8322 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Principles of Biomedical Sciences Human Body Systems allows students to examine the interactions of human body systems as they explore identity, power, movement, protection, and homeostasis. Students design experiments, investigate the structures and functions of the human body, and use data acquisition software to monitor body functions such as muscle movement, reflex and voluntary action, and respiration. Exploring science in action, students build organs and tissues on a skeletal manikin, work through interesting real world cases and often play the roles of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Medical Interventions (PLTW) Course #8323 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Human Body Systems Medical Interventions allows students to investigate a variety of interventions involved in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease as they follow the life of a fictitious family. The course is a How-To manual for maintaining overall health and homeostasis in the body. Students explore how to prevent and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; prevent, diagnose and treat cancer; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through these scenarios, students are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Biomedical Innovation (PLTW) Course #8324 Credit: 1 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Medical Interventions Biomedical Innovation offers students the opportunity to design innovative solutions for the health challenges of the 21st century. They work through progressively challenging open-ended problems, addressing topics such as clinical medicine, physiology, biomedical engineering, and public health. They have the opportunity to work on an independent project with a mentor or advisor from a university, hospital, research institution, or the biomedical industry. Throughout the course, students are expected to present their work to an audience of STEM professionals. Hospitality & Tourism Culinary Arts Culinary Arts Prep Course #8155 Credit: 1 Grade: Culinary Arts Prep focuses on the preparation of food through labs, sanitation and safety, recipes, measuring, utensils, teamwork, time management and careers. This class is for students who are considering culinary arts, hospitality or restaurant management as a career. CPHS Practicum in Culinary Arts I: Restaurant Management Course #8156 Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisites: Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness or Culinary Arts Prep, Student Information Request Practicum in Culinary Arts II: Restaurant Management Course #8157 Credit: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisites: Practicum in Culinary Arts I: Restaurant Management, Student Information Request Practicum in Culinary Arts I provides occupationally specific training designed to enhance career opportunities in food production, management and related services. Instruction includes operation and management of a food service establishment, marketing strategies, quality food production, presentation, techniques, and technology application in the food service industry. An interview and application process will be required for this class. Practicum in Culinary Arts II includes a higher level of quality food production, presentation, along with front of the house and back of the house techniques. An interview and application process will be required for this class. Both of these courses require two class periods. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Basic Culinary Arts Prep Course #8032 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Culinary Arts Prep uses modified Culinary Arts content to meet the individual learning requirements of students. Hospitality CPHS & RHS Hotel Management Course #8166 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Travel and Tourism Management Course #8165 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Hotel Management focuses on providing knowledge and skills needed to pursue staff and management positions available in the Hotel Industry. This in-depth study of the lodging industry includes departments within a hotel such as front desk, food and beverage, housekeeping, maintenance, human resources, and accounting. This course will focus on professional communication, leadership, management, human resources, technology, and accounting. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. Note: Articulated college credit course Travel and Tourism Management incorporates management principles and procedures of the travel and tourism industry as well as destination geography, airlines, international travel, cruising, travel by rail, lodging, recreation, amusements, attractions, and resorts. Employment qualifications and opportunities are also included in this course. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. CPHS & RHS Hospitality Services: Hotel Management Course #8167 Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisites: Hotel Management/Travel & Tourism Management, Student Information Request Planning for the Future...47

48 Hospitality Services provides a unique practicum experience that allows students the opportunity to participate in a learning environment that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. Students will gain academic and on the job preparation to pursue high demand and high skill careers in hospitality and tourism industries. This course requires two class periods. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Human Services Principles of Human Services Course #8150 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-11 Principles of Human Services uses knowledge and skills in family studies and human development to enhance personal development, foster quality relationships, promote wellness of family members, and manage multiple adult roles. This course introduces students to careers in counseling and mental health, child development, family and community, personal care services, social work, education, hospitality and food service, and interior design. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high wage, or high demand careers. Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Course #8153 Credit: 1 Grade: Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness allows students to investigate and practice concepts concerning food preparation and nutrition. Instruction focuses on the impact our food choices have on our health through the study of nutrients, dietary needs, menu planning, and label reading. Proper safety and sanitation practices, along with reading recipes, accurate measuring, and care of equipment are stressed. Effective habits needed for employment, such as time management, teamwork, and problem solving are also covered. Child Development Course #8152 Credit: 1 Grade: Child Development will focus on responsibilities and commitments involved with parenthood. Students will gain knowledge and skills related to the development, care, guidance, and protection of children. Specific topics such as postpartum care, infant care, nutrition, health and safety, children in crisis, stages and theories of growth, and areas of development will be discussed. Counseling and Mental Health Course #8169 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Principles of Human Services, Principles of Health Science Technology I or Child Development Counseling and Mental Health examines material in counseling and mental health as it relates to health and wellness across the life span. Students will study the psychological effects of chemical 48...Planning for the Future dependency, maladaptive conditions, and other mental health issues associated with careers in counseling, mental health, and social work. Basic Principles of Human Services Course #8033 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Principles of Human Services uses modified Principles of Human Services content to meet the individual learning. requirements of students. Basic Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Course #8031 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness uses modified Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness content to meet the individual learning. Basic Child Development Course #8029 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Basic Child Development uses modified Child Development content to meet the individual learning. Applied Activities of Professional Communication, Teen Leadership, Lifetime, Nutrition & Wellness, and Culinary Arts Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied Activities of Daily Living courses are based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Addressing skill sets that may affect areas such as domestic, recreation, leisure, school and community, students may investigate through hands-on sessions a variety of activities including organizing a daily routine and schedule; study areas may also include cooking, safety, leisure, chores, duties and responsibilities, budget, time management, first aid, and communication, health care, transportation, telephone skills, and age appropriate recreation activities. Students develop strategies to respond to potential emergencies that may appear in the process of daily living. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living; 1) introduce, teacher-model, ample practice opportunities, 2) project-based instruction/learning, 3) real-world simulations, 4) community and real-world applications. Applied Principles of Human Services, Interpersonal Studies, Child Development, and Family & Community Services Course # Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Applied Personal Social Skills courses are based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). The course emphasizes interpersonal skill development as a prerequisite to meaningful employment. Particular attention placed on such skills as greetings, responding to authority, interpersonal appropriateness, problem solving, and conflict resolution within a situational context. Use of appropriate techniques is monitored through a variety of instructional settings including home, school, job, and other settings available in the community. Skills of verbal communication, appropriate physical contact and body language, expression of anger or disagreement, reporting inappropriate behaviors of others, and the ability to develop trust and work cooperatively are introduced. As the student moves through the levels of instruction, skills build and expand to promote transition to independent living; 1) introduce, teacher-model, ample practice opportunities, 2) project-based instruction/learning, 3) real-world simulations, 4) community and real-world applications. Cosmetology Cosmetology I Course #8373 Credit: 3 Grade: Prerequisites: Student Information Request Cosmetology II Course #8374 Credit: 3 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Cosmetology I Cosmetology is a planned 1000 clock hour, two-year sequence of classroom and laboratory instruction, 1000 laboratory clock hours plus 500 academic hours awarded upon the completion of the 1000 laboratory hours. Instruction is designed to provide job-specific training for entry-level employment in cosmetology careers. Instruction includes sterilization and sanitation processes, shampooing and rinsing hair, application of conditioning creams and color rinses, application of scalp and hair treatments, shaping and thinning hair, hair-styling, permanent waving, hair coloring, manicuring, and facial massage. Note: Due to mandatory state clock-hour requirements, students scheduled in the cosmetology class are required to be at school for clock-in at 8:00 a.m. each day their class meets. In addition, cosmetology students must continue attending school in the summer in order to complete mandatory state clock-hour requirements. In order to participate in the cosmetology program, students must provide their own transportation to all required activities associated with the program. Note: Course meets the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulations requirements of licensure upon passing the state exam. Marketing Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance Course #8250 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance will provide students with an introductory level of knowledge and skills within the following areas: economics, private enterprise systems, the impact of Global Business, marketing of goods and services, advertising, sales process, product pricing, and personal financial management. Within each subject area students will be given the opportunity to reinforce, apply and transfer their academic knowledge and skills while participating in interesting and relevant activities within business, marketing and financial settings. Advertising and Sales Promotion Course #8251 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Sports and Entertainment Marketing Course #8255 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Advertising and Sales Promotion is a first semester course designed

49 as a comprehensive introduction to the principles and practices of advertising. The course will explore issues in advertising, historical influences, strategies, the media decision processes and marketing as an effective communication tool. Students will gain knowledge of techniques used in all media areas of current advertising. Advertising and Sales Promotion will provide opportunities for students to analyze markets, consumers, promotional campaigns. Sports and Entertainment Marketing is a second semester course which will provide students with an understanding of the marketing concepts and theories that apply to sports and sporting events and entertainment. Students will apply their knowledge and skills in developing, creating and implementation of promotional plans, sponsorship proposals, endorsement contracts, and Sports and Entertainment Marketing plans. Fashion Marketing Course #8256 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Retailing and E-tailing Course #8253 Credit: 1/2 Grade: Fashion Marketing is a first semester course designed to provide students with knowledge of the various business functions in the fashion industry. Students will gain a working knowledge of design, promotion, textiles, merchandising, mathematics, selling, visual merchandising, and career opportunities. Retailing/E-tailing is a second semester class which explores the retail industry from the viewpoint of the business and the consumer utilizing both online and offline marketing. Students will have the opportunity to develop skills that involve electronic media techniques necessary for businesses today to compete within a global economy. This course will help to prepare students for a future as an employee, manager, or entrepreneur in the field of retailing/e-tailing. Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW) Course #8310 Credit: 1 Grade: 9-12 Introduction to Engineering Design allows students to gain knowledge and skills in the application, design, production and assessment of products, services, and systems. Students explore the design process and its applications to engineering and technological activities. Models of product solutions are created, analyzed, and communicated using solid modeling computer design software. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Principles of Engineering (PLTW) Course #8314 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design or concurrent enrollment Principles of Engineering is a broad-based survey course designed to help students understand the field of engineering and engineering technology and its career possibilities. Students will develop engineering problem solving skills and explore various engineering systems and manufacturing processes. They will also learn how engineers address concerns about the social and political consequences of technological change. Note: This course can substitute for a science graduation requirement. Please see your counselor for additional information concerning substitution options/requirements. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Note: Articulated college credit course VHS, VRHS & RHS Aerospace Engineering (PLTW) Course #8319 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design and credit or concurrent enrollment in Principles of Engineering Aerospace Engineering propels students learning in the fundamentals of atmospheric and space flight. As they explore the physics of flight, students bring the concepts to life by designing an airfoil, propulsion system, and rockets. Students learn basic orbital mechanics using industry-standard software and also explore robot systems through projects such as remotely operated vehicles. Note: Possible articulated college credit available RHS Civil Engineering and Architecture (PLTW) Course #8318 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Design and Principles of Engineering Civil Engineering and Architecture allows students to learn about civil engineering and architecture and apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Students communicate and present solutions to their peers and members of a professional community of engineers and architects. Note: Possible articulated college credit available VHS Engineering Design and Development (PLTW) Course #8317 Credit: 1 Grade: Prerequisites: Introduction to Engineering Design and credit or concurrent enrollment in Principles of Engineering Engineering Design and Development is an engineering research course in which students work in teams or individually to research, design, and construct a solution to an open-ended engineering problem. Students apply principles developed in the proceeding courses and are guided by a community mentor. They must present progress reports, submit a final written report, and defend their solutions to a panel of outside reviewers at the end of the school year. Transportation, Distribution & Logistics Automotive Technology RHS Automotive Technology Course #8387 Credit: 1 Grade: Automotive Technology is designed to provide an overview of transportation services and career opportunities and training requirements. Topics covered include basic lab safety, tool care and use, and utilization of service manuals, publications and on-line technical resources. RHS Advanced Automotive Technology Course #8388 Credit: 2 Grade: Prerequisite: Automotive Technology, Student Information Request Advanced Automotive Technology is designed to provide job specific training for entry-level employment in the automotive engine repair and service career field. Introduction emphasizes use of repair manuals, shop safety, and recognition of proper use of tools and equipment. Also students will learn service and repair of basic automobile systems: lubrication, cooling, brakes, fuel, engines, and chassis. Note: Possible articulated college credit available RHS Practicum in Automotive Technology: Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Course #8389 Credit: 2 Grade: 12 Prerequisite: Advanced Automotive Technology Practicum in Automotive Technology is a continuation of Advanced Automotive Technology, with primary emphasis placed on shop safety, tools, and equipment. Application of the skills and knowledge will be provided through hands-on experiences in the classroom. Safe use of hand and power tools and equipment commonly used in the maintenance and repair of engines and vehicles will be expected of participants. Note: Possible articulated college credit available Note: Recognized business/industry certification/license available. Planning for the Future...49

50 Ac Academies/Programs of Study - Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013 The represents the cornerstone of Leander ISD s Career Development System. An important goal of the is for our graduates to be set apart from other students from across the state. The is the vehicle through which this is accomplished. A certificate is awarded upon graduation. More than 50 Programs of Study are currently available in the four Academies and are correlated to the federally supported Career Clusters. Courses chosen during high school become the foundation for the future; therefore, careful selection of courses will form a related to a chosen post-secondary educational goal. See list below for a complete listing of the Programs of Study. How to use the : Courses that are part of the system were selected based on data collected from business and industry regarding skills needed to gain employment. 1) Select a based on the career field in which you are interested. Note that the section of this course catalog provides an outline of available certifications, college credit, corresponding extracurricular student-leadership opportunities, post-secondary majors, and careers. 2) The number of credits needed to earn a certificate refers to credits earned by passing identified courses; this number varies by. 3) Credit must be earned in any prerequisite courses listed, if any, for a certificate. 4) Credit must be earned in any required courses listed. 5) Supplemental courses to enhance learning should be considered if there is room remaining in your schedule. Leander ISD Academies / Career Clusters / Programs of Study (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Arts & Communication Communications Journalism Languages Other Than English Speech Communication Visual Communication Humanities Advanced Humanities General Fine Arts Performing Arts Band Choral Music Dance Technical Theatre Theatre Arts Visual Arts Interior Design & Architecture Photography - CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS Visual Arts Business & Computer Technology Finance, Business Management & Administration Accounting & Finance Management General Business Hospitality & Tourism Culinary Arts: Restaurant Management - CPHS Hospitality: Hotel Management - CPHS Information Technology Computer Technology Internetworking Technology - ACC only Software Applications Marketing, Sales and Services Marketing and Management Public Relations Engineering & Industrial Technology Architecture & Construction Architectural Design Graphics - CPHS, & RHS Construction Electricity - Construction Technologies - CPHS & General Technology Manufacturing Agricultural Mechanics Engineering Design Graphics General Agriculture Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Advanced Math Science Computer Science Engineering Sciences Project Lead The Way: Engineering Transportation Automotive Technology - RHS Human Services, Health & Agriculture Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources General Animal Science Floral and Horticulture Design Veterinary Medical Applications Law, Public Safety & Security Criminal Justice Technology - ACC Military Service - & VRHS Education & Training Education Human Services Cosmetology - Counseling & Mental Health Human Ecology Human Relations Health Science Biotechnology - CPHS & Fitness & Wellness Health Science Technology Medical Sciences Sports Medicine 50...Planning for the Future

51 Arts & Communication Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Journalism Languages Other than English Communications Cluster 3 Credits Required Speech Communication Visual Communications Required Courses (choose 2 or more from the following; check prerequisites): Journalism/Analysis of Visual Media (9-11) Advanced Journalism: Newspaper I, II, III (10-12) Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I, II, III (10-12) Advanced Journalism: Broadcast I, II, III (10-11) Choose 2 additional credits from the following if needed: Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Journalism Independent Study I, II, III (10-12) Photography Art II (CPHS, RHS, VRHS, VHS) (10-12) Photojournalism (9-12) Audio/Video Production I (10-12) Required Courses (3 credits of the same language): American Sign Language French German Latin Spanish Required Courses (choose 3): Debate I-IV (9-12) Oral Interpretation I-IV (9-12) Public Speaking I-IV (9-12) Professional Communications (10-12) Communication Applications (9-12) Required Courses (choose 3, check prerequisites): Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Advanced Journalism: Broadcast I-III (CPHS, RHS, VHS) (10-12) Animation (11-12) Photojournalism (10-12) Video Game Development (11-12) Audio/Video Production I (10-12) Advertising & Sales Promotion/Sports & Entertainment Marketing (10-12) Art I (9-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Career Preparation (12) Language Level IV AP/IB (11-12) Spanish V AP/IB (12) Art I (9-12) Communication Applications (9-12) Hotel Management/Travel & Tourism Management (10-12) Hospitality Services: Hotel Management (11-12) Instructional Practices in Education and Training Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness (10-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Advanced Journalism: Broadcast I-III (CPHS, RHS, VHS) (10-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) Choir (9-12) Creative & Imaginative Writing (10-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) PALs - Peer Assistance Leadership I (11-12) Theatre (9-12) Theatre Productions (9-12) Instructional Practices in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Advertising & Sales Promotion/Sports & Entertainment Marketing (10-12) Fashion Marketing/Retailing & E-tailing (10-12) Counseling & Mental Health (11-12) Certification and/or College Credit: Art I (9-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) Computer Science I Pre-AP (10-12) Creative & Imaginative Writing (10-12) Interior Design (10-12) Journalism/Analysis of Visual Media (9-12) Photography Art II (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (10-12) Technical Theatre (9-12) Photojournalism (9-12) College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit College Credit: AP/IB Qualifying exam scores College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Extracurricular: w Yearbook, Newspaper, Broadcast, Photography w UIL Journalism w Art Clubs w COOL Week Internship w DECA w Language Clubs w German Exchange Program w National Spanish Honor Society w UIL Speech & Debate w Theatre Productions w PALs Broadcast Staff w Art Club w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Education w Mass Communications w Graphic Design w Convergence Media w Web Design w International Studies w Bilingual Education w Linguistics w International Business w Public Relations w Sports Communication w Radio, Television, & Film w Political Communication w Web Designer w Graphic Design w Radio, Television & Film w Computer Animation Careers: w Graphic Designer w Photographer/Photojournalist w Writer/Editor w Social Media Writer/Analyst w Web Design w Teacher/Professor w International Sales Rep w Interpreter w Language Teacher w Travel Agent w Public Relations Specialist w Speech Writer w Clergy w Law/Politics w Acting w Telecommunications w Psychologist/Social Work w Radio, Television & Film w Teaching Sales & Marketing w Animator w Graphic Designer w Web Designer w Advertising Planning for the Future...51

52 Programs of Study: Arts & Communication Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Performing Arts Cluster Band Choral Music Dance 4 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 4 Credits Required Required Courses: 4 credits in Band and/or Color Guard (9-12) Choir (9-12) Communication Applications (9-12) Instructional Practices in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Music Theory or Music Theory AP (11-12) Theatre (9-12) Required Courses: 3 Credits in Choir Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Art I (9-12) Communication Applications (9-12) Instructional Practices in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Music Theory or Music Theory AP (11-12) Theatre (9-12) Theatre Productions (9-12) 4 Credits of the same Language Other than English Extracurricular: Required Courses: 3 Credits in Dance Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Instructional Practices in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Dance Independent Study Anatomy and Physiology (11-12) Art I (9-12) Choir (9-12) Communication Applications (9-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Technical Theatre (9-12) Theatre (9-12) w UIL Marching Band w Concert Band w Musical Productions w Musical/Theatre Productions w UIL Choir Competitions w Dance/Drill Team w Color Guard w Dance Competitions Post-Secondary: w Music Education w Music Composition w Music History, Literature & Theory w Instrumental Performance w Music Education w Voice and Opera w Dance Education w Visual & Performing Arts w Dance Performance w Dance Production Careers: Music Educator w Arranger/Composer w Instrumental Performer w Director/Conductor w Choir Music Director w Private Voice Instructor w Music Teacher w Professional Singer w Professional Dancer w Dance Studio Owner w Choreographer w Dance Team Director Humanities Cluster Advanced Humanities General Fine Arts 5 Credits Required 4 Credits Required Required Courses (choose 5): Art Drawing AP or Drawing I (ACC) (11-12) Art 2D, 3D, Art History AP (11-12) Art IB I-II () (11-12) Creative Writing (ACC) (11-12) English IV AP, IB (), or English Comp. I-II (ACC) (11-12) English III AP or IB () (11) European History AP (11-12) Human Geography AP (9-12) History of Americas IB I- II () (11-12) Introduction to Humanities (ACC) (11-12) Introduction to Psychology (ACC) (11-12) Introduction to Sociology (ACC) (11-12) Languages Other than English AP, IB (), and/or Dual Credit (ACC) (11-12) Macroeconomics AP, IB (), or Principles of Macroeconomics (ACC) (11-12) Music Theory AP or Music Theory I (ACC) (11-12) Psychology AP (CPHS, RHS, VHS VRHS), IB I-II (), or Theatre IB I - II () (11-12) Theory of Knowledge IB () (12) US Government AP or US Government (ACC) (11-12) US History AP or US History II (ACC) (11-12) World History AP (10) Certification and/or College Credit: College Credit: AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores or Dual Credit Extracurricular: w National Honor Society w Academic Decathlon w UIL Academics Post-Secondary: Required Courses (choose 4): Art I (9-12) Art II (10-12) Band I (9-12) Band II (10-12) Band III (11-12) Choir I (9-12) Choir II (10-12) Dance I (9-12) Dance II (10-12) Photography Art II (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (10-12) Photojournalism (9-12) Technical Theatre I (9-12) Technical Theatre II (10-12) Theatre I (9-12) Theatre II (10-12) Theatre Productions I (9-12) Theatre Productions II (10-12) Principles & Elements of Floral Design (10-12) Art AP - Art History (10-12) w VASE Competitions w Art/Photography Club w Musical/Theatre Production w Band/Choir w International Studies w Political Science w Pre-Law w Comparative Literature w Music w Performance Studies w Dance w Education Careers Performing Arts Cluster Technical Theatre Theatre Arts 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses: Theatre I or Theatre Productions I (9-12) 2 credits in Technical Theatre (9-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technology (10-12) Art I (9-12) Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (10-12) Electrical Technology () (10-12) Electronics (, VRHS) (10-12) Interior Design (10-12) Introduction to Engineering Design - PLTW (10-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Photography Art II (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (10-12) Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) w Film Club w Musical/Theatre Production w UIL One-Act Play w Arts Management w Theatre w Film Production w Visual & Performing Arts w Drama/Theatre w Director w Prop Designer/Scenic Artist w Lighting Director w Sound Engineer Extracurricular: Post-Secondary: Careers: Required Courses: 3 credits in Theatre and/or Theatre Productions and/or Theatre Arts IB I - II () (11-12) Art I (9-12) Choir (9-12) Creative Imagination and Writing (10-12 Dance (9-12) Instructional Practices in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Photography Art II (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (10-12) Photojournalism (10-12) Practicum in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! II (12) Technical Theatre (9-12) w Film Club w Musical/Theatre Production w UIL One-Act Play w Film Studies w Theatre Arts w Radio, Television & Film w Visual & Performing Arts w Actor w Voice Over Actor w Director w Theatre Teacher w Museum Curator w Anthropologist w Professor w Lawyer w Actor w Performing Arts Instructor w Elementary Teacher w Musician 52...Planning for the Future

53 Arts & Communication Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Interior Design and Architecture Required Courses (choose 3): Architectural Design (CPHS,, RHS) (10-12) Interior Design (10-12) Introduction to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Principles & Elements of Floral Design (10-12) Advanced Architectural Design (CPHS, ) (11-12) Civil Engineering and Architecture (RHS) (11-12) Art I (9-12) Communication Applications (9-12) Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (10-12) Counseling and Mental Health (11-12) Professional Communications (10-12) Career Preparation (12) College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Visual Arts Cluster Photography 3 Credits Required Required Courses (Choose 2; check pre-requisites: Art I (9-12) or Photojournalism I (10-12) Advanced Journalism: Newspaper I (10-12) Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I (10-12) Journalism Independent Study (Photo) (10-12) Photography Art II - III (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (10-12) Portfolio Development (required for ) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I - III (10-12) Editor Independent Study Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Photography Art IV (CPHS,, VHS, RHS) (11-12) Photojournalism (9-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Animation (11-12) Journalism/Analysis of Visual Media (9-12) Certification and/or College Credit: College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Visual Arts Required Courses: 3 credits in Art Portfolio Development Note: students have the opportunity to focus in either 2-D or 3-D media. Art AP/IB (10-12) Interior Design (10-12) Intro to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Photography Art II (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (10-12) Principles & Elements of Floral Design (10-12) Technical Theatre (9-12) w FCCLA w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship w Habitat for Humanity w Interior Architecture w Environmental Design w Architecture w Landscape Architecture Extracurricular: w Art/Photography Competitions w Journalism Staff w Art/Photography Club w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w VASE Competition w Art/Photography Club w COOL Week Internship w Commercial Photography w Commercial Art w Art History w Graphic Design w Art History w Graphic Design w Art Education w Studio Arts Careers: w Architect w Set Designer w Interior Designer w Home Stager w Photographer w Layout Designer w Media Communications w Art Director w Studio Photographer w Photojournalist w Studio Photographer w Artist w Game Designer w Art Director w Art Teacher Planning for the Future...53

54 Business & Computer Technology Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Computer Technology Electronics Information Technology Cluster Internetworking Technology Software Applications 3 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses (check prerequisites): Computer Maintenance (, VRHS) (10-12) Choose 2 additional credit from the following: CISCO Internetworking Technology I (CPHS) (10-12) Computer Science I Pre-AP (10-12) Digital Electronics - PLTW (, VRHS) (10-12) Advanced Electrical Technology (, VRHS) (10-12) Electronics (, VRHS) (10-12) Physics (11-12) Principles of Engineering - PLTW (10-12) Technology Support - Tech Rep (11-12) Required Courses (check prerequisites): Electronics (, VRHS) (10-12) Physics (11-12) Digital Electronics - PLTW (, VRHS) (10-12) or Advanced Electronics (, VRHS) (11-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Computer Maintenance (, VRHS) (10-12) Advanced Electrical Technology (, VRHS) (10-12) Introduction of Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Required Courses (check prerequisites): CISCO Internetworking Technology I (CPHS) (10-12) CISCO Internetworking Technology II (CPHS) (11-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Computer Maintenance (, VRHS) (10-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) Computer Science I Pre-AP (10-12) Required Courses: Business Information Management I (9-12) Business Information Management II (10-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Accounting I (10-12) Accounting II (11-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Global Business/Virtual Business (11-12) Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Certification and/or College Credit: A+ Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit CISCO Certified Entry Network Technician - 1st year, CISCO Certified Network Administrator - 2nd year, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit MOS Certification Word, MOS Certification EXCEL, MOS Certification, Power Point, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Extracurricular: w Robotics w COOL Week Internship w UIL Computer Science w SkillsUSA w Robotics w Skills USA w COOL Week Internship w DECA w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Computer Science w Electrical Engineering w Computer Engineering w Computer Applications w Electrical Engineering w Electronics w Nanotechnology w Internetworking Technology w Information Systems & Decision Science w Emergency Management/Homeland Security w Management and Information Systems Careers: w Computer or Software Hardware Engineer w Information Technology Programmer w Industrial Electronic Tech w Electrical Utility Supervisor w Electronic Design Engineer w Electronic Technician w Internetworking Technician w Network Administrator w Administrative Assistant w Systems Analyst w Office Manager w Database Administrator Finance, Business Management & Administration Cluster Accounting & Finance Management 4 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses (choose 2 or more from the following): Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Accounting I (10-12) Global Business/Virtual Business (11-12) Choose 1-2 additional credit(s) from the following: Accounting II (11-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) Business Management (Entrepreneurship) (10-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Business Information Management II (10-12) 2 Credits of the same Language Other than English Career Preparation (12) Certification and/or College Credit: General Business Required Courses (choose 1 or more): Business Information Management I (9-12) Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Choose 1 or more additional credits from the following: Business Information Management II (10-12) Principles of Information Technology (9-12) Career Preparation (12) Business Management (Entrepreneurship) (10-12) Global Business/ Virtual Business (11-12) Hotel Management/Travel & Tourism Management (CPHS, RHS) (11-12) MOS Certification Word, MOS Certification EXCEL, MOS Certification, Power Point, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit w UIL Academics w COOL Week Internships w DECA w Key Club Extracurricular: Post-Secondary: w UIL Academics w COOL Week Internships w DECA w Key Club Accounting w Business Administration w Personal Finance w Financial Services w Real Estate Finance w Human Resource Management w Marketing w Business w Finance w Management Information Careers: w Accountant w Bookkeeper w Business Manager/Owner w Financial Analyst w Mortgage Lender w Auditor w Stock Broker w Administrative Assistant w Paralegal w Bank Teller w Office Manager 54...Planning for the Future

55 Programs of Study: Business & Computer Technology Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Marketing and Management Marketing, Sales and Services Cluster 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses: Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Advertising & Sales Promotion/Sports & Entertainment Marketing (10-12) Fashion Marketing/Retailing & E-tailing (10-12) Choose 1 additional credit if needed: Business Management (Entrepreneurship) (10-12) Career Preparation (12) Advanced Journalism: Broadcast I-II (CPHS, RHS, VHS) (10-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) Business Information Management II (10-12) Communication Applications (10-12) Global Business/Virtual Business (11-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Public Speaking (9-12) Certification and/or College Credit: College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Extracurricular: Public Relations Required Courses (choose 3): Advertising & Sales Promotion/Sports & Entertainment Marketing (10-12) Communication Applications (10-12) Global Business (11-12) Journalism/Analysis of Visual Media (9-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) PALs I - Peer Assistance and Leadership I (11-12) PALs II - Peer Assistance and Leadership II (12) Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Principles of Human Services (9-11) Public Speaking (9-12) Note: For one credit toward this program of study, students may substitute a maximum of two years of participation in the same extracurricular activity. The following activities are approved for substitution and must be documented by enrollment in the course and/or sponsor verification: Athletics, AVID, Band, Cheerleading, Choir, Color Guard, Debate, Dance Team, Technical Theatre, Theatre Productions, and JROTC. w DECA w COOL Week Internships w DECA w COOL Week Internships w Marketing/Advertising w Fashion Merchandising w Business Management w Real Estate w Public Relations w Sports Marketing & Management w Business Administration w Market Research Analyst w Advertising Manager w Retail Manager w Exhibit Designer w Public Relations Specialist w Marketing Director w Publicist/Sports Agent w Entrepreneur Post-Secondary: Careers: w Public Relations w Sports Management w Journalism w Business Administration w Public Relations Specialist w Non-profit Fundraiser w Publicist/Sports Agent w Speech Writer Hospitality and Tourism Cluster Culinary Arts: Restaurant Management Hospitality: Hotel Management 4 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses: Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness (10-12) or Culinary Arts Prep (10-12) & Practicum in Culinary Arts I (CPHS) (11-12) Choose 2 additional credits from the following: Business Management - Entrepreneurship (10-12) Hospitality Services: Hotel Management (CPHS) (11-12) Hotel Mgmt/Travel & Tourism Management (CPHS, RHS) (11-12) Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Principles of Human Services (9-11) Advertising & Sales Promotion* (10-12) Accounting I (10-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) Principles & Elements of Floral Design (10-12) Global Business/Virtual Business (11-12) Career Preparation (12) Food Handler Certification, ServSafe, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Certification and/or College Credit: Extracurricular: Required Courses: Hotel Mgmt/Travel & Tourism Management (CPHS, RHS) (11-12) Hospitality Services: Hotel Management (CPHS, RHS) (12) Accounting I (10-12) Advertising & Sales Promotion/Sports & Entertainment Marketing (11-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) Culinary Arts Prep (10-12) Business Management - Entrepreneurship/ Retailing & E-tailing (10-12) Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness (10-12) Principles & Elements of Floral Design (10-12) Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance (9-12) Principles of Human Services (9-11) Career Preparation (12) Austin Hotel & Lodging Association Certification, American Hotel & Lodging Associations Management Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit w FCCLA w COOL Week Internship w FCCLA w COOL Week Internship w Culinary Arts w Nutrition w Food Science w Restaurant Management Post-Secondary: Careers: w Hotel & Motel Management w Hospitality Administration w Business Management w Tourism & Travel Management w Chef/Baker/Pastry Chef w Caterer w Restaurant Manager/Owner w Food & Beverage Management w Resort Manager w Concierge Manager w Event Planner w Travel Agent Planning for the Future...55

56 Programs of Study: Engineering & Industrial Technology Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Architectural Design Graphics Construction Electricity Architecture & Construction Cluster Construction Technologies General Technology 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses: Architectural Design (CPHS,, RHS) (10-12) Advanced Architectural Design (CPHS, ) (11-12) Civil Engineering and Architecture (RHS) (11-12) Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Art I (9-12) Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (10-12) Electrical Technology () (10-12) Interior Design (10-12) Introduction to Engineering Design - PLTW College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit w FCCLA w SkillsUSA w Habitat for Humanity w COOL Week Internship Required Courses: Electrical Technology () (10-12) Advanced Electrical Technology () (11-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Computer Science I Pre-AP (10-12) Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (10-12) Electronics (, VRHS) (10-12) Intro to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Physics (11-12) Practicum in Electrical Construction Management () (12) Career Preparation (12) CPR Certification, OSHA Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit w FFA w SkillsUSA w Habitat for Humanity w COOL Week Internship Certification and/or College Credit: Extracurricular: Post-Secondary: Required Courses: Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (10-12) Advanced Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (11-12) Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Electrical Technology () (10-12) Interior Design (10-12) Intro to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Physics (11-12) Practicum in Building Construction Management (CPHS, ) (12) Career Preparation (12) NCCR Certification, OSHA Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit w FCCLA w SkillsUSA w Habitat for Humanity w COOL Week Internship Required Courses (choose 3): Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Computer Maintenance (, VRHS) (10-12) Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (10-12) Electrical Technology () (10-12) Electronics (, VRHS) (10-12) Introduction to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Physics (11-12) Automotive Technology (RHS) (10-11) OSHA Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit w Robotics w FFA w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship w Landscape Architecture w Architectural Technology w Environmental Design w Interior Architecture w Construction Science w Industrial Technology w Construction Inspection w Power Installation w Construction Science w Construction Trades w Construction Inspection w Survey Engineering w Industrial Technology w Warehousing Operations w Electronics Repair w Construction Science Careers: w Architect w Drafts Person w Construction Admin. w Landscape Architect w Master Electrician w Electrical Engineer w Electrical Inspector w Line Installer and Repair w Construction Management w Home Builder w Home Inspector w General Carpenter w Master Plumber w Stonemason w HVAC Technician w General Contractor Agricultural Mechanics Manufacturing Cluster Engineering Design Graphics General Agriculture 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses: Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Agricultural Facilities Design and Fabrication (11-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Practicum in Agricultural Mechanics (12) Physics (11-12) Advanced Electrical Technology () (11-12) Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (10-12) Electrical Technology () (10-12) Introduction to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Professional Communications (10-12) Required Courses: Intro to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Principles of Engineering - PLTW (10-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Physics (11-12) Computer Science I Pre-AP (10-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Construction Technology (CPHS, ) (10-12) Electrical Technology () (10-12) Electronics (, VRHS) (10-12) Certification and/or College Credit: Required Courses (choose 3): Agricultural Facilities Design and Fabrication (11-12) Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Livestock Production/Small Animal Management (10-12) or Wildlife, Fisheries, & Ecology Management (10-12) Principles and Elements of Floral Design (10-12) or Horticulture Science/ Landscape Design & Turf Grass Management (CPHS, ) (10-12) Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources (9-12) Professional Communications (10-12) OSHA Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Angler Certification, Hunter/Boater Safety Certification, Texas State Florists Association Student Certification, Pesticide Applicator Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Extracurricular: w FFA w Robotics w COOL Week Internship w SkillsUSA w Robotics w COOL Week Internship w FFA w COOL Week Internship w 4H Post-Secondary: w Agricultural Engineering w Ag Equipment Technology w Agricultural Power Machinery w Agricultural Mechanization w Civil Drafting w Industrial Design w Computer-Aided Drafting w Engineering w Agricultural Business w Sustainable Agriculture w Farm & Ranch Management w Soil Science Careers: w Construction Manager w Welder w Metal Fabrication and Construction w Agricultural Engineer w Estimator w Project Engineer w Ag Educator w Draftsperson w Industrial Designer w Graphics Designer w Civil Engineer w Agricultural Economist w Nursery Manager w Agricultural Extension Agent w Conservation Officer w Ag Educator 56...Planning for the Future

57 Programs of Study: Engineering & Industrial Technology Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Advanced Math Science Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Cluster Computer Science Engineering Sciences Project Lead The Way: Engineering 5 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses (choose 5): Algebra II Pre-AP or Algebra II Pre-IB () (10-12) Anatomy & Physiology Advanced (11-12) Biology AP or Biology IB I-II () (11-12) Calculus AP (12) Calculus (ACC) Chemistry AP or Chemistry II IB () (11-12) Chemistry Pre-AP or Chemistry I IB () (10-12) College Algebra (ACC) Computer Science I Pre-AP or Fundamentals of Programming (ACC) Computer Science II AP (11-12) or C++ Programming (ACC)/Data Structures (ACC) Environmental Biology (ACC) Environmental Science AP (11-12) Introduction to Biotechnology (ACC) Introduction to Chemistry (ACC) Medical Terminology (ACC) Mathematics IB () (12) Physics Pre-AP/IB or General College Physics (ACC) Physics AP or Physics IB I-II () (11-12) Pre-Calculus Pre-AP or Pre-Calculus IB () (11-12) Scientific Research & Design (11-12) Statistics AP (12) Stellar Astronomy (ACC) Required Courses (check prerequisites): Computer Science I Pre-AP (10-12) Computer Science II AP (11-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Advanced Journalism: Broadcast I (CPHS, RHS, VHS) (10-12) Business Information Management I (9-12) CISCO Internetworking I (CPHS) (10-12) CISCO Internetworking II (CPHS) (11-12) Computer Maintenance (, VRHS) (10-12) Electronics (, VRHS) (10-12) Graphic Design & Illustration (10-12) Technology Support - Tech Reps (10-12) Video Game Development (11-12) Robotics Programming and Design (9-12) Mobile Application Development (11-12) Required Courses (choose 4): Introduction to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Computer Science I Pre-AP (10-12) Physics or Physics I IB () (11-12) Pre-Calculus (11-12) Architectural Design (CPHS,, RHS) (10-12) Calculus AP (12) Chemistry AP or Chemistry I-II IB () (11-12) Computer Science II AP (11-12) Earth & Space Science (11-12) Electrical Technology () (10-12) Electronics (, VRHS) (11-12) Environmental Science AP Environmental Systems (11-12) Mathematics IB () (12) Physics AP or Physics II IB () (11-12) Principles of Engineering - PLTW (10-12) Mobile Application Development (11-12) Robotics Programming and Design (9-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Required Courses: Intro to Engineering Design - PLTW (9-12) Principles of Engineering - PLTW (10-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Digital Electronics - PLTW (, VRHS) (11-12) Aerospace Engineering - PLTW (VHS, VRHS) (11-12) Engineering Design & Development (VHS) (11-12) Civil Engineering and Architecture (RHS) (11-12) Agriculture Mechanics & Metal Technologies (10-12) Computer Science I Pre-AP (10-12) Construction Technology (CPHS,) (10-12) Physics (11-12) Pre-Calculus (11-12) Robotics Programming and Design (9-12) College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP Qualifying Exam Scores Certification and/or College Credit: Extracurricular: College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP Qualifying Exam Scores w Mu Alpha Theta w Academic Decathlon w National Honor Society w Robotics w UIL Computer Science w COOL Week Internship w Robotics w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship w JETS or UIL Competitions w Robotics w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Applied Mathematics w Science Technology w Statistics w Biotechnology w Computer Science w Computer System. Analysis w Computer Support Spec. w System Administration w Engineering Technology w Materials Engineering w Industrial Engineering w Mechanical Engineering w Engineering(Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Aerospace, Petroleum, etc) w Robotics Technology Careers: w Biomedical Engineer w Professor/Teacher w Actuary w Research Scientist w Software Engineer w Information Systems Manager. w Games Programmer w Web Developer w Civil Engineer w Health & Safety Engineer w Environmental Engineer w Nuclear Engineer w Engineer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Aerospace, Petroleum, etc)w Engineering Technician Transportation Cluster Automotive Technology 3 Credits Required Required Courses: Automotive Technology (RHS) (10-11) Advanced Automotive Technology (RHS) (11-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Practicum in Automotive Technology: Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics (RHS) (12) Certification and/or College Credit: NATEF Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Extracurricular: w COOL Week Internship w Skills USA Post-Secondary: w Alt. Fuel Vehicle Technology w Vehicle Emissions Tech. w Automotive Technology w Small Engine Repair Technology Careers: w Automotive Technology w Small Engine Repair w Auto Body Repair w Heavy Equipment Maintenance Planning for the Future..57

58 Programs of Study: Human Services, Health & Agriculture Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) General Animal Science Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Cluster Floral and Horticulture Design Veterinary Medicine 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses (choose 3): Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (9-10) Wildlife, Fisheries & Ecology Management (10-12) Livestock Production/ Small Animal Management (10-12) Advanced Animal Science (11-12) Advanced Biotechnology (CPHS, ) (11-12) Anatomy & Physiology Advanced (11-12) Biology AP, IB I, IB II (11-12) Professional Communications (10-12) Angler Certification, Hunter/Boater Safety Certification, Certified Veterinary Assistant, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, Dual Credit Choose 2 or more credits from the following: Horticulture Science/Landscape Design & Turf Grass Management (CPHS, ) (10-12) Principles & Elements of Floral Design (10-12) Interior Design (10-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following if needed: AP Environmental Science or Environmental Systems (11-12) Art I (9-12) Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (9-10) Earth and Space Science (11-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Architectural Design (CPHS,, RHS) (10-12) Introduction to Engineering Design (9-12) Professional Communications (10-12) Certification and/or College Credit: Texas State Florists' Association Student Certification, Pesticide Applicator Certification, College Credit: AP Qualifying Exam Scores Extracurricular: Required Courses: Veterinary Medical Applications (11-12) Choose 2 additional credits from the following: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (9-10) Livestock Production/Small Animal Management (10-12) Advanced Animal Science (11-12) Anatomy & Physiology Advanced (11-12) Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources (9-10) Professional Communications (10-12) Medical Microbiology (11-12) Medical Terminology/Pharmacology (11-12) Certified Veterinary Assistant w FFA w 4H w Animal Shelter Volunteer w COOL Week Internship w FFA w 4H w Community Garden Volunteer w COOL Week Internship w FFA w 4H w Animal Shelter Volunteer w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Animal Science w Dairy Science w Agriculture Education w Poultry Science w Veterinary Medicine w Biomedicine w Range Management w Floriculture w Environmental Design w Horticulture w Landscape Design w Biomedical Science w Veterinary Pathology w Veterinary Public Health w Epidemiology w Ag Extension Agent w Poultry Hatchery Manager w Natural Resources Manager w Veterinary Technician Careers: w Florist w Plant Geneticist w Landscape Architect Retail Owner/Manager w Golf Course Manager w Ag Educator w Animal Nutritionist w Veterinarian w Animal Trainer w Veterinary Pathologist Education & Training Cluster Education 3 Credits Required Required Courses: Instructional Practice in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Practicum in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! II (12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Art I (9-12) Child Development (10-12) Counseling and Mental Health (11-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VHS) (10-12) Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness (10-12) PALs I - Peer Assistance and Leadership I (11-12) Principles of Human Services (9-11) Professional Communications or Communication Applications (10-12) College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Certification and/or College Credit: Extracurricular: w FCCLA w PALs w Key Club w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Elementary Education w Instructional Media w Special Education w Bilingual Education Careers: w Teacher w Librarian w Day Care Administrator w School Counselor Criminal Justice Technology Law, Public Safety & Security Cluster Military Service 3 Credits Required 4 Credits Required Required Courses (Dual Credit Only): Intro to Criminal Justice (ACC - CRIJ 1301) Court Systems and Practices (ACC - CRIJ 1306) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Communication Applications (10-12) Counseling and Mental Health (11-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Principles of Human Services (9-11) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Advanced Biotechnology (CPHS, ) (11-12) Languages Other Than English JROTC I (9-12) College Credit: Dual Credit w JROTC w COOL Week Internship w Criminal Justice w Pre-law Studies w Criminal Science w Corrections Administration w Criminal Investigator w Probation Officer w Lawyer w Police Officer Certification and/or College Credit: Required Courses: AFJROTC I-III () or NJROTC I-III (VRHS) (9-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: AFJROTC IV () or NJROTC IV (VRHS) (12) Communication Applications (10-12) Court Systems and Practices (ACC - CRIJ 1306) Intro to Criminal Justice (ACC - CRIJ 1301) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Professional Communications (10-12) College Credit: Dual Credit Extracurricular Opportunities: Post-Secondary: Careers: w JROTC w Military Technologies w Emergency Management/Homeland Security Career opportunities vary based on career assessments/specialization/military branch 58...Planning for the Future

59 Programs of Study: Human Services, Health & Agriculture Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Cosmetology Counseling & Mental Health Human Services Cluster Human Ecology Human Relations 6 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Required Courses: Cosmetology I (3 Credits) () (11-12) Cosmetology II (3 Credits) () (12) Required Courses: Principles of Human Services (9-11) Counseling and Mental Health (11-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Child Development (10-12) Instructional Practice in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Investigations in Psychology/Psychology AP (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (11-12) PALs I - Peer Assistance and Leadership I (11-12) Psychology I IB () (11-12) RAP - Raiders/Rangers Assisting Peers (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Required Courses (choose 3): Principles of Human Services/Interpersonal Studies (9-11) Child Development (10-12) Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness (10-12) Interior Design (10-12) Ready, Set, Teach! (11-12) Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Required Courses (choose 3): Child Development (10-12) Instructional Practice in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! I (11-12) Investigations in Psychology/Psychology AP (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (11-12) or Psychology I-II IB () (11-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) PALs I - Peer Assistance and Leadership I (11-12) PALs II - Peer Assistance and Leadership II (12) Principles of Human Services (9-11) Accounting I (11-12) Anatomy & Physiology Advanced(11-12) Chemistry (10-12) Communication Applications (10-12) Professional Communications (10-12) Health (9-12) Principles of Human Services (9-11) Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance (9-12) Anatomy & Physiology Advanced (11-12) Communication Applications (10-12) Health (9-12) Medical Terminology/Pharmacology (11-12) Practicum in Education and Training - Ready, Set, Teach! II (12) Principles of Health Science I (11-12) Ready, Set, Teach! II (12) Culinary Arts: Restaurant Management (CPHS) (11-12) Hotel Management/Travel & Tourism Management (10-12) Counseling & Mental Health (11-12) *Note: For one credit towards this program of study, students may substitute a maximum of two years of participation in the same extracurricular activity. The following activities are approved for substitution and must be documented by enrollment in the course and/or sponsor verification: Athletics, AVID, Band, Cheerleading, Choir, Color Guard, Debate, Dance Team, Technical Theatre, Theatre Productions, and JROTC. Certification and/or College Credit: State of Texas Cosmetology License (upon passing the state exam) College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship w FCCLA w PALs w COOL Week Internship Extracurricular: w FCCLA w Key Club w PALs w COOL Week Internship w FCCLA w Key Club w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Applied Science for Cosmetology w Business Management w Marketing w Nail Technician w Make-Up Artist w Esthetician w Salon/Spa Manager/Owner w Corporate Sales Representative w Hair Stylist w Clinical Psychology w Human Development w Family Psychology w Forensic Psychology Careers: w Family Studies and Human Services w Human Nutrition w Apparel, Textiles, & Interior Design w Gerontology w Hospitality w Psychologist w Social Worker w Counselor w Psychiatrist w Event Planner w Food Scientist w Registered Dietician w Marriage & Family Therapist w Human Resource Dev. w Public Administration w Human Services w Youth Services w Career Counselor w Outdoor Recreation Specialist w Human Resources Officer w Peace Corps Planning for the Future...59

60 Programs of Study: Human Services, Health & Agriculture Academy (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2012 and 2013) Biotechnology Fitness & Wellness Health Science Cluster Health Science Technology Medical Sciences Sports Medicine 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required 3 Credits Required Courses (check prerequisites): Chemistry (10-12) Advanced Biotechnology (CPHS, ) (11-12) Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Biology AP or Biology I IB () (11-12) Biology II IB () (12) Chemistry AP or Chemistry I IB () (11-12) Chemistry II IB () (12) Environmental Science AP or Environmental Systems (11-12) Horticulture Science (10-12) Livestock Production (10-12) Medical Microbiology (11-12) Pharmacology (11-12) Small Animal Management (10-12) Required Courses (choose 3): Child Development (10-12) Health Science (11-12) Investigations in Psychology/Psychology AP (CPHS, RHS, VHS, VRHS) (11-12) Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness (10-12) Medical Microbiology (11-12) Medical Terminology/Pharmacology (11-12) Psychology I IB () (11-12) Sports Medicine I (9-10) Sports Medicine II (10-11) Required Courses (check prerequisites): Principles of Health Science (11-12) Health Science (12) Required Courses (choose 3): Anatomy & Physiology Advanced (11-12) Biology AP or Biology I IB () (11-12) Biology II IB () (12) Health Science I (11-12) Medical Microbiology (11-12) Medical Terminology/ Pharmacology(11-12) Advanced Biotechnology (CPHS, ) (11-12) Required Courses (choose 3): Sports Medicine I Sports Medicine II Sports Medicine III Sports Medicine IV Supplemental Courses to Enhance Learning: Business Information Management I (9-12) Communication Applications (10-12) Note: For one credit toward this program of study, students may substitute a maximum of 2 years of participation in the same extracurricular activity. The following activities are approved for substitution and must be documented by enrollment in the course and/or sponsor verification: Athletics, AVID, Band, Cheerleading, Choir, Color Guard, Debate, Dance Team, Technical Theatre, Theatre Productions, and JROTC. Anatomy & Physiology Advanced (11-12) Bio AP or Biology I, II IB () (11-12) Chemistry (10-12) Child Development (10-12) Counseling and Mental Health (11-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness (10-12) Medical Microbiology (11-12) Medical Terminology/Pharmacology (11-12) Advanced Biotechnology (CPHS, ) (11-12) Sports Medicine I-II (9-11) Calculus AB AP (12) or Math IB () (12) Chemistry AP or Chemistry I-II IB () (11-12) Child Development (10-12) Counseling and Mental Health (11-12) Leadership (CPHS,, VHS) (9-12) or RAP (RHS, VRHS) (10-12) Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness (10-12) Physics (11-12) Physics AP or Physics I-II IB () (11-12) Practicum in Health Science (12) Pre-Calculus (11-12) Sports Medicine I - II (9-11) Anatomy & Physiology Advanced (11-12) Biology(9-12) Biology AP, Biology I-II IB () (11-12) Counseling and Mental Health (11-12) Health (9-12) Health Science (11-12) Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness (10-12) Medical Microbiology (11-12) Medical Terminology/Pharmacology (11-12) Certification and/or College Credit: College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores, Dual Credit CPR/First Aid/AED Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores Certified Nursing Assistant, CPR/First Aid/ AED Certification, Phlebotomy Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit CPR/First Aid/AED Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores, Dual Credit CPR/First Aid/AED Certification Extracurricular: w HOSA w FFA w Environmental Club w COOL Week Internship w HOSA w FCCLA w COOL Week Internship w HOSA w COOL Week Internship w HOSA w COOL Week Internship w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Biomedical Science w Biotechnology w Microbiology w Molecular and Cell Biology w Clinical Laboratory Science w Health & Physical Fitness w Kinesiology w Fitness Administration w Personal Training w Medical Technology w Public Health w Nursing w Allied Health w Biomedical Science w Pre-Veterinary Studies w Pre-Medicine w Pre-Pharmacy w Sport Management w Kinesiotherapy w Physical Therapy w Therapeutic Recreation Careers: w Forensic Scientist w Research Scientist w Lab Technician w Geneticist w Dietician w Personal Trainer w Physical Therapist w Pharmaceutical Sales Rep. w Nurse Practitioner w Pharmacy Technician w EMT w Phlebotomist w Anesthesiologist w Physician w Dentist w Surgeon w Athletic Trainer w Sports Nutritionist w Exercise Physiologist w Physical Therapist 60...Planning for the Future

61 Endorsement Areas - Programs of Study: (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Leander ISD offers opportunity in all five (5) state recognized Endorsement areas. The State recognized endorsement areas are: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM); Business and Industry; Public Service; Arts and Humanities; and Multi-disciplinary. An important goal of the is for our graduates to be set apart from other students from across the state. The is the vehicle through which this is accomplished. A certificate is awarded upon graduation. More than 25 Programs of Study are currently available in the five (5) Endorsement areas. Courses chosen during high school become the foundation for the future; therefore, careful selection of courses will form a related to a chosen post-secondary educational goal. See list below for a complete listing of the Programs of Study. How to use the : 1) Select a based on the career field in which you are interested. Note that the section of this course catalog provides an outline of available certifications, college credit, corresponding extracurricular student-leadership opportunities, post-secondary majors, and careers. 2) The number of credits needed to earn a certificate refers to credits earned by passing identified courses; this number varies by. 3) Credit must be earned in any prerequisite courses listed, if any, for a certificate. 4) Credit must be earned in any required courses listed. Endorsement Areas / Programs of Study (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Advanced Math Advanced Science Computer Science Engineering: Project Lead The Way STEM Studies Public Service Biomedical Science: Project Lead The Way Cosmetology - () Education and Training Health Science Human Services Junior Reserve Officer Training Corp Air Force JROTC - () Navy JROTC - (VRHS) Business & Industry Ag - Agricultural Mechanics Ag - Animal Science Ag - Plant Science Agriculture Studies Architecture and Interior Design - (, CPHS & RHS) Arts, Audio/Video Technology and Communications Automotive Technology - (RHS) Business Management and Administration Construction Technology - ( & CPHS) Culinary Arts: Restaurant Management - (CPHS) Electrical Technology English Advanced Journalism - Newspaper and Yearbook Debate Oral Interpretations Public Speaking Electrical Technology - () Finance Hospitality: Hotel Management - (CPHS & RHS) Marketing Arts & Humanities Fine Arts Art Dance Music - Band and Choir Technical Theatre Theatre Arts Languages Other Than English ASL French Latin Spanish Social Studies Planning for the Future...61

62 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Endorsement A student may earn a STEM endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements including Algebra II, Chemistry, and Physics. In addition students must complete one of the requirements listed below. Advanced Math Advanced Science Computer Sciences PLTW - Engineering 7 Credits Required 6 Credits Required 7 Credits Required 7 Credits Required Required Courses: Algebra I Geometry or Geometry Pre-AP or Geometry Pre-IB () Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP or Algebra Pre-IB () Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP or Chemistry Pre-IB () Physics or Physics Pre-AP or Physics Pre-IB () Choose 2 additional credit from the following: Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Pre-calculus Pre-calculus Pre-AP or Pre-calculus Pre-IB () Pre-calculus Biotechnology (ACC) AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC IB Mathematics SL () IB Mathematics HS () AP Statistics AP Computer Science Math Independent Study Required Courses (check prerequisites): Biology or Biology Pre-AP or Biology IB () Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP or Chemistry Pre-IB () Physics or Physics Pre-AP or Physics Pre-IB () Choose 2 additional credit from the following: Biology AP or Biology I & II () Chemistry AP or Chemistry I & II IB () Physics AP or Physics IB I& II () Anatomy and Physiology Medical Microbiology Earth and Space Science AP Environmental Science Environmental Systems IPC Scientific Research and Design I & II Advanced Animal Science Advanced Biotechnology Principles of Engineering Medical Microbiology Astronomy (ACC) Certification and/or College Credit: Required Courses (check prerequisites): Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP or Algebra II Pre-IB () Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP or Chemistry Pre-IB () Physics or Physics Pre-AP or Physics Pre-IB () Choose 4 additional credit from the following: Computer Science I Pre-AP Computer Science II AP Robotics Programming and Design Mobile Application Development Independent Study of Technology Applications Required Courses: Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP or Algebra II Pre-IB () Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP or Chemistry Pre-IB () Physics or Physics Pre-AP or Physics Pre-IB () Intro to Engineering Design - PLTW Principles of Engineering - PLTW Choose 1 additional credit from the following: Gateway to Technology (Middle School) Aerospace Engineering - PLTW (VHS, RHS,VRHS) Engineering Design & Development (VHS) Civil Engineering and Architecture (RHS) Choose additional credit, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Electrical Technology () Architectural Design (, CPHS & RHS) Construction Technology ( & CPHS) Agriculture Mechanics and Metal Technologies Scientific Research and Design Advanced Biotechnology College Credit: AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores College Credit: AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores Extracurricular: College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, AP/IB Qualifying Exam Scores w Mu Alpha Theta w Academic Decathlon w National Honor Society w UIL Competition Academic Decathlon w National Honor Society w UIL Competition Post-Secondary: w Robotics w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship w JETS or UIL Competitions w Robotics w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship w JETS or UIL Competitions w Applied Mathematics w Statistics Biology w Chemistry w Geological & Related Science w Biotechnology w Physics w Pre-Med w Microbiology w Computer Science w Computer System Analysis w Computer Support Spec w Systems Administration w Engineering (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Aerospace, Petroleum, etc) w Robotics Technology Careers: w Statistician w Professor/Teacher w Actuary w Mathematician w Biologist w Biomedical Technician w Chemist w Research Assistant w Professor/Teacher w Software Engineer w Information Systems Manager w Programmer w Game Design w Web Developer w Engineer (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Aerospace, Petroleum, etc)w Engineering Technician Science, Technology, Engineering & Math Endorsement A student may earn a STEM endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements including Algebra II, Chemistry, and Physics. In addition students must complete one of the requirements listed below. STEM Studies 6 Credits Required Required Courses: Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP or Algebra II Pre-IB () Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP or Chemistry Pre-IB () Physics or Physics Pre-AP or Physics Pre-IB () Choose at least 3 additional credits from no ore than two of the areas listed below: Advanced Math Advanced Science Computer Science CTE STEM Advanced Quantitative Reasoning Pre-calculus Pre-calculus Pre-AP or Pre-calculus Pre-IB () Pre-calculus Biotechnology (ACC) AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC IB Mathematics SL () IB Mathematics HS () AP Statistics AP Computer Science Math Independent Study Biology AP or Biology I & II () Chemistry AP or Chemistry I & II IB () Physics AP or Physics IB I& II () Anatomy and Physiology Medical Microbiology Earth and Space Science AP Environmental Science Environmental Systems IPC Scientific Research and Design I & II Advanced Animal Science Advanced Biotechnology Principles of Engineering Medical Microbiology Astronomy (ACC) Computer Science I Pre-AP Computer Science II AP Robotics Programming and Design Mobile Application Development Independent Study of Technology Applications Intro to Engineering Design - PLTW Principles of Engineering - PLTW Gateway to Technology (Middle School) Aerospace Engineering - PLTW (VHS, RHS,VRHS) Civil Engineering and Architecture (RHS) Engineering Design & Development (VHS) 62...Planning for the Future

63 Business and Industry (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Business and Industry Endorsement A student may earn a Business and Industry endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. Students must complete one of the requirements listed below. Culinary Arts: Restaurant Management Hospitality: Hotel Management Arts, Audio/Video Technology and Communications 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required Required Courses: Culinary Arts Prep Practicum in Culinary Arts I (CPHS) Choose additional credits from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Human Services or Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance Practicum in Culinary Arts II Business Management - Entrepreneurship Hospitality Services: Hotel Management (CPHS and RHS) Hotel Mgmt/Travel & Tourism Management (CPHS, and RHS) Retailing and E-tailing/Fashion Marketing Advertising and Sales Promotion/Sports Marketing Required Courses: Hotel Mgmt/Travel & Tourism Management (CPHS, RHS) Hospitality Services: Hotel Management (CPHS, RHS) Choose additional credits from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Human Services or Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance Practicum in Hospitality and Tourism (CPSH and RHS) Business Management - Entrepreneurship Culinary Arts Prep Retailing and E-tailing/Fashion Marketing Advertising and Sales Promotion/Sports Marketing Certification and/or College Credit: Required Courses: Choose 2 credits from the following: Audio/Video Productions Advanced Audio/Video Productions Graphic Design and Illustration Animation Video Game Design Choose additional credits, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Problems and Solutions Advertising and Sales Promotion/Sports Marketing Food Handler Certification, ServSafe, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Austin Hotel & Lodging Association Certification, American Hotel & Lodging Associations Management Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Extracurricular: Adobe Certified Specialist in Illustrator, Photoshop and Flash College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit w CTSO (FCCLA) w COOL Week Internship w CTSO (FCCLA) w COOL Week Internship w Anime Club w Broadcast Staff w Graphic Design & Illustration Club w COOL Week Internship w Culinary Arts w Nutrition w Food Science w Restaurant Management w Chef/Baker/Pastry Chef w Caterer w Restaurant Manager/Owner w Food & Beverage Management Post-Secondary: w Hotel & Motel Management w Hospitality Administration w Business Management w Tourism & Travel Management Careers: w Resort Manager w Concierge Manager w Event Planner w Travel Agent w Web Designer w Graphic Design w Radio, Television & Film w Computer Animation w Animator w Graphic Designer w Web Designer w Advertising Planning for the Future...63

64 Business and Industry (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Marketing Business and Industry Endorsement A student may earn a Business and Industry endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. Students must complete one of the requirements listed below. Finance Business Management and Administration English Elective 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required Required Courses: Advertising & Sales Promotion/Sports & Entertainment Marketing Fashion Marketing/Retailing & E-tailing Choose additional credits from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance Business Information Management I Business Information Management II Global Business/Virtual Business Business Management (Entrepreneurship) Accounting I Accounting II Career Preparation Required Courses: Accounting I Accounting II Choose additional credits from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance Business Information Management I Business Information Management II Global Business/Virtual Business Business Management (Entrepreneurship) Advertising & Sales Promotion/Sports & Entertainment Marketing Fashion Marketing/Retailing & E-tailing Career Preparation Certification and/or College Credit: Choose 2 credits from the following: Business Information Management I Business Information Management II Global Business/Virtual Business Business Management (Entrepreneurship) Choose additional credits, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Business, Marketing, & Finance Advertising & Sales Promotion/Sports & Entertainment Marketing Fashion Marketing/Retailing & E-tailing Career Preparation Accounting I Accounting II Required Courses: 3 credits of the same disciplines in one of the following areas: Advanced Journalism: Newspaper I - III Advanced Journalism: Yearbook I - III Public Speaking I-III Debate I - III Oral Interpretation I-III Choose additional credit from the following: English IV AP English Literature and Composition IB Language Studies College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit QuickBooks Certified User College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit MOS Certification Word, MOS Certification EXCEL, MOS Certification Power Point ; College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Extracurricular: w DECA w COOL Week Internships w UIL Academics w COOL Week Internships w DECA w Key Club w UIL Academics w COOL Week Internships w DECA w Key Club Yearbook, Newspaper, Broadcast w UIL Journalism w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Marketing/Advertising w Fashion Merchandising w Business Management w Real Estate w Public Relations w Sports Marketing & Management w Business Administration w Accounting w Business Administration w Personal Finance w Financial Services w Real Estate Finance w Human Resource Management w Marketing w Business w Finance w International Trade w Organizational Management w Human Resource Management w Management and Information Systems w Education w Mass Communications w Graphic Design w Convergence Media * Web Design w Journalism w Political Science Careers: w Market Research Analyst w Advertising Manager w Retail Manager w Exhibit Designer w Public Relations Specialist w Marketing Director w Publicist/Sports Agent w Entrepreneur w Accountant w Bookkeeper w Business Manager/Owner w Financial Analyst w Mortgage Lender w Auditor w Stock Broker w Administrative Assistant w Business Owner/Entrepreneur w Bank Teller w Office Manager w Public Relations Specialist w Systems Analyst w Office Manager w Database Administrator w Speech Writer w Journalist w Educator w Mass Communications w Graphic Design w Convergence Media * Web Design 64...Planning for the Future

65 Business and Industry (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Business and Industry Endorsement A student may earn a Business and Industry endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. Students must complete one of the requirements listed below. General Animal Science Floral and Horticulture Design Agricultural Mechanics Agriculture Studies 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required Choose 2 credits from the following: Small Animal Management/Wildlife, Fisheries & Ecology Management Livestock Production/ Advanced Animal Science Veterinary Medical Applications Choose additional credits, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Practicum in Veterinary Medical Applications Required Courses: Horticulture Science/Landscape Design & Turf Grass Management (CPHS, ) Principles & Elements of Floral Design Choose additional credits from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Interior Design Architecture Design Certification and/or College Credit: Required Courses: Agriculture Mechanics and Metal Technologies Agricultural Facilities Design and Fabrication Choose additional credits from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Construction Technology ( and CPHS) Electrical Technology () Architecture Design ( and CPHS) Practicum in Agricultural Mechanics Choose 3 credits from the following: Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Agriculture Mechanics and Metal Technologies Small Animal Management/Wildlife, Fisheries & Ecology Management Floral Design Choose additional credits, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Angler Certification, Hunter/Boater Safety Certification, Certified Veterinary Assistant, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, Dual Credit Texas State Florists' Association Student Certification, Pesticide Applicator Certification, College Credit: AP Qualifying Exam Scores OSHA Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit OSHA Certification, Texas State Florists Association Student Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Extracurricular: w FFA w 4H w Animal Shelter Volunteer w COOL Week Internship w FFA w 4H w Community Garden Volunteer w COOL Week Internship w FFA w Skills USA w COOL Week Internship w FFA w 4H w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Animal Science w Dairy Science w Agriculture Education w Poultry Science w Veterinary Medicine w Biomedicine w Range Management w Floriculture w Environmental Design w Horticulture w Landscape Design w Agricultural Engineering w Ag Equipment Technology w Construction Science w Ag Systems Management w Agricultural Mechanization Agricultural Business w Sustainable Agriculture w Farm & Ranch Management w Soil Science Careers: w Ag Extension Agent w Poultry Hatchery Manager w Range Manager w Veterinary Technician or Pathologist w Animal Nutritionist w Veterinarian w Animal Trainer w Ag Educator w Florist w Plant Geneticist w Landscape Architect Retail Owner/Manager w Golf Course Manager w Ag Educator w Construction Manager w Welder w Metal Fabrication and Construction w Agricultural Engineer w Estimator w Project Engineer w Ag Educator w Agricultural Economist w Nursery Manager w Agricultural Extension Agent w Conservation Officer w Ag Educator Planning for the Future..65

66 Business and Industry (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Architectural Design Graphics Business and Industry Endorsement A student may earn a Business and Industry endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. Students must complete one of the requirements listed below. Construction Electricity Construction Technology Automotive Technology 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required Choose 2 credits from the following: Architectural Design (CPHS,, RHS) (10-12) Advanced Architectural Design (CPHS, ) (11-12) Interior Design Choose additional credits, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Construction Technology ( and CPHS) Electrical Technology () Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies Required Courses: Electrical Technology () Advanced Electrical Technology () Choose additional credit from the following: Professional Communications Practicum in Electrical Construction Management () Construction Technology ( and CPHS)) Architecture Design ( and CPHS) Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies Certification and/or College Credit: Required Courses: Construction Technology (CPHS, ) Advanced Construction Technology (CPHS, ) Choose additional credit from the following: Professional Communications Practicum in Building Construction Management ( and CPHS) Electrical Technology () Architecture Design ( and CPHS) Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies Required Courses: Automotive Technology (RHS) Advanced Automotive Technology (RHS) Choose additional credit from the following: Professional Communications Practicum in Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics (RHS) Agricultural Mechanics & Metal Technologies College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit NCCER Certification, CPR Certification, OSHA Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit Extracurricular: NCCER Certification, OSHA Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit ASE Student Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit w FCCLA w Habitat for Humanity w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship w FFA w Habitat for Humanity w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship FFA w Habitat for Humanity w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship FFA w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Landscape Architecture w Construction Management w Urban Planning w Environmental Design w Interior Architecture w Construction Management w Industrial Technology w Construction Inspection w Power Installation w Construction Management w Urban Planning w Engineering w Construction Trades w Construction Inspection w Survey Engineering w Alt. Fuel Vehicle Technology w Vehicle Emissions Tech. w Automotive Technology w Engineering Safety & Compliance w Small Engine Repair Technology Careers: w Architect w Drafts Person w Construction Admin. w Landscape Architect w Structural Engineer w Building Code Enforcement w Master Electrician w Electrical Engineer w Electrical Inspector w Line Installer and Repair w Construction Management w Home Builder w Home Inspector w Carpenter/Plumber/Electrician w Cost Estimator w Stone Mason w HVAC Technician w General Contractor w Automotive/Aviation/Diesel Mechanic w Small Engine Repair w Health & Safety Engineer w Auto Body Repair w Heavy Equipment Maintenance 66...Planning for the Future

67 Public Service (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Public Service Endorsement A student may earn a Public Service Endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. In addition, students must complete one of the requirements listed below. Cosmetology Human Services Education 6 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required Required Courses: Cosmetology I (3 Credits) () Cosmetology II (3 Credits) () State of Texas Cosmetology License (upon passing the state exam) Choose 3 credits from the following: Principles of Human Services Counseling and Mental Health Child Development Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Choose additional credit, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Culinary Arts Prep or Interior Design Instructional Practice in Education and Training Certification and/or College Credit: College Credit: Possible articulated college credit Certification: Business/Industry recognized certification Required Courses: Instructional Practice in Education and Training Practicum in Education and Training Choose additional credit from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Human Services Child Development Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Counseling and Mental Health College Credit: Possible articulated college credit Certification: Business/Industry recognized certification w SkillsUSA w COOL Week Internship w Applied Science for Cosmetology w Business Management w Marketing w Nail Technician w Make-Up Artist w Esthetician w Salon/Spa Manager/Owner w Corporate Sales Representative w Hair Stylist Extracurricular: w FCCLA w Big Brothers/Big Sisters w PALs w COOL Week Internship w Key Club Post-Secondary: w Clinical Psychology w Human Development w Family Psychology w Forensic Psychology w Family Studies and Human Services w Human Nutrition w Apparel, Textiles, and Interior Design w Gerontology Careers: w Psychologist w Social Worker w Counselor w Psychiatrist w Career Counselor w Outdoor Recreation Specialist w Family & Consumer Science Teachers w Peace Corps w FCCLA w Key Club w PALs w COOL Week Internship w Elementary Education w Instructional Media w Special Education w Bilingual Education w Teacher w Librarian w Day Care Administrator w School Counselor Planning for the Future...67

68 Public Service (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Public Service Endorsement A student may earn a Public Service Endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. In addition, students must complete one of the requirements listed below. Health Science Technology PLTW - Biomedical Sciences JROTC 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Required 4 Credits Choose 4 credits from either Air Force JROTC or Navy JROTC: Choose 3 credits from the following: Health Science Practicum in Health Science Anatomy & Physiology Advanced Medical Microbiology Choose additional credit, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Principles of Biomedical Science (PLTW) Medical Terminology/ Pharmacology Child Development Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Counseling and Mental Health Choose 3 credits from the following: Principles of Biomedical Science (PLTW) Human Body Systems (PLTW) Medical Interventions (PLTW) Biomedical Innovation (PLTW) Anatomy & Physiology Choose additional credit, if needed, from the following: Professional Communications Health Science Medical Terminology/ Pharmacology AFJROTC I () AFJROTC II () AFJROTC III () AFJROTC IV () NJROTC I (VRHS) NJROTC II (VRHS) NJROTC III (VRHS) NJROTC IV (VRHS) Certification and/or College Credit: Certified Nursing Assistant, CPR/First Aid/AED Certification, Phlebotomy Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit CPR/First Aid/AED Certification, College Credit: Courses for Articulated Credit, Dual Credit Extracurricular: w HOSA w COOL Week Internship w HOSA w COOL Week Internship w COOL Week Internship Post-Secondary: w Medical Technology w Public Health w Nursing w Allied Health w Kinesiotherapy w Physical Therapy w Therapeutic Recreation w Nurse Practitioner w Pharmacy Technician w EMT w Phlebotomist w Sports Nutritionist w Exercise Physiologist w Physical Therapist w Biomedical Engineering w Pre-Veterinary Studies w Pre-Medicine w Pre-Pharmacy w Biotechnology w Forensic Science Careers: w Anesthesiologist w Physician w Dentist w Surgeon w Forensic Scientist w Biomedical Engineer w Clinical Technician w Research Assistant w Military Technologies w Emergency Management/Homeland Security w Public Administration w Political Science w Law Career opportunities vary based on career assessments/specialization/military branch. In public sector - w Homeland/Military/Private Security w Municipal/State/Local Government 68...Planning for the Future

69 Multidisciplinary (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Multidisciplinary Endorsement A student may earn a Multidisciplinary Endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. In addition, students must complete one of the options listed below. Multidisciplinary 16 Credits Required (Option 1) 4 Credits Required (Option 2) 16 credits - Four credits in each of the foundation areas to include English IV, Chemistry and/or Physics Choose at least 4 credits of Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Dual Credit selected from English, mathematics, science, social studies, economics, LOTE and fine arts. Required Courses: 4 credits of English English I or English I Pre-AP/IB English II or English II Pre-AP/IB English III or English III AP/IB English IV or English IV AP/IB Required Courses: 4 credits of Math Algebra I Geometry or Geometry Pre-AP or Geometry Pre-IB () Choose additional credit from the following: Algebra II or Algebra II Pre-AP or Algebra Pre-IB () Advanced Quantitative Reasoning, or Precalculus Pre-calculus Pre-AP or Pre-calculus Pre-IB () Pre-calculus Biotechnology (ACC) AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC IB Mathematics SL () IB Mathematics HS () AP Statistics AP Computer Science Math Independent Study Required Courses: 4 credit of Science Biology or Biology Pre-AP or Biology IB () Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP or Chemistry Pre-IB () AND/OR Physics or Physics Pre- AP or Physics Pre-IB () Choose additional credits from the following: Biology AP or Biology I & II () Chemistry AP or Chemistry I & II IB () Physics AP or Physics IB I& II () Anatomy and Physiology Medical Microbiology Earth and Space Science AP Environmental Science Environmental Systems IPC Scientific Research and Design I & II Advanced Animal Science Advanced Biotechnology Principles of Engineering Medical Microbiology Chemistry or Chemistry Pre-AP or Chemistry Pre-IB () Physics or Physics Pre-AP or Physics Pre-IB () Required Courses: 4 credit of Social Studies World Geography/Human Geography AP AND/OR World History/World History AP US History or US History AP or History of Americas I & II () Government or Government AP and Economics or Economics AP Choose additional credit if needed from the following: European History AP Investigations in Psychology/Psychology AP Psychology, IB I-II () Influence of the Old/New Testament World Geography/Human Geography AP World History/World History AP Required Courses: 4 credits of Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate or Dual Credit English III AP/IB/DC English IV AP/IB/DC Human Geography AP World History AP US History AP or DC IB History of Americas I & II () Government AP or DC/Economics AP or DC European History AP Investigations in Psychology/Psychology AP Psychology, IB I-II () Biology AP or Biology I & II () Chemistry AP or Chemistry I & II IB () Physics AP or Physics IB I& II () AP Environmental Science AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC IB Mathematics SL () IB Mathematics HS () AP Statistics Art AP - Drawing Portfolio Art AP - Two Dimensional Design Art AP - Three Dimensional Design Art AP - Art History Theatre Arts IB I-II Music I IB Music Theory AP French IV AP/IB Latin IV AP/IB Spanish IV AP/IB Spanish V AP/IB Planning for the Future...69

70 Arts and Humanities (Students entering 9th grade in Fall 2014) Arts and Humanities Endorsement A student may earn an Arts and Humanities Endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. In addition students must complete one of the requirements listed below. With written permission of the parents, a student may substitute a course from ELA, Social Studies, LOTE or Fine Arts for the 4th science requirement. Fine Arts 4 Credits Required Choose at least 4 credits from no more than two of the areas listed below: Art Music (Band and Choir) Dance Theatre Technical Theatre Music Studies Art I-IV Art AP - Drawing Portfolio Art AP - Two Dimensional Design Art AP - Three Dimensional Design Art AP - Art History Band: Wind Ensemble I-IV Band: Symphonic I-IV Band: Concert I-IV Band: Cadet Band I-IV Choir: Men s I-IV Choir: Women s I-IV Choir: Mixed I-IV Choir: Vocal Ensemble I-IV Dance I-IV Dance Team Prep I-IV Dance Team JV I-IV Dance Team I-IV Dance Composition I-II Theatre I-IV Theatre Production I-IV Theatre Arts IB I-II Technical Theatre I-IV Music IB I Music Theory AP Music Theory Extracurricular: w Art Club w Film Club w VASE Competitions w National Art Honor Society w UIL Marching Band w Concert Band w Musical Productions w Musical/Theatre Prod. w UIL Choir Competitions w Dance/Drill Team w Color Guard w Dance Competitions w Film Club w Musical/Theatre Production w Thespian Society w UIL One-Act Play w Film Club w Musical/Theatre Production w Thespian Society w UIL One-Act Play w UIL Marching Band w Concert Band w Musical Productions Post-Secondary: Advertising w Art/Art History w Visual Arts Studies w Music Education w Music Composition w Music History, Literature & Theory w Instrumental Performance w Music Education w Voice and Opera w Vocal Performance w Dance Education w Visual & Performing Arts w Dance Performance w Dance Production w Drama/ Theatre w Film Studies w Theatre Arts w Radio, Television & Film w Visual & Performing Arts w Drama/Theatre w Arts Management w Theatre w Film Production w Visual & Performing Arts w Drama/Theatre Music Education w Music Composition w Music History, Literature & Theory w Instrumental Performance Careers: Graphic Designer w Multimedia Artist w Art/Creative Director w Music Educator w Arranger/Composer w Instrumental Performer w Director/Conductor w Choir Music Director w Private Voice Instructor w Music Teacher w Professional Singer w Professional Dancer w Dance Studio Owner w Choreographer w Dance Team Director w Actor w Voice Over Actor w Director w Theatre Teacher w Director w Prop Designer/Scenic Artist w Lighting Director w Sound Engineer w Music Educator w Arranger/Composer w Instrumental Performer w Director/Conductor Arts and Humanities Endorsement A student may earn an Arts and Humanities Endorsement by completing foundation and general endorsement requirements. In addition students must complete one of the requirements listed below. With written permission of the parents, a student may substitute a course from ELA, Social Studies, LOTE or Fine Arts for the 4th science requirement. Social Studies Choose 5 credits from the courses below: World Geography or Human Geography AP World History or World History AP US History or US History AP History of Americas I & II () US Government or US Government AP European History AP Government or Government AP/Economics or Economics AP Investigations in Psychology/Psychology AP () Psychology, IB I-II () Influence of the Old/New Testament Languages Other Than English Languages Other Than English 5 Credits Required 4 Credits Required (Option 1) 4 Credits Required (Option 2) Choose 4 credits of the same language: ASL I - IV French I-IV Latin I-IV Spanish I-V Extracurricular: Choose 2 credits of the same language and 2 additional credits of the same language: ASL I - IV French I-IV Latin I-IV Spanish I-V w National Honor Society w Academic Decathlon w UIL Academics w COOL Week Internship w International Studies w Political Science w Pre-Law w Comparative Literature w Language Clubs w German Exchange Program w Spanish Honor Society Post-Secondary: w International Studies w Bilingual Education w Linguistics w International Business Careers: w Language Clubs w German Exchange Program w Spanish Honor Society w International Studies w Bilingual Education w Linguistics w International Business w Museum Curator w Anthropologist w Professor w Lawyer w State/Local Government International Sales Rep w Interpreter w Language Teacher w Travel Agent International Sales Rep w Interpreter w Language Teacher w Travel Agent 70...Planning for the Future

71 Catalog Index Use the Programs of Study to locate the sequence of courses required or recommended to complete the Programs of Study. If you are interested in a course description for a specific course, use this chart to find the page number for the course description. Accounting I-II...46 ACT...20, 22 Adapted Physical Education...40 Advanced Animal Science Advanced Architectural Design...44 Advanced Audio/Video Production...45 Advanced Automotive Technology...49 Advanced Construction Technology...44 Advanced Electrical Technology...44 Adv Journalism: Newspaper Production I-III...28 Adv Journalism: Yearbook Production I-III...28 Advanced Quantitative Reasoning...29 Advanced Programs...25 Advertising and Sales Promotion Aerobic Activity...40 Aerospace Engineering (PLTW)...49 Ag Facilities Design & Fabrication...44 Ag Mechanics & Metal Technologies...44 Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources... Cluster...58 Air Force JROTC I-IV...24, Algebra I...28 Algebra II...29 Algebra II Pre-AP...29 Algebra II Pre-IB...29 Alternative Methods for High School Credit...17 American Sign Language I-IV...34 Analysis of Visual Media...28 Anatomy & Physiology... 31, 47 Animation...45 AP Classes...18 Applied Activities of Professional Communication, Teen Leadership, Lifetime, Nutrition & Wellness, and Culinary Arts...48 Applied Algebra, Geometry, Math Models and Dollars & Cents...30 Applied American Sign Language I-IV...34 Applied Biology, IPC, Environmental Systems, and Principles of Technology...32 Applied Business Information Management...46 Applied Communication Applications...27 Applied Daily Communications...27 Applied Economics - Free Enterprise...33 Applied English Applied French Applied Health...40 Applied Leadership...41 Applied Occupational Preparation Applied Physical Education Applied Principles of Human Services, Interpersonal Studies, Child Development, and Family & Community Services...48 Applied Professional Communications...45 Applied Spanish I...36 Applied Teen Leadership...41 Applied US History and Government...33 Applied World Geography and World History...33 Architectural Design...44 Architecture and Construction...44 Architecture and Construction Cluster...56 Art AP - Art History...37 Art AP - Portfolio...37 Art I...36 Art I - II IB...38 Art II-IV: Ceramics...37 Art II-IV: Drawing...36 Art II-IV: Painting...37 Art II-IV: Photography...37 Art II-IV: Sculpture...37 Articulated College Credit Courses...19 Arts and Communication Academy Athletics...40 Audio/Visual Production I...45 Automatic Admission to Texas Public Colleges and Universities...20 Automotive Technology...49 AVID I-IV Band...38 Basic Ag Mechanics & Metal Technologies...44 Basic Algebra Basic American Sign Language I-II...34 Basic Art I...38 Basic Art II-IV: Ceramics...37 Basic Art II-IV: Drawing Basic Art II-IV: Painting...37 Basic Art II-IV: Sculpture...37 Basic Biology...30 Basic Business Information Management...46 Basic Career Preparation I-II...43 Basic Child Development...48 Basic Choir I-IV...40 Basic Communication Applications...27 Basic Construction Technology...44 Basic Culinary Arts Prep...47 Basic Earth & Space Science...32 Basic Economics...33 Basic English Basic Environmental Systems...32 Basic French I...35 Basic Geometry Basic Government...33 Basic Health...40 Basic Integrated Physics and Chemistry...30 Basic Latin I-II...35 Basic Leadership...41 Basic Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness...48 Basic Math Models...30 Basic Occupational Investigations Basic Principles & Elements of Floral Design...43 Basic Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources...43 Basic Principles of Human Services...48 Basic Problems and Solutions I-II...43 Basic Professional Communications...45 Basic Reading Improvement Basic Small Animal Management...43 Basic Spanish I...36 Basic Study Lab Basic Technical Theatre I-IV...40 Basic Teen Leadership...41 Basic Theatre I...40 Basic U.S. History...33 Basic Vocational Experience Basic Wildlife, Fisheries & Ecology Management...43 Basic World Geography...33 Basic World History...33 Basic Writing Improvement Biology...30 Biology AP...30 Biology I IB...30 Biology II IB...30 Biology Pre-AP...30 Biology Pre-IB...30 Biomedical Innovation...47 Business & Computer Technology Academy Business Info Management I & II...46 Business Management - Entrepreneurship...46 Calculus AB AP...29 Calculus BC AP...29 Career and Technical Education (CTE)...16, Career Preparation...43 Cheerleading...40 Chemistry...30 Chemistry AP...31 Chemistry I IB Chemistry II IB...31 Chemistry Pre-AP...30 Chemistry Pre-IB...30 Child Development...48 Choir...38 Civil Engineering and Architecture...49 Co-Enrollment...19 College and Career Development College & Career Readiness Program College & Career Readiness Standard...22 College & Career Ready Chart...72 College Board Adv Placement Program...18 College Entrance Exams PSAT, SAT and ACT...20 College Preparatory Courses and Programs...18 College Preparatory Mathematics...29 College Connection...19 College Transition...41 Color Guard...38 Communication Applications...27 Communications Cluster...51 Computer Science I Pre-AP...42 Computer Science AP...42 Construction Technology...44 COOL Week...20 Correspondence, Distance & Virtual Courses...17 Cosmetology I-II...48 Counseling and Mental Health...48 Course Selections Courses for Gifted and Talented Students (QUEST)...15 Creative and Imaginative Writing...26 Credit by Examination...17 Culinary Arts Prep...47 Dance Composition I-II...39 Dance I-IV Dance Team Prep I-II...39 Dance Team...39 Dance Team JV...39 Debate I-III...27 Distinguished Achievement Program...6, 13 Dollars and Cents...30 Dual Credit Enrollment...19 Early College Start ACC Early Graduation...17 Earth and Space Science...32 Economics Education & Training...45 Education and Training Cluster...58 Elective Social Studies Program...33 Electrical Technology...44 Endorsement Areas...5, 8-9, Engineering and Industrial Technology Academy Engineering Design and Development (PLTW)..49 English for Speakers of Other Languages I-II...26 English English I...25 English I Pre-AP...25 English I Pre-AP QUEST...25 English I Pre-IB...25 English I-III Sheltered Instruction...26 English II...25 English II Pre-AP...25 English II Pre-AP QUEST...25 English II Pre-IB...25 English III English III AP...26 English III IB...26 English III - ACC Dual Credit...26 English IV...26 English IV AP...26 English IV IB...26 English IV - ACC Dual Credit...26 English IV - British Literature - ACC Dual Credit...26 English IV - College Prep...26 English Transition Environmental Science AP...31 Environmental Systems...31 ESL Reading I-III...28 European History AP...33 FAFSA/TASFA...20 Fashion Marketing...49 Finance...46 Finance, Business Management & Administration Cluster...54 Fine Arts Foundations of Personal Fitness...40 Four Year Planning Document French I...34 French II...34 French II Pre-AP/IB...34 French III Pre-AP...34 French III Pre-IB French IV AP...35 French IV IB...35 French V...35 General Information Geometry Pre-AP...28 Geometry Pre-IB...28 Geometry...28 German IV AP...35 German IV IB...35 Global Business...46 Government...32 GPA Calculation and Reporting...21 Grade Level Classification...14 Graphic Design and Illustration...45 Health...40 Health Science...46 Health Science Cluster...60 Health/Physical Education...40 High School Courses Taken in Middle School...17 High School Graduation Programs...13 High School Graduation Requirements History of the Americas I & II IB...32 Horticulture Science...43 Hospitality & Tourism Hospitality and Tourism Cluster...55 Hospitality Services: Hotel Management Hotel Management...47 Human Body Systems...47 Human Geography AP...32 Human Services Cluster...59 Human Services, Health & Agriculture Academy Humanities Cluster...52 Index...71 Influence of the OT, NT on American Civilization Information Technology Cluster...54 Instructional Practice in Education &... Training (Ready, Set, Teach! I)...45 Integrated Physics & Chemistry...30 Interior Design...44 International Baccalaureate Program...18 Introduction to Engineering Design (PLTW)...49 Introduction to Speech Communication - ACC Dual Credit...27 Investigations in Psychology...33 Journalism...28 Journalism Independent Study - Internship...28 JROTC...24, Landscape Design & Turf Management...43 Languages Other Than English Latin I...35 Latin II...35 Latin II Pre-AP/IB...35 Latin III Pre-AP...35 Latin III Pre-IB...35 Latin IV AP...35 Latin IV IB...35 Law, Public Safety and Security Cluster...58 Leadership & Development...41 Leadership...41 Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness...48 LISD Courses Approved for Dual Credit...23 LISD High School Graduation Requirements Livestock Production...43 Macroeconomics AP...33 Manufacturing Cluster...56 Marketing, Sales and Services Cluster...55 Marketing...48 Math...10, Math Independent Study - Intermediate College Algebra...29 Math Models with Applications...29 Math & Science Course Sequence...10 Mathematics SL IB...29 Mathematics HL IB...29 Medical Interventions...47 Medical Microbiology... 32, 47 Medical Terminology...46 Mobile Application Development...42 Music I IB...38 Music Theory AP...38 Navy JROTC I-IV... 24, 42 Naviance...20 Oral Interpretation I-III...28 PALs I-II...41 Performance Acknowledgements Performing Arts Performing Arts Cluster...52 Pharmacology...46 Photojournalism I...28 Physical Education Substitutes...16 Physics...31 Physics C AP...31 Physics I IB...31 Physics II IB...31 Physics Pre-AP...31 Physics Pre-IB...31 Practicum in Agricultural Mechanics...44 Practicum in Automotive Technology...49 Practicum in Building Construction Management...44 Practicum in Culinary Arts I-II...47 Practicum in Education and Training (Ready, Set, Teach! 2)...45 Practicum in Electrical Construction Management...44 Practicum in Health Science...46 Practicum in Veterinary Medical Applications...44 Pre-Calculus...29 Pre-Calculus Pre-AP...29 Pre-Calculus Pre-IB...29 Principles & Elements of Floral Design...43 Principles of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources...43 Principles of Biomedical Sciences...47 Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance...48 Principles of Engineering (PLTW)...49 Principles of Human Services...48 Principles of Information Technology...46 Principles of Macroeconomics - ACC Dual Credit...33 Problems and Solutions I-II...43 Professional Communications... 27, 45 Programs of Study PSAT... 14, 20, 22 PSAT Team...41 Psychology AP...33 Psychology I-II IB...33 Public Speaking I-III QUEST... 15, 41 Reading...28 Recommended High School Plan...6, 13 Required State Assessments for Graduation...7, 14 Retailing and E-tailing...49 Robotics Programming and Design...42 SAT... 20, 22 Schedule Changes...15 Science...10, Science, Technology, Engineering and Math...49 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Cluster...57 Scientific Research & Design I-II...31 Section 504 Services...15 Small Animal Management...43 Social Studies Spanish I...35 Spanish II...36 Spanish II Pre-AP/IB...36 Spanish III...36 Spanish II Pre-IB...36 Spanish III Pre-AP...36 Spanish IV AP...36 Spanish IV IB...36 Spanish V AP...36 Spanish V IB...36 Special Education Services...15 Specialized Programs...24 Speech Sports and Entertainment Marketing Sports Medicine I-IV...40 STAAR End of Course...7, 14 Statistics AP...29 Suggested Course Sequence Options Summer School...17 Table of Contents Team or Individual Sport...40 Technical Theatre I-IV Technology Applications Independent Study...42 Texas Scholars...14 Texas Success Initiative (TSI)...22 Theatre Arts I-II IB...39 Theatre I-IV...39 Theatre Productions I-IV...39 Theory of Knowledge IB...27 Transportation Cluster...57 Transportation, Distribution & Logistics...49 Travel & Tourism Management...47 U.S. Government AP...32 U.S. Government - ACC Dual Credit...32 U.S. History...32 U.S. History AP...32 U.S. History I - ACC Dual Credit...33 U.S. History II - ACC Dual Credit...32 Veterinary Medical Applications...44 Video Game Development...45 Virtual Business...46 Visual Arts Visual Arts Cluster...53 Wildlife, Fisheries & Ecology Management...43 World Geography...32 World History...32 World History AP...32 World Language Substitutes Planning for the Future...71

72 Problem Solving Research Communication Skills Precision & Accuracy Interpretation think: know: Content Key Terms Challenging Courses Effort Factual Information Organizing Concepts go: act: Postsecondary Costs Postsecondary Awareness Eligibility & Admissions Career Awareness Self-Advocacy Goal setting Persistence & Motivation Time Management Note & Test Taking Skills Technology Proficiency

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