Belton ISD Secondary Course Planning Guide

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1 Belton ISD Secondary Course Planning Guide Published

2 Belton High School 600 Lake Road Belton, TX Belton New Tech High Waskow 320 N. Blair Belton, TX Lake Belton Middle School 8818 Tarver Road Temple, TX North Belton Middle School 7907 Prairie View Temple, TX South Belton Middle School 805 Sagebrush Belton, TX This catalog is a guide based on information, as it is known at the time of publication. Occasionally, changes occur due to action by the Texas Legislature and/or Texas State Board of Education. In addition, there could be changes that affect course offerings, grade point distribution, graduation requirements and students class schedules after this catalog is printed. Courses listed in this catalog may not be available because of limited enrollment. It is the policy of the Belton Independent School District not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex or handicap in its programs, services, or activities as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights act of 1964, as amended; Title IX of Education Amendments of 1972; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. Belton ISD will take steps to assure that lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all educational and vocational programs. For information about your rights or grievance procedures, contact the Title IX Coordinator or the Section 504 Coordinator at 400 North Wall, Belton, Texas at Published

3 Planning Your Course of Study How to Use the Course Planning Guide Planning your course of study during middle and high school is an important step in planning your future. The decisions you make, along with the course of study you pursue, will affect your plans for the future, including college and career readiness. College students change their majors an average of three times. Given this information, you will probably reconsider your career goals several times. The decisions you make now, regarding both your course selections and the activities in which you participate, will impact your options beyond high school. It is best to pursue a broad, well-rounded program of study that will prepare you for a variety of opportunities, and Belton ISD offers students a variety of options. You are encouraged to pursue a rigorous, challenging selection of courses best suited to your needs. Within this book you will find a listing of courses, a guide for career planning and general information about graduation plans and school policies. Pages contain information specifically regarding high school courses, while pages contain information specifically regarding options for middle school students Please use this guide throughout the year as a reference as you plan your coursework and your future. You have important decisions to make, please take them seriously and make them count. Your counselor is available to answer any questions or concerns you might have regarding the course planning process. High School Students and Parents: Review the graduation requirements on pages 4-5. Use your Skyward access to review your 4-year plan and/or transcript of the high school courses you have completed. Think about your plans after high school and career goals. Decide which college and/or articulated credit (see page 8) opportunities you might want to pursue in high school. For information about: Ways to potentially earn college credit see page 10. Preparing for college see pages Ways to earn high school credits outside the normal school day see pages 8-9. Review the course designations offered on page 6. Update your 4-year plan as needed. Choose courses for next year s schedule that support your 4-year plan and career goals. Be sure you have completed the prerequisite requirements for the courses you select. Complete the course selection process that was explained by your campus and submit it by the required deadline. Middle School Students and Parents: Review the middle school course of study on page 58. Also familiarize yourself with the requirements of the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) + endorsements on pages 4-5. Study the content and requirements of the courses available for your grade level on pages Think about your future goals for high school and beyond. Consider the examples of ways to earn high school credit while in middle school on page 61. Make a final decision about the courses you plan to take next year. Complete the course selection process that was explained by your campus and submit it by the required deadline. Page 1 Published

4 Table of Contents Introduction How to Use the Course Planning Guide High School Program Graduation Requirements, Student Classification 3 Foundation High School Graduation Program 4 Endorsement Options for the FHSP Course Designations, Course Load, Extracurricular Activities Traditional Ways to Earn High School Credit Alternate Ways to Earn High School Credit College Readiness Alternate Ways to Earn College Credit AP Courses Dual Credit Courses Texas Success Initiative (TSI) Requirements NCAA Requirements Websites Testing Dual Credit Guide Grading and Class Rank System Grading and Class Rank System Course Planning Course Planning Worksheet Course Sequence Overviews & Information English / Language Arts Mathematics Science Social Studies Endorsement Sequence Overviews/Information Multidisciplinary 28 Arts & Humanities Fine Arts 29 Foreign Language 30 Social Studies 30 Business & Industry Agriculture & Manufacturing 31 Business Management & Administration 36 Communication & Information Technology 38 Construction & Auto Tech 42 Hospitality & Tourism 44 Journalism & Speech 45 Public Service Health Science 46 JROTC 49 Public Service 50 STEM Engineering 53 Math 53 Science 53 Multidisciplinary STEM 53 Additional High School Information High School Misc. Electives High School Physical Education High School Athletics Middle School Program Middle School Course of Study Grading Policy in Middle School Middle School Courses Please check the Belton ISD Course Planning Guide online at for updated information. Page 2 Published

5 Graduation Requirements Graduation Requirements / Student Classification Beginning with the Freshman class of , a student must earn passing scores on five (5) STAAR End-of-Course (EOC) exams, in addition to earning all required course credits for their graduation plans to earn a diploma. Requirements of the Foundation High School Program (FHSP) found on page 4 apply to students entering 9th grade in the fall of 2014 and thereafter. STAAR End of Course Exams English Language Arts Math Science Social Studies English I English II Algebra I Biology US History Student Classification The Foundation High School Program (FHSP) requires 22 credits, and is the basis for our grade level classifications below. The FHSP + Endorsement requires a total of 26 credits, and is the plan recommended for all students. Students may not be approved for a FHSP (22 credits) until after the sophomore year. Students are classified based on the number of academic credits they have earned at the beginning of the school year. All students who have completed 8th grade enter high school as a freshman regardless of the number of high school credits they may have already earned through middle school, summer school, credit by exam and/or online learning. Grade Level Classification Grade Classification Credits Additional Requirement 9th Freshman th Sophomore th Junior enrolled in English 3 12th Senior 16+ enrolled in 4th English credit December Graduation December graduation applications may be obtained through the counselor s office and must be completed and returned by September 2nd. Early graduates may participate in the graduation ceremony in June but will not be eligible for valedictorian or salutatorian honors. Early graduates GPAs and class ranks will be determined in the same manner as other graduating seniors. All early graduates must have passed all EOC tests prior to receiving the early graduation application. Page 3 Published

6 The Foundation High School Program (FHSP) + Endorsement FOUNDATION HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM (FHSP) The 22-credit Foundation is required for all endorsements. ENGLISH Must consist of English I, II, III (ESOL I and ESOL II may be substituted for English I and II for students with limited English proficiency), and an additional/advanced English course MATHEMATICS Must include Algebra I, Geometry, and an additional/advanced math course beyond Algebra I SCIENCE Must include Biology, one credit selected from IPC, Chemistry, or Physics, and one additional/advanced, lab-based science course SOCIAL STUDIES Must include World Geography or World History, US History, one-half credit Government, and one-half credit Economics LANGUAGES OTHER THAN ENGLISH Must consist of 2 levels in the same language FINE ARTS Choir, Band, Orchestra, Dance, Art, Theatre Arts, AP Music Theory or Principles & Elements of Floral Design PHYSICAL EDUCATION May include Athletics or PE (up to 4 credits). Foundations of Personal Fitness, fall semesters of Marching Band or Color Guard or the first year of Cheerleading, JROTC or Magic Belles ELECTIVES TOTAL FHSP CREDITS ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ENDORSEMENT MATHEMATICS - ALGEBRA II or other advanced math credit dependent on endorsement SCIENCE ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES Electives must be chosen from the five endorsement categories of STEM, Business & Industry, Arts & Humanities, Public Services, and/or Multidisciplinary Studies TOTAL CREDITS: FHSP + ENDORSEMENT 26 College Board Advanced Placement and Dual Credit courses may be substituted in appropriate areas for both Foundation and Endorsement credits. STATE ASSESSMENT PERFORMANCE In addition to the credit requirements as listed, students must meet passing standards on the following End-of-Course Exams: English I, English II, Algebra I, Biology and United States History. 1 ENDORSEMENTS All students will begin on the Multidisciplinary Endorsement. Students will be permitted to change their endorsement with written notification. There are 5 endorsement options, which allow students flexibility based on individual interests and career goals. Each endorsement is designed to prepare students to successfully enter postsecondary education or the workforce upon graduation from high school. MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES - Allows a student to complete prescribed courses from each of the four foundation subject areas, advanced placement courses from four foundation subject areas or four advanced courses from within one endorsement area or among endorsement areas not in a coherent sequence. ARTS & HUMANITIES - Art; Dance; Music; Theatre; Social Studies; Languages other than English BUSINESS & INDUSTRY - Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources; Architecture and Construction; Arts, A/V Technology and Communications; Business, Management and Administration; Finance; Hospitality and Tourism (Culinary Arts); Information Technology, Manufacturing; Marketing, Sales and Service; Transportation and Logistics (Auto Technology); Advanced Broadcast Journalism, Newspaper or Public Speaking PUBLIC SERVICES - Education and Training; Health Science, Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security; Human Services; JROTC STEM - Science, including computer science; Technology; Engineering and Mathematics (Algebra II, Chemistry and Physics are required for the STEM endorsement). Specific requirements for each endorsement were adopted by the State Board of Education on January 31, RECOGNITIONS Students have the opportunity to earn additional recognitions in the following areas: DISTINGUISHED LEVEL OF ACHIEVEMENT A student may earn a distinguished level of achievement by successfully completing all curriculum requirements for the Foundation High School Program, plus each of the following: A fourth credit in mathematics, which must include Algebra II; A fourth credit in science; The requirements of at least one endorsement A student must graduate with a Distinguished Level of Achievement to be considered for the Top 10% and eligible for automatic admission to a Texas public college or university. PERFORMANCE ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS A student may earn a performance acknowledgement in one or more of the following categories: AP test score of 3 or above; Outstanding performance on the PSAT, the SAT or the ACT; Completion of at least 12 hours college coursework with final grades of A or B (3.0 GPA or above); Bilingualism and biliteracy Earning a nationally or internationally recognized business or industry certification or license Page 4 Published

7 Belton ISD Endorsement Options Multidisciplinary Studies A Multidisciplinary Studies endorsement requires completion of the FHSP and at least one of the following: four (4) additional/advanced courses, from within one endorsement area or from various endorsement areas, that prepare the student to either successfully enter post-secondary education without the need for remediation or successfully enter the workforce OR Four (4) credits in each of the four foundation subject areas of English Language Arts, math, science, and social studies, including a traditional English IV option (academic or Dual Credit) course, and Chemistry and/or Physics OR Four (4) AP or Dual Credit courses selected from English Language Arts, math, science, social studies, LOTE, and/or Fine Arts Please note: All 9th graders will begin on the multidisciplinary endorsement. STEM A STEM (science, technology, engineering & math) endorsement requires completion of the FHSP, including Algebra II, Chemistry, Physics, and one of the following: A coherent sequence of 4 CTE credits, including: at least 2 courses in the same career cluster, and at least 1 advanced CTE course that is the 3rd course or higher in a sequence related to science, technology, engineering, or math OR A coherent sequence of 4 credits in Computer Science or Computer Programming OR Successful completion of 2 additional math courses for which Algebra II is a prerequisite OR Successful completion of 2 additional science credits beyond Biology, Chemistry, and Physics OR A cross-disciplinary study of science and math, including 3 credits from a combination of courses chosen from up to 2 of the following categories: STEM CTE career cluster courses Computer Science Math courses for which Algebra II is a prerequisite Science courses beyond Chemistry and Physics Public Services A Public Service endorsement requires completion of the FHSP and ONE of the following: A coherent sequence of 4 CTE credits, including: at least 2 courses in the same career cluster, and at least 1 advanced CTE course that is the 3rd course or higher in a sequence in ONE of the following career clusters: Health Science Education & Training Government & Public Administration Human Services Law, Public Safety, Corrections & Security NJROTC This endorsement cannot be earned through combining courses from separate Public Services pathways. Business & Industry A Business & Industry endorsement requires completion of the FHSP and one of the following: A coherent sequence of 4 CTE credits, including: at least 2 courses in the same career cluster; and at least 1 advanced CTE course that is the 3rd course or higher in a sequence in one of the following career clusters: Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources Architecture & Construction Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Business Management & Administration Finance Hospitality & Tourism Information Technology Manufacturing Marketing Transportation, Distribution & Logistics OR Four (4) English Language Arts elective credits, including 3 levels in ONE of the following areas Journalism - Newspaper or Yearbook or Speech - Debate or Oral Interpretation OR Four (4) Technology Applications credits selected from: Digital Design & Media Production Digital Art & Animation Digital Communication in the 21st Century Digital Video & Audio Design OR A combination of courses selected from various categories within the Business & Industry endorsements to form a coherent sequence Arts & Humanities An Arts & Humanities endorsement requires completion of the FHSP and ONE of the following: Five (5) social studies credits OR Four (4) levels/credits of the same language of LOTE OR Two (2) levels/credits of one LOTE and 2 levels/credits of a separate LOTE OR A coherent sequence of 4 credits in Fine Arts from ONE or TWO Fine Arts disciplines of Art, Dance, Music, and/or Theatre OR Four (4) English elective credits selected from English IV, Communication Applications, and AP English Literature & Composition Page 5 Published

8 Course Designations Course Designations / Course Load / Extracurricular Activities Courses are divided into the following designations: Academic Academic courses provide students with the opportunity to take subjects that will advance learning in basic subject areas. These courses provide on-grade level instruction in all Texas Essential Knowledge & Skills as outlined in the state board approved well-balanced curriculum. Dual Credit Dual credit courses provide students the opportunity to earn college credit through concurrent enrollment at a local college or university. Dual credit options include Temple College (including Texas Bioscience Institute for BHS), UMHB, and UT-Permian Basin. Pre-Advanced Placement/Honors According to the College Board Advanced Placement Program, Pre-AP curriculum is one that is different in pace, depth, breadth, and/or complexity. All students are taught in accordance with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills. Advanced Placement AP courses allow students the opportunity to pursue college-level studies while still in high school. AP courses prepare students for College Board Advanced Placement Tests. See additional information on the Advanced Placement Program on page 10. Local Credit This is a course in which a student participates but may not receive state credit towards graduation (P.E. after 4.0 credits, Athletics after 4.0 credits, all Aide classes, Cheerleading after 1.0 credit) Gifted & Talented Program Gifted and Talented students can progress beyond the regular school curriculum. Students at the high school level are provided services through designated pre-advanced placement and advanced placement courses. Courses are offered in five academic areas: math, science, social studies, language arts, foreign language, and two electives areas in art and music. Students may be nominated for the gifted and talented program at any time by teachers, counselors, parents or other interested persons. Criteria to identify gifted and talented students shall be established in the board-approved program for the gifted and talented. Written parental consent shall be obtained before any special testing or individual assessment is conducted as part of the screening and identification process. A selection committee shall evaluate each nominated student according to the established criteria and shall select those students for whom gifted program placement is the more appropriate educational setting. Assessment tools may include, but are not limited to, the following: achievement and ability tests, behavioral checklist completed by teachers and parents, teacher nominations based on classroom observations, student/parent conferences, student work products (if available) and an interview. Parents and students shall be notified in writing upon selection of the student for the gifted and talented program. Participation in the program or services provided for gifted students is voluntary. The district shall obtain written permission of the student and parent before a student is placed in the gifted program. Course Load 9 th, 10 th, & 11 th grade students are required to take 7 credit courses each semester. Generally, seniors are required to take a minimum of 6 credit courses each semester. Students with off campus period designations are required to be off campus during those periods. Students in a career prep class are required to take a minimum of 4 classes each semester in addition to the career prep class. Students who wish to gain position or try out for membership in any extracurricular squad must be currently enrolled in Belton ISD. Extracurricular Activities Participation in extracurricular activities is a privilege, and strict academic standards for participation exist across the state; Belton ISD, in compliance with state law and the UIL, reinforces this with the No Pass-No Play rule. In order to be eligible to participate in extracurricular activities following the initial six-week period of the school year, a student must not have a recorded grade average lower than a 70. Waiver of Suspension However, this suspension may be waived by a principal if the class failed is identified as an advanced placement, pre-advanced placement, or college dual credit class. Page 6 Published

9 General Information about Credits Traditional Ways to Earn High School Credit Awarding of Credit High school graduation course credit may be earned only if the student receives a grade equivalent to or higher than 70 on a 100-point scale, based on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills of each course. A student who successfully completes only one semester of a two-semester course is awarded partial credit. However, for full year courses required for graduation, students must earn the remaining credit through a credit recovery method. Denial of Credit Students must be in attendance at least 90% of the time a class is in session to receive credit per Texas Education Code When attendance falls below 90% of the days the class is offered, after consideration of absences labeled as due to extraordinary circumstances, the student and parent(s) shall be notified in writing. The principal and/or campus Attendance Review Committee shall hear all cases where a student's attendance has fallen below 90% and an appeal has been filed in writing. To receive credit, the principal and/or Attendance Review Committee may assign one or more alternative learning activities to make up work missed or credit lost. Local Credit Warning Local credit courses DO NOT count towards required state graduation credits. Original Credit / Recovery Credit Original credit is earned when a student takes a course for the first time and successfully meets the course requirements to earn a passing semester or year average. Recovery credit is earned when a student retakes a course for which credit was not awarded the first time because of a failing semester/year average. The recovery may occur by retaking the entire course in its standard format or by retaking it in an alternate format. Your school counselor is a valuable resource when making decisions about how to earn credit. High School Credit Courses in Middle School (Original Credit) The HS shown alongside course descriptions in the middle school section denotes high school credit courses available to middle school students. Students can select courses that yield high school credit during middle school. These options are described on page 61 of the course planning guide. High school credit courses taken in middle school will become a permanent part of the student s high school transcript for credit purposes, but will NOT be calculated in student s Grade Point Average. Fall and Spring Semesters, Grades 9-12 (Original Credit and Credit Recovery) Students can earn all 26 required graduation credits for the Foundation High School Plan + Endorsement by successfully completing required courses during the normal school day at BHS and Summer School BHS and may offer both recovery and accelerated summer school for those students who qualify. Dates will be announced near the end of the school year. All class offerings are dependent upon final student counts and pre-registration. Tuition will be charged for accelerated summer school classes. The recovery summer school program is for students who have unsuccessfully attempted a subject during the regular school year. Students cannot receive credit for recovery summer school unless they have previously attempted the class. Students may complete one semester of the entire year of a course, which they did not successfully complete during a preceding school year. Accelerated summer school is for students who wish to take selected classes during the summer term to provide more opportunities in their schedules during the regular school year. Course listings of the course offerings will be available through the Counseling Center near the end of the school year. Students will be asked to pay tuition and registration fees and any applicable lab or supply fees. Page 7 Published

10 Alternate Ways to Earn High School Credit Blended Learning Blended learning combines online digital media with traditional classroom methods. Belton ISD will offer a blended learning experience in Government and/or Economics for BHS seniors and Physics for juniors. Please contact your school counselor for an application if interested in this type of experience. Correspondence Courses Correspondence courses offer an alternate way of earning high school credit. These courses are offered through the University of Texas or Texas Tech University. The course must include the state required essential knowledge and skills, and the correspondence grade must be received by December prior to June graduation if that course is to count toward high school graduation. However, grades earned in correspondence courses are not used in computing grade point average (GPA) or class rank. Students are responsible for all registration fees and materials. Web site for Texas Tech: Web site for UT Austin: Credit by Acceleration Credit by Acceleration (CBA) allows students to accelerate and earn credit for a particular course without formal instruction. The district will offer CBA for all academic courses. The exams will be offered at least three days during each of these four testing windows: January 1 to March 31, April 1 to June 30. July 1 to September 30, and October 1 to December 31. Students who score 80% mastery (or greater) on each examination will be given credit for the course tested. Grades earned through credit by acceleration are not used when computing a student s Grade Point Average or class rank. Credit by Articulation Students planning to attend a community college or technical college can obtain college credit by taking certain high school courses. Credit by Articulation allows students to earn college credit for courses that cover the same material learned in high school. Career and technical courses may count toward a certificate or an Associate Degree at Temple College. Some courses may earn students articulated credit statewide. In order to receive college credit through articulation, a student must: complete a planned series of high school courses at the required grade level and receive the minimum high school grade each college requires (Some colleges require a high school grade of 80 or 85.), successfully complete one semester of coursework at the college (grade of C or above), meet other requirements as specified by the college, such as passing a college test in that subject, and present a high school transcript to the college and fill out a Credit by Articulation form at the college. Once the previously mentioned criteria are met, credit received for high school course(s) will appear on the college transcript. See the CTE Coordinator or Director. Credit by Exam Students may register for Credit by Exam (CBE) or Credit by Acceleration (CBA) through the University of Texas ( ) or Texas Tech University ( ). Scores on CBE and CBA exams may not be used to gain eligibility for extracurricular activities or in computing grade point average (GPA) or class rank. A student may attempt Credit by Exam (CBE) who has had sufficient prior formal instruction as determined by the school on the basis of a review of the student s educational records. Students enrolled in BISD must: have an average grade of 50 in each subject area in which CBE is being attempted, pass the state approved exam as defined in BISD policy with a grade of 70 to earn course credit, and not request re-examination on the denied course in the same school-year cycle in which the credit was denied. Students in a non-public school education setting must: submit the course curriculum for which prior seat time is being claimed. A curriculum review committee will review the submitted materials to determine if they match the course curriculum as aligned with TEKS and EOC. take the state-approved exam for the course(s) for which credit is sought and pass with a grade of 70. If this grade is not attained, credit for the course is denied. The student may not request re-examination on the denied course in the same school-year cycle in which the credit was denied. Pending the state-certified exam results, the campus administrator will decide probationary placement. For questions, please contact the Coordinator of Advanced Academics. Page 8 Published

11 Alternate Ways to Earn High School Credit (cont d) Off-Campus Physical Education Classes Physical Education is designed to promote self-confidence, social skills and safety awareness in students by developing knowledge of lifetime fitness through various activities and skills. Local Policy: The district has developed the following policy allowing students to participate in an off-campus commercially sponsored activity instead of the campus physical education class. This policy reflects Texas Administrative Code Subchapter (D) for receiving physical education credit through off-campus commercial programs. The parent must apply to the district for approval, and such approval may be granted under the following conditions: Olympic-level participation and/or competition that include a minimum of 15 hours per week of highly intense, professional, supervised training. The training facility, instructors, and the activities involved in the program must be certified by the superintendent or designee to be of exceptional quality. Students qualifying and participating at this level may be dismissed from school one hour per day. Students dismissed may not miss any class other than physical education. Private or commercially sponsored physical activities include those certified by the superintendent or designee to be of high quality and well supervised by appropriately trained instructors. Student participation of at least five hours per week must be required. Students certified to participate at this level may not be dismissed from any part of the regular school day. Certification of Program Before qualifying, local policy requires that the following information be provided to the superintendent or designee to certify the activity in which the student will participate: Type of activity Attendance requirements Qualification of coach Information concerning the health benefits and the rigor of the activity TxVSN - Texas Virtual School Network Senate Bill 1788, passed by the 80th Texas Legislature in 2007, established a state virtual network to provide supplemental, online courses for Texas students. Courses are provided by Texas school districts, open enrollment charter schools, Education Service Centers, and institutions of higher education. All high school courses offered through the TxVSN are aligned with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) as well as the inacol National Standards of Quality for Online Courses. All high school courses are led by an instructor who is Texas-certified in the course subject area and grade level and has completed professional development on effective online instruction. Students may request to take an online course for high school credit, provided the course is part of the student s normal course load. The course must be necessary and required for high school graduation and not offered at Belton High School. Students may take a maximum of two online courses per semester. Payment for courses taken through TxVSN will be the responsibility of the student. Courses taken through TxVSN will not count towards GPA. Students interested in taking online courses must consult their counselor. Both the counselor and the principal must approve the online course request. For more information about the TxVSN, please see Miscellaneous Alternate Ways to Earn Credit Physical Education Credit: Students can also obtain physical education credit through correspondence courses in physical education from the University of Texas at Austin or Texas Tech University (see information on Correspondence Courses). In addition to the regular course work, credit by exam/acceleration, correspondence courses, and summer school, students may earn high school credit in other non-traditional ways. Approval for these types of credit must be obtained before a class is started. Applied music: credit for taking private music lessons outside of school. Student must first register through the counselor. Physical Education Credit: one credit required for all graduation plans. Students may be allowed to substitute the following courses for the required credit: Marching Band (PE waiver will be given for Fall semester only) Drill Team (PE waiver will be given for Fall semester only) Cheerleading (PE credit for the first year, all other credits will be local credits) Athletics offered during the school day (PE credit for the first year), may receive up to 4 state PE credits) JROTC (PE waiver for first year) Colorguard (PE waiver will be given for Fall semester only) Page 9 Published

12 Advanced Placement Program Alternate Ways to Earn College Credit The Advanced Placement (AP) program sponsored by the College Board enables students to complete college-level courses while they are in high school. Courses that are designated AP follow specific curricula approved by the College Board and differ from the academic courses in those same subjects. An AP course is like a first-year college course because of the subject matter studied and because each student is expected to assume the responsibility to complete assignments in a manner requested by the instructor. Upon successful completion of the AP level course, the student receives high school credit and the appropriate higher-level grade-point according to the grading scale. When the student takes the AP exam and scores in an acceptable range, advanced college placement and/or college credit or both may be awarded upon college entrance by the accepting institution. The purpose of an AP course is to prepare the student to take the exam; therefore, each student enrolled in an AP course is encouraged to take the AP exam. All state-supported Texas universities are now required to accept AP scores of a 3 or higher. All other credit and score requirements are at the university s discretion. AP Exam - The examinations for all AP courses are given on designated national test dates during May of each year. The cost of these exams is the student s responsibility. Fee reductions may be applied to the total cost for students on free and reduced lunch. In addition, students may also be required to purchase an AP study guide. All information and registration dates are available through the counselors office. Students should review their college selection s policy regarding the awarding of credit, placement and grades on the basis of AP exam scores. Students can check their college s course listing and use the Texas Common Numbering System to make sure these courses are accepted by the college they wish to attend. Pre-AP/AP Exit Policy - Schedule changes from Pre-AP and AP courses will be allowed for students until the 8th day of class for the 1st semester. After the 8th day, students must wait until the end of the 4th week to drop a Pre-AP or AP course. Pre-AP or AP incentive points will not transfer to the new course. Students will have one more opportunity to drop following the completion of 1st semester, and between the 1st and 10th day of class for the 2nd semester. Any class changes may affect the student s entire schedule and courses sought will be subject to availability of space in the prospective less-challenging class. Dual Credit Dual Credit is an early admission program for high school juniors and seniors that allow students to earn college credit through identified high school courses. Students interested in enrolling in dual credit courses must adhere to the deadlines set forth by the college governing the course. Dual Credit Warning Dual Credit students must apply for admission, document eligibility for courses selected, enroll and pay associated fees by BISD designated deadline. Students who do not complete all steps by the BISD deadlines will be enrolled in a BISD course equivalent. Texas Success Initiative TSI Assessment Students attending Texas public institutions of higher education must be in compliance with the Texas Success Initiative (TSI). The law requires all entering college students to be assessed for college readiness in mathematics, reading, and writing unless the student qualifies for an exemption. Each student who fails to meet the minimum passing standard of the assessment instrument must be advised regarding developmental education necessary to ensure readiness to perform college level academic coursework and will be placed in a developmental program designed to help the student reach that goal. TSI Exemptions However, students may be exempt from the TSI Assessment if they have one of the following: an ACT composite score of 23 or higher, with English and math individual scores greater than or equal to 19, or SAT Administered prior to March 5, an SAT combined score of 1070, with critical reading and math individual scores greater than or equal to 500 SAT Administered after March 5, an SAT minimum score of 480 of Evidence-Based Reading and Writing, a minimum score of 530 on mathematics test Note: No combined score, mixing or combining scores from SAT prior to March 5, 2016, and after March 5, 2016 is not allowable TAC Title 19, Part 1, Chapter 4, Subchapter C, Rule 4.54 Page 10 Published

13 Many college sports are regulated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), an organization that has established rules on eligibility, recruiting and financial aid. If a student is planning to enroll in college as a freshman and wishes to participate in Division I or Division II sports, he/she must be certified by the NCAA Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse. The Clearinghouse will analyze academic information and determine if the student meets the NCAA s initial eligibility requirements. Students wanting to participate in Division I or Division II sports should start the certification process early, usually by the end of their junior year. In order to be certified, students must complete the registration packet, have their transcript and SAT/ACT scores sent to the NCAA, and pay a fee. It is the student s responsibility to submit the registration packet. Additional information may be found at Websites The following is a partial listing of websites that students may find valuable during high school. BISD does not recommend or endorse any websites. They are provided as an informational tool only Common Application ApplyTexas (Texas Common Application) Grant, Scholarship and early graduation information SAT registration, college and financial aid information ACT registration, college and financial aid information Free Application for Student Financial Aid Scholarship search information NCAA information Career Information Testing BISD provides the opportunity for a student to take various standardized tests needed for the college process and to evaluate a student s future career planning. Some of these tests require registration and payment of a fee. Future College Board revisions may result in additional testing availability. PSAT (8th Grade, Freshmen, Sophomores and Juniors) The PSAT is a Pre-SAT. It provides practice for the upcoming SAT exam and gives students a chance to see how their skills compare with those of other students applying to college. For juniors, it is the only way to qualify for National Merit Scholarships. SAT and/or ACT (Juniors and Seniors) The SAT or ACT is required by most colleges and universities for acceptance and financial aid. Initial testing should occur during the junior year, but each of these tests may be retaken as often as needed. Belton High School is listed as a national test site for both the SAT and the ACT. Other locations and dates are available throughout Central Texas. See the counselor s office for a schedule of test dates, or go to to register for the SAT, or to register for the ACT. Fee waivers for students in the free or reduced lunch program are available in the counseling office. Belton High School CEEB code: Belton New Tech High Waskow CEEB code: Page 11 Published

14 Preparing for College (cont d) Testing (cont d) Students with Disabilities Testing Students may apply for testing accommodations through College Board Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) or ACT s Request for ACT Special Testing. The counselors at BHS and have all the information needed for a student to apply. If students feel that they qualify, they should see the counselor as soon as possible, preferably during the freshman year. A student s qualification will cover all College Board testing programs for as long as the student remains with BISD, unless the school indicates that the accommodations have changed. ACT testing is done on a test-by-test basis. To be eligible, the student must: have a disability that necessitates testing accommodations, have documentation on file at his/her high school that supports the need to request accommodations and meets the Guidelines for Documentation, receive the requested accommodations, due to the disability, for school-based tests for four months. Please Note: All decisions regarding accommodations are made by College Board or ACT. If students are eligible, they will qualify for accommodations on the following tests: *PSAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test, SAT Program (Reasoning Tests and Subject Tests), Advanced Placement Program tests, ACT, and possibly other local tests. *PSAT/NMSQT eligibility enables the student to receive accommodations for SAT Center testing. Students may request accommodations appropriate to their disability. The preference is to accommodate the student in the same manner used for school-based tests. However, when that is not possible, accommodations can still be provided to meet the need. Accommodations may include extended time for testing, photo-enlarged test, larger print, Braille, audio cassette, reader, writer, and/or computer for writing. However, these accommodations may not be available for every test. The student must contact the SSD Coordinator in advance to arrange for the needed assistance. Students who currently use accommodations in school or have an IEP or 504 Plan are not automatically qualified for College Board accommodations. Page 12 Published

15 Belton Independent School District Dual-Credit Course Offerings In order to receive high school and college credit for a course, the course must be on the list below and taken during the course of a school calendar year (August May). Institution of Higher Education Course Name IHE Course Number High School Course Name Course Number HS Credit Institution of Higher Education American Literature since 1865 ENGL 2328 English IV (second semester) UTPB online American Literature to 1865 ENGL 2327 English IV (first semester) UTPB online British Literature since 1785 ENGL 2322 English IV (second semester) TC-TBI; UMHB British Literature since 1800 ENGL 2323 English IV (second semester) UTPB online British Literature to 1785 ENGL 2321 English IV (first semester) UMHB British Literature to 1800 ENGL 2322 English IV (first semester) TC-TBI; UTPB online English Composition I ENGL 1301 English III (first semester) English IV (first semester) English Composition II ENGL 1302 English III (second semester) English IV (second semester) Rhetoric & Composition ENGL 1321 English III (first semester) English IV (first semester) Rhetoric & Composition II ENGL 1322 English III (second semester) English IV (second semester) TC-TBI; TC; UTPB online 0.5 TC-TBI; TC; UTPB online 0.5 UMHB 0.5 UMHB Beginning Spanish I SPAN 1411 Spanish III (first semester) UTPB online Beginning Spanish II SPAN 1412 Spanish III (second semester) UTPB online Second Year Spanish I SPAN 2311 Spanish IV (first semester) UTPB online Second Year Spanish II SPAN 2312 Spanish IV (second semester) UTPB online Calculus I MATH 1330 Independent Study Math (Calculus AB) /1/2 0.5 TC / UMHB Calculus I MATH 2413 Independent Study Math (Calculus AB) /1/2 0.5 TC-TBI; UTPB online Calculus II MATH 2414 Independent Study Math (Calculus AB) /1/2 0.5 TC-TBI College Algebra MATH 1314 Independent Study Math (Coll. Alg) /1/2 0.5 TC-TBI; UTPB online Elementary Statistics MATH 1442 Statistics TC-TBI PreCalculus MATH 1306 PreCalculus UMHB PreCalculus MATH 2412 PreCalculus TC-TBI; TC; UTPB online Selected Exercise and Sport Science EXSS Physical Education Two EXSS courses = 0.5 BISD credit UMHB Anatomy and Physiology I BIOL 2401 A&P (first semester) TC-TBI Anatomy and Physiology II BIOL 2402 A&P (first semester) TC-TBI General Biology I BIOL 1406 Science Research & Design II BIOL II TC-TBI General Biology II BIOL 1407 Science Research & Design II BIOL II TC-TBI General Chemistry I CHEM 1410 Scientific Research & Design I UMHB General Chemistry I CHEM 1411 Science Research & Design I CHEM TC-TBI General Chemistry II CHEM 1412 Science Research & Design I CHEM TC-TBI Genetics BIOL 2316 Medical Microbiology TC-TBI American History HIST 1301 US History (first semester) TC; TC-TBI American History HIST 1302 US History (second semester) TC; TC-TBI American National Politics PLSC 2305 United States Government UTPB online Economics (Macro) ECON 2301 Economics TC-TBI; TC Humanities (Intro to HUMA 1301 Humanities TC-TBI Humanities) Introduction to Psychology PSYC 1301 Psychology UTPB online Page 13 Published

16 Introduction to Sociology SOC 1301 Sociology UTPB online Microeconomics BECO 2312 Economics UMHB Microeconomics ECON 2302 Economics Advanced Studies TC-TBI Psychology PSYC 2301 Psychology TC; TC-TBI Sociology SOCI 1301 Sociology TC-TBI State & Federal Government I POLS 2310 United States Government UMHB State & Federal Government II POLS 2311 United States Government UMHB Texas Government GOVT 2306 Texas Government TC-TBI US Government GOVT 2305 United States Government TC-TBI; TC *Intro to Public Speaking COMM 1315 Communication Application UTPB online Introduction to Biotechnology BITC 1311 Advanced Biotechnology TC-TBI *Introduction to Health HPRS 1201 Principles of Health Science TC-TBI Professions Microbiology BIOL 2420 Medical Microbiology TC-TBI *Speech SPEECH Communication Applications TC-TBI 1315 EMT EMSP 1160 & EMSP 1501 Practicum EMT N TC * Course is not included in GPA calculation Page 14 Published

17 Class Rank and Grade Point Average (GPA) Grading and Class Rank System The grade point average (GPA) is the average of grades in specific core subjects ( English, mathematics, science, social studies and foreign language ), two additional AP course offerings and three additional dual credit offerings listed below. The grade point average (GPA) is used to create class ranking. Course classifications considered for grade point averages and class ranking purposes are academic, pre-advanced placement/honors, dual credit and advanced placement. (See Core Subject chart below.) calculates class rank and GPA separate from Belton High School. SUBJECTS ADVANCED PLACEMENT DUAL CREDIT PRE-ADVANCED PLACEMENT ACADEMIC ENGLISH MATHEMATICS SCIENCE SOCIAL STUDIES FOREIGN LANGUAGE ADDITIONAL AP COURSES AP English III (BHS only) AP English IV (BHS only) AP Calculus AB AP Calculus BC AP Statistics AP Biology AP Chemistry AP Env Sci AP Physics I AP Physics 2 (BHS only) AP Physics C AP W History AP US History AP Government AP Macroeconomics AP Microeconomics AP European History AP Human Geography AP Psychology (BHS only) AP Spanish IV AP Spanish V AP French IV (BHS only) AP German IV (BHS only) AP Art History AP Music Theory AP Computer Science Dual Credit English III Dual Credit English IV Dual Credit Humanities Dual Credit College Algebra Dual Credit Precalculus Dual Credit Calculus Dual Credit Statistics Dual Credit Anatomy & Physiology Dual Credit Biology (I & II) Dual Credit Biotech Dual Credit Chemistry (I & II) Dual Credit Genetics Dual Credit Microbiology Dual Credit US History Dual Credit Government Dual Credit Economics Dual Credit MacroEconomics Dual Credit MicroEconomics Dual Credit Psychology Dual Credit Sociology Dual Credit Spanish III Dual Credit Spanish IV Dual Credit EMT Pre-AP English I Pre-AP English II Honors English III only) Honors English IV only) Pre-AP Geometry Pre-AP Algebra II Pre-AP Precalculus Pre-AP Biology Pre-AP Chemistry Pre-AP Physics only) Pre-AP World Geography Honors World History only) Honors US History only) Honors Government only) Honors Economics only) Pre-AP Spanish II Pre-AP Spanish III Pre-AP French II (BHS only) Pre-AP French III (BHS only) Pre-AP German II (BHS only) Pre-AP German III (BHS only) English I (BHS only) English II (BHS only) English III (BHS only) English IV (BHS only) Creative Writing Geometry Algebraic Reasoning (BHS only) Algebra II Adv Quantitative Reasoning Math Models w/applications (BHS only) Precalculus (BHS only) Statistics (BHS only) Physics Biology (BHS only) IPC (BHS only) Chemistry (BHS only) Anat. & Phys (BHS only) Env Systems (BHS only) Adv Plant Soil Sci (BHS only) Adv Animal Sci (BHS only) Forensic Science (BHS only) Astronomy (BHS only) World Geography (BHS only) World History (BHS only) US History (BHS only) Government (BHS only) Economics (BHS only) Psychology Sociology only) Personal Financial Literacy Special Topics in SS - Cold War Special Topics in SS - Holocaus t Spanish II Spanish III (BHS only) French II (BHS only) German II (BHS only) Grades shall be given for every course every semester. Grade points shall be assigned depending on the course classification and the grade earned. (See Grade Point Average Explanation section) Class rank shall be based on the average of these grade points based on the numerical grade average. Class rank computed at the end of the junior year may be used for college application purposes until re-ranking occurs after the 1st semester of the senior year. Final class rank shall be determined at the end of the second progress-reporting period of the 4th marking period. That rank becomes a permanent record on the Academic Achievement Record (AAR); no re-ranking shall occur after graduation for transcript purposes. Page 15 Published

18 High school courses taken prior to 9th grade, American Preparatory Institute (API) courses, college courses not taken as dual credit, correspondence courses, summer school courses, Algebra I, first year foreign language, local credit courses, and credit by exam/acceleration are NOT used when calculating grade point. Please note: Dual credit weighting is dependent on the high school credit received and how it is calculated in GPA. Grade Point Average Explanation For Advanced Placement classes, twenty (20) points will be added to the semester grade for GPA calculation purposes. For Pre-Advanced Placement/Honors classes, ten (10) points will be added to the semester grade for GPA calculation purposes. For Dual Credit classes at ten (10) points will be added to the semester grade for GPA calculation purposes. For Dual Credit classes at BHS, fifteen (15) points will be added to the semester grade for GPA calculation purposes For academic classes, the actual semester grade will be used for GPA calculations. No points will be added to any Pre-Advanced Placement, Dual Credit, or Advanced Placement grade if the semester grade is below 70. The extra points for Pre-Advanced Placement, Dual Credit, and Advanced Placement classes will only be added for GPA calculations and will not appear on report cards or transcripts. Final Grade System BISD high schools are on a SEMESTER-GRADE SYSTEM. The final grade for the year is the average of the two (2) semester grades. A student must have a grade average of 70 for the year to pass and receive one full credit. One-half credit may be awarded on a semester basis. The following grading scale is used: A (90-100); B (80-89); C (75-79); D (70-74); F (below 70-Failing) Grading Policy - BHS Academic Courses Minor grades - 35% Major Grades - 65% Pre-Advanced Placement and Advanced Placement Courses Minor Grades - 25% Major Grades - 75% Examples of minor grades may include, but are not limited to, the following: homework, weekly notebook checks, pop quizzes, warm-ups, worksheets, vocabulary, short essays, presentations, cooperative learning group work, mini-assessments, etc. Examples of major grades may include, but are not limited to, the following: projects, major papers, major tests, presentations, labs, unit tests, unit projects, 9 week tests, notebooks, etc. Progress Reports will be issued every three weeks to every student. Academic courses will provide a minimum of 9 minor and 3 major grades in any 9-week grading period. Pre-AP and AP courses will provide a minimum of 6 minor and 3 major grades in a 9-week grading period. Dual credit students may access their grades through the university. Belton High School will only issue a mid-term progress grade and final grade report for dual credit courses. Grading Policy - Learners at will be assessed based on the Learner Outcomes, and percentages for each outcome are listed below. Content Knowledge (60%): The learner will demonstrate a mastery of the required curriculum through rigorous, engaging, and relevant learning experiences and authentic assessments. Written Communication (10%): The learner will use standard conventions of grammar and rhetoric to produce clear, concise, logical writing appropriate for a variety of audiences. Oral Communication (10%): The learner will clearly articulate ideas in a manner appropriate to audience, occasion, and setting. Professional Ethics (10%): The learner will demonstrate trust, respect, and responsibility through time management, leadership, and collaboration. Page 16 Published

19 Innovation (10%): The learner will initiate innovative solutions to problems using creativity and/or technology Dual credit students may access their grades through the university. Belton High School will only issue a mid-term progress grade and final grade report for dual credit courses. Capstone Course - Independent study is designed to allow students to research self-selected topics. The student will generate relevant, interesting, and researchable questions with instructor guidance and approval. Students will draw relevant questions for further study from the research findings or conclusions. The findings and conclusions will be presented to a panel of experts at the end of the school year. Enrollment Pledge only) Once a student is enrolled at Belton New Tech High it will be for the complete school year. Students may not transfer to Belton High School at semester. At the end of the freshman year, current students will be asked to make a one-year commitment to attend the next school year. At the end of the sophomore year, current students will be asked to make a two-year commitment to attend both their junior and senior years and graduate from Honor Graduates Students whose class rank is within the top 15 percent of the graduating class shall be designated honor graduates. District honor graduates shall include the following: Students whose class rank is within the top two percent of the graduating class shall be designated summa cum laude graduates. Summa cum laude (with highest distinction) graduates shall wear a gold medal with a blue ribbon at the graduation ceremony. Students whose class rank is within the next three percent of the graduating class shall be designated magna cum laude graduates. Magna cum laude (with great distinction) graduates shall wear a silver medal with a red ribbon at the graduation ceremony. Students whose class rank is within the next five percent of the graduating class shall be designated cum laude graduates. Cum laude (with distinction) graduates shall wear a bronze medal with a white ribbon at the graduation ceremony. Students whose class rank is within the next five percent of the graduating class shall be designated as graduating with honors. Graduates graduating with honors shall wear a bronze medal with a gold ribbon at the graduation ceremony. National Honor Society members wear gold cords and collars. Bioscience students may wear earned cords. (BHS only) Top 10 Percent According to the Texas Education Code (House Bill 588), students are admitted to any Texas state public college or university if they graduate in the top 10% of their class. * This applies to university admission but may not apply to the school of their preference according to their major. Students must apply no later than two years after they graduate from a Texas high school, and they must complete the application process before the deadline date established by their college of choice. * Exception: SB 175, passed by the 81st Legislature, modifies the top 10 percent admissions program for The University of Texas at Austin. Under the new law the University is to automatically admit enough students to fill 75% of available spaces set aside for Texas residents in an entering freshman class. Using data from recent years, the University has determined that automatically admitting students in the top 7% of their high school class to the 2018 entering freshman class will fill 75% of available spaces for Texas applicants. As a result, UT Austin will automatically admit all eligible 2018 summer/fall freshman applicants who rank within the top 7% of their high school class, with remaining spaces to be filled through holistic review. Page 17 Published

20 Valedictorian and Salutatorian No high school senior shall be eligible for valedictorian or salutatorian honors who has not taken as many as four (4) academic courses each year of high school. Students must have been a registered full-time student at the same high school during the last four (4) semesters prior to graduation to be eligible. To be considered registered for a full semester, a student must enroll no later than the close of school on the tenth (10 th ) day of the beginning of the first semester. Final ranks, honor graduate designations, and valedictorian and salutatorian designations will be determined at the end of the second progress reporting period of the 4th marking period. That rank becomes a permanent record of the Academic Achievement Record (AAR); no re-ranking will occur after graduation. The student with the highest accumulated GPA is named the Valedictorian, and the student with the second highest accumulated GPA is named the Salutatorian. Students graduating earlier than they would normally graduate will not be eligible for valedictorian or salutatorian status. Transfer Students In order for students to be eligible for valedictorian or salutatorian status, they must have been a registered full-time student at their respective high school during the last four semesters prior to graduation. A student is considered registered for a full semester if he or she enrolls no later than the close of school on the tenth (10th) day of the start of the semester. Page 18 Published

21 Course Planning Worksheet As courses are selected for the upcoming year, students and parents will also want to think about the courses that will be required through graduation. Though courses may change slightly, this page is provided for students and parents to look at not only planned courses for the upcoming year, but anticipated courses for the remainder of the student s high school experience. This will be a good page to tear out and revisit each year the student begins the registration process. 7th & 8th Grade - High School Credit Earned Course Course Number Credit Total Credits Earned: 9th Grade - Freshman 10th Grade - Sophomore Course Course Number Credit Course Course Number Credit Total Credits Earned Total Credits Earned 11th Grade - Junior 12th Grade - Senior Course Course Number Credit Course Course Number Credit Total Credits Earned Total Credits Earned Page 19 Published

22 English Language Arts and Reading Course Sequence English Language Arts and Reading course information can be found on the following page. Page 20 Published

23 English Language Arts and Reading Course Information Course HS Course # HS Credit Prerequisites Notes/Recommendations English I English I Pre-AP English II Grade 8 ELAR BHS: G/T Identified or Advanced on Grade 8 ELAR Spring STAAR English II Pre-AP English I BHS: G/T Identified or Advanced on English I Spring EOC English III - BHS English III Honors English III AP- BHS English I & English II G/T Identified or Advanced on English I and II Spring EOC English III DC/TC Fall TSI complete in Reading and Writing, or exempt from TSI English III DC/TC Spring Must apply and meet entrance criteria English III DC/UMHB Fall Score > 18 on ACT Rd & Wr or score > 450 on SAT Critical Rd & Wr (old SAT) English III DC/UMHB Spring or score > 24 on Rd, and > 26 on Wr & Language (new SAT) English III DC/UTPB Fall TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt from TSI English III DC/UTPB Spring Must apply and meet entrance criteria English IV - BHS English IV Honors English IV AP -BHS English I, II, & III G/T Identified or Advanced on English I and II Spring EOC English IV DC/TC Fall TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt from TSI English IV DC/TC Spring Must apply and meet entrance criteria English IV DC/UMHB Fall Score > 18 on ACT Rd & Wr or score > 450 on SAT Critical Rd & Wr (old SAT) English IV DC/UMHB Spring or score > 24 on Rd, and > 26 on Wr & Language (new SAT) English IV DC/UTPB Fall English IV DC/UTPB Spring TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt from TSI Must apply and meet entrance criteria Creative Writing English I, II, & III Course will satisfy the fourth ELA/R credit Page 21 Published

24 Math Course Sequence Math course information can be found on the following page. Page 22 Published

25 Math Course Information Course HS Course # HS Credit Prerequisites Notes/Recommendations Algebra I Grade 8 Math Geometry (9th) (10th) 1.0 Algebra I Geometry Pre-AP Algebra I Algebraic Reasoning Algebra I, Geometry Algebra II Algebra I, Geometry Algebra II Pre-AP Algebra I, Geometry Math Models with Applications Algebra I, Geometry PreCalculus Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II PreCalculus Pre-AP Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II *** Not open for students to choose during pre-registration; students are hand-scheduled into this course Advanced Quantitative Reasoning (AQR) Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II Senior level course for 4th math requirement Statistics Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II Senior level course for 4th math requirement Statistics AP Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II Can be concurrently enrolled in PreCalculus or Calculus course Calculus AB AP Pre-AP PreCalculus Equivalent to college Calculus I Calculus BC AP Pre-AP PreCalculus Equivalent to college Calculus I & II College Prep Math Algebra I, Geometry, 3rd Math College Algebra DC/TC - BHS College Algebra DC/UMHB UMHB: MATH 1306 PreCalculus DC/UMHB UMHB: MATH PreCalculus (HS) and TSI complete in Math or exempt from TSI PreCalculus (HS) and Score > 21 on ACT Math or score > 550 on SAT Math or score > 570 on new SAT Math Grade of C or higher in College Algebra or score > 23 on ACT Math, or score > 580 on SAT Math *** Not open for students to choose during pre-registration; students are hand-scheduled into this course Must be a 5th math Must apply and meet entrance criteria Must be a 5th math Please note: score requirements could change with the new SAT scoring guidelines PreCalculus DC/UTPB TSI complete in Math or exempt from TSI Must apply and meet entrance criteria Calculus DC/UMHB UMHB: MATH Grade of C or higher in Math 1320 (PreCalculus) Calculus DC/UTPB TSI complete in Math or exempt from TSI Must apply and meet entrance criteria Page 23 Published

26 Science Course Sequence Science course information can be found on the following page. Page 24 Published

27 Science Course Information Course HS Course # HS Credit Prerequisites Notes/Recommendations Biology Biology Pre-AP Chemistry Chemistry Pre-AP Grade 8 Science Biology, Algebra I BHS: Met Standard or Advanced th on 8 Grade Science STAAR nd BHS: Concurrent enrollment in 2 year of math and Met Standard or Advanced on Biology EOC th Physics Biology, Algebra I Recommended for 11 graders Environmental Systems Astronomy - BHS Biology and Chemistry or Biology and Physics Biology and Chemistry and Physics Biology AP Biology Chemistry AP Biology, Chemistry, Algebra II Physics 1 AP Biology, Geometry Physics 2 AP Biology, Physics 1 AP Physics C AP Biology, Physics 1 AP Environmental Science AP Biology, Chemistry IPC Biology th th Recommended for 11 or 12 graders th Recommended as a 4 year science College Board recommends completion of chemistry and taken concurrently with physics. May be taken concurrently with physics Concurrent enrollment in Algebra II Note: Physics 1 AP is a trigonometry-based course Concurrent enrollment in PreCalculus Note: Physics 2 AP is a trigonometry-based course equivalent to a first year college physics course for non-engineering students Concurrent enrollment in Calculus AP Note: Physics C is a calculus-based course equivalent to a first year college physics course for engineering students *** Not open for students to choose during pre-registration; students are hand-scheduled into this course Page 25 Published

28 Social Studies Course Sequence Social studies course information can be found on the following page. Page 26 Published

29 Social Studies Course Information Course HS Course # Credit Prerequisites Notes/Recommendations World Geography Studies World Geography Studies Pre-AP - BHS World Geography Studies Honors - World History Studies BHS: Advanced on previous Reading STAAR World History Studies Honors BHS: Advanced on previous Reading STAAR World History Studies AP Special Topics - Cold War / Holocaust / / 0.5 Psychology / Psychology AP - BHS / / 0.5 Sociology / Psychology / / 0.5 European History AP Human Geography AP United States History United States History Honors World Geography World Geography or World History United States History AP BHS: Prior completion of AP level SS course United States History DC/TC / / 0.5 TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt from TSI United States History DC/UTPB / / 0.5 Must apply and meet entrance criteria Government Government AP Government Honors United States History Government DC/TC TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt from TSI / Must apply & meet entrance criteria Government DC/UMHB UMHB: POLS 2310 {Fall} / POLS 2311 {Spring} score > 18 on ACT English or score > 450 on SAT Verbal Must apply and meet entrance criteria Government DC/UTPB TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt from TSI / Must apply & meet entrance criteria Economics Economics Honors United States History Microeconomics AP {Personal & Business} If taken in 11th, must take macro in 12th Macroeconomics AP {Global} Economics DC/TC TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt from TSI / Must apply & meet entrance criteria Principles of MicroEconomics DC/UMHB UMHB: BECO score > 18 on ACT English or score > 450 on SAT Verbal AND score > 22 on ACT Math or score > 450 on the SAT Math Must apply and meet entrance criteria Economics DC/UTPB TSI complete in Reading and Writing or exempt from TSI / Must apply & meet entrance criteria Page 27 Published

30 Digital Learning With a focus on preparing our students for success in their post-secondary endeavors, Belton ISD has implemented a digital learning mindset. To ensure students gain digital productivity skills for the classroom, 6th grade students will be enrolled in a Multimedia course. This course, and others offered throughout the secondary curriculum, teach students skills such as collaboration, communication, creativity and critical thinking, which will help prepare them for their future careers. Integrating digital learning into the curriculum assists our teachers in reaching students with diverse learning styles. Through digital learning students are able to demonstrate productivity skills, take control of their own learning, and access real time information. Endorsements The next several pages will provide students and parents information about the various endorsements and options under each endorsement. A graphic depicting the course sequence will precede any course information. Some of the courses, such as fine arts, will not have specific course descriptions since the title of the course is self-explanatory. Students and parents are encouraged to contact the school counselor for direction on obtaining information not listed in this course planning guide for any needed clarification. Multidisciplinary Course Sequence Page 28 Published

31 Arts & Humanities Course Sequences Fine Arts Course Sequence Page 29 Published

32 Foreign Language, Mixed Languages, Social Studies Course Sequences Page 30 Published

33 Business & Industry Course Sequences & Information Agriculture & Manufacturing Course Sequence (Course information can be found on the following page.) Page 31 Published

34 Agriculture & Manufacturing Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources / 1.0 None Principles of Construction / 1.0 None Principles of Arts, Audio/Video Technology, & Communication / 1.0 None Business Information Management I / 1.0 / 9th Grade / 1.0 / 10th-12th Grade None Principles of Human Services / 1.0 None Principles of Health Science / 1.0 / 9th Grade / 1.0 / 10th - 12th Grade None Agriculture & Manufacturing Course Information To be prepared for careers in agriculture, food, and natural resources, students must attain academic skills and knowledge in agriculture. This course allows students to develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, personal development, globalization, industry standards, details, practices, and expectations. To prepare for success, students need to have opportunities to learn, reinforce, experience, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Principles of Construction is intended to provide an introduction and lay a solid foundation for those students entering the construction or craft skilled areas. The course provides a strong knowledge of construction safety, construction mathematics, and common hand and power tools. Careers in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster require, in addition to creative aptitude, a strong background in computer and technology applications, a strong academic foundation, and a proficiency in oral and written communication. Within this context, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the various and multifaceted career opportunities in this cluster and the knowledge, skills, and educational requirements for those opportunities. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce and postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create word-processing documents, develop a spreadsheet, formulate a database, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate software. This laboratory course will enable students to investigate careers in the human services career cluster, including counseling and mental health, early childhood development, family and community, and personal care services. Each student is expected to complete the knowledge and skills essential for success in high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand human services careers. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. The Principles of Health Science provides an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems of the healthcare industry. To pursue a career in the health science industry, students should learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The health science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive health care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Students are expected to apply the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a health science career through further education and employment. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. Page 32 Published

35 Small Animal Management / 0.5 None Equine Science / 0.5 None To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to enhance academic knowledge and skills, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Suggested small animals which may be included in the course of study include, but are not limited to, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, avian, dogs, and cats. knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Suggested small animals which may be included in the course of study include, but are not limited to, small mammals, amphibians, reptiles, avian, dogs, and cats. To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to enhance academic knowledge and skills, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. Suggested animals which may be included in the course of study include, but are not limited to, horses, donkeys, and mules. Wildlife, Fisheries, and Ecology Management / 1.0 None Landscape Design and Management / 0.5 None Turf Grass Management / 0.5 None Floral Design / 1.0 None Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technologies / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Agriculture, Food, and Natural Resources To be prepared for careers in natural resource systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to natural resources, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course examines the management of game and non-game wildlife species, fish, and aquacrops and their ecological needs as related to current agricultural practices. Landscape Design and Management is designed to develop an understanding of landscape design and management techniques and practices. To prepare for careers in horticultural systems, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to horticultural systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. Turf Grass Management is designed to develop an understanding of turf grass management techniques and practices. To prepare for careers in horticultural systems, students must attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to horticultural systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To be prepared for careers in floral design, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge as well as technical knowledge and skills related to horticultural systems and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply and transfer their knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop students' ability to identify and demonstrate the principles and techniques related to floral design as well as develop an understanding of the management of floral enterprises. Through the analysis of artistic floral styles and historical periods, students develop respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Students respond to and analyze floral designs, thus contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and evaluations. To be prepared for careers in agricultural power, structural, and technical systems, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge; acquire technical knowledge and skills related to power, structural, and technical agricultural systems and the industry; and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, industry certifications, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. This course is designed to develop an understanding of agricultural mechanics as it relates to safety and skills in tool operation, electrical wiring, plumbing, carpentry, fencing, concrete, and metal working techniques. Page 33 Published

36 Veterinary Medical Applications / 1.0 Small Animal or Equine Science Advanced Plant and Soil Science / 1.0 Recommended Biology, IPC, Chemistry or Physics and a minimum of one credit from AFNR Cluster Advanced Animal Science / 1.0 Biology and Chemistry or IPC; Algebra I and Geometry; and either Small Animal Management or Equine Science Recommended Veterinary Med Greenhouse Operation and Production 27267/ 1.0 None *Practicum in Ag, Food, & Natural Resources-Floral Design I / 2.0 Floral Design *Welding I / 2.0 Recommended Algebra I or Agricultural Mechanics Project-Based Research Vet Tech / 1.0 Veterinary Medical Applications *Practicum in Ag, Food, & Natural Resources-Floral Design II / 2.0 Floral Design I To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire technical knowledge and skills related to animal systems and the workplace, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry expectations. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills and technologies in a variety of settings. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, veterinary practices as they relate to both large and small animal species. Plant and Soil Science provides a way of learning about the natural world. Students should know how plant and soil science has influenced a vast body of knowledge, that there are still applications to be discovered, and that plant and soil science is the basis for many other fields of science. Investigations, laboratory practices, and field exercises will be used to develop an understanding of current plant and soil science. This course is designed to prepare students for careers in the food and fiber industry. Students will learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge in a scientific setting. This course counts as a fourth Science credit. (This course has been approved by TEA as a fourth science credit.) To be prepared for careers in the field of animal science, students need to attain academic skills and knowledge, acquire knowledge and skills related to animal systems, and develop knowledge and skills regarding career opportunities, entry requirements, and industry standards. To prepare for success, students need opportunities to learn, reinforce, apply, and transfer their knowledge and skills in a variety of settings. This course examines the interrelatedness of human, scientific, and technological dimensions of livestock production. Instruction is designed to allow for the application of scientific and technological aspects of animal science through field and laboratory experiences. (This course has been approved by TEA as a fourth science credit.) Greenhouse Operation and Production is designed to develop an understanding of greenhouse production techniques and practices. The practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experiences such as employment, independent study, internships, assistantships, mentorships, or laboratories. Rapid advances in technology have created new career opportunities and demands in many industries. Welding provides the knowledge, skills, and technologies required for employment in metal technology systems. Students develop knowledge and skills related to this system and apply them to personal career development. This course supports integration of academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. Knowledge about career opportunities, requirements, and expectations and the development of workplace skills prepare students for future success. Project-Based Research is a course for students to research a real-world problem. Students are matched with a mentor from the business or professional community to develop an original project on a topic related to career interests. Students use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, compile findings, and present their findings to an audience that includes experts in the field. The practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experiences such as employment, independent study, internships, assistantships, mentorships, or laboratories. Page 34 Published

37 Welding II / 2.0 Welding I Recommended Algebra I or Geometry *Practicum in Ag, Food, & Natural Resources-Vet Tech / 2.0 Project-Based Research Vet Tech *Practicum in Manufacturing / 2.0 Welding II Welding II builds on knowledge and skills developed in Welding. Students will develop advanced welding concepts and skills as they relate to personal and career development. This course integrates academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. The practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experiences such as employment, independent study, internships, assistantships, mentorships, or laboratories. Practicum in Manufacturing builds on knowledge and skills developed in Welding II. Students will develop advanced welding concepts and skills as they relate to personal and career development. This course integrates academic and technical knowledge and skills. Students will have opportunities to reinforce, apply, and transfer knowledge and skills to a variety of settings and problems. *If you cannot fit the 2 hour course in your schedule, please contact the CTE Director or CTE Coordinator. Page 35 Published

38 Business Management and Administration Course Sequence Business Management and Administration Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites Principles Courses For all Principles course information see page 32. Principles of Business Marketing and Finance / 1.0 None Business Management and Administration Course Information In Principles of Business, Marketing, and Finance, students gain knowledge and skills in economies and private enterprise systems, the impact of global business, marketing of goods and services, advertising, and product pricing. Students analyze the sales process and financial management principles. This course allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems and settings in business, marketing, and finance. Page 36 Published

39 Fashion Design I / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Arts, Audio/Video Technology, & Communication Interior Design I / 1.0 Algebra I and English I Business Information Management I / 1.0 / 10th-12th Grade None *Interior Design II / 2.0 Interior Design I Accounting I / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance Accounting II / 1.0 Accounting I Business Information Management II / 1.0 Business Information Management I Money Matters / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance Entrepreneurship / 1.0 Recommend Principles of Business, Marketing & Finance Careers in fashion span all aspects of the textile and apparel industries. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of fashion and the textile and apparel industries. Interior Design is a technical course that addresses psychological, physiological, and sociological needs of individuals by enhancing the environments in which they live and work. Individuals use knowledge and skills related to interior and exterior environments, construction, and furnishings to make wise consumer decisions, increase productivity, and compete in industry. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce and postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create word-processing documents, develop a spreadsheet, formulate a database, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate software. Interior Design II is a technical laboratory course that includes the application of the employability characteristics, principles, processes, technologies, communication, tools, equipment, and materials related to interior design to meet industry standards. Students investigate the field of accounting, including how it is impacted by industry standards as well as economic, financial, technological, international, social, legal, and ethical factors. Students reflect on this knowledge as they engage in the process of recording, classifying, summarizing, analyzing, and communicating accounting information. Students formulate and interpret financial information for use in management decision making. Students continue the investigation of the field of accounting, including how it is impacted by industry standards as well as economic, financial, technological, international, social, legal, and ethical factors. Students reflect on this knowledge as they engage in various managerial and cost accounting activities. Students formulate and interpret financial information for use in management decision making. In Business Information Management II, students implement personal and interpersonal skills to strengthen individual performance in the workplace and in society and make a successful transition to the workforce or postsecondary education. Students apply technical skills to address business applications of emerging technologies, create complex word-processing documents, develop sophisticated spreadsheets using charts and graphs, and make an electronic presentation using appropriate multimedia software. In Money Matters, students will investigate money management from a personal financial perspective. Students will apply critical-thinking skills to analyze financial options based on current and projected economic factors. Students will gain knowledge and skills necessary to establish short term and long-term financial goals. Students will examine various methods of achieving short-term 10 and long-term financial goals through various methods such as investing, tax planning, asset allocation, risk management, retirement planning, and estate planning. Students will gain the knowledge and skills needed to become an entrepreneur. Students will learn the principles necessary to begin and operate a business. The primary focus of the course is to help students understand the process of analyzing a business opportunity, preparing a business plan, determining feasibility of an idea using research, and developing a plan to organize and promote the business and its products and services. In addition, students understand the capital required, the return on investment desired, and the potential for profit. Page 37 Published

40 Communication and Information Technology Course Sequence (Course information can be found on the following page.) Page 38 Published

41 Communication and Information Technology Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites Principles Courses For all Principles course information see page 32. Digital Media / 1.0 None Digital Audio Technology I / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Arts, Audio/Video Technology, & Communication or Digital Media or Audio/Video Production I Project-Based Digital Audio Technology / 1.0 Digital Audio Technology I Digital Audio Technology II / 1.0 Digital Audio Technology I Commercial Photography I / 1.0 None Project-Based Research Commercial Photography / 1.0 Commercial Photography I Commercial Photography II / 1.0 Recommended Commercial Photography I Communication and Information Course Information Through the study of digital and interactive media and its application in information technology, students will analyze and assess current and emerging technologies, while designing and creating multimedia projects that address customer needs and resolve a problem. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment. Digital Audio Technology I was designed to provide students interested in audio production careers such as audio for radio and television broadcasting, audio for video and film, audio for animation and game design, music production and live sound, and additional opportunities and skill sets. Digital Audio Technology I does not replace Audio Video Production courses but is recommended as a single credit, co-curricular course with an audio production technical emphasis. This course can also be paired with Digital and Interactive Media. Students will be expected to develop an understanding of the audio industry with a technical emphasis on production and critical-listening skills. Project-Based Research is a course for students to research a real-world problem. Students are matched with a mentor from the business or professional community to develop an original project on a topic related to career interests. Students use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, compile findings, and present their findings to an audience that includes experts in the field. Digital Audio Technology II was designed to provide additional opportunities and skill sets for students interested in audio production careers such as audio for radio and television broadcasting, audio for video and film, audio for animation and game design, and music production and live sound. Careers in commercial photography require skills that span all aspects of the industry from setting up a shot to delivering products in a competitive market. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the commercial photography industry with a focus on creating quality photographs. Project-Based Research is a course for students to research a real-world problem. Students are matched with a mentor from the business or professional community to develop an original project on a topic related to career interests. Students use scientific methods of investigation to conduct in-depth research, compile findings, and present their findings to an audience that includes experts in the field. Careers in commercial photography span all aspects of the industry from setting up a shot to delivering products in a competitive market. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced technical understanding of the commercial photography industry with a focus on producing, promoting, and presenting professional quality photographs. Page 39 Published

42 Audio/Video Production I / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Arts, A/V Technology, & Communication *Audio/Video Production II w/ Audio/Video Production II Lab / 2.0 Audio/Video Production I *Practicum in Audio/Video Production / 2.0 Audio/Video Production II & Audio/Video Production Lab Graphic Design & Illustration I / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Arts, A/V Technology & Communication Graphic Design & Illustration II / 1.0 Graphic Design & Illustration *Practicum in Graphic Design & Illustration / 2.0 Graphic Design & Illustration II Digital Media / 1.0 None Video Game Design I / / 1.0 Digital Media Video Game Design II / / 1.0 Video Game Design I Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities in a studio environment. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio, video, or animation format. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities in a studio environment. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio, video, or animation format. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities in a studio environment. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio, video, or animation format. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an understanding of the industry with a focus on fundamental elements and principles of visual art and design. Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industries. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an advanced understanding of the industry with a focus on mastery of content knowledge and skills. Careers in graphic design and illustration span all aspects of the advertising and visual communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop a technical understanding of the industry with a focus on skill proficiency. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Through the study of digital and interactive media and its application in information technology, students will analyze and assess current and emerging technologies, while designing and creating multimedia projects that address customer needs and resolve a problem. Students implement personal and interpersonal skills to prepare for a rapidly evolving workplace environment. The knowledge and skills acquired and practiced will enable students to successfully perform and interact in a technology driven society. Students enhance reading, writing, computing, communication, and critical thinking and apply them to the information technology environment. The student will be provided the opportunity to design, program, and create a functional video game. The course will introduce basic programming language and skills that are essential to developing a video game. Topics covered are mathematics, physics, design, and computer programming. Students will dive into the inner workings of a fully functional role-playing game (RPG) by customizing playable characters, items, maps, and chests and eventually applying customizations by altering and enhancing the core game code. Page 40 Published

43 Video Game Design III / / 1.0 Video Game Design II Audio/Video Production I / / 1.0 Digital Media Audio/Video Production II / / 1.0 Audio/Video Production I Practicum in Audio/Video Production / / 1.0 Audio/Video Production II Students will develop mobile applications. Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities in a studio environment. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio, video, or animation format. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities in a studio environment. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio, video, or animation format. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. Careers in audio and video technology and film production span all aspects of the audio/video communications industry. Within this context, in addition to developing advanced technical knowledge and skills needed for success in the Arts, Audio/Video Technology, and Communications career cluster, students will be expected to develop an increasing understanding of the industry with a focus on applying pre-production, production, and post-production audio and video activities in a studio environment. This course may be implemented in an advanced audio, video, or animation format. Instruction may be delivered through lab-based classroom experiences or career preparation opportunities. *If you cannot fit the 2 hour course in your schedule, please contact the CTE Director or CTE Coordinator. Page 41 Published

44 Construction & Auto Tech Course Sequence Construction & Auto Tech Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites Principles Courses For all Principles course information see page 32. *Construction Technology I / 2.0 Recommended Principles of Construction Construction & Auto Tech Course Information In Construction Technology I, students gain knowledge and skills specific to those needed to enter the work force as carpenters or building maintenance supervisors or prepare for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students acquire knowledge and skills in safety, tool usage, building materials, codes, and framing. Page 42 Published

45 *Mill & Cabinetmaking Technology / 2.0 Recommended Principles of Construction *Automotive Technology I: Maintenance and Light Repair / 2.0 None *Construction Technology II / 2.0 Construction Technology In Mill and Cabinetmaking Technology, students gain knowledge and skills specific to those needed to enter the workforce in the area of millwork and cabinet manufacturing and installation. The student may also apply these skills to professions in carpentry or building maintenance supervision or use the skills as a foundation for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students acquire knowledge and skills in cabinet design, tool usage, jointing methods, finishes, and numerical and computer control production methods. Automotive Technology I : Maintenance and Light Repair includes knowledge of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. This course includes applicable safety and environmental rules and regulations. In Automotive Technology I : Maintenance and Light Repair, students will gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study will allow students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach safety, tool identification, proper tool use, and employability. In Construction Technology II, students gain advanced knowledge and skills specific to those needed to enter the work force as carpenters, building maintenance technicians, or supervisors or prepare for a postsecondary degree in construction management, architecture, or engineering. Students build on the knowledge base from Construction Technology and are introduced to exterior and interior finish out skills. *Practicum in Construction Management-Mill & Cabinetmaking I / 2.0 Mill & Cabinetmaking * Automotive Technology II: Automotive Service / 2.0 Automotive Technology *Practicum in Construction Technology / 2.0 Construction Technology II *Practicum in Construction Management-Mill & Cabinetmaking II / 2.0 Practicum in Construction Management-Mill & Cabinetmaking I *Practicum in Transportation Systems / 2.0 Automotive Technology II Practicum in Construction Management is an occupationally specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or on-the-job training experiences. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom. Automotive services include advanced knowledge of the function of the major automotive systems and the principles of diagnosing and servicing these systems. In Advanced Automotive Technology, students gain knowledge and skills in the repair, maintenance, and diagnosis of vehicle systems. This study allows students to reinforce, apply, and transfer academic knowledge and skills to a variety of interesting and relevant activities, problems, and settings. The focus of this course is to teach the theory of operation of automotive vehicle systems and associated repair practices. In Practicum in Construction Technology, students will be challenged with the application of gained knowledge and skills from Construction Technology I and II. In many cases students will be 85 allowed to work at a job (paid or unpaid) outside of school or be involved in local projects the school has approved for this class. Practicum in Construction Management is an occupationally specific course designed to provide classroom technical instruction or on-the-job training experiences. Safety and career opportunities are included in addition to work ethics and job-related study in the classroom. The Practicum is designed to give students supervised practical application of knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience such as internships, mentorships, independent study, or laboratories. *If you cannot fit the 2 hour course in your schedule, please contact the CTE Director or CTE Coordinator. Page 43 Published

46 Hospitality and Tourism Course Sequence Hospitality and Tourism Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites Principles Courses For all Principles course information see page 32. Introduction to Culinary Arts / 1.0 None *Culinary Arts / 2.0 Recommend Introduction to Culinary *Advanced Culinary Arts / 2.0 Culinary Arts Hospitality and Tourism Course Information Introduction to Culinary Arts will emphasize the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the management of a variety of food service operations. The course will provide insight into the operation of a well-run restaurant. Introduction to Culinary Arts will provide insight into food production skills, various levels of industry management, and hospitality skills. This is an entry level course for students interested in pursuing a career in the food service industry. This course is offered as a classroom and laboratory-based course. Culinary Arts begins with the fundamentals and principles of the art of cooking and the science of baking and includes management and production skills and techniques. Students can pursue a national sanitation certification, a Texas culinary specialist certification, or any other appropriate industry certification. This course may be offered as a laboratory-based or internship course. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. Advanced Culinary Arts will extend content and enhance skills introduced in Culinary Arts by in depth instruction of industry-driven standards in order to prepare students for success in higher education, certifications, and/or immediate employment. Page 44 Published

47 Journalism & Speech Course Sequences Journalism & Speech Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites Journalism I / 1.0 Yearbook I / 1.0 Journalism I Yearbook II / 1.0 Yearbook I Yearbook III / 1.0 Yearbook II Public Speaking / 1.0 Debate I / 1.0 Public Speaking Debate II / 1.0 Debate I Debate III / 1.0 Debate II Journalism & Speech Course Information In Journalism, students are expected to write in a variety of forms and for a variety of audiences and purposes. Students will learn journalistic traditions, the principles of publishing, research various topics, and write journalistic texts. Students enrolled in Yearbook I, II, III communicate in a variety of forms such as print, digital, or online media for a variety of audiences and purposes. High school students are expected to plan, draft, and complete written and/or visual communications on a regular basis, carefully examining their copy for clarity, engaging language, and the correct use of the conventions and mechanics of written English. In Yearbook I, II, III, students are expected to become analytical consumers of media and technology to enhance their communication skills. In addition, students will apply journalistic ethics and standards. Students enrolled in Yearbook I, II, III will refine and enhance their journalistic skills, research self-selected topics, and plan, organize, and prepare a project(s) in one or more forms of media. Application and interview required. Must be able to provide own transportation to off-campus events. In Public Speaking, students will learn the concepts and skills related to preparing and presenting public messages. Within this process, students will gain skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and thinking and will examine areas such as invention, organization, style, memory, and delivery. Controversial issues arise in aspects of personal, social public, and professional life in modern society. Debate and argumentation are widely used to make decisions and reduce conflict. Students who develop skills in argumentation and debate become interested in current issues, develop sound critical thinking, and sharpen communication skills. They acquire lifelong skills for intelligently approaching controversial issues. Page 45 Published

48 Public Service Course Sequences and Information Health Science Course Sequence (Course information can be found on the following page.) Page 46 Published

49 Health Science Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites Principles of Health Science / 1.0 = 10th - 12th / 1.0 = 9th None Medical Terminology / 1.0 None Pharmacology / 1.0 Biology and Chemistry Recommended: Principles of Health Science or Medical Terminology Anatomy and Physiology / 1.0 Biology and Chemistry Recommended: a course from the Health Science Cluster DC Anatomy and Physiology / 1.0 (TC) Biology and Chemistry Health Science Theory / 1.0 Principles of Health Science and Biology Health Science Theory & Health Science Clinical / 2.0 Principles of Health Science and Biology Counseling and Mental Health / 1.0 Recommended: Principles of Human Services Health Science Course Information The Principles of Health Science course is designed to provide an overview of the therapeutic, diagnostic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems of the healthcare industry. The Medical Terminology course is designed to introduce students to the structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, word roots, singular and plural forms, and medical abbreviations. The course allows students to achieve comprehension of medical vocabulary appropriate to medical procedures, human anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology. The Pharmacology course is designed to study how natural and synthetic chemical agents such as drugs affect biological systems. Knowledge of the properties of therapeutic agents is vital in providing quality health care. It is an ever-changing, growing body of information that continually demands greater amounts of time and education from health care workers. In Anatomy and Physiology, students conduct laboratory and field investigations, use scientific methods during investigations, and make informed decisions using critical thinking and scientific problem solving. Students in Anatomy and Physiology study a variety of topics, including the structure and function of the human body and the interaction of body systems for maintaining homeostasis. Upon successful completion of this course, students will: Define both anatomy & physiology. Understand biochemistry of proteins, lipids, nucleic acids & carbohydrates. Identify cellular organelles & their functions. Identify & understand functions of skin structures. Be familiar with details of bone histology. Identify bones of the body. Identify components of major joints & understand/explain their motions. Understand and explain muscle physiology. Identify muscles of the body. The Health Science Theory course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will employ hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development. The Health Science Theory course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will employ hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development. The Health Science Clinical course is designed to provide for the development of advanced knowledge and skills related to a wide variety of health careers. Students will employ hands-on experiences for continued knowledge and skill development. Clinical MUST be taken concurrently. Students model the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a counseling and mental health career through simulated environments. Students are expected to apply knowledge of ethical and legal responsibilities, limitations, and the implications of their actions. Professional integrity in counseling and mental health care is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Page 47 Published

50 Practicum in Health Science - Phlebotomy / 2.0 Prerequisites: Principles of Health Science, Health Science Theory, and Biology Practicum in Health Science - Pharmacy Tech / 2.0 Prerequisites: Principles of Health Science, Health Science Theory, and Biology DC Practicum in Health Science EMT / 2.0 (TC) Prerequisites: Medical Terminology and Chemistry or Anatomy & Physiology The Practicum is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. To pursue a career in the health science industry, students should learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The health science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive health care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. The Practicum is designed to give students practical application of previously studied knowledge and skills. Practicum experiences can occur in a variety of locations appropriate to the nature and level of experience. To pursue a career in the health science industry, students should learn to reason, think critically, make decisions, solve problems, and communicate effectively. Students should recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others. The health science industry is comprised of diagnostic, therapeutic, health informatics, support services, and biotechnology research and development systems that function individually and collaboratively to provide comprehensive health care. Students should identify the employment opportunities, technology, and safety requirements of each system. Professional integrity in the health science industry is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Students are expected to employ their ethical and legal responsibilities and limitations and understand the implications of their actions. Students in this course will register for EMSP 1501 and EMSP 1160 at Temple College. The registration for both courses will need to be completed by the deadline for DC enrollment for fall semester. EMSP 1501 covers topics such as patient assessment, airway management, trauma management, cardiac arrest management, cardiology, medical emergencies and pediatrics. Other topics include EMS systems, medical/legal issues, workforce safety, documentation, communication, rescue awareness, obstetrics, gynecology, and geriatrics. EMSP 1160 is the clinical portion of the course. Students are required to complete specific emergency room and EMS agency rotations. Page 48 Published

51 MCJROTC Course Sequence MCJROTC Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites MCJROTC I / 1.0 MCJROTC II / 1.0 MCJROTC I MCJROTC III / 1.0 MCJROTC II MCJROTC IV / 1.0 MCJROTC IV Marine Corps JROTC Course Information The Marine Corps Junior Reserve Officer s Training Corps is a four year academic program in Leadership Education. This program is designed to develop the leadership abilities of each student regardless of the career path they choose to follow. Students who enroll in MCJROTC are NOT required to serve in the military following graduation from high school. This program places an emphasis in the following areas: leadership training, history, community service, drill and ceremonies, physical fitness, first aid and health, peer mediation, cultural awareness, marksmanship training, and goal setting. Page 49 Published

52 Public Service Course Sequence (Course information can be found on the following page.) Page 50 Published

53 Public Service Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit Prerequisites Principles Courses For all Principles course information see page 32. Child Development / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Human Services Counseling and Mental Health / 1.0 Recommended Principles of Human Services Instructional Practices /2.0 Recommended Child Development Practicum in Education and Training / 2.0 Instructional Practices Practicum - Human Services I / 2.0 Recommended Child Development Practicum - Human Services II / 2.0 Practicum - Human Services I Public Service Course Information This technical laboratory course addresses knowledge and skills related to child growth and development from prenatal through school-age children, equipping students with child development skills. Students use these skills to promote the well-being and healthy development of children and investigate careers related to the care and education of children. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations. Students model the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue a counseling and mental health career through simulated environments. Students are expected to apply knowledge of ethical and legal responsibilities, limitations, and the implications of their actions. Professional integrity in counseling and mental health care is dependent on acceptance of ethical and legal responsibilities. Instructional Practices is a field-based internship that provides students with background knowledge of child and adolescent development as well as principles of effective teaching and training practices. Students work under the joint direction and supervision of both a teacher with knowledge of early childhood education and exemplary educators or trainers in direct instructional roles with elementary-, middle school-, and high school-aged students. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, develop materials for educational environments, assist with record keeping, and complete other responsibilities of teachers, trainers, paraprofessionals, or other educational personnel. Practicum in Education and Training is a field-based internship that provides students background knowledge of child and adolescent development principles as well as principles of effective teaching and training practices. Students in the course work under the joint direction and supervision of both a teacher with knowledge of early childhood education and exemplary educators in direct instructional roles with elementary-, middle school-, and high school-aged students. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, assist with record keeping, make physical arrangements, and complete other responsibilities of classroom teachers, trainers, paraprofessionals, or other educational personnel. Practicum in Human Services provides occupationally specific training and focuses on the development of consumer services, early childhood development and services, counseling and mental health services, and family and community services careers. Instruction may be delivered through school-based laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, mentoring, and job shadowing. Practicum in Human Services provides occupationally specific training and focuses on the development of consumer services, early childhood development and services, counseling and mental health services, and family and community services careers. Instruction may be delivered through school-based laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, mentoring, and job shadowing. Page 51 Published

54 Law Enforcement I / 1.0 None Law Enforcement II 27430/1.0 Recommended Law Enforcement I Forensic Science / 1.0 Biology and chemistry required Law Enforcement I recommended Law Enforcement I is an overview of the history, organization, and functions of local, state, and federal law enforcement. This course includes the role of constitutional law, the United States legal system, criminal law, law enforcement terminology, and the classification and elements of crime. Law Enforcement II provides the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for a career in law enforcement. This course includes the ethical and legal responsibilities, operation of police and emergency telecommunication equipment, and courtroom testimony. Forensic Science is a course that uses a structured and scientific approach to the investigation of crimes of assault, abuse and neglect, domestic violence, accidental death, homicide, and the psychology of criminal behavior. Students will learn terminology and investigative procedures related to crime scene, questioning, interviewing, criminal behavior characteristics, truth detection, and scientific procedures used to solve crimes. Using scientific methods, students will collect and analyze evidence through case studies and simulated crime scenes such as fingerprint analysis, ballistics, and blood spatter analysis. Students will learn the history, legal aspects, and career options for forensic science. Page 52 Published

55 STEM Course Sequence (Stem Course Information on Following Page) Page 53 Published

56 STEM Course Information Course Name HS Course # / HS Credit PLTW Introduction to Engineering Design / 1.0 PLTW Computer Science Essentials / 1.0 PLTW Principles of Engineering / 1.0 PLTW AP Computer Science Principles / 1.0 PLTW Civil Engineering and Architecture / 1.0 PLTW Cybersecurity / 1.0 AP Computer Science Applications - PLTW To be determined / 1.0 Advanced Structured Languages (COSC 2330) DC/TC - 1st semester and System Analysis and Desig (BCIS 2390) DC/TC - 2nd semester Engineering Design and Development To be determined / 1.0 STEM Course Information Prerequisites - See Course Sequence on Prior Page Students dig deep into the engineering design process, applying math, science, and engineering standards to hands-on projects. They work both individually and in teams to design solutions to a variety of problems using 3D modeling software, and use an engineering notebook to document their work. Students work in teams to create simple apps for mobile devices using MIT App Inventor. Students explore the impact of computing in society and the application of computing across career paths and build skills and awareness in digital citizenship and cyber security. Students model, simulate, and analyze data about themselves and their interests. They also transfer the understanding of programming gained in App Inventor to learn introductory elements of text-based programming in Python to create strategy games. Through problems that engage and challenge, students explore a broad range of engineering topics, including mechanisms, the strength of structures and materials, and automation. Students develop skills in problem solving, research, and design while learning strategies for design process documentation, collaboration, and presentation. Using Python as a primary tool and incorporating multiple platforms and languages for computation, this course aims to develop computational thinking, generate excitement about career paths that utilize computing, and introduce professional tools that foster creativity and collaboration. While this course can be a student's first in computer science, students without prior computing experience are encouraged to start with Introduction to Computer Science. CSE helps students develop programming expertise and explore the workings of the Internet. Projects and problems include app development, visualization of data, cybersecurity, and simulation. Students learn important aspects of building and site design and development. They apply math, science, and standard engineering practices to design both residential and commercial projects and document their work using 3D architecture design software. Note: These courses will be offered to BISD students for the first time in the Fall of Because of time lapse between printing of this document and the actual first class offering, this is subject to change. Note: These courses will be offered to BISD students for the first time in the Fall of Because of time lapse between printing of this document and the actual first class offering, this is subject to change. Note: These courses will be offered to BISD students for the first time in the Fall of Because of time lapse between printing of this document and the actual first class offering, this is subject to change. Note: These courses will be offered to BISD students for the first time in the Fall of Because of time lapse between printing of this document and the actual first class offering, this is subject to change. Page 54 Published

57 High School Miscellaneous Elective Courses Additional High School Information Course Name AVID Career Prep I Extended Career Prep I Career Prep II Extended Career Prep II Advanced Journalism Newspaper Miscellaneous Elective Courses Course Number # of Semesters / Credit / 2 semesters / 1 credit / 2 semesters / 1 credit / 2 semesters / 1 credit / 2 semesters / 1 credit / 2 semesters / 2 credits / 2 semesters / 1 credit / 2 semesters / 2 credits / 2 semesters / 1 credit Grade Level , / 2 semesters / 1 credit 9, 10, 11, 12 Notes BHS / Application and Interview Contact CTE Coordinator or School Counselor if interested BHS Journalism or Teacher Approval Professional Communications / 1 semester / 0.5 credit 9, 10, 11, 12 BHS The Bible as Literature / 2 semesters / 1 credit 9, 10, 11, 12 BHS Peer Assistance for Students with Disabilities I Peer Assistance for Students with Disabilities II (available Fall 2018) / 2 semesters / 1 credit 10, 11, / 2 semesters / 1 credit 11, 12 BHS Teacher Approval BHS Teacher Approval High School Physical Education One credit of physical education is required for graduation. Belton ISD has developed a policy to allow students to participate in an off campus commercially - sponsored activity instead of the campus physical education class. Parents must apply to the district for approval. Also, students may be allowed to substitute one of the following physical activities for the required credits: marching band or color guard during the fall semester, Magic Belles, cheerleading, athletics, or JROTC. (See Alternate Ways to Earn Credit.) Course Name Foundations of Personal Fitness & Individual & Team Sports Physical Education Course Options Course Number # of Semesters / Credit / 1 semester / 0.5 credit / 1 semester / 0.5 credit Grade Level Notes 9, 10, 11, 12 Aerobic Activities / 2 semesters / 1 credit 9, 10, 11, 12 BHS Adventures in Outdoor Education / 2 semesters / 1 credit 9, 10, 11, 12 BHS Partner s PE (1st time taken in high school) Partner s PE (2nd or subsequent time taken in high school) / 2 semesters / 1 credit 9, 10, 11, / 2 semesters / 1 local credit 10, 11, 12 BHS Teacher or ARD Committee Approval BHS ARD Committee Approval Page 55 Published

58 High School Athletics - Athletics can also be used to satisfy the physical education requirement for graduation. Students enrolling on a UIL Athletic Team are expected to enroll for one year unless they are a senior who will not participate in the 2nd semester. UIL rules prohibit students from being enrolled in more than 1 period of athletics. FOOTBALL GIRLS VOLLEYBALL STUDENT ATHLETIC TRAINER Course Name Grade Course Number Course Name Grade Course Number Course Name Grade Course Number Varsity Varsity Varsity Sub Varsity Sub Varsity SWIMMING (CO-ED) Course Name Grade Course Number Varsity BOYS BASKETBALL GIRLS BASKETBALL Course Name Grade Course Number Course Name Grade Course Number Varsity Varsity Sub Varsity Sub Varsity Sub Varsity TENNIS (CO-ED) Course Name Grade Course Number Varsity BOYS SOCCER GIRLS SOCCER Course Name Grade Course Number Course Name Grade Course Number Varsity Varsity Sub Varsity Sub Varsity Sub Varsity CROSS COUNTRY (BOYS / GIRLS) Course Name Grade Course Number Varsity / / BASEBALL GIRLS TRACK / Course Name Grade Course Number Course Name Grade Course Number / Varsity Varsity SOFTBALL Course Name Grade Course Number Varsity BOYS GOLF GIRLS GOLF Course Name Grade Course Number Course Name Grade Course Number Varsity Varsity Sub Varsity Page 56 Published

59 Page 57 Published

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