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1 Table of Contents Page Academic Policies 4 Office of the Dean of Undergraduate & Graduate Studies 5 School Deans 5 College Academic Policies/Degree Requirements 6 Core Curriculum Class of Frequently Asked Questions 10 Core Curriculum Attribute Codes 14 Majors with Specific Math/Quantitative Reasoning Requirements 15 Advanced Placement Equivalency Chart 16 International Baccalaureate (IB) Exam Chart 18 Academic Policies Specific to Class Year 19 Pass/Fail Option 20 Summer/Wintersession Course Work 21 Being Undeclared 23 Exploratory Courses 24 Frequently Asked Questions 26 Important Reminders 28 Organizing Your First Semester 30 Undeclared Advising Office & Advisor Contact Information 32 Majors, Minors & Certificate Programs 34 The Majors 35 The Minors & Certificate Programs 36 Exploring Arts & Sciences 47 Thinking of a Major in Science or Math? 48 Academic Planning Forms American Studies 49 Applied Physics 50 Art History 51 Biochemistry 52 Biology (BA) 53 Biology (BS) 54 Biology BA/Optometry 55 Biology BS/Optometry 56 Biology BA/Pre-Med 57 Biology BS/Pre-Med 58 Business Economics 59 Chemistry (BA) 60 Chemistry (BS) 61 Computer Science 62 1

2 Creative Writing 63 Economics (BA) 64 Engineering-Physics-Systems 65 English 66 Foreign Language Studies 67 Global Studies 68 History 69 Humanities 70 Mathematics 71 Music 72 Music Education 73 Philosophy 74 Political Science 75 Psychology 76 Public & Community Service 77 Quantitative Economics 78 Social Science 79 Sociology 80 Studio Art 81 Theatre, Dance & Film 82 Theatre, Dance, & Film Musical Theatre 83 Theology 84 Women s Studies 85 Exploring Business 86 Thinking of a Major in Business? 87 Academic Planning Forms Accountancy 88 Finance 89 Management 90 Marketing 91 Exploring Professional Studies 92 Health Policy & Management Academic Planning Form 93 Thinking of a Major in Education? 94 Academic Planning Forms Elementary/Special Education 95 Biology (BA) 96 Biology (BS) 97 Chemistry 98 English 99 Foreign Language Studies 100 History 101 Mathematics 102 Music Education* 103 Physics 104 2

3 Social Work 105 Career Advising and Campus Resources 106 Pre-Law Advising Program 107 Pre-Medical Science Advising Program 108 Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) 109 Center for Career Education and Professional Development 110 Center for International Studies 111 Office of Academic Services 114 Online and Electronic Resources 116 Forms 119 Academic Program Adjustment Form 120 Academic Planning Form Class of Core Focus Declaration Form 122 Final Examination Schedule 123 Course Series Chart 126 *Music Education is part of the School of Arts and Sciences, but is included in the School of Professional Studies section because of its connection to the Education Department. For updated information, refer to the Providence College website at 3

4 Academic Policies Page Office of the Dean of Undergraduate & Graduate Studies 5 School Deans 5 College Academic Policies/Degree Requirements 6 General Degree Requirements 6 Credit Hour Requirements 7 Good Academic Standing 8 Merit-Based Scholarships 8 Core Curriculum 9 Frequently Asked Questions 10 Attribute Codes 14 Majors with Specific Math Requirements 15 Advanced Placement (AP) Equivalency Chart 16 International Baccalaureate (IB) Exam Chart 18 Academic Policies Specific to Class Year 19 Pass/Fail Option 20 Summer/Wintersession Course Work 21 4

5 Office of the Dean of Undergraduate & Graduate Studies Harkins Hall 213; (401) Dean of Undergraduate & Graduate Students Dean for Freshman Students & Interim Director of the Undeclared Advising Program Dean for Sophomore Students Rev. Mark D. Nowel, O.P. Wanda S. Ingram, Ed. D. TBA Dean for Junior Students Dean for Senior Students Assistant Dean and Director of Multicultural Student Success Joseph A. Gemma, M.B.A. Denise A. Godin, M.S. Ralph E. Tavares Jr., M.B.A School Deans School of Arts & Sciences School of Business School of Professional Studies Dr. Sheila Adamus Liotta Dr. Sylvia Maxfield Dr. Brian M. McCadden (401) (401) (401) Ruane Center 147 Koffler 108B Harkins

6 College Academic Policies & Degree Requirements Below are some (not all) of the critical academic policies that you should be aware of as you plan and proceed through your undergraduate program. These are more fully explained in the Providence College Undergraduate Catalog, found at Always refer to the Catalog when you have any question about academic policies or your program. The Catalog is the official document of record and contains current information about the College calendar, admissions, degree requirements, fees, regulations and course offerings. General Degree Requirements All students must meet the following criteria to be eligible for the bachelor s degree: 1. A minimum of 120 earned credit hours. Satisfactory completion of the Core Curriculum requirements. 2. A minimum 2.00 (4.0 scale) cumulative quality point average (i.e. GPA ) overall and in the major or minor, if applicable. Some majors/programs may have higher credit hour and/or GPA requirements. 3. A minimum of 24 upper-division credits in the major. 4. Normally, unless otherwise stipulated, students may not begin their senior year in any major in which they have not achieved a 2.00 cumulative average in their major subject(s). 5. Students are responsible for meeting the graduation requirements of their major curriculum. Modification of any departmental rule can be made only with written approval of the chair of the department or program director in consultation with the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate and Graduate Studies 6. At least half of the courses/credits required for the major, minor, or certificate program must be successfully completed at Providence College or through an officially affiliated program. Some academic programs may require more than half of their requirements to be complete at Providence College. 7. Undergraduate students must spend at least 8 semesters in full-time attendance, unless the period is reduced by advanced standing credit from another institution as reviewed and approved by the Dean of Undergraduate and Graduate Studies. The College reserves the right to allow graduation at the completion of 7 semesters following the successful petition by students to the Committee on Academic Status. 6

7 Credit Hour Requirements In general, incoming freshmen will be expected to complete Development of Western Civilization (DWC) plus three, 3- (or more) credit courses in their first semester (total of four courses) and then five, 3- (or more) credit courses in each succeeding semester to reach the graduation requirement of 120 credit hours. **EXCEPTION: Most science majors, business majors, education majors and Honors Program students will complete DWC plus three, 3- (or more) credit courses in the 2 nd semester. These majors and programs have additional credits (i.e. 4- credit courses or additional 1- credit courses) included in their major requirements and therefore students will automatically reach the 120 credit hour graduation requirement by completing the major/program. Therefore, it is extremely important that you consult your advisor if you have any questions regarding the number of courses you should be taking each semester. REMINDER: Academic programs vary in their requirements, so students should consult the Academic Program Planning sheets (under the Exploring tabs in this Guidebook) and their faculty advisors. Sample Course/Credit Sequence* Fall Semester Spring Semester # of Courses # of # of Courses # of 1 st Year DWC + 4 DWC (**) 12 Total = 4 courses = 13 credits = 5 courses = 16 credits 2 nd Year DWC + 4 DWC + 4 4(*) Total = 5 courses = 16 credits = 5 courses = 16 credits 3 rd Year Total = 5 courses = 15 credits = 5 courses = 15 credits 4 th Year Total = 5 courses = 15 credits = 5 courses = 15 credits Graduation requirement includes a minimum of 120 credits Total: 121 credits Liberal Arts Honors Program Sample Course/Credit Sequence* Fall Semester Spring Semester # of Courses # of # of Courses # of 1 st Year DWC + 5 DWC Total = 4 courses = 14 credits = 4 courses = 14 credits 2 nd Year DWC + 5 DWC Total = 5 courses = 17 credits = 5 courses = 17 credits 3 rd Year Total = 5 courses = 15 credits = 5 courses = 15 credits 4 th Year Total = 5 courses = 15 credits = 5 courses = 15 credits Graduation requirement includes a minimum of 120 credits Total: 122 credits *Assume all courses other than DWC are 3- credits and student has no AP credits. Some majors carry additional credits which may warrant changes to these sample sequences; for a specific Major sequence refer to the Major Academic Planning Form. 7

8 Good Academic Standing Freshmen & Sophomores Semester Minimum CGPA for good standing Probation (CGPA) CGPA Dismissal Semesters on probation End of 1 st 1.60 < 1.60 no dismissal no dismissal End of 2 nd < consecutive semesters End of 3 rd <1.70 on academic probation End of 4 th <1.80 Merit-Based Scholarships Freshmen & Sophomores Students who hold Merit-Based Scholarships must: Maintain the number of courses required to fulfill the scholarship credit minimum. Achieve the required GPA for each semester (each scholarship has specific requirements). Consult with their academic advisor and the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate and Graduate Studies as early as possible if they are struggling in a course. 8

9 Core Curriculum The subjects that you study as undergraduates and, just as importantly, the skills and intellectual habits you acquire in the process, shape the lives you'll lead after college. Your course of study in the Core Curriculum, as well as in your disciplinary studies, should require you to question assumptions, engage in self-reflection, think critically and analytically, and communicate effectively. The Core Curriculum, as well as study in majors and concentrations, should prepare students to connect what you learn at PC to life beyond the College, and help you to understand and appreciate the complexities of the world and your role in it. Our Core Curriculum combines the breadth appropriate to a liberal arts education in the Catholic and Dominican tradition with the flexibility needed for every student to focus on exploring one aspect of the Core in-depth. 9

10 Frequently Asked Questions What are the requirements of the Core Curriculum? Effective with the Class of 2016, students will need to complete the following core curriculum requirements: Development of Western Civilization (16 credits, 20 credits for Liberal Arts Honors) Core Foundation (24 credits) o Theology Requirement: one 200-level and one 300-level (6 credits) o Philosophy Requirement: one ethics and one non-ethics (6 credits) o Natural Science Requirement* (3 credits) o Social Science Requirement (3 credits) o Quantitative Reasoning Requirement (3 credits) o Fine Arts Requirement (3 credits) Core Focus (6 credits)** Proficiencies (May be fulfilled through other requirements) o Intensive Writing Proficiency I o Intensive Writing Proficiency II o Oral Communication Proficiency o Diversity Proficiency o Civic Engagement Proficiency *Students who have not taken physics in high school must complete the natural science requirement with a physics-based course. ** Liberal Arts Honors program students fulfill the Core Focus requirement through successful completion of the Liberal Arts Honors curriculum. Students enrolled in the 3-2 engineering and 3-4 NECO optometry programs fulfill the Core Focus by virtue of completing the degree program. All secondary education and music education majors are considered double majors for this purpose and may fulfill the Core Focus through completion of appropriately designated courses in the second (Core Foundation area) major. What is the Development of Western Civilization Colloquium? DWC 202 is the final semester of the Development of Western Civilization Program and is a team-taught colloquium. Students choose from a variety of colloquia according to their interests. Building upon the other semesters of the DWC program, the advanced colloquium focuses on a specific, contemporary issue in the context of western tradition. Is the Development of Western Civilization requirement the same for transfer students? Transfer students who enter as second-semester freshmen are required to complete DWC 101, DWC 102, and DWC 202. Transfer students who enter with first-semester sophomore status or higher are required to complete DWC 101 and DWC 202. As DWC 101 currently is only offered in the fall semester, it is recommended that transfer students who begin matriculation in the spring should delay enrollment in DWC until the following fall semester. Students should complete the DWC requirement in sequential order, with DWC 101 as the introductory foundation course and the DWC 202 Colloquium as the final course in the program. Why are some students required to take a Physics-based Natural Science core requirement? Students who did not complete a high school physics course will be required to complete a physics-based natural science core course. Those who have already completed a high school 10

11 physics course will be permitted to complete either a standard natural science core course or a physics-based natural science core course. When should students plan to complete the Quantitative Reasoning requirement? Some majors require that students enroll in a specific math course during their first semester. For others, students may choose when to complete their quantitative reasoning requirement. If a student is not interested in a major that requires a specific math course, it is recommended that students defer taking a quantitative reasoning core course until a major is determined. Students may have future opportunities to fulfill the quantitative reasoning requirement through a required course in their major (e.g., PSY 202 Research Design and Statistical Analysis II for psychology majors), and such courses are typically not taken in the first semester. All new students enrolling in the fall semester are expected to complete the math placement exam during the summer prior to enrollment. What is the Core Focus requirement? Students are required to take two additional courses in a Core Foundation area or two courses in a specified theme, both of which are outside or beyond their major requirements. The Core Focus can be fulfilled in one of two different ways: two courses in a particular discipline, or a thematic concentration of two linked courses. Discipline concentrations consist of two courses in a language (modern or classical), science (physical or biological), social science (e.g., psychology, anthropology, sociology, economics), fine arts (e.g., art, art history, music, theatre, creative writing), or quantitative reasoning (math, statistics), as designated by the specific academic department or program. To encourage depth in the concentration, both courses must be from the same department. Students also may fulfill this requirement by completing a thematic concentration. A list of approved themes is available on the PC website under Core Curriculum. Courses used to fulfill the Core Focus requirement may not be used toward Core Foundation requirements. How can students fulfill proficiency requirements? Students are encouraged to fulfill proficiency requirements within their major, Core Foundation, Core Focus, or free electives. Students should work closely with their faculty advisors to include courses that meet proficiency requirements in their course schedules, overlapping with other requirements when possible. This will allow students greater flexibility with free elective courses. Selected Writing I (composition/writing) and Oral Communication (public speaking) transfer courses may be articulated as equivalent to Providence College courses that meet these proficiency requirements. All other proficiencies must be met through successful completion of designated Providence College day school courses unless authorized through student petition. Are students required to complete an English Proficiency requirement before enrolling in courses designated Intensive Writing I or II for the Writing Proficiency requirement? Students who demonstrate an academic need will be required to enroll in and successfully complete a special writing lab course (WRT credits) prior to enrolling in an Intensive Writing I proficiency course. Does a study abroad experience satisfy the Diversity Proficiency requirement? A study abroad experience by itself does not satisfy the Diversity Proficiency requirement. However, an approved study abroad course may meet the requirement. 11

12 What are the graduation requirements under the Core Curriculum? Students are required to complete a minimum of 120 credits hours, earn a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA and a 2.0 major GPA (some majors have a higher cumulative GPA), satisfy all major and Core requirements, and complete the minimum 8 semesters of full-time residency. Transfer students residency requirement is determined by their class standing at the time of acceptance. Coursework may vary in credits per course. For example, a student may complete a 1.5-credit music course to count toward the 120-credit requirement. How many courses should students enroll in each semester? In general, students will be expected to complete four (4) courses in their first semester and then five (5) courses in each succeeding semester in order to reach the 120 credit hour graduation requirement. Some majors and programs (for example, the science and business majors as well as the Honors Program) have additional credits (i.e. four credit courses or additional 1-credit courses) included in the major/program requirements that may help students to reach the 120 credit hour minimum in a variety of ways. Therefore, it is extremely important that students consult with their advisor and the Academic Program Planning forms regarding the number of courses to be taken each semester. Does the Core Curriculum allow students to complete double majors or one or more minors? In addition to completing the requirements for their chosen major and the Core Curriculum, students may choose to complete a second major or one or more minors. However, in most instances students should expect to perform extra work and to complete credits beyond the minimum needed to complete a single degree program. Are some class sizes smaller than others? Yes. Students can expect smaller class sizes in the Development of Western Civilization seminars (15-18 students) and team-taught colloquia (approximately 30 students). In addition, the Intensive Writing I and Intensive Writing II proficiencies (18) and the Oral Communication proficiency (20) normally have lower enrollment limits. Who is involved in the oversight and implementation of the Core? The overarching Core Curriculum Administrative Implementation Team (CCAT) is responsible for general oversight of the implementation of the Core, provision of resources to support the Core, consideration of policy issues, and for its timeline. The Core Curriculum Committee (CCC) is charged with the review and approval of all course and curricular issues, and with the development and oversight of course approval forms. The CCC also oversees several subcommittees focused on the review of courses for specific Core requirements. The Development of Western Civilization Program Committee (DWCPC) has several program responsibilities, including approval of DWC Colloquia. What role should academic department chairs and program directors play in the implementation of the Core? As the Core Curriculum requires ownership and responsibility across the College, chairs and directors play a critical role in Core implementation. Chair/director responsibilities may include: Encouraging department/program faculty to modify existing courses and/or develop new courses that may be submitted for approval to meet specific Core objectives; 12

13 Facilitating department/program discussions about how Core objectives, specifically Core proficiencies, may be embedded into one or more major requirements; this can aid in providing greater scheduling flexibility for students in the major; Reviewing and updating advising-related curricular materials, including degree audits, Academic Guidebook program plans, and sample sequences for the Undergraduate Catalog; Permitting and encouraging faculty to teach a core course, and in particular, in the DWC Colloquia; Identifying courses that may be used to fulfill the Core Focus concentration requirement for the discipline (where applicable); Encouraging faculty to collaborate with colleagues in other disciplines to develop Core Focus thematic concentrations; Ensure that the syllabi for Core courses list the appropriate Core objectives as stipulated in the guidelines for PC course syllabi; Ensure that major/program course content continues to meet Core objectives. What role should faculty advisors expect to play in the implementation of the Core? Faculty advisors are critical in helping students to navigate the Core Curriculum. Advisors should be prepared to assist students with the selection of courses that may fulfill major, Core, and elective requirements, thus ensuring appropriate progress toward the degree. Faculty advisors should seek to guide students to complete their Core requirements efficiently, suggesting courses that may fulfill a combination of major and Core requirements when possible. Do students have responsibility for completing the Core requirements? Ultimately, students are responsible for ensuring successful completion of all degree requirements, including those of the Core. Students should plan to meet regularly with their faculty advisors to discuss progress toward their degree, and they should review their academic program requirements in the Academic Guidebook and the Undergraduate Catalog. 13

14 Core Curriculum Attributes Effective for Class of 2016 and beyond Below is a list of attribute codes which fulfill core requirements. These attributes are searchable on CyberFriar by using the search for courses feature. Choose select a department then scroll down to select an attribute type, scroll to the bottom and click on class search. This will bring up a list of courses that fulfill the particular core requirement you selected. Core Requirements DWC Ethics Phil Fine Arts Quant Reasoning Physics-Based NSC Std. NSC Soc Sci THL 200 level THL 300 level Int Writ I Prof Int Writ II Prof Oral Com Prof Diversity Prof Civic Engmt Prof Note: Please visit the Enrollment Services webpage (see below) to view online tutorials on how to search for courses on Cyberfriar (by attribute and by course series), how to generate a degree audit, and how to generate a what-if degree audit. 14

15 Majors with Specific Math/Quantitative Reasoning Requirements Major Required Math Courses Accountancy* 108 or higher Biology, B.A. 109 (or higher) Biology, B.S (or higher) Biology, Optometry B.A (or higher) Biology, Optometry B.S (or higher) Biology, Secondary Ed, B.A. 109 (or higher) Biology, Secondary Ed, B.S (or higher) Chemistry, B.A Chemistry, B.S.* Biochemistry, B.S Computer Science* 117, 131, 132 Economics, B.A. 108 or 109 or 131 and 217 or 325 Business Economics 108 or 109 or 131 and 217 or 325 Quantitative Economics (or ) and (217 or 325) Engineering-Physics Systems* , 223, 304, 318 Finance* 108 or higher, and 217 Management * 108 or higher Marketing* Mathematics* 108 or higher , 215, 223, 290, 315, 323, 324, 330 or 316 & 2 electives Applied Physics* , 223, 304, 318 Political Science PSC 102 Psychology PSY L Sociology SOC 209 *Math Intensive Majors For majors with a specific math/quantitative reasoning requirement, generally, you should take the math course level that you are recommended for based on the results of your Math Placement test. If it is a higher level math than required for a major, it will still satisfy the major requirement. If it is a lower level math, you will need to take another course later to satisfy your major requirement. Sometimes it is better to select a math/quantitative reasoning course which provides some review before taking the next level. IF you are NOT interested in a major which requires a specific math course, it is recommended that you defer taking a Quantitative Reasoning Core course until you determine your major. You may have future opportunities to fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning Core requirement with a choice more appropriate for your major (i.e. statistical analysis type courses are offered in the social sciences) and such courses are typically not taken in the first semester. 15

16 Advanced Placement (AP) Equivalency Chart Advanced Placement Exam Score Providence College Course Equivalent Art History 4 or 5 ARH 106 (Fine Arts core) or Free Elective Biology 4 or 5 Standard Natural Science core or Free Elective Calculus AB 4 or 5 MTH 131 (Quantitative Reasoning core) Calculus BC 4 or 5 MTH 131 (Quantitative Reasoning core) Chemistry 4 or 5 Standard Natural Science core or Free Elective Computer Science 4 or 5 CSC 103 English Language & Composition 4 Free Elective 5 Free Elective satisfying the Int. Writing I prof. English Literature & Composition 4 Free Elective 5 Free Elective satisfying the Int. Writing I prof. Environmental Science 4 or 5 Standard Natural Science core or Free Elective European History** 4 Free elective 5 European History elective or Free Elective French Language & Culture 4 or 5 FRN 104 German Language & Culture 4 or 5 GER 104 Government & Politics: United States 4 Free Elective 5 Political Science Elective or Free Elective Government & Politics: Comparative 4 Free Elective 5 Political Science Elective or Free Elective Human Geography 4 or 5 Free Elective Italian Language & Culture 4 or 5 ITA 104 Latin - Vergil 4 LAT LAT 202 Macroeconomics 4 or 5 ECN 102 (Social Science core) Microeconomics 4 or 5 ECN 101 (Social Science core) Music Theory 4 or 5 MSC 201 & MSC 201L Physics B 4 or 5 Physics-Based Natural Science core or Free Elective Physics C- Electricity & Magnetism 4 or 5 Physics-Based Natural Science core or Free Elective Physics C- Mechanics 4 or 5 Physics-Based Natural Science core or Free Elective Physics 1: Algebra-Based 4 or 5 EPS 105 (Physics-Based Natural Science core) Physics 2: Algebra-Based 4 or 5 EPS 105 (Physics-Based Natural Science core) Psychology 4 or 5 PSY 100 (Social Science core) Spanish Language 4 or 5 SPN 104 Spanish Literature 4 or 5 SPN 104 Statistics 4 or 5 Free Elective or FIN 217 (Business majors) Studio Art- Drawing 4 or 5 Fine Arts core or Free Elective or ART 111* Studio Art-2D Design 4 or 5 Fine Arts core or Free Elective or ART 101* Studio Art-3D Design 4 or 5 Fine Arts core or Free Elective or ART 102* United States History** 4 Free Elective 5 HIS 255 or HIS 256 or HIS 257 or Free Elective World History** 4 Free Elective 5 Non-western History Elective or Free Elective 16

17 Advanced Placement (AP) *Portfolio subject to department review for Studio Art majors **History majors with an Advanced Placement grade of 5 on the A.P. U.S. and/or European History exam(s) will be given a one-course reduction in the required courses for the specific area(s) and will be given flexibility in choosing the remaining two courses (i.e., any two courses for the particular area). For instance, a major with a grade of 5 in U.S. History would be required to take only two courses in U.S. History and may choose any U.S. History courses for those required courses. A major with a grade of 5 in European History would be required to take only two courses in European History and may choose any European History courses for those required courses. History majors with an Advanced Placement grade of 5 on the World History exam will be given a one-course reduction, which will satisfy the requirement for a course in non-western history. A limit of two A.P. scores of 5 will be recognized by the Department for reduction of the total number of courses in the major. History majors with an Advanced Placement grade of 4 on the A.P. U.S. and/or European History exam(s) will be given flexibility in choosing any three courses for U.S. and/or European History. For such students, the required number of History credits to be earned for the major would remain at 33. DECLARATION OF A CORE FOCUS: Only one AP course can be used toward fulfilling a Core Focus. NOTE: AP credits may be removed for students who earn credits in similar or repeat courses at Providence College. ** IMPORTANT ** If you have earned AP or IB credits, you should NOT repeat the equivalent course at Providence College. You can earn credit for a given course ONLY ONCE. If you have a question about your AP or IB credits, consult with your advisor or dean. 17

18 International Baccalaureate (IB) Exam Chart Providence College recognizes credit earned through the International Baccalaureate, an internationally recognized curriculum and examination program. Of the two IB examination levels (Higher Level and Standard Level), the College recognizes the Higher Level examinations where a score of 5, 6, or 7 has been achieved. Each successfully passed examination in the Higher Level of the IB program will earn three credits. Providence College recognizes the following Higher Level examinations: International Baccalaureate Exam Score Providence College Course Equivalent Biology 5, 6 or 7 Standard Natural Science core or Free Elective Business & Management 5, 6, or 7 Free Elective Chemistry 5, 6, or 7 Standard Natural Science core Computer Science 5, 6, or 7 CSC 103 Dance 5, 6, or 7 Fine Arts core or Free Elective Economics Not Transferable English A: Lang & Lit 5 Free Elective English A: Lang & Lit 6 or 7 Free Elective satisfying Intensive Writing I prof. English A: Lit 5 Free Elective English A: Lit 6 or 7 Free Elective satisfying Intensive Writing I prof. English A1 5 Free Elective English A1 6 or 7 Free Elective satisfying Intensive Writing I prof. Film 5, 6, or 7 Fine Arts core or Free Elective French A2 5, 6, or 7 FRN 210 French B 5, 6, or 7 FRN 104 Further Mathematics 5, 6, or 7 Individual Student Review Required German 5, 6, or 7 GER 104 Global Politics 5, 6, or 7 PSC 207 or Free Elective History Americas 5, 6, or 7 Free Elective History of Asia/Oceania 5, 6, or 7 Free Elective History Europe 5, 6, or 7 Free Elective Mathematics 5, 6, or 7 Syllabus Required for Review Music 5, 6, or 7 Syllabus Required for Review Physics 5, 6, or 7 EPS 105 (Physics-Based Natural Science core) Portuguese A2 5, 6, or 7 Free Elective Psychology 5, 6, or 7 PSY 100 (Social Science core) Spanish A2 5, 6, or 7 SPN 104 Spanish B 5, 6, or 7 SPN 104 Visual Arts 5, 6, or 7 Fine Arts core or Free Elective or with portfolio review may be applicable for Major/Minor credit ** IMPORTANT ** If you have earned AP or IB credits, you should NOT repeat the equivalent course at Providence College. You can earn credit for a given course ONLY ONCE. If you have a question about your AP or IB credits, consult with your advisor or dean. 18

19 Academic Policies Specific to Class Year Freshmen Freshmen in good standing are allowed to take an extra course on a space-available basis (see Dean s website under forms ) for instructions Pass/Fail option begins with second semester One semester of Development of Western Civilization must be completed before a 200- level Theology course can be taken Sophomores Sophomores in good standing are allowed to take an extra course on a space-available basis (see Dean s website under forms for instructions) All undeclared students must declare their majors by February (date TBA) of their sophomore year Evening school courses in the School of Continuing Education are normally available to Juniors and Seniors only. Semester Minimum CGPA For Good Standing End of 1st 1.60 End of 2nd 1.80 End of 3rd 1.90 End of 4th 1.99 End of 5th 2.00 End of 6th 2.00 End of 7th 2.00 End of 8th 2.00 Probation (CGPA) below CGPA no dismissal less than 1.58 less than 1.70 less than 1.80 less than 1.90 less than 1.90 less than 1.90 less than 1.90 Dismissal Semesters on Probation no dismissal Two consecutive semesters on academic probation *Students who receive financial aid must comply with federal standards. The above may not reflect those standards. 19

20 Pass/Fail Option All eligible students desiring to take a course on a pass/fail basis must notify the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate and Graduate Studies no later than the deadline as noted in the College s official Academic Calendar. Once a student elects the pass/fail grading option, the pass/fail option is final and cannot be retroactively changed back to a standard letter grade. There will be no retroactive change of a standard letter grade to a pass/fail course. 1. Only one course per semester (with a maximum of four courses in total) may be taken on a pass/fail basis. (Option for freshmen begins with the second semester); 2. A student s cumulative grade point average for the previous semester must be at least 2.0; 3. Any course taken on a pass/fail basis must be selected from free electives; 4. earned on a pass/fail basis will not be averaged in a student s grade point average; 5. failed in a pass/fail course will be averaged as an F with 0.00 quality grade points. Courses excluded from pass/fail option: 1. All courses designated as fulfilling Core Curriculum requirement. 2. All courses taken within a major or minor, either required or elective, that constitute the total credit hours required by the department (unless the course is offered only on a pass/fail basis). A major or minor course taken as a free elective beyond the required credit hours for the program may be designated as pass/fail. 20

21 Summer/Wintersession Course Work Permission for summer or wintersession course work is obtained from the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate and Graduate Studies for make-up or enrichment purposes only, not to advance your status or to graduate early. PROVIDENCE COLLEGE SUMMER AND WINTERSESSION COURSE WORK Summer school at Providence College is run by the School of Continuing Education (SCE). There is no online registration for SCE summer session. 1. First step is to consult your Academic Advisor, Class Dean, and/or your Cyberfriar Audit Evaluation to determine your unfulfilled degree requirements. 2. Next, review the Dean s Approved SCE Course List. This list contains the approved courses and how they will be applied to your program of study (major/minor, core, free elective credit, etc.). Day School students will NOT be permitted to register for SCE courses which do not appear on the Dean s Approved SCE Course List. 3. Once you find a course or courses you are interested in taking, call to schedule an appointment with your Class Dean in Harkins 213. That s where you will fill out the Course Approval Form and Course Registration Form. 4. Finally, you will process these forms in the School of Continuing Education Office (109 Harkins Hall). Payment is required at the time of registration. Online and lab courses carry an additional fee. NOTE: When these courses are completed, the credits and grades will automatically be transferred onto your day school transcript. 21

22 Summer/Wintersession Course Work TRANSFER COURSEWORK FROM OTHER COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES If you want to take Summer or Wintersession courses at another institution, your first step is to consult your Academic Advisor, class dean, and/or your CyberFriar Audit Evaluation to determine your unfulfilled degree requirements. Courses for Major Identify one or more specific courses at an accredited college/university that you believe will fulfill one of your requirements. You must check the Transfer Course Database to learn if the course is currently transferrable at 1. If the course is in the database a) Once you have found courses that will be accepted for transfer, please schedule an appointment with your class dean in Harkins 213 (phone ) to fill out the Course Approval Form. b) You must then register for the approved course properly, and ensure that an official transcript is sent to the Dean of Enrollment Services at Providence College upon successful completion of the course. Successful completion means earning a C or better in the course. Please remember that credits for the approved course and its PC equivalent will be included on the student s PC transcript, but the grade will be recorded as a T and will not affect the student s GPA. 2. If the course is not in the database -- That means it has not yet been articulated for transfer to PC, please bring the course syllabus to the Office of Enrollment Services in Harkins Hall, 310. The course will be reviewed by the department/program for transfer articulation. You will receive an at your PC address from Enrollment Services informing you of the outcome of the transfer course review. The course and its articulation status will then be added to our database. Courses for Core Foundation Identify one or more specific courses at an accredited college/university that you believe will fulfill one of your requirements. You must check the Transfer Course Database to learn if the course is currently transferrable at It must specifically indicate that the course will satisfy a specific Core Foundation requirement for Class of 2017, 2018, 2019, Once you have found courses that will be accepted for core transfer, please schedule an appointment with your class dean in Harkins 213 (phone ) to fill out the Course Approval Form. Follow same instructions in Items 1.a and 1.b. above. If the course is not in the database, follow same instructions in Item 2 above. 22

23 Being UNDECLARED Page Exploratory Courses by Major 24 Frequently Asked Questions 26 Important Reminders 28 Organizing Your First Semester 30 Undeclared Advising Office & Advisor Contact Information 32 23

24 Undeclared students often ask, Which courses should I take while I m exploring my options and making decisions about my major? You should take the courses in majors that best match your interests and skills. Each department at the College recommends specific courses for students who are considering a major in that department. Be careful in your selection, however. These may differ from courses that interested students may take as electives but that do not fulfill requirements of the major. This listing should provide some help in selecting the courses you want to explore before you declare a major. Always confirm your choices with your advisor before you register. Major Exploratory Courses for the Major Courses That Satisfy Core Requirements Accountancy ACC 203 American Studies AMS 101 Art & Art History Art History ARH 106 All satisfy Fine Arts Core Studio Art ART 101 or ART111 Biology BIO or CHM BIO , CHM Natural Science Core Chemistry & Biochemistry CHM or MTH CHM 121/121L - Natural Science Core MTH Quantitative Reasoning Core Computer Science CSC 103 Creative Writing ENG 175 ENG 175 Intensive Writing I Proficiency Economics ECN 101 or ECN 102 ECN Social Science Core Education Elementary/Special EDU 125 or EDU 221 EDU 125 & 221 Diversity Proficiency Secondary EDU 201 English ENG 175 ENG 175 Intensive Writing I Proficiency Engineering/Physics EPS 101, EPS 131*, MTH 131, and ECN 101 (*1 cr. seminar taken as a 5 th course.) MTH 131 Quantitative Reasoning Core ECN 101 Social Science Core ACC , ECN ECN Social Science Core Foreign Language Study Adhere to Placement Test results or get permission from Department Chair. Global Studies GST 101 GST Civic Engagement Proficiency Health Policy & Management HPM HPM 240 (Social Science); HPM 408 (Civic Engagement); HPM 445 (Intensive Writing II)

25 History HIS or HIS electives in consultation with Electives can possibly fulfill requirements faculty Humanities ARH 106 ARH 106 Fine Arts Core Management MGT 101, ACC 203, ECN 101 or ECN 102 Marketing MKT 205, ACC 203, ECN 101 or ECN 102 Mathematics MTH 131 MTH 131 Quantitative Reasoning Core Music MSC L Philosophy PHL 101, PHL 103, PHL 150, PHL 202, PHL 206, PHL 207 PHL Core: PHL 101, 103, 207, etc. (any PHL) PHL Ethics-Core: PHL 202 (or any PHL-ethics course) Political Science PSC 101 PSC 101 Social Science Core & Civic Engagement Proficiency Psychology PSY 100 PSY 100 Social Science Core Public & Comm. Service PSP 101 PSP 302 Social Science Social Work SWK 101 SWK 220 SWK 253 Any introductory-level course in the social science departments (e.g. PSP 101, ECN 101 or 102, HIS 103, LIN 201, SOC 101, PSC 101, PSY 100, WMS 201) PSP 101 Civic Engagement Proficiency PSP 302 Diversity Proficiency Can possibly fulfill requirements SWK Social Science Core SWK 220 Diversity Proficiency SWK 253 Social Science Core Sociology SOC 101 SOC 101 Social Science Core Theatre TDF 100 & 200 Level Courses Can possibly fulfill Fine Arts Core Theology* THL 200 (*Available after 1 semester of DWC) THL 200 Theology Group I Core Women s Studies WMS 101 WMS 101 Diversity Proficiency 25

26 Being UNDECLARED Frequently Asked Questions 1. What are the advantages of being Undeclared at PC? Undeclared students enjoy a unique opportunity to explore their interests, tap their talents, research options, evaluate alternatives, and make informed academic decisions before selecting a suitable academic major. Students may have many interests or may be unsure of how their interests may relate to a major. First-year students are often unfamiliar with the PC curriculum and want to explore before declaring. The Undeclared Advising Program provides an opportunity for guided exploration of the curriculum so that students can assess their interests and talents in relationship to a major. 2. Can I start out Undeclared and still graduate with my class in four years? Absolutely! Nearly half of the first year class matriculates at PC every fall as Undeclared students. The Undeclared Program provides students the opportunity to explore their interests before they declare their majors. Some students have already narrowed the field to a short list of potential majors. Others need to learn more about the majors offered at the College. In either case, there is more than enough time to explore your academic options and to complete your degree in the four year program at PC. 3. What kind of academic advising is available to Undeclared students? All Undeclared students are assigned academic advisors who will work with them from New Student Orientation until they have selected their majors. Advisors come from all academic departments. They understand the uncertainties of first-year students and have the resources available to assist these students in making sound academic decisions. Often a student is assigned an advisor from a department related to the student s interests. For example, a student considering a major in the sciences might be assigned a faculty advisor from one of the science departments. However, all the Undeclared Advisors are knowledgeable about every major at the College. They all know what resources are available and where to refer students for specific information or academic assistance. 4. What courses should I take while I m Undeclared? Students should select courses that interest them and that allow them to explore potential majors. (Refer to the listing of Exploratory Courses by Major included on the following pages in this section of the Guidebook.) Students should not be taking Core Foundational Requirements right away, but should select courses that will provide some insight into the area of study that is the focus of the majors they are considering. 5. How are careers related to majors? What can I do with this Major? Generally, at the undergraduate level, there is not just one specific major required to enter a career field. While some careers require specific academic preparation, most are built on skills that can be developed in virtually any major - the ability to think critically, organize and integrate information, speak and write effectively. The liberal arts curriculum at PC develops these skills in all of its students. 26

27 Needless to say, a student who plans on becoming an accountant needs courses in accountancy. A student who plans to become a physician needs to take science courses. But not all physicians were science majors. Potential lawyers don t need to be political science majors. And businesses don t restrict hiring to students in business majors. Helpful links to career options for various majors & PC Student Testimonials can be found on the Undeclared Advising Program website: Career Connections 6. Where will I get help selecting a major? One of the primary goals of every Undeclared Advisor is to help students make informed decisions in the process of selecting a major. The advisor will also be able to refer students to other sources of information such as the Dean s Office, Center for Career Education and Professional Development, Office of Academic Services, as well as the chairs and faculty members from all the academic departments. Each fall a MAJOR/MINOR Fair is held to introduce students to all majors and minors at the College. Selecting the Right Major Seminars are scheduled to help students recognize and develop their interests, abilities and aspirations. And of course, the Undeclared Advising Program Office is always available to any student who has questions or concerns about selecting a major. 7. *When do I need to decide about my major at PC? How will I know if it s the right one? The Undeclared Advising Program tracks the progress of all Undeclared students so that they have selected a major by February of sophomore year. This way, students will have a new advisor assigned by the major department who will assist in academic planning and selection of courses the student will take in the five remaining semesters. Ignoring this deadline may result in the inability to register for classes in a timely manner. Careful selection of exploratory courses will help determine if your interests and talents are well suited to the selected major. But sometimes, if the choice is not a good match, students may change majors after consultation with the departments involved and the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate and Graduate Studies. *Early declaration is REQUIRED for the Education Department (by April 30 th of Freshman Year) and is recommended for majors within the School of Business (Accountancy, Finance, Marketing and Management). 8. Where can I find information on-line for Undeclared students? Many Useful LINKS, INFORMATION and RESOURCES can be found on the 27

28 Important Reminders Below are some things to remember as you begin to plan and prepare for your academic future. EXPLORE! Your schedule as a first semester student will include four courses. Pick at least two or three courses that will allow you to explore your interests. Your advisor will be a valuable help here. EXPLORE! If you have already identified a particular academic area of interest, be sure to register for courses that will allow you to explore it. See the planning forms in the tabbed section of this Guidebook. EXPLORE! Curiosity is bad for cats but good for students! If you are curious about a course or subject that you have never studied, by all means select an exploratory course in that area. IF you are thinking about Elementary/Special Education, Music Education, Health Policy and Management, the Sciences, Social Work or Business majors, review the relevant Academic Planning Forms in the tabbed pages of the Guidebook to select the recommended first semester/year course(s). Some majors require an early start. IF you are interested in continuing with a language or starting a new one, now is the time. This is a good way to develop your college-level academic skills. You may decide to complete a language minor, major or apply your language skills during study abroad. IF you are interested in exploring the Sciences, Mathematics, Economics or Business majors which all require a specific Math course, it is wise to elect the appropriate math course early. Some majors have specific math requirements (see page 15); some require more than one semester. Generally, you should take the math course level that you are recommended for based on the results of your Math Placement test. If it is a higher level math than required for a major, it will still satisfy the major requirement. If it is a lower level math, you will need to take another course later. Sometimes it is better to select a math/quantitative reasoning course which provides some review before taking the next level. IF you are NOT interested in a major which requires a specific math course, it is recommended that you defer taking a Quantitative Reasoning Core course until you determine your major. You may have future opportunities to fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning Core requirement with more interesting choices with a major content element (i.e. Statistical analysis type courses are offered in the social sciences) and such courses are typically not taken in the first semester. BE FLEXIBLE! Each semester, once you have selected the courses you want to take, be sure to identify some alternatives. You are never guaranteed that your first choices will have seats available. BE ORGANIZED! Use the Sample Academic Planning Form to plan and organize your course schedules. BE ADVISED! If you re not sure, ask your advisor 28

29 and a few DON Ts DON T select a course for which you have earned AP credits (carefully review page 16). AP credits may exempt you from an introductory course or may fulfill a core requirement. DON T focus on the core requirements while you are exploring majors. Many of the exploratory courses you select will also meet core requirements, and, with very few exceptions, you have plenty of room in your four-year program of study for electives. Courses that meet specific core curriculum requirements are identified on CyberFriar. DON T be concerned about DWC. All freshmen are pre-registered for a section of DWC 101: Development of Western Civilization. DON T limit your exploration to courses. Talk to department representatives, students, and your professors about your interests. Take advantage of the events that are scheduled for Undeclared students and listed on the Undeclared Advising Program Events Calendar (SAKAI) and on the Undeclared website: ( address). 29

30 Organizing Your First Semester It s YOUR education Consult, Explore, Plan! We provide the resources and advisors You make the decisions Orientation Checklist QUESTIONS Who is my advisor? (put contact info on back cover of Guidebook) If I have general questions about the Undeclared Advising Program, who should I contact? Your first semester What are my first semester courses? & ANSWERS. Undeclared Advising Program Office (401) Development of Western Civilization What are my placement test results? (review these with your advisor) 4. Recommended Math Level: Recommended Language Level: What AP credits do I have? AP test scores of 4-5: How will my AP credits affect my course selections? Be sure you are NOT registered for a course that is equivalent to AP transfer credits. You will not get credit twice. (see Guidebook, pg. 16) 30

31 Early Academic Planning What are academic areas of little or no interest to me? What are the areas of academic interest that I would like to explore? What are the recommended courses that will help me explore those interests? Review Electronic Resources Is my PC Account established properly? If not, call the IT Help Desk at (401) 865-HELP (4357) Does my Banner ID and password allow me to log onto CyberFriar? Am I able to log onto SAKAI to see my Courses and Advising groups? Did I review the Content of the SAKAI group for the Undeclared Advising Program and the Undeclared Advising website? If not, call (401) ( Office of Enrollment Services) If not, call IT at (401) 865-HELP (4357) or 31

32 Undeclared Advising Office & Advisor Contact Information Wanda S. Ingram, Ed. D. Interim Director of the Undeclared Advising Program Harkins 213; (401) Advisor Department Phone: (401) Location Edward Andrews History 1594 Ruane 122 eandrews Comfort Ateh Secondary Education 2497 Harkins 322 cateh Giuseppe Butera Philosophy 1103 Siena 124 gbutera Eliane Boucher Psychology 1527 Sowa 159 ebouche1 Julia Camp Accountancy 2653 Koffler 206 jcamp Lynn Curtis Art/Art History 2018 Service 100 lcurtis Edmund Dain Philosophy 2887 Siena 139 edain Angela Dills Economics 2590 Sullivan 114 adills Fang Dong Economics 2832 Sullivan 104 fdong Fred Drogula History 1891 Ruane 120 fdrogula Patrick Ewanchuk Biology 2394 Al. Mag. 318B ewanchuk Cyrielle Faivre Foreign Languages 2112 Sullivan 206 cfaivre Francis Ford Mathematics & Computer Science 2635/2334 Howley 210 fford Suzanne Fournier English & LAH 2587 Ruane LL 19 fournier Joseph Gemma Undergrad Dean s Office/Mgt. 2661/2495 Harkins 213 jgemma Michael Grande Accountancy 2485 Ruane 218 mgrande2 Matthew Guardino Political Science 2547 Howley 302 mguardin Laura Hauerwas Elementary/Special Education 2717 Harkins 328C lhauerwa Michael L. Hayes Social Work 2521 Howley 104 mhayes William Hogan English 2992 Ruane 231 whogan Jennifer Illuzzi History 1945 Ruane 135 jilluzz1 Anthony Jensen Philosophy 2043 Siena 133 ajensen2 Matthew Keane Accountancy 1275 Koffler 105 mkeane Colin King Philosophy 2642 Siena 132 cking7 Jeffrey Kotz Finance 2575 Koffler 227 jkotz Katherine Kranz Social Work 1581 Howley 100 kkranz Stephen Lynch English & LAH 2233 Ruane LL 18 sjlynch

33 Marian Mattison Social Work 2526 Howley 107 mmattisn Cayla McBee Mathematics & Computer Science 2639 Howley 211 cmcbee Terence McGoldrick Theology 2258 Siena 234 tmcgoldr Stephen Mecca Engineering-Physics-Systems 2099 Sowa 220 smecca Saaid Mendoza Psychology 2614 Sowa 161 smendoza Alexander Moffett English 2719 Ruane LL 36 amoffett Judith Morse Accountancy 2721 Koffler 202 jmorse Seann Mulcahy Chemistry & Biochemistry 1280 AL Mag 319 smulcahy Darra Mulderry History 1745 Ruane 130 mulderry Jessica Mulligan Health Policy & Management 2021 Howley 204 jmullig5 Kevin O Connor Education/Secondary 2123 Harkins 323 koconn17 Paul O Malley History 2192 Ruane 133 pomalley Maureen Outlaw Sociology 2523 Howley 102 moutlaw Kenneth Overly Chemistry & Biochemistry 1956 Al. Mag. 217 koverly Stephen Perreault Accountancy 1892 Koffler 224 spearreau Valerie Peterson Accountancy 1940 Ruane 223 vpeterso Despina Prassas Theology 1621 Siena 214 dprassas Margaret Ruggieri Accountancy 2654 Koffler ruggieri Lynne Ryan Elementary/Special Education 2504 Harkins 316 lynnryan Leila Setayeshgar Mathematics/Computer Science 2636 Service 225 lsetayes Monica Simal Foreign Languages 1836 Sullivan 214 msimal Ralph Tavares Undergrad. Dean s Office 2288 Harkins 213 rtavare1 Marla Tipping Biology 2250 Sowa 227 mtipping Jennifer Van Reet Psychology 1824 Sowa 160 jvanreet Adam Villa Mathematics & Computer Science 2132 Service 228 avillla James Waters Biology 2682 Al. Mag. 405 jwaters2 Linda Wilkens Mathematics & Computer Science 1896 Howley 209 lwilkens Fatma Gizem Zencirci Political Science 2365 Howley 315 fzencirc 33

34 Majors, Minors & Certificate Programs Page The Majors 35 The Minors & Certificate Programs 36 34

35 The Majors School of Arts & Sciences American Studies Applied Physics Art History Biology 3/4 Biology/Optometry Biochemistry Chemistry Computer Science Economics (Business, Quantitative) English (Creative Writing) Foreign Language Studies (French, Italian, Spanish) Global Studies History Humanities Mathematics Music Music Education Philosophy Political Science Pre-Engineering Psychology Public & Community Service Social Science Sociology Studio Art Theatre, Dance & Film Theatre, Dance, & Film Musical Theatre Theology Women s Studies School of Business Accountancy Finance Management Marketing School of Professional Studies Elementary/Special Education Health Policy & Management Secondary Education in: Biology (BA & BS) Chemistry English French History Italian Mathematics Physics Spanish Social Work 35

36 The Minors & Certificate Programs School of Arts & Sciences Applied Physics Art History Asian Studies Biology: Evolutionary Biology & Ecology Black Studies Classics Computer Science: Business Programming Computer Science: Technical Dance Economics English Literature Film/Video Foreign Language Studies (French, German, Italian, Spanish) History Latin American Studies Labor Management Relations Certificate Mathematics Music Neuroscience Certificate Philosophy Political Science Public Administration Certificate Public & Community Services Public & Community Services: Health Sociology Studio Art (Concentrations in Ceramics, Digital Imaging, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture) Systems Science Theatre Arts Theology Women s Studies Writing School of Business Accountancy Business Studies Certificate Finance 36

37 The Minors & Certificate Programs Minors offer students the opportunity to focus on an academic area that may complement their major. They are entirely optional, not required, and should be declared AFTER selecting a major. Minors generally require completion of 5-7 courses in the selected discipline. Certificate Programs are offered in Business Studies, Labor- Management Relations, Neuroscience, and Public Administration. Minor Requirements Accountancy *Students entering in the minor must have a GPA of at least 2.0 Required Courses 1. ACC 203 Financial Accounting, 3 credits 2. ACC 110 Computer Applications in Business I, 1 credit 3. ACC 204 Managerial Accounting, 3 credits 4. ACC 111 Computer Applications in Business II, 1 credit 5. ACC 310 Intermediate Accounting I, 4 credits 6. ACC 311 Intermediate Accounting II, 4 credits 7. ACC 301 Cost Accounting, 3 credits 8. An elective in accounting numbered 300 or higher Choose One of the Following: ACC 350 Accounting Information Systems, 3 credits ACC 405 Advanced Accounting, 3 credits ACC 406 Taxes and Business Decisions, 3 credits Applied Physics Art History Asian Studies 1. EPS 101 General Physics I, 4 credits 2. EPS 102 General Physics II, 4 credits 3. EPS 201 Modern Physics, 4 credits 4. Two additional courses at 200 level or higher 1. ARH 106 Art History Survey One introductory studio art course 2. At least four additional courses in art history. A basic minor must consist of one course in each of the following areas: ancient art, medieval art, Renaissance art, and modern art *All are one semester, 3 credit courses Eighteen (18) credit hours (six courses, of which at least one must be at the 300 or 400 level) Suggested course distribution: 1. 3 credits in Asian history or Asian art history 2. 3 credits in social sciences of Asia credits draw from any combination of courses approved by the program *Because this minor tends to be interdisciplinary by nature, courses in the program are listed separately under departments. Course offerings can be expanded through the use of special topics within relevant departments, at the discretion of the Director. 37

38 Biology: Evolutionary Biology & Ecology Black Studies *Six required courses with a total of credits. 1. BIO 103 General Biology I 2. BIO 104 General Biology II 3. BIO 310 Evolution 4. BIO 401 Ecology 5-6.Two courses from the following: BIO 201 Comparative Anatomy BIO 209 Introductory Botany BIO 210 Field Botany BIO 220 An Introduction to Tropical Biology BIO 225 Symbiosis BIO 230 Invertebrate Zoology BIO 240 Marine Biology BIO 330 Comparative Biomechanics BIO 350 Animal Behavior BIO 403 Plant Physiology To complete the minor in black studies, students take one required course, BLS Introduction to Black Studies, and select an additional five courses from among program and departmental electives. Each student is required to complete one elective from each thematic track. The remaining two electives allow for and promote specialization within a particular track. It is possible that a single course might satisfy the requirement of one or more tracks. However, a course will only be counted as meeting the requirements of ONE thematic track. For students whose interests are not directly addressed in formal course offerings, the program also offers the opportunity for independent reading and research, at the student s initiative, with the support of a faculty sponsor. Required Course BLS Introduction to Black Studies Elective Courses Students must take one course from each thematic track: Thematic Area: Culture, Language, Literature and the Arts BLS The African-American Artist 3 BLS Dimensions of Contemporary Black Life 3 BLS The African World View 3 BLS History of Jazz 3 BLS African Politics 3 BLS Twentieth-Century African-American Literature 3 Thematic Area: Historical Inquiry BLS Topics in African and African-American History 3 BLS Social Movements 3 BLS African-American Women 3 BLS History of Africa Since BLS African-American History to BLS African-American History Since Thematic Area: Social & Structural Analysis BLS Dimensions of Contemporary Black Life 3 BLS Faith and Spirit in the Black Family and Community 3 38

39 Black Studies continued BLS Urban Politics in the United States 3 BLS Social Movements 3 BLS Race and Ethnic Relations 3 BLS Urban Sociology 3 BLS The Power of Whiteness 3 BLS Diversity and Culture in Social Work Practice 3 BLS Contemporary Social Problems 3 BLS African-American Women 3 BLS The Economics of the Developing Nations 3 BLS Race and Politics in the Americas 3 Special Topics Series May meet requirements for any one of the thematic tracks, depending on topic. BLS Seminar in Black Studies 3 BLS Independent Reading in Black Studies 3 BLS Directed Research Project in Black Studies 3 Business Studies- Certificate 1. ACC 203 Financial Accounting 2. MTH 107 Mathematics for Business Analysis I (or any higher level math course) 3. ECN 101 Principles of Economics: MICRO 4. Human Relations elective (Recommended course MGT 101 Principles of Management) 5. MKT 205 Principles of Marketing 6. FIN 207 Managerial Finance I 7. BSP 440 Business Policy and Decision-Making Analysis Alternatives for Human Relations Elective: SOC 340 Organizations in Society PSP 202 Foundations of Organizational Service PSY 317 Social Psychology HIS 366 American Business History PSY 100 Intro to Psychology AND SOC 101 Intro to Sociology (SOC 101 must be taken along with PSY 100. This is a 6-credit substitution) Alternatives for BSP 440: HPM 420 Strategic Management in Health Care ECN 312 Managerial Economics Classics Requires at least six courses for a total of 18 credit hours. 1. Four of these courses must be in ancient Greek (GRK) and/or Latin (LAT) 2. The remaining two courses can be chosen from the list of approved courses offered by the History Department in the following concentrations:* Classics, History, Greek, Latin *One of the history electives may be substituted for an approved course from an affiliated department. 39

40 Computer Science: Business Programming Computer Science: Technical Dance Required Courses: 1. MTH 117 Discrete Mathematics, 4 credits 2. CSC 103 Computer Science I, 4 credits 3. CSC 104 Computer Science II 4 credits 4. CSC 225 Discrete Data Structures, 4 credits 5. CSC 424 Database Management Systems, 3 credits 6. CSC 433 Computer Network, 3 credits Required Courses: 1. MTH 117 Discrete Mathematics, 3 credits 2. CSC 103 Computer Science I, 4 credits 3. CSC 104 Computer Science II, 4 credits 4. CSC 225 Discrete Data Structures, 4 credits 5. CSC 387 Computer Architecture, 4 credits 6. CSC 445 Operating Systems, 3 credits 1. TDF 319 Dance History 2. TDF 212 Modern Dance or TDF 313 Intermediate Modern Dance 3. TDF 315 Dance Composition 4. Plus three electives in dance chosen in consultation with the student s advisor; one or more must be at the 300-level or above, for a total of six courses, plus two crew experiences worth ½ credit each. Opportunities for off-campus study are available during the junior and senior years. Six semesters of participation in the Providence College Dance Company may be accumulated to count as one 3-credit dance elective. English Literature 1. ENG Pre-1800 Literature courses 3. 2 Post-1800 Literature courses 4. 1 ENG elective Economics Film/Video 1. ECN 101 Principles of Economics: Micro, 3 credits 2. ECN 102 Principles of Economics: Macro, 3 credits 3. One or both of the following: ECN 201 Microeconomic Analysis, 3 credits ECN 202 Macroeconomic Analysis, 3 credits 4. Any other two (2) or three (3) economics courses The total credit hours for the minor are 18 credits. Group A: Minors must choose TWO of the following: TDF 120 History of Film: The Silent Period and the Transition to Sound, 3 credits TDF 121 History of Film: The Classic Era and Beyond , 3 credits TDF 220 The Catholic Imagination of Four American Filmmakers, 3 cr. TDF 226 Analyzing Film, 3 credits Group B: Required Courses TDF 322 Film Theory, 3 credits TDF 328 Film/Video Production, 3 credits 40

41 Film/Video continued Finance Electives Choose TWO electives in consultation with an advisor. One must be at 300-level or above. Required courses 1. ECN 101 Principles of Economics: Micro, 3 credits 2. ECN 102 Principles of Economics: Macro, 3 credits 3. ACC 203 Financial Accounting, 3 credits 4. FIN 207 Managerial Finance I, 3 credits 5. FIN 218 Financial Markets and Institutions, 3 credits 6. FIN 317 Investments, 3 credits 7. Finance Elective - to be selected from FIN 211, 308, 320, 325, 417, 419, 420, 440, 445, 470, 495, or 496 Foreign Language Studies French German Italian Spanish A minor is fulfilled by the successful completion of 18 credits/semester hours of course work in the target language, in a progressive sequence beginning at a level determined by the department to be appropriate for each individual student. An online placement test is required for incoming freshmen interested in pursuing the study of French, Italian or Spanish and should be completed prior to Freshman Orientation. History Requires at least six courses for a total of 18 credit hours. 1. American History, two courses (1) Pre-1877 & (1) Post European History, two courses (1) Pre-1715 & (1) Post History Elective, two courses (HIS 100 Thinking and Writing about History & (1) course in Non-Western History are encouraged but not required.) Latin American Studies 18 credit hours, with no language competence requirement, distributed in the following manner: 1. Four courses (3 credits each) from the following areas: anthropology, foreign language studies, history, political science, global studies, and sociology for a total of 12 credits. 2. A senior capstone seminar in Latin American Studies 3 credits. 3. One additional (3-credit) course from anthropology, history, foreign language studies, or political science, with the provision that this course cannot also count toward the student s major. (Example: A political science major may not take a political science course as the final three credits toward the Minor in LAS.) Courses: Requirements for a Minor concentration in Latin American Studies must be taken from the following list. However, under special circumstances, the Director of LAS may authorize an appropriate substitute course, such as a tutorial or a special topic course. APG Latin America: Mexico and Central America 3 41

42 Latin American Studies continued Labor-Mgmt Relations - Certificate APG Latin America: South America 3 HIS Early and Colonial Latin American History 3 HIS Modern Latin American History 3 HIS The Diversity of Latin American Religious History 3 PSC Latin American Politics 3 PSC Seminar on Latin America 3 SOC Latin American Society 3 SPN Hispanic Civilizations 3 SPN The Hispanic Short Story 3 SPN Hispanic Caribbean Literature and Culture 3 SPN Survey of Spanish-American Literature 3 SPN Contemporary Spanish-American Novel 3 SPN Spanish-American Literature 3 SPN Spanish-American Novel 3 LAS Selected Topics LAS Tutorial Latin American Studies (1-4 ) LAS Senior Seminar (3 ) LAS Independent Study Required Courses: 1. MGT 101 Principles of Business Management, 3 credits 2. FIN 310 Operations Management I, 3 credits 3. ECN 101 Prin. of Economics: Micro OR ENC 102 Prin. of Economics: Macro 4. ECN 321 Labor-Management Relations, 3 credits 5. ECN 322 Collective Bargaining, 3 credits 6. LBR 386 Labor Law, 3 credits (MGT 101 and ECN 101 or 102 are recommended entry-level courses, suitable for freshman and sophomores) 7. Three (3) elective courses Elective courses may include offerings in business, economics, psychology, sociology, labor-management relations, and related fields as approved by the program director. Generally, courses must be taken in the undergraduate school. Labor-management relations courses may be taken in the School of Continuing Education or the summer school. Internships are available through the program and may be arranged with employers, labor unions, or government agencies. Mathematics Music 1. One of the following courses: MTH 131 Calculus and Analytical Geometry I OR MTH 109 Calculus I 2. One of the following courses: MTH 132 Calculus and Analytical Geometry II OR MTH 110 Calculus II 3. MTH 290 Foundations of Higher Mathematics, 3 credits 4. Any three (3) math courses numbered 200 or higher with at least one numbered 300 or higher *All students must declare a minor during the second semester of the sophomore year, unless otherwise approved by the department chairperson. 1. Required Courses (11 credit hours) MSC 201 Theory I, 3 credits MSC 201L Theory I Lab, 1 credit MSC 202 Theory II, 3 credits MSC 202L Theory II Lab, 1 credit MSC 210 Music Appreciation, 3 credits 42

43 Music continued 2. Selected Courses (6 credit hours) - 3 credits (1 course) at the level & 3 credits (1 course) at the 200, 300, or 400 level. MSC 206, MSC 207, MSC 214, MSC 215, MSC 216, MSC 217, MSC 218, MSC 220, MSC 223, MSC 224, MSC 225, MSC 226, MSC 227, MSC 229, MSC 301, MSC 302, MSC 303, MSC 304, MSC 305, MSC 306, MSC 310, MSC 311, MSC 312, MSC 320, MSC 321, MSC 322, MSC 324, MSC 328, MSC 401, MSC 481, MSC 482 Other Requirements for the Minor 3. Participation in an appropriate performance organization is expected of all music minors for a minimum of three semesters. 4. Private study of the same instrument or voice for a minimum of three semesters. There is an additional fee for these lessons. Jury will be expected for each of these semesters. It is recommended that music minors perform in student performance hours during semesters of private study of instrument or voice. Neuroscience Certificate For Biology majors 1) All requirements from the major, including BIO 360 Neurobiology, and two of the following: BIO 201 Comparative Anatomy BIO 205 Human Anatomy BIO 308 Modern Genetics BIO 310 Evolution BIO 320 Developmental Biology BIO 330 Comparative Biomechanics BIO 350 Animal Behavior BIO 405 Physiology BIO 410 Electron Microscopy 2) The following psychology course are required: PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology PSY 201 Research Design & Statistical Analysis I PSY 202 Research Design & Statistical Analysis II PSY 324 Psychology of Abnormal Behavior 3) PSY 405 Research in Neuropsychology OR PSY 426 Experimental Biopsychology (with the appropriate pre-requisites, PSY 315 or PSY 326) 4) A Neuroscience Capstone course during senior year: BIO 479 Neuroscience Capstone OR PSY 479 Neuroscience Capstone For Psychology majors 1) All requirements for the major, including at least one psychology course from each of the following groups: a) PSY 405 Research in Neuropsychology OR PSY 426 Experimental Biopsychology (with the appropriate pre-requisites, PSY 315 or PSY 326) b) PSY 324 Psychology of Abnormal Behavior c) PSY 303 Learning, PSY 316 Cognitive Psychology, PSY 325 Health Psychology OR PSY 482 Drugs and Behavior 2) The following biology course are required: a) BIO 103 General Biology I b) BIO 104 General Biology II c) BIO 200 Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics 43

44 Neuroscience - Certificate continued Philosophy d) BIO 360 Neurobiology 3) Two Biology Course from the following are required: BIO 201 Comparative Anatomy BIO 205 Human Anatomy BIO 308 Modern Genetics BIO 310 Evolution BIO 320 Developmental Biology BIO 330 Comparative Biomechanics BIO 350 Animal Behavior BIO 405 Physiology BIO 410 Electron Microscopy 4) A Neuroscience Capstone course during senior year: BIO 479 Neuroscience Capstone OR PSY 479 Neuroscience Capstone 18 credits (six courses) of philosophy are required. Of the 18 credits (six courses), nine credits (three courses) must be at the 300- level or above. * Either: PHL 101 Logic OR PHL 315 Symbolic Logic Remaining Courses any 5 electives in the department. Political Science 1. PSC 101 Politics,3 credits 2. PSC 102 Empirical Political Analysis, 3 credits 3. Any four courses chosen from the department s offerings Public Administration - Certificate Public Administration Core PSC 211 Public Administration PSC 318 American Public Policy PSC 419 Public Program Evaluation PSC 450 Political Science Internship Additional Courses PSC 201 American Government and Politics ACC 203 Financial Accounting ECN 101 Prin. of Econ. Micro OR ECN 102 Principles of Econ. Macro PHL 301 Ethics, Moral Leadership, and the Common Good Public & Community Services Public & Community Service Health *Requires a total of 18 credit hours (six courses) distributed as follows: PSP 101 Introduction to Service in Democratic Communities, 3 credits PSP 202 Foundations of Organizational Service, 3 credits PSP 303 Community Organization, 3 credits PSP 302 Diversity, Community and Service 3 credits Additional Course Options for fulfilling this requirement are the same as those for the major. Any PSP course at, or above, the 300-level PSP PSP Minor Capstone (Spring semester senior year), 3 credits Requirements include the following: PSP 101 Introduction to Service in Democratic Communities, 3 credits* *Service component may be in a community health setting. 44

45 Public & Community Service Health continued Sociology Studio Art Concentrations in: Ceramics Digital imaging Drawing Painting Photography Printmaking Sculpture Systems Science Theatre Theology PSP 202 Foundations of Organizational Service, 3 credits *Students may take HPM 101 instead of PSP 202 PSP 303 Community Organizing, 3 credits PHL 309 Biomedical Ethics, 3 credits *Maybe used to fulfill College ethics core curriculum requirements. PSP 491 Independent Study: Community Health, 3 credits PSP PSP Minor Capstone (Spring semester senior year), 3 credits Required Courses: 1. SOC 101 Introductory Sociology, 3 credits 2. SOC 209 Social Research Methods, 3 credits 3. Four additional sociology courses selected on the basis of the student s interests and career plans after consultation with his/her faculty advisor. Students who minor in sociology are strongly encouraged to take SOC 480 Senior Capstone as one of their sociology electives. 1. Three foundation courses: ART 101 Visual Design I (2D) OR ART 102 Visual Design II (3D) (Note: ART 101 and ART 102 are not sequential) ART 111 Drawing I ARH 106 Art History Survey 2. One introductory studio elective 3. Three courses in one of the following concentrations: ceramics, digital imaging, drawing (beyond ART 111), painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture 1. EPS 115 Concepts of Systems Science, 3 credits 2. EPS 222 Elements of Systems Modeling, 1 credit 3. EPS 303 Systems Approach to Complex Problem Solving, 3 credits 4. Any three (3) credit course offered in computer programming (from approved list) 5. Any three (3) courses totaling nine (9) credits from those listed under Engineering-Physics-Systems Required Courses: 1. TDF 202 History of Theatrical Production 2. Choose: TDF 109 Introduction to Acting OR TDF 210 Theatrical Design 3. TDF 108 Script Analysis 4. Plus three electives in theatre, chosen in consultation with the student s advisor for a total of six courses (2 or more at the 300-level or above) plus two crew experiences worth ½ credit each. Production Participation *Required to achieve a minimum of two crew experiences, both of which must be earned on a main stage production. It is the responsibility of each student to accomplish the appropriate number of crew requirements regardless of when they matriculate as a major or minor. Admission into the minor requires a 2.0 GPA. Six (6) Required Theology Courses: THL 200 Foundations of Theology OR THL 240 Theology of St. Thomas THL 210 Biblical Theology OR THL 220 New Testament: Literature & Theology Three theology electives, one of which must be a 400-level course 45

46 Theology continued THL 480 Major seminar OR THL 481 Major Seminar Women s Studies Complete six (6) courses including the following: 1. WMS 101 Introduction to Women s Studies 2. WMS 489 Capstone Seminar in Women s Studies 3. Four electives courses approved for women s studies credit of which two must be in the humanities: WMS 224, WMS 260,WMS 320,WMS 323, WMS 325,WMS 326, WMS 334,WMS 369,WMS 352, WMS 354, WMS 376, WMS 441, WMS 470 (selected topics), WMS 490 (independent study); And of which two must be in the natural and social sciences: WMS 127,WMS 225,WMS 226, WMS 301,WMS 305,WMS 313, WMS 318, WMS 324, WMS 325,WMS 334, WMS 347, WMS 380, WMS 451,WMS 470 (selected topics), WMS 489, and WMS 490 (independent study). Because Women s Studies is interdisciplinary, all Women s Studies elective courses (elective courses do not include Intro to Women s Studies, Capstone, and Independent Study) are cross-listed. This means that Women s Studies elective courses are listed under Women s Studies and at least one other department or program (including, but not limited to: Sociology, History, Political science, Black studies, and English). This also means that Women s Studies is well suited to fulfill a minor, or a double major. The Women s Studies director is happy to answer any/all questions regarding Women s Studies courses. Writing 1. Twelve hours (4 courses) in writing: ENG 161 Introduction to Journalism ENG 175 Introduction to Literature ENG 204 Literary Journalism ENG 285 Introduction to Creative Writing ENG 301 Intermediate Writing ENG 380 Creative Writing in Fiction ENG 381 Creative Writing in Poetry ENG 385 Advanced Writing ENG 442 The Prose Poem ENG 488 Poetry Capstone ENG 489 Fiction Capstone TDF 405 Principles of Playwriting ART 108 Introduction to Desktop Publishing 2. Six hours (2 courses) in English Literature and language of level 200 or above 46

47 Exploring Arts and Sciences Academic Planning Forms for each major are listed alphabetically Majors in Arts & Humanities Page Art History 51 Creative Writing 63 English 66 Foreign Language Studies 67 History 69 Music 72 Music Education 73 Philosophy 74 Studio Art 81 Theatre, Dance & Film 82 Theatre, Dance, & Film Musical Theatre 83 Theology 84 Majors in Science or Mathematics Applied Physics 50 Biochemistry 52 Biology (BA) 53 Biology (BS) 54 Biology BA/Optometry 55 Biology BS/Optometry 56 Biology BA/Pre-Med 57 Biology BS/Pre-Med 58 Chemistry (BA) 60 Chemistry (BS) 61 Computer Science 62 Engineering-Physics-Systems 65 Mathematics 71 Majors in the Social Sciences Business Economics 59 Economics (BA) 64 Quantitative Economics 78 Political Science 75 Psychology 76 Social Science 79 Sociology 80 Interdisciplinary Majors American Studies 49 Global Studies 68 Humanities 70 Public & Community Service 77 Women s Studies 85 47

48 Thinking of a Major in Science or Math? Are you interested in exploring the sciences, but don t know which major? You should begin with the First Exploratory Course designated below for the major of interest. Additional first year courses recommended for each of the science and math majors are also listed. The early requirements in science and math overlap a great deal. They also satisfy the College Core Requirements. Thus, if you decide NOT to pursue a major in the sciences or math after taking the first exploratory courses, you will likely complete a portion of your core requirements as designated here: Department First Exploratory Additional 1 st Year Courses Course Biology BIO 103 BIO 104 CHM (or ) MTH (or ) Biochemistry CHM 121 (or 101) CHM 122 BIO MTH Chemistry CHM 121 ( or 101) CHM 122 MTH EPS EPS 101 EPS 131 (1 credit MTH ECN 101 seminar taken as a 5 th class) Mathematics & Math/Secondary MTH 131 MTH 132 Education Computer Science CSC 103 MTH 131 or 109 MTH 117 Natural Science BIO 103/103L, BIO 104/104L, CHM 101/101L, CHM 102/102L, CHM 121/121L, or CHM 122 w/122l fulfill the Natural Science Core Math MTH 107, 108, 109, 131, or 132 fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning Core (Note that the science departments all require at least two semesters of math) 48

49 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/14/2016 1st course(s) recommended for American Studies- AMS 101 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 AMS 101 Intro to American Studies (AMS Elective) 3 Core 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 **HIS 103 US History (Social Science Core) 3 ***HIS 104 US History (Social Science Core) rd Year AMS Seminar 3 AMS Seminar 3 6 AMS Elective 3 AMS Elective th Year AMS Seminar 3 AMS Seminar 3 6 AMS Elective 3 Free Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either AMS 101 (Recommended; may be Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same replaced by another AMS elective) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* AMS Elective (3) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity AMS Seminar (4) Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts HIS Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus **Students may elect either HIS 255 or HIS 256 Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement as alternative ***Students have option to substitute HIS Note: Core requirements may be satisfied in the major through careful selection of major electives. Consult your advisor prior to course selection. 49

50 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/9/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Applied Physics (Engineering-Physics Systems) B.S. - EPS 101 and/or 131, MTH 131 Fall Semester # of Spring Semester # of Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 4 8 EPS 101 General Physics I w/ Lab 4 EPS 102 General Physics II w/ Lab 4 8 EPS 131 Intro to Engineering (1 cr, taken as 5th course) 1 Fine Arts Core 3 4 Social Science Core 3 Intensive Writing I Proficiency nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MTH 223 Calc. & Analytical Geometry III 4 MTH 304 Differential Equations 3 7 EPS 201 Intro. Modern Physics w/ Lab (Oral Communication Proficiency) Philosophy Core 3 4 EPS 301 Mechanics 3 7 EPS 222 Elements of Systems Modeling taken as 6th course) (1 cr, 1 4 Diversity Proficiency 3 Theology (200 Level) Core rd Year MTH 318 Topics in Applied Math 3 Free Elective EPS 202 Electronics w/ lab (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 4 7 EPS 221 Scientific Programming 3 EPS 430 Thermodynamics 3 6 CHM 101 General Chemistry I w/ Lab (or CHM 121) (Natural Science Core) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II w/ Lab (or CHM 122) 4 8 Ethics Core 3 Civic Engagement Proficiency 3 6 Theology (300 Level) Core 3 Core Focus th Year EPS 302 Electromagnetism 3 **EPS 448 Applied Quantum Physics 3 6 *EPS 303 Systems Approach to Complex Problem Solving 3 EPS 496 Research or Internship (or EPS 450) 3 6 EPS 495 Research or Internship (or EPS 450) 3 Free Elective 3 6 Core Focus 3 Free Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 132 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either EPS 101, 102, 131, 201, 202, 221, 222, 301, 302, 303* Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (EPS 202) the same core discipline, language or the same 430, 448**, 495, 496 (450 can be substituted for 495 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (EPS 201) themed area* 496, or both) Natural Science - 3 cr. (CHM 101) Diversity MTH 131, 132, 223, 304, 318 Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts CHM (or ) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 131) Honors Program satisfy the core focus *EPS 303 is only offered in Fall of odd years. Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement Students in odd grad yrs should take in Junior year **EPS 448 is only offered in Spring of even years. Students in odd grad yrs should take in Junior year **Currently, PHY Majors fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning and Natural Science Cores along with the Intensive Writing II and Oral Communication Proficiencies. 50

51 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/4/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Art History - ARH 106 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ARH 106 Art History Survey (Fine Arts Core) 3 ARH 200 Ancient Classical Art 3 6 ART Studio Art Elective 3 Core 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ARH 204 Medieval Art 3 ARH 205 Italian Renaissance Art rd Year ARH 380 Interpretive Methods in Art History 3 ARH 103, 104, 118, OR Non-Western 3 6 ART Studio Art Elective 3 ARH 209 Modern Art OR ARH 304 American & European Art Since LNG Modern Language 3 LNG Modern Language th Year ARH 498 Principles of Research 3 ARH Elective (400 level) 3 6 Core 3 ARH Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either ARH 106, 200, 204, 205, 209 OR 304, 380, 498 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same ARH 103, 104 OR 211 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* ART Studio Art Elective (2) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity ARH Elective Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts ARH Elective (400 level) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus French or German Language Courses (2) Fine Arts - 3 cr. (ARH 106) requirement PHL 407 is recommended for majors when offered. **Currently, ARH Majors fulfill the Fine Arts Core. 51

52 2020 Academic Planning Form As of 4/15/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 4 CHM 121 Intro Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 122 Intro Chemistry II w/ Lab 4 BIO 103 General Biology I w/ Lab 4 BIO 104 General Biology II w/ Lab 4 CHM 132 Intro to Biochemistry nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II w/ Lab 4 EPS 101 General Physics I w/ Lab 4 EPS 102 General Physics II w/ Lab 4 BIO 200 Cellular and Molecular Biology 3 Social Science core 3 3 rd Year CHM 309 Biochemistry 3 CHM 321 & 321L Physical Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 331 Adv. Analytical Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 312 Biochemistry II 3 CHM 381 Chemistry Seminar 1 CHM 382 Chemistry Seminar 2 Theology I core 3 Theology II core 3 Core Focus elect. - part 1 3 Core Focus elect. - part th Year CHM 401 Inorganic Chemistry w/ Lab 4 CHM 310L Biochemistry Lab 3 CHM 481 Chemistry Seminar 2 CHM 482 Chemistry Seminar 0 BIO 308 Modern Genetics w/ Lab 4 Free elective 3 Fine Arts core 3 Free elective 3 Philosophy Elective 3 Philosopy Ethics core *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Foundational Component: Core Focus/Concentration: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. 2 courses/ 6 cr. from either the same core CHM , , L, Theology (Grp I & II) - 6 cr. discipline, language or the same themed area 331, 381, 382, 401, 481, 482 Philosophy (1 + Ethics) - 6 cr. MTH , BIO , 200, 308 Natural Science - (CHM 121/121L) Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors EPS Social Science - 3 cr. Honors Program automatically satisfy the core Note that CHM 310L and Quantitative Reasoning - (MTH 131 or MTH 132) focus requirement. CHM 312 are offered in alternate years Fine Arts - 3 cr. Proficiencies: (many proficiencies may be attained by completion of designated Foundational or Core Focus courses.) For Study Abroad - fall of the junior year Intensive Writing - I Intensive Writing - II (in the major: BIO 200 and CHM 310L) Oral Communication (in the major: CHM 381/382/481/482) Diversity Civic Engagement Example Sequence for Biochemistry B.S. (most electives can be chosen at student's discretion.) following consultation with department chair and provided one finds equivalent courses abroad. Note CHM 310L & CHM 312 are offered every other year. 52

53 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/23/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Biology B.A. - BIO or CHM # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 BIO 103 General Biology I (Natural Science Core) 4 BIO 104 General Biology II 4 8 CHM 101 General Chemistry I (Natural Science Core) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II 4 8 MTH 109 Calculus I or higher (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I 4 BIO 200 Int. Cell Bio & Mol. Genetics (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) rd Year BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 8 EPS 101 General Physics I 4 Science Elective th Year BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 Science Elective 3 7 Science Elective 3 Science Elective *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either BIO , 200 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (BIO 200) the same core discipline, language or the same CHM , 201 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* MTH 109 or higher Natural Science - 3 cr. (BIO 103 or CHM 101) Diversity EPS 101 Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts 3 BIO Electives w/ lab (4 cr. each) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109 or higher) Honors Program satisfy the core focus 4 approved Science Electives above the Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement introductory level elected from Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics (EPS 102; MTH 110, MTH 131, and MTH 132 allowed). **Currently, BIO BA Majors fulfill the Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores and the Intensive Writing II Proficiency. 53

54 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/23/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Biology B.S. - BIO or CHM # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 BIO 103 General Biology I (Natural Science Core) 4 BIO 104 General Biology II 4 8 CHM 101 General Chemistry I (Natural Science Core) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II 4 8 MTH 109 Calculus I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 MTH 110 Calculus II nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHM 202 Organic Chemistry II 4 8 Core 3 BIO 200 Int. Cell Bio & Mol. Genetics (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) rd Year BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 8 EPS 101 General Physics I 4 EPS 102 General Physics II 4 8 Elective (optional) Core th Year BIO Elective 3 BIO Elective 3 6 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 Core *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either BIO , 200 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (BIO 200) the same core discipline, language or the same CHM , Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* MTH 109 & 110 or higher Natural Science - 3 cr. (BIO 103 or CHM 101) Diversity EPS Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts 5 BIO Electives, 3 of these electives Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109) Honors Program satisfy the core focus must be lab courses (4 cr. each) Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, BIO BS Majors fulfill the Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores along with the Intensive Writing II Proficiency. 54

55 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/23/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 BIO 103 General Biology I 4 BIO 104 General Biology II 4 8 CHM 101 General Chemistry I (Natural Science Core) MTH 109 Calculus I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 7 Year Combined Degree Program - Biology B.A. & O.D. Providence College (PC) & New England College of Optometry (NECO) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II MTH 110 Calculus II nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I 4 BIO 200 Int. Cell Bio & Mol. Genetics (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 7 EPS 101 General Physics I 4 EPS 102 General Physics II (Sci Elective) 4 8 Bio Elective w/lab 4 Core/Elective 3 7 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective rd Year BIO Elective w/ Lab (Microbiology) 4 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 8 CHM Biochemistry (Science Elective) 3 MTH Biostatistics (Science Elective) th Year Social Science - PSY Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 OAT - September Test Administration Science Elective (fulfilled by 1st year course at NECO) *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 98 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus/Concentration: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. from either the same core P.C. B.A. Degree Requirements - in Italics Theology (Grp. I & 11) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (BIO 200) discipline, language or the same themed area* NECO Admissions Requirements - in Bold Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (FULFILLED THROUGH NECO) Natural Science - 3 cr. (CHM 101) Diversity Social Science - 3 cr. (PSY 100) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109) Honors Program satisfy the core focus/ Fine Arts - 3 cr. concentration requirement **Currently, BIO BA Optometry Majors fulfill the Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores along with the Intensive Writing II Proficiency. Providence College General Degree Requirements: These will be completed during the first three years at Providence College. DWC is equivalent to 4 cr. English. The Writing I and II Proficiencies are equivalent to at least 2 credits of English. The Providence College core will thus satisfy the NECO admission requirement in English. The first year courses at the New England College of Optometry will be accepted as transfer credits to complete the remaining requirements for the Providence College degree. These must include sufficient credits to meet the 120 credit minimum. One of the first year professional courses will fulfill the remaining B.A. degree requirements in Biology. 55

56 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/21/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 BIO 103 General Biology I 4 BIO 104 General Biology II 4 8 CHM 101 General Chemistry I (Natural Science Core) MTH 109 Calculus I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 7 Year Combined Degree Program - Biology B.S. & O.D. Providence College (PC) & New England College of Optometry (NECO) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II MTH 110 Calculus II nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHM 202 Organic Chemistry II 4 8 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 BIO 200 Int. Cell Bio & Mol. Genetics (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 7 EPS 101 General Physics I 4 EPS 102 General Physics II 4 8 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective rd Year BIO Elective w/ Lab (Microbiology) 4 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 8 CHM Biochem 3 MTH Biostats th Year Social Science (Psy 100) 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 OAT - September Test Administration BIO Electives (fulfilled by 1st year courses at NECO) *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 99 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. from either the same core P.C. B.S. Degree Requirements - in Italics Theology (Grp I & II) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (BIO 200) discipline, language or the same themed area* NECO Admissions Requirements - in Bold Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (FULFILLED THROUGH NECO) Natural Science - 3 cr. (CHM 101) Diversity Social Science - 3 cr. (PSY 100) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109) Honors Program satisfy the core focus/ Fine Arts - 3 cr. concentration requirement **Currently, BIO BS Optometry Majors fulfill the Natural Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores along with the Intensive Writing II Proficiency and the Core Focus/Concentration requirement. Providence College General Degree Requirements: These will be completed during the first three years at Providence College. DWC is equivalent to 4 cr. English. The Writing I and II proficiency is equivalent to at least 2 credits of English. The Providence College core will thus satisfy the NECO admission requirement in English. The first year courses at the New English College of Optometry will be accepted as transfer credits to complete the remaining requirements for the Providence College degree. These must include sufficient credits to meet the 120 credit minimum. Up to three of the first year professional courses will fulfill the remaining B.S. degree requirements in Biology. 56

57 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/21/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 BIO 103 General Biology I 4 BIO 104 General Biology II 4 8 CHM 101 General Chemistry I (Natural Science Core) MTH 109 Calculus I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 1st course(s) recommended for Biology B.A. Pre-Med - BIO or CHM CHM 102 General Chemistry II Science Elective - Statistics nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I 4 BIO 200 Int. Cell Bio & Mol. Genetics (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 7 PSY 100 Intro. to Psychology (Social Science Core) 3 Science Elective - Organic Chemistry II 4 7 Core 3 SOC 100: Intro. to Sociology 3 6 Free Elective (optional) Free Elective (optional) rd Year BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 8 EPS 101 General Physics I 4 Science Elective - General Physics II 4 8 Science Elective - Biochemistry 3 Core 3 6 Elective (optional) Core th Year BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 Core *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: (BOLD) DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either BIO , 200 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (BIO 200) the same core discipline, language or the same CHM , Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* MTH 109 or higher Natural Science - 3 cr. (CHM 101 or BIO 103) Diversity EPS 101 Social Science - 3 cr. (PSY 100) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts 3 BIO Electives w/ lab (4 cr. each) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109) Honors Program satisfy the core focus 4 SCI Electives w/ lab (3 or 4 cr. each) Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement Premed Requirements (HIGHLIGHTED) **Currently, BIO BA (Pre-Med) Majors fulfill the Natural Science, Quantitative Reasoning and Social Science Cores along with the Intensive Writing II Proficiency. 0 Note: DWC is equivalent to 4-credits of English. The Writing I and II Proficiencies are equivalent to at least 2 credits of English. The Premedical prerequisites listed may be spread out over four years, but are required BEFORE taking the MCAT. Students may elect to take 4 or 5 courses in the second semester freshman year. However, with two laboratory courses, 5 courses should be taken only with the advice and approval of the student's academic advisor. *Preparation for the statistics covered on the MCAT may be completed with Statistics, Biostatistics, Research, Design & Statistical Analysis (PSY ), and others. 57

58 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/21/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 BIO 103 General Biology I 4 BIO 104 General Biology II 4 8 CHM 101 General Chemistry I (Natural Science Core) MTH 109 Calculus I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II MTH 110 Calculus II nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHM 202 Organic Chemistry II 4 8 PSY 100 Intro. to Psychology (Social Science Core) 1st course(s) recommended for Biology B.S. Pre-Med - BIO or CHM BIO 200 Int. Cell Bio & Mol. Genetics (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 6 MTH 218: Biostatistics 3 SOC 100: Intro. to Sociology 3 6 Free Elective (optional) Free Elective (optional) rd Year BIO Elective: Biochemistry (CHM 309) 3 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 7 EPS 101 General Physics I 4 EPS 102 General Physics II 4 8 Free Elective (optional) Core th Year BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 8 BIO Elective 3 Core *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: (BOLD) DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either BIO , 200 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (BIO 200) the same core discipline, language or the same CHM , Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* MTH 109 & 110 or higher Natural Science - 3 cr. (CHM 101 or BIO 103) Diversity EPS Social Science - 3 cr. (PSY 100) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts 5 BIO Electives, 3 of these electives Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109) Honors Program satisfy the core focus must be lab courses (4 cr. each) Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement Premed Requirements (HIGHLIGHTED) **Currently, BIO BS (Pre-Med) Majors fulfill the Natural Science, Quantitative Reasoning and Social Science Cores along with the Intensive Writing II Proficiency. Note: DWC is equivalent to 4 cr. English. The Writing I and II Proficiencies are equivalent to at least 2 credits of English. The Premedical prerequisites listed may be spread out over four years, but are required BEFORE taking the MCAT. Students may elect to take 4 or 5 courses in the second semester freshman year. However, with two laboratory courses, 5 courses should be taken only with the advice and approval of the student's academic advisor. *Preparation for the statistics covered on the MCAT may be completed with Statistics, Biostatistics, Research, Design & Statistical Analysis (PSY ), and others. 58

59 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/9/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Business Economics B.A. - ECN 101 or ECN 102 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ECN 101 Principles of Micro (or ECN 102) (Social Science Core) 3 ECN 102 Principles of Macro (or ECN 101) 3 6 MTH 108 or 109 or 131 (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 ACC 203 Financial Accounting 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ECN 201 Microeconomics Analysis (or ECN ECN 202 Macroeconomic Analysis (or ECN ) 201) MTH 217 Intro to Statistics (or MTH 423) 3 ECN 214 Intro to Econometrics w/ Lab rd Year ECN Elective 3 ECN Electives (2) 6 9 ACC 204 Managerial Accounting 3 THL 374 Theological Ethics for Business and Economics (300-level Theology Core) 3 6 FIN 207 Managerial Finance 3 Core 3 6 Core th Year ECN Electives (2) 6 ECN 488 Capstone 3 9 Core 3 ECN Elective 3 6 Free Elective 3 3 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 122 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either ECN 101, 102, 201, 202, 214 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. (THL 374) Intensive Writing - II (ECN 488) the same core discipline, language or the same 6 ECN Electives (at least one at 400 level) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (ECN 488) themed area* ECN 488 Capstone Course Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity MTH 108 (109 or 131) & MTH 217 OR 423 Social Science - 3 cr. (ECN 101 or 102) Civic Engagement(ECN 424 *Students completing the Liberal Arts ACC 203, 204 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 108 or higher) and ECN 425) Honors Program satisfy the core focus FIN 207 Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement THL 374 OR 376 **Currently, ECNB Majors fulfill the Social Science, Quantitative Reasoning and 300-level Theology Cores and the Intensive Writing II and Oral Communication Proficiencies. 59

60 2020 Academic Planning Form As of 4/15/2016 Example Sequence for Chemistry B.A. (most electives can be chosen at student's discretion.) # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 4 CHM 121 Intro Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 122 Intro Chemistry II w/ Lab 4 Social Science core 3 Free Elective 3 2 nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II w/ Lab 4 EPS 101 General Physics I w/ Lab 4 EPS 102 General Physics II w/ Lab 4 Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 3 rd Year CHM 331 Adv. Analytical Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 321 Physical Chemistry I 3 CHM 381 Chemistry Seminar 1 CHM 382 Chemistry Seminar 2 Free Elective 3 Theology II core 3 Theology I core 3 Core Focus elect. - part 2 3 Core Focus elect. - part 1 3 Free Elective 3 Free Elective th Year CHM 401 Inorganic Chemistry w/ Lab 4 *Science Elective 3 CHM 481 Chemistry Seminar 2 CHM 482 Chemistry Seminar 0 Philosopy Ethics core 3 Philosophy core 3 Fine Arts core 3 Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Foundational Component: Core Focus/Concentration: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. 2 courses/ 6 cr. from either the same core CHM , , 321 Theology (Grp I & II) - 6 cr. discipline, language or the same themed area 331, 381, 382, 401, 481, 482 Philosophy (1 + Ethics) - 6 cr. MTH Natural Science - (CHM 121/121L) Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors EPS Social Science - 3 cr. Honors Program automatically satisfy the core *Science Elective (Chosen from BIO Quantitative Reasoning - (MTH 131 or MTH 132) focus requirement. or advanced courses in BIO, CHM, EPS, or MTH Fine Arts - 3 cr. excluding Research) Proficiencies: (many proficiencies can be attained by completion of designated Foundational or Core Focus courses.) Intensive Writing - I Intensive Writing - II (in the major: CHM 222L/CHM 321/CHM 331L/CHM 401L) Oral Communication (in the major CHM 381/382/481/482) Diversity Civic Engagement 60 For Study Abroad - fall or spring of the junior year following consultation with department chair and provided one finds equivalent courses.

61 2020 Academic Planning Form As of 4/15/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 4 CHM 121 Intro Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 122 Intro Chemistry II w/ Lab 4 Social Science core 3 Philosophy core 3 2 nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 3 rd Year CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II w/ Lab 4 EPS 101 General Physics I w/ Lab 4 EPS 102 General Physics II w/ Lab 4 Core Focus elect. - part 1 3 Core Focus elect. - part 2 3 CHM 331 Adv. Analytical Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 321 Physical Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 332 Organic Analysis w/lab 2 CHM 309 Biochemistry 3 CHM 432 Adv. Analytical Chemistry II w/lab 2 CHM 382 Chemistry Seminar 2 CHM 381 Chemistry Seminar 1 Theology II core 3 Theology I core 3 Core Focus elect. - part 2 3 Core Focus elect. - part th Year CHM 401 Inorganic Chemistry w/ Lab 4 CHM 482 Chemistry Seminar 0 CHM 311 Chemistry of Materials w/ Lab 2 Philosopy Ethics core 3 CHM 322 Physical Chemistry II w/ Lab 2 Free elective 3 CHM 481 Chemistry Seminar 2 Free elective 3 Free elective 3 Free elective 3 Fine Arts core 3 Free elective *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Foundational Component: Core Focus/Concentration: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. 2 courses/ 6 cr. from either the same core discipline, CHM , , 311, L, L Theology (Grp I & II) - 6 cr. language, or theme 331, 332, 381, 382, 401,432, 481, 482 Philosophy (1 + Ethics) - 6 cr. (It is strongly recommended that students wishing to pursue MTH Natural Science - (CHM 121/121L) their study of Chemistry in graduate school take 2 extra MTH courses EPS Social Science - 3 cr. to complete the Core Focus.) Quantitative Reasoning - (MTH 131 or MTH 132) Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors Fine Arts - 3 cr. Program automatically satisfy the core focus requirement. For Study Abroad - Spring of the junior year following consultation with department chair. Proficiencies: (many proficiencies can be attained by completion of designated Foundational and Core Focus courses.) Intensive Writing - I Note that CHM 311/311L, CHM 322/322L, CHM 3 Intensive Writing - II (CHM 222L/CHM 321/CHM 331L/CHM 401L) Oral Communication (CHM 381/382/481/482) Diversity Civic Engagement Example Sequence for Chemistry B.S. (most electives can be chosen at student's discretion.) 61 and CHM 432/432L are offered every other year.

62 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/10/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CSC 103 Computer Science I 4 CSC 104 Computer Science II 4 8 MTH 109 Calc I OR MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 1st course(s) recommended for Computer Science - CSC 103 (not 101) 3/4 MTH 110 Calc II OR MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 3/4 6/8 Core 3 MTH 117 Discrete Math /15 14/15 28/30 2 nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CSC 225 Discrete Structures 4 CSC 387 Computer Architecture rd Year CSC 424 Database Management Systems 3 CSC Elective 3 6 Core 3 *Math Elective th Year CSC 440 Numerical Analysis I 3 CSC 433 Computer Networks 3 6 CSC 445 Operating Systems 3 CSC Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 122/124 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either CSC 103, 104, 225, 387, 424, 433, 440, 445 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same CSC Electives (2) which must be 300 or 400 level Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* MTH 117, 131 (or 109), 132 (or 110) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity *Math elective chosen from: Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts MTH 215, 217, 223, 307, OR 317, 325, 331 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109, 110, 117, 131, 132) Fine Arts - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus requirement **Currently, CSC Majors fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning Core. 62

63 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/10/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Creative Writing - ENG 175 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ENG 175 Intro to Literature (Intensive Writing ENG Literature with Intensive Writing I Proficiency) Proficiency II Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ENG 380 Creative Writing in Fiction OR Eng 381 Creative Writing in Poetry 3 ENG Literature Pre rd Year ENG Literature Pre ENG 442 Seminar: The Prose Poem 3 6 *ENG Literature Post ENG Literature Pre th Year *ENG Literature Post ENG 488 Seminar: Poetry Capstone OR ENG 489 Seminar: Fiction Capstone 3 6 ENG Literature Elective 3 Free Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I (ENG 175) 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either ENG 175, 380 OR 381, 442, 488 OR 489 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same ENG Lit Pre-1800 (4) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* ENG Lit Post 1800 (4) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity ENG Lit Elective Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts *No more than 2 creative writing courses may Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus satisfy 4 Post 1800 classes requirement Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, ENGC Majors fulfill the Intensive Writing I Proficiency. Note: Additional proficiencies and core requirments may be satisfied in the major through careful selection of major electives. Consult your advisor prior to course selection. 63

64 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/9/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Economics B.A. - ECN 101 or ECN 102 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ECN 101 Principles of Micro (or ECN 102) (Social Science Core) 3 ECN 102 Principles of Macro (or ECN 101) 3 6 MTH 108 or 109 or 131 (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 MTH 217 Intro to Statistics (or MTH 423) 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ECN 201 Microeconomics Analysis (or ECN ECN 202 Macroeconomic Analysis (or ECN ) 201) ECN 214 Intro to Econometrics w/ Lab 4 Core rd Year ECN Elective 3 ECN Electives (2) 6 9 Core 3 THL 376 Catholic Social Thought (300-level Theology Core) 3 6 Core th Year ECN Electives (2) 6 ECN 488 Capstone 3 9 Free Elective 3 ECN Elective 3 6 Free Elective 3 3 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 122 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either ECN 101, 102, 201, 202, 214 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. (THL 376) Intensive Writing - II (ECN 488) the same core discipline, language or the same 6 ECN Electives (at least one at 400 level) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (ECN 488) themed area* ECN 488 Capstone Course Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity MTH 108 (or 109 or 131) & MTH 217 OR 423 Social Science - 3 cr. (ECN 101 or 102) Civic Engagement( ECN 424 *Students completing the Liberal Arts THL 374 OR 376 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 108 or higher) and ECN 425 ) Honors Program satisfy the core focus Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, ECN Majors fulfill the Social Science, Quantitative Reasoning and 300-level Theology Cores and the Intensive Writing II and Oral Communication Proficiencies. 64

65 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/9/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 4 8 EPS 101 General Physics I w/ Lab 4 EPS 102 General Physics II w/ Lab 4 8 EPS 131 Intro to Engineering 1 Fine Arts Core 3 4 ECN 101 Principles of Micro Econ (required by affiliate schools) (Social Science Core) 3 Intensive Writing I Proficiency nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 EPS 201 Intro Modern Physics w/ Lab (Oral Communication Proficiency) 4 EPS 301 Mechanics 3 7 MTH 223 Calc & Analytical Geometry III 4 MTH 304 Differential Equations 3 7 Philosophy Core 3 EPS 222 Elements of Systems Modeling (1 cr, taken as 6th course) 1 4 Diversity Proficiency 3 Theology (200 Level) Core 3 6 Free Elective rd Year MTH 318 Topics in Applied Mathematics 3 EPS 202 Electronic Devices with Lab (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) th Year EPS 221 Scientific Programming 3 EPS 430 Thermodynamics 3 6 CHM 101 General Chemistry I w/ Lab (or CHM 121) (Natural Science Core) 1st course(s) recommended for Engineering-Physics-Systems B.S. (3+2 Program) - EPS 101 and/or 131, MTH 131, ECN CHM 102 General Chemistry II w/ Lab (or CHM 122) 4 8 Ethics Core 3 Civic Engagement Proficiency 3 6 Theology (300 Level) *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 102 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same EPS 101, 102, 131, 201, 202, 221, 222, 301, 430 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (EPS 202) core discipline, language or the same themed area* CHM (or ) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (EPS 201) (FULFILLED BY COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) MTH , 223, 304, 318 Natural Science - 3 cr. (CHM 101) Diversity ECN 101 (required by affiliate schools) Social Science - 3 cr. (ECN 101) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 131) Program satisfy the core focus requirement Fine Arts - 3 cr. **Currently, EPS Majors fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning, Social Science and Natural Science Cores; the Intensive Writing II and Oral Communication Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. Note that each Engineering subfield (e.g. Biomedical, Civil, Mechanical, Chemical, etc.) may require additional courses beginning in the second year of study. 65

66 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/10/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ENG 175 Intro to Literature (Intensive Writing I Proficiency) 1st course(s) recommended for English - ENG English Literature course with Intensive Writing II Proficiency 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ENG Literature Pre ENG Literature Post rd Year ENG Literature Pre ENG Literature Pre *ENG Literature Post *ENG Literature Post th Year *ENG Literature Post Eng Elective for Major Credit 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I (ENG 175) 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either ENG 175 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same ENG Lit Pre-1800 (4) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* ENG Lit Post 1800 (4) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity ENG Lit Elective Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts *No more than 2 creative writing courses may Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus satisfy 4 Post 1800 classes requirement Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, ENG Majors fulfill the Intensive Writing I Proficiency. Note: Additional proficiencies may be satisfied in the major through careful selection of major electives. Consult your advisor prior to course selection. 66

67 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/16/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 FLS 201 Major Language OR FLS FLS 201 Major Language OR FLS Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 FLS 212 Major Language (Fulfills Fine Arts Core) 3 FLS 321 OR 322 Major Language Literature 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective rd Year FLS 321 OR 322 Major Language Literature 3 FLS 300 Major Language Elective 3 6 FLS 300 Major Language Elective *(Study FLS 300 Major Language Elective *(Study Abroad Abroad is highly recommended for Fall or Spring. is highly recommended for Fall or Spring. Students 3 Students are able to fulfill all 300 Major Language are able to fulfill all 300 Major Language Cores 3 6 Cores abroad) abroad.) Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective th Year FLS 300 Major Language Elective 3 FLS Major Language Literature (400 level) 3 6 FLS Major Language Literature (400 level) 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. 1st course(s) recommended for Foreign Language Studies Level Course Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Require DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either FLS 201, 210, 212, 321, 322 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (FRN 321, 322) the same core discipline, language or the same FLS Major Electives level ( 3 courses ) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication(FRN 212) themed area* FLS Literature (2 courses ) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (SPN 322, FRN 370 Cult & Hist) Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts *Study Abroad: Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus Students fulfill 5 Language Fine Arts - 3 cr. (FLS 212) requirement Major requirements when studying abroad 67

68 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/9/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 GST 101 Introduction to Global Studies (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 GST 370: Special Topics in Globalization 3 6 Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 GST 303 Case Studies in Globalization (Social Science Core) 3 GST Concentration I 3 6 Advanced Language I 3 Advanced Language II rd Year 4 th Year Core/Elective 3 GST 290 Global Engagement 1 4 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 GST Upper Level Course I (Diversity Proficiency) THL 354, 358, or 376 (300-level Theology Core) Core/Elective Core/Elective GST Concentration II GST Concentration III 3 6 PSC International Focus 3 GST Concentration IV 3 6 GST 325 The Global Economy 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 GST 480 Global Studies Capstone I - Seminar (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 1st course(s) recommended for Global Studies - GST GST 481 Global Studies Capstone II - Thesis (Oral Communication Proficiency) 3 6 PHL 301 Ethics, Moral, Leadership and the Common Good 3 Core/Elective 3 6 GST Upper Level Course II 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 122 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either GST 101, 303, 480, 481 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. (THL 376) Intensive Writing - II (GST 480) the same core discipline, language or the same PSC Elective (International Focus) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (GST 481) themed area* ECN 102 or GST 325 Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (most upper level GST) THL 354, 358, OR 376 Social Science - 3 cr. (GST 201) Civic Engagement (GST 101) *Students completing the Liberal Arts PHL 301 (Preferred Ethics Core) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus 2 Advanced Language Courses Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement 4 GST Thematic Concentration Courses 2 GST Upper Level Courses **Currently, GST Majors fulfill the Social Science and 300-level Theology Cores; and the Intensive Writing II, Oral Communication, Diversity, and Civic Engagement Proficiencies. 68

69 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/3/2016 1st course(s) recommended for History - HIS 100, HIS , or History Electives in consultation with faculty # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 Core 3 HIS 100 Thinking and Writing about History (Intensive Writing I Proficiency) 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 HIS US period requirement 3 HIS US period requirement rd Year HIS US period requirement OR HIS elective 3 HIS US period requirement OR HIS elective 3 6 HIS European - Pre HIS European - Post th Year HIS European History - Pre or Post HIS Non-Western 3 6 HIS Seminar 3 HIS Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I (HIS 100, 214) Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. (HIS 214) Intensive Writing - II (HIS 226, 231, 319, 338, Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. 352, 366 ) themed area* Natural Science - 3 cr. Oral Communication (HIS 230, 255, 339, 424, 483 ) Social Science - 3 cr. (HIS 366) Diversity (HIS 207, 231, 298, 299, 334, 344, , 368, 369 ) HIS Non-Western (1) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Civic Engagement (HIS 205, 302, 483 ) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors HIS Electives (2) Fine Arts - 3 cr. Program satisfy the core focus requirement. Junior/Senior Seminar Core Focus: Major Requirements: 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either HIS 100 the same core discipline, language or the same HIS US Period - 255, 256, 257, OR 258 (choose 3) HIS European Period (3) - one Pre 1715, one Post 1715, and one Pre OR Post 1715 **Currently, HIS Majors may fulfill the Theology 200 level and Social Science Cores along with all of the Proficiencies through careful selection of major electives. See class numbers above and consult your advisor prior to course selection. 69

70 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/31/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Humanities- ARH 106 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 Foreign Language I 3 Foreign Language II rd Year Foreign Language III 3 Foreign Language IV 3 6 Humanities Art 3 Humanities Focus th Year Humanities Focus 3 Humanities Focus 3 6 Humanities Focus 3 Humanities Focus 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either Humanities Art (1) Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same Foreign Language (4) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area (consult with Department Chair)* Humanities Focus (5) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (Arts, Classics, Foreign Languages, History, Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts Literature, Music, Philosophy, Theatre, Theology) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement 70

71 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/10/2016 Fall Semester # of Spring Semester # of Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 *MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 4 8 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MTH 223 Calculus III 4 MTH 290 Foundations of Higher Mathematics 3 7 MTH 215 Linear Algebra 3 CSC 103 OR CSC rd Year MTH 323 Real Analysis I 3 1st course(s) recommended for Mathematics - MTH MTH 324 Real Analysis II OR MTH 316 Abstract Algebra II OR MTH 330 Complex Variables 3 6 MTH 315 Abstract Algebra I 3 MTH Elective th Year Free Elective 3 MTH Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 124 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either MTH 131, 132, 215, 223, 290, 315, 323, 324 OR 316 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same OR 330 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* MTH Elective (2) (must be 300-level or higher) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity CSC 103 or CSC 104 or any CSC courses numbered Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts 200 or higher but not CSC 440 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 131 or 132) Honors Program satisfy the core focus *Math Majors placed into MTH 132 will have the Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement MTH 131 requirement waived **Currently, MTH Majors fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning Core. 71

72 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/18/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MSC 201 & 201L Theory I w/ Lab 4 MSC 202 & 202L Theory II w/ Lab 4 8 MSC 106 Recital Attendance P/F MSC 106 Recital Attendance P/F 0 Free elective 3 Free Elective 3 6 Intensive Writing I Proficiency 3 Quantitative Reasoning Proficiency 3 6 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons Ensemble 0.5 Ensemble Free Elective (optional) nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MSC 301 & 301L Theory III w/ Lab 4 MSC 302 & 302L Theory IV w/ Lab 4 8 MSC 310 Music History & Lit I (Fine Arts Core) 3 MSC 311 Music History & Lit II (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) MSC 106 Recital Attendance P/F MSC 106 Recital Attendance P/F 0 Social Science Core 3 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 6 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons Ensemble 0.5 Ensemble Free Elective (optional) Free Elective (optional) rd Year MSC 312 Music History & Lit III 3 MSC Elective 3 6 MSC 106 Recital Attendance P/F MSC 106 Recital Attendance P/F 0 MSC Elective 3 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 6 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 Diversity Proficiency 3 6 Intensive Writing II Proficiency 3 Free Elective 3 6 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons Ensemble 0.5 Ensemble Free Elective (optional) 1st course(s) recommended for Music - MSC L, L, Fine Arts Courses (not MSC 210) Free Elective (optional) th Year MSC Elective 3 MSC 498 Senior Recital/Project 1 4 MSC 106 Recital Attendance P/F MSC 106 Recital Attendance P/F 0 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 Natural Science Core 3 6 Civic Engagement Proficiency 3 Free Elective 3 6 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons Ensemble 0.5 Ensemble Free Elective (optional) Free Elective 3 3 Free Elective (optional) *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either MSC L, L, L, L, 310, Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (MSC 311) the same core discipline, language or the same 311, 312 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* MSC Electives (3): At either 300 or 400 level Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity MSC 106 required ALL semesters Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts Large ensemble required for ALL semesters Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus Applied lessons required for ALL semesters - Fine Arts - 3 cr. (MSC 310) requirement Sign up in MSC dept. office Smith Center G04 Senior Recital/Project required during senior year **Currently, MSC Majors fulfill the Fine Arts Core and the Intensive Writing II Proficiency. #Students must pass a piano proficiency test at the end of their sophomore year

73 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/21/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MSC 201 & 201L Theory I w/ Lab 4 MSC 202 & 202L Theory II w/ Lab 4 8 MSC 206 Piano Class I or MSC 207 Voice Class 3 MSC 230 Intro to Music Education 3 6 Quantitative Reasoning Core 3 Intensive Writing I Proficiency 3 6 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons MSC 106 Recital Attendance MSC 106 Recital Attendance 0 Ensemble 0.5 MSC 206 Piano I or MSC 306 Piano II or MSC 207 Voice Class Ensemble nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MSC 301 & 301L Theory III w/ Lab 4 MSC 302 & 302L Theory IV w/ Lab 4 8 MSC 310 Music History & Lit I (Fine Arts Core) 3 MSC 311 Music History & Lit II (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 6 SWK 253 Human Behavior (Social Science Core) 3 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 6 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons MSC 106 Recital Attendance MSC 106 Recital Attendance 0 Free Elective (Optional) MSC 306 Piano II or MSC 207 Voice Class or Elective (as advised) 3 3 Ensemble 0.5 Ensemble rd Year MSC 330 & 330L Teaching General Music 4 MSC 331 & 331L Teaching Music in Secondary School th Year MSC 305 Conducting 3 MSC 303 Music Composition 3 6 MSC 312 Music History & Lit III 3 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 6 EDU 221 Intro & Char Indv w/ Special Needs (Diversity Proficiency) 3 MSC 334 Teaching Woodwinds (not a full course) 1 4 MSC 333 Teaching Brass & Percussion (not a full course) 1 Natural Science Elective 3 4 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons MSC 106 Recital Attendance MSC 106 Recital Attendance 0 Free Elective (Optional) Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 3 Ensemble 0.5 Ensemble MSC 332 & 332L Teaching Music in Secondary MSC 499 Student Teaching (Oral Communication 4 School, Instrumental Proficiency) MSC 498 Senior Recital/Project 1 Applied Lessons (may be waived with permission of instructor) MSC 335 Teaching Strings (not a full course) 1 MSC 106 Recital Attendance 1 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 3 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 3 Free Elective 3 3 Applied Lessons MSC 106 Recital Attendance 0 Ensemble *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. 1st course(s) recommended for Music Education - MSC L, L, Fine Arts Courses (not MSC 210) Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same MSC L, L, L, L, 310, Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (MSC 311) core discipline, language or the same themed area* 311, 312 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (MSC 499) (FULFILLED THROUGH COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) EDU 221, 301 Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (EDU 221) SWK 253 Social Science - 3 cr. (SWK 253) Civic Engagement (EDU 301) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors Program smsc 106 required ALL semesters Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. satisfy the core focus requirement Large ensemble required for 7 semesters Fine Arts - 3 cr. (MSC 310) Applied lessons required for ALL semesters - **Currently, MSCE Majors fulfill the Fine Arts and Social Science Cores; the Intensive Writing II, Oral Communication, Diversity and Civic Engagement Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. It is recommended that students, in consultation with their advisor, select one core course that satisfies the needed proficiency (Writing I) to complete all core requirements. 73 Sign up in MSC dept. office Smith Center G04 Senior Recital/Project required during fall semester of senior year #Students must pass a piano proficiency test by the end of their sophomore year

74 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/18/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 PHL 101 (Logic) 3 Core 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 PHL 300 Ancient Philosophy 3 PHL 360 Early Modern Philsophy rd Year PHL 330 Wisdom of Aquinas 3 PHL Departmental Elective th Year PHL Ethics Core 3 PHL Contemporary Elective 3 6 PHL 315 Intro to Symbolic Logic (if PHL 101 not already taken) 1st course(s) recommended for Philosophy - PHL PHL 480 Seminar 3 6 PHL Departmental Elective 3 PHL 426 Metaphysics 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either PHL 101 OR 315 (recommended for majors) Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same PHL 300, 330, 360, 426, 480 and Ethics course Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. (PHL 101) Oral Communication themed area* (PHL 202 NOT REQUIRED) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity For contemporary elective chose one of Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts PHL 326, 352, 412, 422, 430 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus 3 Departmental Electives Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement In total, 8 courses must be 300-level or above **Currently, PHL Majors fulfill 3 credits of the Philosophy Core. The Philosophy-Ethics Core requirement can be satisfied through careful selection of Philosophy courses. 74

75 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/31/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 PSC 101 Politics (Social Science Core, Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 PSC 102 Intro Empirical Analysis (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 PSC Subfield Requirement 3 PSC Subfield Requirement 3 6 PSC Elective 3 Core rd Year PSC Subfield Requirement 3 PSC Subfield Requirement 3 6 PSC Elective 3 PSC Elective th Year PSC Elective 3 1st course(s) recommended for Political Science - PSC 101 PSC 489 Capstone Seminar (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either PSC 101, 102 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (PSC 488) the same core discipline, language or the same Subfields: Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* International Relations Requirement Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity Political Theory Requirement Social Science - 3 cr. (PSC 101) Civic Engagement (PSC 101) *Students completing the Liberal Arts American Politics Requirement Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (PSC 102) Honors Program satisfy the core focus Comp. Politics Requirement Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement PSC Capstone Seminar PSC Electives (4) **Currently, PSC Majors fulfill the Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores and the Intensive Writing II and Civic Engagement Proficiencies. 75

76 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/4/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 PSY 100 Intro to Psychology (Social Science Core) 3 PSY Social/Cultural Contexts Elective 3 6 Intensive Writing I Core/Foreign Language (for Core Focus) 3 Core Free Elective nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) rd Year PSY L Research Design and Statistical Analysis I w/ Lab 4 PSY L Research Design and Statistical Analysis II w/ Lab (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 4 8 PSY Biological Processes Elective 3 Core PSY Understanding Developmental Processes PSY Applying Research Methods to 3 Elective Psychology w/ Lab 4 7 PSY Understanding Individuals Elective 3 PSY Elective th Year PSY Studying Psychology in Depth Elective 3 PSY Elective 3 6 PSY Elective 3 Free Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 124 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. 1st course(s) recommended for Psychology - PSY 100 Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either Total: 12 PSY Courses Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (PSY 406, 407, 409, the same core discipline, language or the same PSY 101, 201, 202 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. 416, 426) themed area* 1 from Understanding Biological Processes: Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (PSY 305, 314, 318) PSY 315, 325, 326 Social Science - 3 cr. (PSY 100) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts 1 from Understanding Individuals: PSY 303, 316, Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (PSY L) Oral Proficiency (PSY 479, 488) Honors Program satisfy the core focus 323, 324, 330 Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement 1 from Understanding Development: PSY 306, from Understanding Social/Cultural Contexts: **Currently, PSY Majors fulfill the Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores. The Intensive Writing II, Oral Communication and Diversity Proficiencies can be satisfied through careful selection of major electives. Note: The Neuroscience Capstone is offered by the Psychology and Biology departments in alternating years. PSY 305, 317, from Applying Research Methods to PSY: PSY 402, , 409, 416, from PSY in Depth: PSY , , 485, 486, ; Neuroscience Capstone (PSY 479) 3 PSY Electives: 3 additional from any of the above or PSY 335, 350, 395; BIO 320, 360

77 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/18/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 PSP 101 Intro to Service Democratic Comm. ( Civic Engagement Proficiency ) 3 PSP 202 Foundations of Org. Serv. (or next Fall) Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 PSP 303 Community Organizing (Intensive Writing I Proficiency ) 3 PSP 320 Practicum rd Year PSP 321 Practicum 3 PSP Cultural Diversity ( PSP 302 fulfills Diversity Proficienc y) 3 6 THL 376 Catholic Social Thought (300-level Theology Core) Free Elective 3 3 PSP Track Course 3 6 PHL 301 Ethics, Moral Leadership, and the Common Good ( Ethics Core ) th Year PSP 450 Internship 3 1st course(s) recommended for Public & Community Service - PSP 101 PSP 481 Capstone Seminar (PSP 480 & 481 combined fulfill Writing II Proficiency) 3 6 PSP 480 Capstone Seminar 3 PSP Track Course 3 6 PSP Track Course 3 Free Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I (PSP 303) 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either PSP 101, 202, 303, 320, 321, 450, 480, 481 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. (THL 376) Intensive Writing - II (PSP 480 & 481) the same core discipline, language or the same PSP Track Courses (3) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. PHL 301 Oral Communication themed area* Cultural Diversity Course Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (PSP 302) PHL 301 Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement (PSP 101, 301) *Students completing the Liberal Arts THL 376 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement NOTE: Currently, PSP majors can meet all proficiencies except Oral Communication in the major. PSP majors may also fulfill the Social Science Core Requirement through the track courses. Currently, two courses that fulfill this major requirement also fulfill the Diversity Proficiency --PSP 302 and SWK 220. Be sure to check with the Chair about new options as they are approved.

78 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/9/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Quantitative Economics B.A. - ECN 101 or 102, MTH 109 or 131, MTH 110 or 132 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ECN 101 Principles of Micro (or ECN 102) (Social Science Core) 3 ECN 102 Principles of Macro (or ECN 101) 3 6 MTH 109 Calculus I (or MTH 131) (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 MTH 110 Calculus II (or MTH 132) 3 6 Core 3 ENG 101 Freshman Writing Seminar nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ECN 201 Microeconomics Analysis (or ECN ECN 202 Macroeconomic Analysis (or ECN ) 201) MTH 217 Intro to Statistics (or MTH 423) 3 ECN 214 Intro to Econometrics w/ Lab rd Year ECN 315 Math for Economists I 4 ECN 314 Econometrics Models 3 7 ECN Elective 3 ECN Elective 3 6 Quantitative Elective (Non Departmental) 3 Quantitative Elective (Non Departmental) 3 6 Core 3 THL 376 Catholic Social Thought (300-level Theology Core) th Year ECN 409 OR 415 OR ECN 488 Capstone 3 6 Quantitative Elective (Non Departmental) 3 ECN Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either ECN 101, 102, 201, 202, 214, 314, 315 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. (THL 376) Intensive Writing - II (ECN 488) the same core discipline, language or the same & EITHER 409, 415, OR 486 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (ECN 488) themed area* ECN Electives (9 credits) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity ECN 488 Capstone Course Social Science - 3 cr. (ECN 101 or 102) Civic Engagement(ECN 424 *Students completing the Liberal Arts THL 374 OR 376 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 108 or higher) and ECN 425) Honors Program satisfy the core focus MTH 217 OR 423 Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement MTH 109/110 OR MTH 131/132 0 **Currently, ECNQ Majors fulfill the Social Science, Quantitative Reasoning and 300-level Theology Cores and the Intensive Writing II and Oral Communication Proficiencies. 78

79 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/12/2016 1st Courses recommended for SSC - Introductory courses in the Social Sciences (Anthropology, Economics, History, Linguistics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology) # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 SSC Course 3 SSC Course 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 SSC Course 3 SSC Research Methods Requirement rd Year SSC Theory Requirement 3 SSC Courses (2) 6 9 Core th Year SSC Courses (2) 6 SSC 480 Capstone Seminar 3 9 Free Elective 3 3 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either 10 Social Sciences courses in 3 disciplines Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same including: Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* 1 Research Methods Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity 1 Theory Course Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts 1 Capstone Seminar Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus 6 upper level courses Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, SSC Majors fulfill the Social Science Core requirement; they can meet Core Proficiency requirements through selection, within the major, of the appropriate courses. Consult the Program Advisor. 79

80 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/13/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total # of Credis for year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 SOC 101 Intro Sociology (Social Science Core) 3 SOC Elective 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 SOC 209 Reserch Methods (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 SOC Elective rd Year SOC Elective 3 Core 3 6 SOC 403 or 417 History of Social Thought or Cont. Social Theory SOC Elective ** th Year SOC Elective 3 Free or Soc elective 3 6 SOC 480 Capstone Seminar (Oral Communication Proficiency & Writing II proficiency) 3 SOC Elective *** 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. 1st course(s) recommended for Sociology - SOC 101 Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either 10 Sociology Courses including: Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (SOC 480^) the same core discipline, language or the same SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (SOC 480) themed area* SOC 209 Research Methods Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (SOC 301, 354^) SOC 403 OR 417 Social Science - 3 cr. (SOC 101, 301, 321, 405) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts SOC 480 Capstone Seminar Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (SOC 209, 336) Honors Program satisfy the core focus **SOC 450 and/or SOC 451 are strongly recommended Fine Arts - 3 cr. ^Pending Approval requirement ***SOC 336 Social Statistics is strongly recommended for students going on to graduate school **Currently, SOC Majors fulfill the Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores and the Oral Communication Proficiency. 80

81 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/4/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Studio Art - ART 101 or ART 111 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ART 101 Visual Design I (Fine Arts Core) 3 ART 102 Visual Design II 3 6 ART 111 Drawing I 3 ART 112 Drawing II 3 6 ARH 106 Art History Survey 3 ARH Elective 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ART 213 Drawing III 3 ART Studio Elective 3 6 ART Studio Elective 3 Core rd Year ART Concentration I 3 ART Concentration II 3 6 ART Studio Elective 3 ART Studio Elective (3D) 3 6 ARH Elective 3 Core th Year ART Concentration III 3 ART Concentration IV (Studio Thesis) 3 6 ARH Elective 3 Core 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: #Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either ART 101, 102, 111, 112, 213 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same ARH 106 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* ARH Elective (3) Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity ART Elective (4) Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts ART Concentration I, II, III, IV Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus PHL 407 is recommended for majors when offered. Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement #For a complete list of Studio Thesis Courses, please see the Providence College Catalog. **Currently, ART Majors fulfill the Fine Arts Core. 81

82 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/11/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 TDF 108 Script Analysis 3 TDF 205 Theatrical Production 3 6 TDF 109 Intro to Acting (Fine Arts Core and Oral Communication Proficiency) 3 TDF 252 Crew Experience TDF 252 Crew Experience 0.5 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) rd Year 1st course(s) recommended for Theatre, Dance & Film - TDF 100 & 200 Level Courses TDF 202 History of Theatre 3 TDF Concentration Elective 3 6 TDF 252 Crew Experience 0.5 TDF 252 Crew Experience ENG 311, ENG 312, ENG 313, ENG 357, ENG 368, ENG 372 or TDF TDF Concentration Elective ( level) 3 6 TDF Concentration Elective 3 TDF 301 Western Drama in Performance th Year TDF Concentration Elective ( level) 3 TDF 492 Senior Capstone 3 6 TDF Concentration Elective ( level) 3 Free Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either TDF 108, 109, 202, 205, 252, 301, 492 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same TDF Electives (6) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (TDF 109) themed area* *One or more electives from: ENG 311, Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity ENG 312, ENG 313, ENG 357, ENG 368, Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts ENG 372, TDF 480 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus Note: Remaining electives selected from ALL TDF Fine Arts - 3 cr. (TDF 109) requirement COURSES in consultation with advisor Note: Four electives must be 300 level or above **Currently, TDF Majors fulfill the Fine Arts Core as well as the Oral Communication Proficiency. 82

83 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/11/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 TDF 108 Script Analysis 3 TDF 205 Theatrical Production 3 6 TDF 109 Intro to Acting (Fine Arts Core and Oral Communication Proficiency) 3 MSC 101 Basic Concepts of Music 3 6 TDF 252 Crew Experience 0.5 TDF 252 Crew Experience Voice Lessons nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) rd Year TDF 202 History of Theatre 3 TDF 204 Voice and Diction 3 6 TDF Required Elective in Dance 3 Core 3 6 TDF 252 Crew Experience 0.5 TDF 252 Crew Experience Voice Lessons ENG 311, ENG 312, ENG 313, ENG 357, ENG 368, ENG 372 or TDF 480 1st course(s) recommended for Theatre, Dance & Film Musical Theatre Track- TDF 100 & 200 Level Courses 3 TDF 206 American Musical Theatre or MSC 223 Music in the Theatre Core 3 TDF 301 Western Drama in Performance 3 6 Opera Workshop th Year TDF 483 Advance Analysis and Performance 3 TDF 492 Senior Capstone 3 6 Free Elective 3 Core 3 6 Opera Workshop *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 124 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either TDF 108, 109, 202, 205, 252, 301, 492 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same MSC 101, TDF 204, TDF 206 or MSC 223, MSC/TDF 483, Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (TDF 109) themed area* One of the following electives: TDF 111, 212, 214, 216, 313, 314, 316 or 370 Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity Two semester of Voice Lessons and Two semesters of Opera Workshop Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts *One or more electives from: ENG 311, Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus ENG 312, ENG 313, ENG 357, ENG 368, Fine Arts - 3 cr. (TDF 109) requirement ENG 372, TDF 480 Note: Remaining electives selected from ALL TDF **Currently, TDF Majors fulfill the Fine Arts Core as well as the Oral Communication Proficiency. COURSES in consultation with advisor Note: Four electives must be 300 level or above

84 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/31/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 Core 3 THL 220 New Testament (200-level Theology Core) 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 THL 312 Old Testament (300-level Theology Core) 3 THL 330 Early Christian Doctrine rd Year THL 240 Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas (or THL 443) 1st course(s) recommended for Theology - THL THL 370 Principles of Moral Decision 3 6 THL 350 Christ, Word and Redeemer 3 THL Elective th Year THL 480 Senior Seminar 3 THL 481 Senior Seminar 3 6 THL Elective (400 level) 3 THL Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either THL 220, 240 OR 443, 312, 330, 350, 370, 480, 481 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. (THL 220 and THL 312) Intensive Writing - II (THL 380) the same core discipline, language or the same 3 THL Electives (one 400 level) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (THL 358, THL 373) Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, THL Majors fulfill both levels of the Theology Core. Note: Core requirements may be satisfied in the major through careful selection of major electives. Consult your advisor prior to course selection. 84

85 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/4/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 WMS 101 Intro to Women's Studies (Diversity Proficiency) 3 WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science 3 WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science rd Year WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science 3 WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science 3 6 WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science (or next Fall) (or next Spring) 4 th Year WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science OR WMS 489 Capstone 1st course(s) recommended for Women's Studies - WMS WMS Elective - Humanities or Social Science OR WMS 489 Capstone *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either WMS 101, 489 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same 3 WMS Electives in the Humanities (minimum) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* 3 WMS Electives in the Social Sciences or Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (WMS 101) Natural Sciences Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts 2 WMS Electives from either Humanities or Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus Social Sciences Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement Total: 10 courses Note: At least six of the ten courses must be at the **Currently, WMS Majors fulfill the Diversity Proficiency. 300 or 400 level. Note: Core requirements may be satisfied in the major through careful selection of major electives. Consult your advisor prior to course selection.

86 Exploring Business Page Thinking of a Major in Business? 87 School of Business Majors: Accountancy 88 Finance 89 Management 90 Marketing 91 86

87 Thinking of a Major in Business? Are you interested in exploring business, but don t know which major? Business majors in the School of Business require the same Business Core Curriculum The Core Business Courses Include: FIN 217 Statistical Analysis & Business Decisions I ACC 203 Financial Accounting ACC 204 Managerial Accounting ACC 110 & 111 Computer Applications in Business (each is a 1 credit self-paced program that is to be taken concurrently with ACC 203 and 204) MKT 205 Principles of Marketing FIN 207 Managerial Finance I MGT 301 Organizational Behavior FIN 310 Operations Management I MGT 330 Legal Environment for Business I The Business Core Curriculum also includes some courses that meet the College Core Curriculum requirements. These include: ECN 101 ECN 102 MTH 108 Principles of Economics Micro Principles of Economics Macro Mathematics for Business Analysis II The following courses are typically taken by freshmen and sophomores majoring in business: ECN 101 & 102 MTH 108 MKT 205 FIN 217 ACC 203 & 204 ACC 110 &

88 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/19/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Accountancy- ACC 203 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ACC 203 Financial Accounting** 3 ACC 204 Managerial Accounting 3 6 MTH 108 Math Business Analysis II or higher level calc. (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 ECN 102 Principles of Economics: Macro 3 6 Core (Recommended: ENG 101 or ENG Intensive Writing I Proficiency ) 3 ACC 111 Computer App. in Business II (1 cr.) 1 4 ACC 110 Computer App. in Business (1 cr.) 1 MKT 205 Principles of Marketing nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ACC 310 Intermediate Acct. I*** 4 ACC 311 Intermediate Acct. II**** 4 8 ECN 101 Principles of Economics: Micro (Social Science Core) 3 FIN 207 Managerial Finance I 3 6 FIN 217 Statistical Analysis & Business Decisions I (or MTH 217) 3 Core 3 6 Core rd Year ACC 301 Cost Accounting 3 ACC 350 Acct. Info. Systems 3 6 ACC 405 Advanced Accounting 3 ACC 406 Taxes & Business Decisions (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 6 MGT 301 Organizational Behavior (Diversity Proficiency) 3 FIN 310 Operations Mgmt. 4 7 ACC 200 Intro to the Profession (1 cr.) 1 Core 3 4 Core th Year MGT 330 Legal Environment for Business I 3 ACC 485 Accounting Policy (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 6 ACC 412 Auditing (Oral Communication Proficiency) 4 Core *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 122 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: *Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either ACC 200, 301, 310, 311, 350, 405, 406, 412, 485 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (ACC 485) the same core discipline, language or the same ACC 110, 111, 203, 204 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (ACC 412) themed area* ECN 101, 102 Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (FIN 301, MGT 301) FIN 207, 217, 310 Social Science - 3 cr. (ECN 101 or 102) Civic Engagement (ACC 406) *Students completing the Liberal Arts MGT 301, 330 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 108 or higher) Honors Program satisfy the core focus MKT 205 Fine Arts - 3 cr. **Pre-requisite is C grade to take requirement ACC 310 *For a complete list of course pre-requisites, *** Pre-requisite is C- grade to please see the Providence College Catalog. take ACC 311 **** Pre-requisite is C- grade to take ACC 405 Currently, ACC Majors fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning and Social Science Cores and the Intensive Writing II, Oral Communication, Diversity, and Civic Engagement Proficiencies. 88

89 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/5/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Finance- ECN 101,102 or ACC 203, 204 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ACC 203 Financial Accounting 3 ACC 204 Managerial Accounting 3 6 MTH 108 Math Business Analysis II or higher level calc. (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 ECN 102 Principles of Economics: Macro 3 6 ECN 101 Principles of Economics: Micro (Social Science Core) 3 ACC 111 Computer App. in Business II (1 cr.) 1 4 ACC 110 Computer App. in Business (1 cr.) 1 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 FIN 218 Fin. Markets and Institutions 3 FIN 207 Managerial Finance I 3 6 FIN 217 Statistical Analysis & Business Decisions I (or MTH 217) 3 MKT 205 Principles of Marketing 3 6 FIN 210 Intro. to the Finance Profession rd Year FIN 317 Investments 3 FIN 308 Managerial Finance II 3 6 FIN 310 Operations Mgmt. 4 MGT 301 Organizational Behavior th Year FIN 419 International Finance 3 FIN 480 Seminar in Finance 3 6 FIN Elective (400 level) 3 MGT 330 Legal Enviornment for Business I 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 122 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: *Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either FIN 207, 210, 217, 218, 308, 310, 317, 419, 480 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same FIN Elective (1) selected from FIN 417, 420, 440, 445, 470, 495 or Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* any other 400-level FIN course except FIN 450 or 490 Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity ACC 110, 111, 203, 204 Social Science - 3 cr. (ECN 101 or 102) Civic Engagement (FIN 218) *Students completing the Liberal Arts ECN 101, 102 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 108 or higher) Honors Program satisfy the core focus MTH 108, 217 Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement MGT 301, 330 MKT 205 PHL 306 OR PHL 202 **Currently, FIN Majors fulfill the Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores. *For a complete list of course prerequisites, please see the Providence College Catalog. 89

90 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/4/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Management- MGT 101 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MGT 101 Principles of Management 3 ACC 204 Managerial Accounting 3 6 ACC 203 Financial Accounting 3 ECN 102 Principles of Economics: Macro (Social Science Core) 3 6 MTH 108 Math Business Analysis II or higher level calc. (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 Non-departmental elective of MTH 108 Math Analysis II 3 6 ACC 110 Computer App. in Business (1 cr.) 1 ACC 111 Computer App. in Business II (1 cr.) nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 FIN 217 Statistical Analysis & Bus Decisions I (or MTH 217 Intro. to Statistics) 3 MKT 205 Principles of Marketing 3 6 MGT 301 Organizational Behavior 3 FIN 207 Managerial Finance I 3 6 ECN 101 Principles of Economics: Micro 3 Core rd Year FIN 310 Operations Mgmt. 4 MGT 320 Human Resources Management 3 7 MGT Elective (internship encouraged) 3 Core th Year MGT 330 Legal Environment for Business I 3 MGT 489 Capstone Seminar in Strategy 3 6 MGT 401 Organizational Theory 3 MGT Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: *Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either MGT 101, 301, 320, 330, 401, 489 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same MGT Electives (2) (MGT 450 is recommended) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* MTH 108 or higher Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity ECN 101, 102 Social Science - 3 cr. (ECN 101 or 102) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts FIN 207, 217, 310 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 108 or higher) Honors Program satisfy the core focus MKT 205 Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement ACC 110, 111, 203, 204 PHL 306 OR PHL 202 **Currently, MGT Majors fulfill the Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores. 90 *For a complete list of course prerequisites, please see the Providence College Catalog.

91 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/2/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Marketing - MKT 205 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MKT 205 Principles of Marketing 3 ECN 102 Principles of Economics: Macro (Social Science Core) 3 6 ECN 101 Principles of Economics: Micro MTH 108 Math Business Analysis II or higher 3 (Social Science Core) level calc. (Quantitative Reasoning Core) nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MKT 335 Buyer Behavior OR FIN FIN 217 Statistical Analysis OR MKT ACC 203 Financial Accounting 3 MGT 301 Organizational Behavior 3 6 ACC 110 Computer App. in Business I (1 cr.) 1 ACC 204 Managerial Accounting 3 4 Core 3 ACC 111 Computer App. in Business II (1 cr.) rd Year MKT 336 Promotional Strategy 3 MKT 426 International Marketing (Diversity Proficiency) 3 6 FIN 207 Managerial Finance I 3 FIN 310 Operations Mgmt. 4 7 Core 3 MGT 330 Legal Environment Business I th Year MKT 434 Marketing Research 3 MKT 480 Capstone 3 6 MKT Elective 3 MKT Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: *Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either MKT 205, 335, 336, 426, 434, 480 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same MKT Electives (2) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* ECN 101 and 102 Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (MKT 426, MGT 301) FIN 207, 217, 310 Social Science - 3 cr. (ECN 101 or 102) Civic Engagement *Students completing the Liberal Arts MTH 108 or higher Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 108 or higher) Honors Program satisfy the core focus MGT 301, 330 Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement ACC 110, 111, 203, 204 PHL 306 is recommeneded **Currently, MKT Majors fulfill the Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores and the Diversity Proficiency. 91 Note: Students transferring from Finance may substitute MTH 217 for FIN 217 *For a complete list of course pre-requisites please see the Providence College Catalog.

92 Exploring Professional Studies School of Professional Studies Health Policy & Management 93 Thinking of a Major in Education? 94 Elementary/Special Education 95 Biology (BA) 96 Biology (BS) 97 Chemistry 98 English 99 Foreign Language Studies 100 History 101 Mathematics 102 Music Education* 103 Physics 104 Social Work 105 *Music Education is part of the School of Arts and Sciences, but is included in this section because of its connection to the Education Department. 92

93 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 5/6/15 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 HPM 101 American Health Care System 3 HPM Elective 3 6 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 HPM Elective 3 HPM 240 Epidemiology (Social Science Core) rd Year HPM 300 Financial Management 3 HPM 310 Health Law th Year HPM 408 Analysis & Policy (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 1st course(s) recommended for Health Policy & Management - HPM HPM 450 Field Experience 3 6 HPM 480 Senior Seminar 3 HPM Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 121 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either HPM 101, 240, 300, 310, 408, 450, 480 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II the same core discipline, language or the same HPM Electives (3) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication themed area* Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity Study Abroad: HPM majors may study abroad Social Science - 3 cr. (HPM 240) Civic Engagement (HPM 408) *Students completing the Liberal Arts during Fall or Spring of the junior year with advisor's Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Honors Program satisfy the core focus approval and at an HPM approved program. Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, HPM Majors fulfill the Social Science Core and Civic Engagement Proficiency; HPM 445 satisfies the Intensive Writing II requirement. Note: Undeclared students must take HPM 101 before declaring the major. Contact the Program Chair for information on the HPM 101 wait list. 93

94 Thinking of a Major in Education? The Education Programs Elementary/Special Education Chair, Dr. Susan Skawinski, x 2717 Secondary Education Director, Dr. Kevin J. O Connor x 2123 Music Education - Director, Dr. Patricia W. Cichy x 1954 Providence College offers three undergraduate education programs: The Elementary/Special Education program is a full major and prepares students to teach both special education and general education at the elementary level. The Secondary Education program prepares students to teach at the secondary level and is always completed in conjunction with a discipline major (biology, chemistry, English, French, history, Italian, mathematics, physics, or Spanish). The Music Education program prepares students to teach music in grades K-12. Applying for Admission Full admission to an education program is a 2 stage process - Stage 1, you declare the major and your intent to be admitted to the program, then Stage 2, you formally apply to the program. Stage I: Declaring the Major Make an appointment with the appropriate Department Chair or Program Director to complete the necessary paperwork to declare your intent to be admitted to an undergraduate education program. Those interested in Elementary/Special Education should declare by the end of the freshman year. Those interested in Secondary Education or Music Education should declare during the fall of their sophomore year. For Secondary Education, a student may declare as late as fall of junior year if EDU 201 has been taken. Stage II: Formally Applying to the Major After declaring one of the education programs, the process of applying for admission to the program begins. A number of requirements and formal steps make up the process: A minimum of 2.75 cumulative GPA. A grade of C or better in all education courses (except a B or better is required in EDU 231L for Elementary/Special Education, EDU 206L for Secondary Education, and MUS 230 for Music Education). A minimum 2.0 GPA in content courses within the major for Secondary Education and Music Education. SAT (minimum scores, Math = 520, Reading = 500, Writing = 490) or ACT (minimum scores, Math = 20, Reading = 21, English = 20). The education programs provide tutorial support for students who do not enter Providence College with the required scores; however, due to state regulations if applicants do not meet the required scores within a specific amount of time, a different major must be selected. Participation in an Assessment Review process that includes 1) evaluations of your professionalism and beginning teaching skills (e.g., lesson planning) during initial education classes and related field experiences, and 2) evaluation of your response to a common writing prompt used across all of the education programs. For additional information, please visit the website of the department or program you are interested in and/or consult the online undergraduate catalogue. 94

95 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/20/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 EDU 125 Comm. Disorders of Children OR EDU EDU 125 Comm. Disorders of Children OR EDU Intro to Indv w/ Special Needs 221 Intro to Indv w/ Special Needs 3 6 Core 3 PSY 100 Intro to Psychology (Social Science Core) nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 EDU 231 & 231L Literarcy I: Math Teach. Rd. 4 EDU 270 & 270L Teach Sci & Math in Elem. OR EDU 331 & 331L Literacy II: Teach Lang. Arts and Social Studies (Intensive Writing II 4 8 Proficiency) EDU 285 Strategies in Classroom Mgmt. 3 PSY 306 Child and Adolescent Psychology rd Year 4 th Year 1st course(s) recommended for Elementary/Special Education - EDU 125 or EDU EDU 270 & 270L Teach Sci & Math in Elem. EDU 390 Assess of Child Ind. Differences OR EDU 331 & 331L Literacy II: Teach Lang. 4 (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) Arts and Social Studies 3 7 Core 3 EDU 418 & 418L Assessment & Current Methods for Students w/ M/M Learn. Probs EDU 452 Student Teaching Elem/Sp Ed (Oral Communication Proficiency) 9 EDU 451 Student Teach Elem EDU 322 Home/School Relations 3 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficicency) *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 122 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either EDU 125, 221, 231, 231L, 270, 270L, 285, 301, 322 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (EDU 331 the same core discipline, language or the same 331, 331L, 390, 418, 418L, 451, 452 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. and EDU 390) themed area* PSY 100, 306 Natural Science - 3 cr. Oral Communication (EDU 452) Note: Students going abroad in Junior Year Fall Social Science - 3 cr. (PSY 100) Diversity *Students completing the Liberal Arts must take EDU 270 as sophomores and EDU 331 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Civic Engagement (EDU 301) Honors Program satisfy the core focus as juniors. Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, EDUE Majors fulfill the Social Science Core along with the Intensive Writing II, Oral Communication and Civic Engagement Proficiencies. Note: Both EDU 125 and 221 DO NOT satisfy the Diversity Proficiency for EDUE majors. Therefore, EDUE majors must fulfill the Diversity Proficiency outside the major requirements. 95 0

96 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/23/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Biology/Secondary Education B.A. - BIO 103 & EDU 201 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 BIO 103 General Biology I (Natural Science Core) 4 BIO 104 General Biology II 4 8 CHM 101 General Chemistry I (Natural Science Core) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II 4 8 MTH 109 Calculus I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I 4 BIO 200 Int. Cell Bio & Mol. Genetics (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 7 EDU 201 Educational Psychology (Social Science Core) 3 EDU 206 & 206L Principles of Sec. Ed. w/ Lab 4 7 Science Elective 3 Core rd Year BIO Elective w/ Lab (Ecology) 4 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 8 EPS 101 General Physics I 4 EDU 303 & 303L Child w/ Sp. Needs in Reg Class w/ Lab 4 8 EDU 401 & 401L Educational Measurement w/ Lab 4 Science Elective 3 7 Science Elective 3 Core th Year Bio Elective w/ Lab (Physiology) 4 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 7 EDU 412 & 412L Teaching Science in Sec. Schools w/ Lab 4 EDU 450 Student Teaching (Oral Communication Proficiency) Science Elective 3 EDU 449 Classroom Management (1 cr.) 1 4 Core *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 126 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same This program of study provides certification in Biology Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (BIO 200) core discipline, language or the same themed area* and General Science. Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (EDU 450) (FULFILLED BY COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) BIO , 200 Natural Science - 3 cr. (BIO 103 or CHM 101) Diversity (EDU 211 suggested) 3 BIO Electives w/ Lab (Ecology and Physiology Social Science - 3 cr. (EDU 201) Civic Engagement (EDU 301) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors strongly recommended) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109) Program satisfy the core focus requirement 4 Science Electives above 100 level from BIO, CHM, Fine Arts - 3 cr. MTH, CSC (EPS 102, MTH 110, MTH 131, MTH 132 are allowed) **Currently, BIOE BA Majors fulfill the Natural Science, Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores; the MTH 109 Intensive Writing II, Oral Communication and Civic Engagement Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. CHM , 201 Note: Secondary Education majors have a two step process to declare, including a basic skills test mandated by the Rhode Island EPS 101 Department of Education and a cummulative GPA of at least , 450 EDU 201, 206, 206L, 301, 303, 303L, 401, 401L, 412, 412L

97 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/23/2016 1st course(s) recommended for Biology/Secondary Education B.S. - BIO 103 & EDU 201 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 BIO 103 General Biology I (Natural Science Core) 4 BIO 104 General Biology II 4 8 CHM 101 General Chemistry I (Natural Science Core) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II 4 8 MTH 109 Calculus I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 3 MTH 110 Calculus II nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 CHM 201 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHM 202 Organic Chemistry II 4 8 EDU 201 Educational Psychology (Social Science Core) 3 BIO 200 Int. Cell Bio & Mol. Genetics (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 6 BIO Elective 4 EDU 206 & 206L Principles of Sec. Ed. w/ Lab rd Year BIO Elective w/ Lab (Ecology) 4 BIO Elective w/ Lab 4 8 EPS 101 General Physics I 4 EPS 102 General Physics II 4 8 EDU 401 & 401L Educational Measurement w/ EDU 303 & 303L Child w/ Sp. Needs in Reg Class w/ 4 Lab Lab th Year Bio Elective w/ Lab (Physiology) 4 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 7 BIO Elective 3 EDU 450 Student Teaching (Oral Communication Proficiency) 9 12 EDU 412 & 412L Teaching Science in Sec. Schools w/ Lab 4 EDU 449 Classroom Management (1 cr.) 1 5 Core *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 129 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same This program of study provides certification in Biology Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (BIO 200) core discipline, language or the same themed area* and General Science. Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (EDU 450) (FULFILLED BY COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) BIO , 200 Natural Science - 3 cr. (BIO 103 or CHM 101) Diversity (EDU 211 suggested) 3 BIO Electives w/ Lab (Ecology and Physiology Social Science - 3 cr. (EDU 201) Civic Engagement (EDU 301) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors strongly recommended) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 109) Program satisfy the core focus requirement 2 BIO additional Electives Fine Arts - 3 cr. MTH **Currently, BIOE BS Majors fulfill the Natural Science, Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores; the Intensive CHM , Writing I, Oral Communication and Civic Engagement Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. EPS Note: Secondary Education majors have a two step process to declare, including a basic skills test mandated by the Rhode Island 449, 450 Department of Education and a cummulative GPA of at least 2.5. EDU 201, 206, 206L, 301, 303, 303L, 401, 401L, 412, 412L 97

98 2020 Academic Planning Form As of 4/15/2016 Example Sequence for Chemistry B.A./Secondary Education (most electives can be chosen at student's discretion.) Fall Semester # of # of Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 4 CHM 121 Intro Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 122 Intro Chemistry II w/ Lab 4 Fine Arts core 3 Philosophy core 3 2 nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 CHM 221 Organic Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 222 Organic Chemistry II w/ Lab 4 EPS 101 General Physics I w/ Lab 4 EPS 102 General Physics II w/ Lab 4 EDU 201 Educational Psychology 3 EDU 206/206L Principles of Sec. Ed. w/lab rd Year CHM 331 Adv. Analytical Chemistry I w/ Lab 4 CHM 321 Physical Chemistry I 3 CHM 381 Chemistry Seminar 1 CHM 382 Chemistry Seminar 2 EDU 401/401L Educ. Measurement w/ Lab 4 EDU 303/303L Child w/ Sp. Needs in Reg. Class. 4 Theology I core 3 Theology II core 3 Core Focus elect. - part 1 3 Core Focus elect. - part th Year CHM 401 Inorganic Chemistry w/ Lab 4 EDU 450 Student Teaching 9 CHM 481 Chemistry Seminar 2 CHM 482 Chemistry Seminar 0 EDU 412/412L Teaching Science in Sec. Sch. 4 EDU 301 Foundations of Education 3 Philosopy Ethics core 3 EDU 449 Classroom Management 1 Science Elective* *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Foundational Component: DWC - 4 semester sequence, credits Core Focus/Concentration: Major Requirements: 2 courses/ 6 cr. from either the same core CHM , , 321 Theology (GRP I and II) - 6 Cr. discipline, language or the same themed area 331, 381, 382, 401, 481, 482 Philosophy (1 + Ethics) - 6 cr. MTH Natural Science - (CHM 121/121L) Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors EPS Social Science - (EDU 201) Honors Program automatically satisfy the core *Science Elective (Chosen from BIO Quantitative Reasoning - (MTH 131 or MTH 132) focus requirement. or advanced courses in BIO, CHM, EPS, or MTH Fine Arts - 3 cr. excluding Research) EDU 201, L, 301, L, Proficiencies: (some proficiencies can be attained by completion of designated Foundational courses.) L, L, 449, 450 Intensive Writing - I Intensive Writing - II (in the major CHM 222L/CHM 321/CHM 331L/CHM 401L) Oral Communication (in the major CHM 381/382/481/482) Diversity Civic Engagement (in the major EDU 301) For Study Abroad - fall or spring of the junior year following consultation with department chair and provided one finds equivalent courses. Note: Secondary Education majors have a two step process to declare, including a basic skills test mandated by the RI Department of Education and a cummulative GPA of at least

99 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/10/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 ENG 175 Intro to Literature (Intensive Writing I Proficiency) 3 English course with Intensive Writing II Proficiency nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 Pre- or Post-1800 Literature course 3 Pre- or Post-1800 Literature course 3 6 EDU 201 Educational Psychology (Social Science Core) 3 EDU 206 & 206L Principles of Sec. Ed. w/ Lab rd Year ENG 304 History of English Lang. 3 ENG with WRITING designation 3 6 ENG Elective (Pre- or Post-1800) 3 Post-1800 Literature course 3 6 EDU 401 & 401L Educational Measurement w/ Lab 4 EDU 303 & 303L Child w/ Sp. Needs in Reg. Class w/ Lab th Year ENG Post-1800 Literature course 3 EDU 450 Student Teach in Sec. School (Oral Communication Proficiency) 9 12 EDU 411 & 411L Teach. Eng. In Sec. School 4 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 7 ENG Pre-1800 Literature course 3 EDU 449 Classroom Mgmt (1 cr.) 1 4 Free Elective 3 3 Free Elective *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. 1st course(s) recommended for English/Secondary Education - ENG 175 Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I (ENG 175) 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same ENG 175 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II core discipline, language or the same themed area* 4 Pre-1800 courses (including ENG 304) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (EDU 450) (FULFILLED BY COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) 4 Post-1800 courses Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity 1 ENG writing Course Social Science - 3 cr. (EDU 201) Civic Engagement (EDU 301) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors 6 Education Courses: EDU 201, 206, 206L, 301, Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Program satisfy the core focus requirement 303, 303L, 401, 401L, 411, 411L Fine Arts - 3 cr. EDU 449 (1-credit course) EDU 450 Student Teaching 0 **Currently, ENGE Majors fulfill the Social Science Core; the Intensive Writing I, Oral Communication and Civic Engagement Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. Note: Secondary Education majors have a two step process to declare, including a basic skills test mandated by the Rhode Island Department of Education and a cummulative GPA of at least

100 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/16/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 FLS 201 Major Language OR FLS FLS 201 Major Language OR FLS nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 FLS 212 Major Language(Fulfills Fine Arts Core) 3 FLS 321 OR FLS 322 Major Language Literature 3 6 EDU 201 Educational Psychology(Social Science Core) 3 EDU 206 & 206L Principles of Sec. Ed. w/ Lab rd Year FLS 300 Major Language Elective 3 FLS 300 Major Language Elective 3 6 FLS 321 OR FLS 322 Major Language Literature 3 FLS 400 Major Language Literature 3 6 EDU 401 & 401L Educational Measurement w/ Lab 4 EDU 303 & 303L Child w/ Sp. Needs in Reg. Class w/ Lab th Year FLS 300 Major Language Elective 3 EDU 450 Student Teach in Sec. School (Fulfills Oral Communication Proficiency) 9 12 FLS 400 Major Language Literature 3 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Fulfills Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 6 EDU 415 & 415L Teach. Mod. Lang. In Sec. Schools 4 EDU 449 Classroom Management (1 cr.) 1 5 Free Elective 3 Free Elective *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. 1st course(s) recommended for Foreign Language Studies/Secondary Education Level Course Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same FLS 201, 210, 212, 321, 322 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II core discipline, language or the same themed area* FLS Major Electives Level (3 courses) Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. (FRN 321 & 322) (FULFILLED BY COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) FLS Literature (2 courses) Natural Science - 3 cr. Oral Communication (EDU 450) EDU 201, 206, 206L, 301, 303, 303L, 401, 401L, Social Science - 3 cr.(edu201) Diversity (SPN 322 & *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors 415, 415L, 449, 450 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. FRN 370 Cult & Hist) Program satisfy the core focus requirement Note: EDU 415 is now being offered in Fall of odd yrs. Fine Arts - 3 cr.(fls 212) Civic Engagement (EDU 301) 0 Note: Secondary Education majors have a two step process to declare, including a basic skills test mandated by the Rhode Island Department of Education and a cummulative GPA of at least

101 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 2/3/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 HIS 100 Thinking and Writing about History (Intensive Writing I Proficiency) 3 HIS US period requirement nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 HIS US period requirement 3 HIS US period requirement 3 6 EDU 201 Educational Psychology (Social Science Core) 3 EDU 206 & 206L Principles of Sec. Ed. w/ Lab 4 7 HIS European History - Pre or Post Core rd Year HIS elective OR HIS Non-Western 3 HIS elective OR HIS Non-Western 3 6 HIS European - Pre HIS European - Post EDU 401 & 401L Educational Measurement w/ EDU 303 & 303L Child w/ Sp. Needs in Reg. Class w/ 4 Lab Lab th Year HIS Seminar 3 EDU 450 Student Teach in Sec. School (Oral Communication Proficiency) 9 12 HIS elective OR HIS Non-Western 3 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 6 Core 3 EDU 449 Classroom Management (1 cr.) 1 4 EDU 414 & 414L Teach Soc. Studies in Sec. School 4 4 Free Elective *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 120 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I (HIS 100, 214) Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. (HIS 214) Intensive Writing - II (HIS 226, 231, 319, 338, Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. 352, 366 ) 1st course(s) recommended for History/Secondary Education - HIS 100, HIS , or History Electives in consultation with faculty 101 Core Focus: Major Requirements: 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same HIS 100 core discipline, language or the same themed area* HIS US Period - 255, 256, 257, OR 258 (choose 3) (FULFILLED BY COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) HIS European Period (3) - one Pre 1715, one Post 1715, and one Pre OR Post 1715 Natural Science - 3 cr. Oral Communication (HIS 230, 255, 339, 424, 483, EDU 450 ) Social Science - 3 cr. (HIS 366, EDU 201) Diversity (HIS 207, 231, 298, 299, 334, 344, 345, 352, 368, 369, 481) HIS Non-Western (2) Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. Civic Engagement (HIS 205, 302, 483, EDU 301 ) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors HIS Electives (1) Fine Arts - 3 cr. Program satisfy the core focus requirement Junior/Senior Seminar EDU 201, 206, 206L, 301, 303, 303L, 401, 401L, 414, 414L, 449, 450 **Currently, HISE Majors fulfill the Theology 200 and Social Science Cores; the Intensive Writing I, Oral Communication and Civic Engagement Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. The Intensive Writing II and Diversity Proficiencies can be satisfied through careful selection of major electives. See course numbers above and consult your advisor prior to course selection. Note: Secondary Education majors have a two step process to declare, including a basic skills test mandated by the Rhode Island Department of Education and a cummulative GPA of at least

102 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/10/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 *MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MTH 223 Calculus III 4 MTH 290 Foundations of Higher Mathematics 3 7 EDU 201 Educational Psychology 3 EDU 206 & 206L Principles of Secondary Education 4 7 MTH 215 Linear Algebra 3 Core rd Year MTH 323 Real Analysis I 3 MTH 324 Real Analysis II OR MTH 316 Abstract Algebra II OR MTH 330 Complex Variables th Year MTH 315 Abstract Algebra I 3 MTH 309 Geometry 3 6 CSC 103 OR EDU 303 & 303L Child w/ Special Needs in Reg Class 4 7 EDU 401 & 401L Educational Measurement 4 Core 3 7 MTH 325 Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics I EDU 416 & 416LTeaching Math in Secondary School EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficiency) EDU 450 Student Teaching (Oral Communication Proficiency) 9 13 Core 3 EDU 449 Classroom Management (1 cr.) 1 4 Free Elective 3 3 Free Elective *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 123 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. 1st course(s) recommended for Mathematics/Secondary Education - MTH 131, EDU 201 Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same MTH 131, 132, 215, 223, 290, 309, 315, 323, 324 OR Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II core discipline, language or the same themed area* 316 OR 325, 330 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (EDU 450) (FULFILLED BY COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) EDU 201, 206, 206L, 301, 303, 303L, 401, 401L, 416 Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (EDU 211 suggested) 416L, 449, 450 Social Science - 3 cr. Civic Engagement (EDU 301) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors CSC 103, 104 OR any CSC course higher than the 200-level Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 131 or 132) Program satisfy the core focus requirement except CSC 440 Fine Arts - 3 cr. *Math/Sec Ed Majors placed into MTH 132 will have the MTH 131 requirement waived 0 **Currently, MTHE Majors fulfill the Quantitative Reasoning Core; the Oral Communication and Civic Engagement Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. Note: Secondary Education majors have a two step process to declare, including a basic skills test mandated by the Rhode Island Department of Education and a cummulative GPA of at least

103 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/21/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MSC 201 & 201L Theory I w/ Lab 4 MSC 202 & 202L Theory II w/ Lab 4 8 MSC 206 Piano Class I or MSC 207 Voice Class 3 MSC 230 Intro to Music Education 3 6 Quantitative Reasoning Core 3 Intensive Writing I Proficiency 3 6 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons MSC 106 Recital Attendance MSC 106 Recital Attendance 0 Ensemble 0.5 MSC 206 Piano I or MSC 306 Piano II or MSC 207 Voice Class Ensemble nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MSC 301 & 301L Theory III w/ Lab 4 MSC 302 & 302L Theory IV w/ Lab 4 8 MSC 310 Music History & Lit I (Fine Arts Core) 3 MSC 311 Music History & Lit II (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) 3 6 SWK 253 Human Behavior (Social Science Core) 3 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 6 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons MSC 106 Recital Attendance MSC 106 Recital Attendance 0 Free Elective (Optional) MSC 306 Piano II or MSC 207 Voice Class or Elective (as advised) 3 3 Ensemble 0.5 Ensemble rd Year MSC 330 & 330L Teaching General Music 4 MSC 331 & 331L Teaching Music in Secondary School th Year MSC 305 Conducting 3 MSC 303 Music Composition 3 6 MSC 312 Music History & Lit III 3 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 6 EDU 221 Intro & Char Indv w/ Special Needs (Diversity Proficiency) 3 MSC 334 Teaching Woodwinds (not a full course) 1 4 MSC 333 Teaching Brass & Percussion (not a full course) 1 Natural Science Elective 3 4 Applied Lessons 1.5 Applied Lessons MSC 106 Recital Attendance MSC 106 Recital Attendance 0 Free Elective (Optional) Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 3 Ensemble 0.5 Ensemble MSC 332 & 332L Teaching Music in Secondary MSC 499 Student Teaching (Oral Communication 4 School, Instrumental Proficiency) MSC 498 Senior Recital/Project 1 Applied Lessons (may be waived with permission of instructor) MSC 335 Teaching Strings (not a full course) 1 MSC 106 Recital Attendance 1 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 3 Philosophy/Theology Elective 3 3 Free Elective 3 3 Applied Lessons MSC 106 Recital Attendance 0 Ensemble *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. 1st course(s) recommended for Music Education - MSC L, L, Fine Arts Courses (not MSC 210) Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same MSC L, L, L, L, 310, Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (MSC 311) core discipline, language or the same themed area* 311, 312 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (MSC 499) (FULFILLED THROUGH COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) EDU 221, 301 Natural Science - 3 cr. Diversity (EDU 221) SWK 253 Social Science - 3 cr. (SWK 253) Civic Engagement (EDU 301) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors Program smsc 106 required ALL semesters Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. satisfy the core focus requirement Large ensemble required for 7 semesters Fine Arts - 3 cr. (MSC 310) Applied lessons required for ALL semesters - **Currently, MSCE Majors fulfill the Fine Arts and Social Science Cores; the Intensive Writing II, Oral Communication, Diversity and Civic Engagement Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. It is recommended that students, in consultation with their advisor, select one core course that satisfies the needed proficiency (Writing I) to complete all core requirements. 103 Sign up in MSC dept. office Smith Center G04 Senior Recital/Project required during fall semester of senior year #Students must pass a piano proficiency test by the end of their sophomore year

104 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 3/9/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MTH 131 Calc & Analytical Geometry I (Quantitative Reasoning Core) 4 MTH 132 Calc & Analytical Geometry II 4 8 EPS 101 General Physics I w/ lab 4 EPS 102 General Physics II w/ lab 4 8 EPS 131 Intro to Engineering (1 cr, taken as 5th course) 1 Intensive Writing I Proficiency 3 4 Diversity Proficiency 3 Philosophy Core nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 MTH 223 Calculus III 4 MTH 304 Differential Equations 3 7 EPS 201 Intro. Modern Physics w/ lab (Oral Communication Proficiency) 4 EPS 301 Mechanics 3 7 EDU 201 Educational Psychology (Social EPS 222 Elements of Systems Modeling (1 cr, taken as 3 Science Core) 6th course) 1 4 Theology (200 Level) Core 3 EDU 206 & 206L Principles of Sec. Ed. w/ Lab 4 7 Philosophy Ethics Core rd Year MTH 318 Topics in Applied Mathematics 3 EPS 202 Electronics w/ lab (Intensive Writing II Proficiency) th Year 1st course(s) recommended for Applied Physics (Engineering-Physics Systems)/Secondary Education B.A. - EPS 101 and/or 131, MTH 131 EPS 221 Scientific Programming 3 EPS 430 Thermodynamics 3 6 CHM 101 General Chemistry I w/ lab (or CHM 121) (Natural Science Core) 4 CHM 102 General Chemistry II w/ lab (or CHM 122) 4 8 EDU 401 & 401L Educational Measurement w/ EDU 303 & 303L Child with Special Needs in Regular 4 Lab Class w/ Lab 4 8 Theology (300 Level) *EPS 303 Systems Approach to Complex EDU 450 Student Teach in Sec. School (Oral 3 Problem Solving Communication Proficiency) 9 12 **EDU 412 & 412L Teach Sci. in Sec. Schools 4 EDU 301 Foundations of Education (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 7 Fine Arts Core 3 EDU 449 Classroom Management (1 cr.) 1 4 Free Elective 3 3 Free Elective *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours* Total Program of Study 134 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either the same EPS 101, 102, 131, 201, 202, 221, 222, 301, 303*, 430 Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (EPS 202) core discipline, language or the same themed area* MTH 131, 132, 223, 304, 417 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (EPS 201, (FULFILLED BY COMPLETION OF PROGRAM) CHM (or ) Natural Science - 3 cr. (CHM 101 or CHM 121) EDU 450) EDU 201, 206, 206L, 301, 303, 303L, 401, 401L, Social Science - 3 cr. (EDU 201) Diversity (EDU 211 suggested) *Students completing the Liberal Arts Honors 412**, 412L, 449, 450 Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (MTH 131) Civic Engagement (EDU 301) Program satisfy the core focus requirement *EPS 303 is offered in Fall of odd years. Fine Arts - 3 cr. Students in odd grad years should take it Jr. year **EDU 412 is offered in Fall of even years. **Currently, PHYE Majors fulfill the Natural Science, Social Science and Quantitative Reasoning Cores; the Intensive Writing II and Oral Communication Proficiencies; and the Core Focus requirement. Note: Secondary Education majors have a two step process to declare, including a basic skills test mandated by the Rhode Island Department of Education and a cummulative GPA of at least

105 2020 Academic Planning Form: As of 4/5/2016 # of # of Fall Semester Spring Semester Total Year 1 st Year DWC 101 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 102 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 SWK 101 Human Needs & Social Responses SWK 253 Human Behavior Lifespan (Social (Social Science Core) Science Core) BIO 122 Human Biology (Natural Science Core/Elective Core) Core/Elective 3 Theology I Core/Elective nd Year DWC 201 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credit hrs) 4 DWC 202 (4 credit hrs; Honors 5 credits hrs) 4 8 SWK 220 Diversity & Culture in Social Wk. (Diversity Proficiency) 1st course(s) recommended for Social Work - SWK SWK 254 Behavior in Social Systems (Social Science Core) 3 6 Theology II 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Fine Arts 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective rd Year SWK 360 Social Policy 3 SWK 366 Comm. & Political Practice (Civic Engagement Proficiency) 3 6 SWK 365 Prac. With Indivs. Fam & Groups 3 SWK 370 Soc. Work Practicum & Seminar I 4 7 Ethics (Philosophy) 3 SWK 368 Research (Quantitative Reasoning) 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective th Year SWK 488 Theory/Prac. Capstone 3 SWK 489 Theory/Prac. Capstone II (The combination of SWK 488 & 489 fulfills Intensive Writing II & Oral Communication Proficiency) 3 6 SWK 450 Soc. Work. Practicum & Seminar II 6 SWK 451 Soc. Work Practicum & Seminar III 6 12 SWK 468 Research Design & Stat. Analysis (Elective) 3 Core/Elective 3 6 Core/Elective 3 Core/Elective 3 6 *Graduation Requirement includes a minimum of 120 credit hours*/122 credit hours for Social Work Total Program of Study 122 Core requirements include a foundational component, core focus, and satisfaction of all proficiencies. Foundational Component: Proficiencies: Core Focus: Major Requirements: DWC - 4 semester sequence, cr. Intensive Writing - I 2 courses/ 6 cr. outside the major from either SWK 101, 220, 253, 254, 360, 365, 366, 368, 370, 450, Theology (200 & 300 level) - 6 cr. Intensive Writing - II (SWK 488 & 489) the same core discipline, language or the same 451, 488, 489 Philosophy (1 Ethics) - 6 cr. Oral Communication (SWK 488 & 489) themed area* BIO 122 Natural Science - 3 cr. (BIO 122) Diversity (SWK 220) Note: SWK 101, 220, 253, 254, and BIO 122 Social Science - 3 cr. (SWK 101, 253, 254) Civic Engagement (SWK 366) *Students completing the Liberal Arts should be fulfilled before Junior year. Quantitative Reasoning - 3 cr. (SWK 368, pending) Honors Program satisfy the core focus Fine Arts - 3 cr. requirement **Currently, SWK Majors fulfill the Natural Science (unless the student needs a physics-based course), Social Science, and Quantitative Reasoning Cores; and the Intensive Writing II, Oral Communication, Diversity and Civic Engagement Proficiencies. 0

106 Career Advising and Campus Resources Page Pre-Law 107 Pre-Medical Sciences 108 Army Reserve Officer Training Corps 109 Center for Career Education and Professional Development 110 Study Abroad (Center for International Studies) 111 Office of Academic Services (Tutorial Services, Services for Disabilities) 114 Online and Electronic Resources

107 Pre-Law Advising Program John Scanlan, Ph.D., Pre-Law Advisor, Associate Professor of English English Department, Ruane LL31, (401) ; When visiting upstate New York recently, Chief Justice John Roberts fielded a standard question from a college student: What s the best preparation for law school? Roberts answered directly and thoughtfully: A solid liberal arts education. Chief Justice Roberts is exactly right. There is no prescribed collection of courses that those applying to law school must take. In fact, people enter law school with a variety of undergraduate majors and academic orientations. English and political science are of course popular, as is history Justice Roberts s own concentration when he was in college. But contemporary law students come from a wide variety of undergraduate majors, including philosophy, mathematics, French, finance, art history, psychology, Classics, and virtually every other area of study. What really matters is not the undergraduate major, then, but the degree to which the student s undergraduate work is truly distinguished. In short, four years of rigorous, challenging study really is the best preparation for law school, just as Justice Roberts says. Law schools are postgraduate schools in the first instance; naturally enough, those on the admissions boards there look for evidence that an applicant can handle advanced intellectual work. So the upper end of the curriculum the seminars, the capstones, the senior theses, the courses with the challenging reading lists is the area of the curriculum where students should be especially determined to do their very best work. Students often ask about the value of law-related internships. While such experiences are meaningful to admissions boards (and while such activities certainly provide interns with an initial feel for what a life in the law might really be like), there is no substitute for a potential applicant immersing himself or herself in demanding academic research. Reading and writing: legal work is fundamentally focused on those arts, so the ambitious prelaw student should seek out courses and other activities that place special attention on difficult reading lists and challenging writing assignments. Of course, preparing for law school is a complicated enterprise, especially in its later stages. Preparing for the LSAT, choosing a collection of law schools to which to apply, choosing people who can write convincing letters of recommendation, and much, much else must be handled with great care. But most of these matters are best addressed in an individualized, one-on-one meeting with the Prelaw Advisor here, Prof. J.T. Scanlan. Indeed, Prof. Scanlan always encourages anyone at all interested in law school to meet with him individually and the sooner in one s college career, the better. For additional information, consult the Pre-Law Home Page at 107

108 Premedical Sciences Advising Program Lynne M. Lawson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor Engineering-Physics-Systems, Advisor for the Health Professions Sowa Hall 235, (401) , The program assists students in pre-professional preparation for careers in all of the health professions including medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, optometry, physician assistant, physical therapy, and other allied health professions. Because each of the health professions requires specific preparation, students must work closely with the Advisor for the Health Professions to plan a suitable program of study. This generally involves selection of an appropriate major, required courses, and internships and volunteer service opportunities in the health professions. Admission to most health professions schools is extremely competitive, requiring strong academic performance, satisfactory scores on standardized admissions tests (e.g. MCAT, DAT, GRE, etc.), and evidence of leadership, service and a working knowledge of the health professions. For medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and optometry, academic preparation generally includes a minimum of two semesters each of General Biology General Chemistry Organic Chemistry Calculus General Physics English In addition, many health professions schools strongly recommend or require Biochemistry, Advanced Biology electives, and other specific courses. For example, medical schools may require biochemistry and social/behavioral sciences (psychology, sociology), NP, PA programs require human anatomy and physiology. It is important to contact the Advisor for the Health Professions to confirm profession specific prerequisites. While there is no premed major, most premedical sciences students complete one of the following majors: B.S. degree in Biology B.A. degree in Chemistry, B.S. degree in Biochemistry However, with careful planning, a student may also complete the premedical sciences courses in combination with a liberal arts major. 108

109 Army Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) Army ROTC is a leader development program. Although not a Major or Minor, students completing the program are commissioned as an Officer into the US Army. All students are eligible to enroll in any Basic Course class for credit, regardless of academic major. Only students meeting pre-requisites and contracted for military service are permitted to enroll in Advanced Course classes. Over-enrollment and late enrollment for ROTC classes is authorized. Freshmen are allowed to enroll above 15 credits for ROTC courses. Each ROTC course is worth 3.0 free-elective credits. Freshmen and Sophomore classes are offered each semester on Tuesday from 2:30-6pm. Junior and Senior classes are offered each semester on Wednesday from 2:30-6pm. Additionally, there are five scheduled combined lab periods for all courses each semester on designated Wednesdays from 2:30-6pm. Travel abroad during fall or spring semester is not authorized during junior or senior year. Contracted students must enroll in the appropriate ROTC course each semester. Additionally, these students must maintain a minimum 2.0 term and cumulative GPA each semester or risk loss of benefits or disenrollment from the program. Contracted students may not change majors or drop classes without permission of the Professor of Military Science (Department Chair). Required courses for commissioning: ROTC Basic Course MIL 101 Fall semester Freshman MIL 102 Spring semester Freshman MIL 201 Fall semester Sophomore MIL 203 Spring semester Sophomore ROTC Advanced Course MIL 301 Fall semester Junior MIL 302 Spring semester Junior MIL 401 Fall semester Senior MIL 402 Spring semester Senior There are no pre-requisites for MIL 101 through 203. Pre-requisites for MIL 301 and above include completion of MIL or completion of Cadet Initial Entry Training or prior military service or prior JROTC attendance. Contact the Military Science Enrollment Officer for more information. Contracted students are required to take a Military History course prior to graduation. Providence College history courses are: HIS 103, HIS 104, HIS 202/MIL 202, HIS 256, HIS 257, HIS 301, HIS 316, HIS

110 Center for Career Education and Professional Development For more information, please contact the ROTC Department Enrollment Officer at or Patti Goff, Asst. VP Integrated Learning & Administration / Eileen Wisnewski, Senior Associate Director Location: Slavin Center 108 (401) ; Office Hours: M-TH 8:30-6:00; F 8:30-4:30 efriars PC s internship and job database that also features a calendar of career events, electronic career resource library, and much more. Students should activate their efriars account as soon as possible at: FOCUS Online tool that combines self-assessment and career exploration Take self-assessments and receive a list of careers based on your results Password to access FOCUS is listed on the On-Line Resources PASSWORDS sheet in efriars What can I do with this Major? Learn about typical career areas by major and how to prepare for them Available on the Center for Career Education s webpage Internships FAQ All of your internship questions answered! Informational Internship Guidebook (available in Slavin 108 and in efriars Resource Library) On Campus Interviewing Program Employers recruit PC students for full time jobs and internships! Positions are posted in efriars and employers conduct their first round interviews in Slavin 108 Career Expos Offered each semester and annually attracts between students! Fall: 140+ grad school, internship, job and volunteer opportunities PLUS Major/Minor Fair & Internship Showcase Spring: 100+ internship, job, and volunteer opportunities PLUS LinkedIn photo booth Shadowing Program Annual opportunity to spend a day with a PC alumnus during winter break Check our website for more information - program application date is early Fall Network with Alumni A valuable resource to help you with career development Friarlink* LinkedIn Group of 950+ PC Alumni, willing to share their career expertise Alumni & Student Networking Nights Annual Providence, Boston, NYC and Los Angeles Career panels and other events all year long Resumes Create one now so you can add to it over the next few years at PC. Attend a resume workshop or use our Resume Guidebook (available in Slavin 108 and in efriars) Have your resume reviewed in Slavin 108 during daily Quick Question Hours listed on our webpage Individual Appointment with a Career Advisor Come in and talk to us! Call to schedule an appointment 110

111 Study Abroad & International Student Services (Center for International Studies) Adrian Beaulieu, Ed.S., Dean of International Studies Harkins 215 (401) ; Allie Agati, M.A., Assistant Dean of International Studies Harkins 215 (401) ; Area of Responsibility: Advises majors in the School of Business & the School of Professional Studies on semester and year study abroad options. Primary Designated School Official (PDSO) & RO (Responsible Officer) for international students (F-1 & J-1 visa) and scholars (J-1). Denise Miller, Study Abroad Advisor Harkins 215, (401) ; Area of Responsibility: Advises majors in the School of Arts & Sciences, Maymester, summer and other short-term study abroad options Anna Iadeluca, Administrative Coordinator Harkins 215, (401) ; Areas of Responsibility: Course articulations; academic transcripts; home school tuition payments. The Center for International Studies is responsible for the following activities at the College: Study Abroad (both semester and short-term, e.g., Maymester, summer) International Students & Scholars Study Abroad Basics All students who wish to study abroad must apply for Providence College approval through the Center for International Studies by December 1 st of the year prior to the program. For instance, students wishing to study abroad anytime during the academic year must apply by December 1 st of the previous year. Student Eligibility Requirements: Junior class standing a minimum CGPA of 2.75 a declared major no serious disciplinary action or probationary period up to the time of departure no outstanding financial obligation to Providence College (any student who is indebted to the College will need to arrange payment with the Bursar's Office in order to be approved for participation in a study abroad program). 111

112 Tips for Advising Freshmen All freshmen should be asked whether or not they are considering spending a semester or year studying abroad. Students who express an interest in the possibility of studying abroad should be advised of the following: All majors can obtain major credit abroad (with the exception of Accounting) Students on the Providence College Center for Theology & Religious Studies program in Rome (PC in Rome) may fulfill both Theology core course requirements concurrently during one semester Students should take their Natural Science core during the freshman or sophomore year, as this is more difficult to do abroad Some majors have a major-specific approved programs list. Students should be encouraged to visit for the most up-to-date information Students may participate in summer study abroad any time after the freshman year Applying for Study Abroad (Sophomore Year) Phase I: Providence College students apply to the Center for International Studies in the fall semester of their sophomore year for approval to participate in a semester or year-long study abroad program during their junior year. (Note: Juniors may also apply to study abroad for the fall semester of the senior year only). Undeclared students must formally declare a major before the December 1 st application deadline. This is earlier than the declaration deadline for most undeclared students, but this is done so that students applying to study abroad can discuss their study plans with and obtain approval from their major advisor and the department. Participation in a summer or short-term program is possible after the freshman, sophomore, or junior years. Phase II: Once approved by the Center to participate on study abroad, students must then apply directly to the program for admission. There are two exceptions to this: the PC in Rome program and all Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS) programs are direct admit. Students are admitted directly by the Center, so no application to the program provider (CEA and DIS, respectively) itself is required. All applicants will require letters of recommendation at some point during this phase. Faculty advisors may find it helpful to provide students with a deadline for such requests, given their own teaching and office responsibilities. During the program application phase is when the course articulation, approval and transfer credit process occurs (whether for semester or summer study abroad). Students must submit to the Center for International Studies a Course Pre-Approval form on which they list their proposed courses of study. Course syllabi must be included (in the event that a syllabus is unavailable, a comprehensive course description may be included, but may be insufficient for final course approval). 112

113 Course Articulation, Approval, and Transfer Process: Each semester, the Office of Enrollment Services will circulate to the Chairs/Directors via SAKAI (and/or to the CCC, when necessary) the list of courses that need to be articulated and approved, along with the syllabi or, when not available, the course descriptions. Once complete, the Office of Enrollment Services then enters the list of course articulations in the study abroad course database, found at This articulated list of courses, by institution or program abroad, is available to future students intending to study abroad, as well as to the faculty in their advising work with students. The Center will notify the students as to what courses have been articulated, how they will count (e.g., core curriculum requirement or elective, free elective, etc.) and the number of credits approved for each course for assigning course credit at Providence College. Each semester, the Office of Enrollment Services and the Center for International Studies will provide departments and programs with a list of the Key Dates and Deadlines for the course articulation and review process. 2. International Students The staff at the Center for International Studies is available to assist all international students and visiting exchange students with their adjustment to living in the United States and studying at Providence College. In order to assist new entering international students with their transition to living and studying at Providence College, the Center hosts a mandatory Welcome Program prior to the New Student Orientation at the start of the fall semester. Following the Welcome Program, they then participate in the final Advising & Registration Day and then in the New Student Orientation. International students are expected to maintain the same level of academic rigor and behavior as all PC students. However, especially during their first year, they may struggle with English proficiency and a clear understanding of college expectations in the United States. If an international student is struggling academically, please contact the Center, which can offer guidance and make the appropriate referrals. In advising international students, faculty advisors should exercise cultural awareness and sensitivity as many of these students will be in the US for the first time. Most will be unfamiliar with American higher education. They come with different cultural expectations of college life, how they view professors, and may have academic and learning expectations that, while appropriate in their home country, may not be so at American campuses. Thus, advisors may need to spend more time with international students to be certain they truly understand the content of the advising session and the academic expectations of the College. 113

114 Office of Academic Services OAS Web site: OAS OAS Location: Library 2 nd Floor Room 250 BRYAN MARINELLI, Ph.D. Director of Academic Services/Writing Center Phone: (401) Fax: (401) JONATHAN GOMES Associate Director for Tutoring and Disability Services Phone: (401) Fax: (401) MEGHAN E. MURRAY Associate Director for Student Success and Retention Phone: (401) Fax: (401) MANUELA BARCELOS ESL Specialist Phone: (401) Fax: (401) ANTHONY MENDES Academic Coordinator for Student-Athletes Phone: (401) Fax: (401) KAITLYN O MALLEY Assistant Director for Student-Athlete Services/Life Skills Coordinator Phone: (401) Fax: (401) JENNIFER A. RIVERA Assistant Director for Disability Services Phone: (401) Fax: (401) SR. CAROLYN A. SULLIVAN, O.P. Assistant Director for Tutorial Services Phone: (401) Fax: (401) WILL TONER Assistant Director, Writing Center Phone: (401) Fax: (401) MARISSA MEZZANOTTE Academic Coordinator for Men s Basketball Phone: (401) Fax: (401) MELANIE SHERBURNE Administrative Coordinator Phone: (401) Fax: (401)

115 The Office of Academic Services (OAS) supports all Providence College students through a combination of academic and personal development programming, including individualized and group academic assistance, tutoring, and specialized workshops and outreach. The OAS offers unique attention and support to students with documented disabilities by providing reasonable accommodations and by advocating for equal access to all services and programs offered to members of the campus at large. The OAS also provides specialized support to student-athletes in light of the unique time demands, responsibilities, and rules governing participation in intercollegiate athletics. Services offered by the OAS include: Tutorial Services Individual and group tutoring sessions are available in most subject areas, including the Development of Western Civilization. OAS peer tutors assess individual student needs, develop strategies to address academic challenges, and help supplement classroom/textbook instruction. Tutors stress the learning process itself and place emphasis on the acquisition of independent study skills. The Tutorial Center is nationally certified by the College Reading & Learning Association (CRLA). Writing Center The Providence College Writing Center is available to assist students at any stage of the writing process, from brainstorming a topic to polishing a final draft. This means that the Center is not merely an editorial or remedial service. Through an approach to writing instruction that is student-centered, peer tutors work collaboratively with their tutees to identify and rectify chronic structural or mechanical problems, helping students avoid similar problems in future writing tasks. In short, the Writing Center s purpose is to make better writers, not just better papers. Special Programs and Workshops The OAS offers several workshops devoted to academic topics including: study skills, time management, curriculum-specific success strategies, test taking, reading skills, and GRE/GMAT Test Preparation. Students may contact the OAS to schedule group workshops. They may also seek one-on-one mentoring through the associate director for student success and retention. Coordination/Provision of Reasonable Accommodations for Students with Disabilities Students with documented disabilities (learning, physical, medical, temporary) may qualify for reasonable accommodations, coordinated by the OAS. The assistant director for disability services is available to discuss each student s unique needs and coordinate individualized services. Reasonable accommodations may include the following: extended-time tests, note-taking services, texts in alternate format, adaptive technology, interpreters, and pre-registration for courses. Services are also available for students with specific physical disabilities. (See Student Life and Development). Services for Student-Athletes Providence College student-athletes can take advantage of all services offered through the OAS, as well as the following: academic monitoring, the NCAA s Student Athlete Affairs Program, pre-registration assistance, and space for quiet study. 115

116 Online & Electronic Resources Public Internet Sites Providence College Home Page Click on Academics to find links to Undergraduate Studies, Enrollment Services, the Academic Calendar, the College Catalog, Areas of Study, Special Programs, the Dean s Office, the Undeclared Advising Program and Academic Policies and Resources. 116

117 Web Sites Limited to Members of the PC Community CyberFriar While you are a student, and even after you graduate, you will have access through this password protected system to your academic and College related personal information. In addition to using the site to register for classes, you can check your holds, request copies of your academic transcript, as well as monitor your own academic progress toward your Providence College degree. To get a copy of your Degree Evaluation from CyberFriar: 1. Log in to your Cyberfriar account 2. Click on Student Services 3. Click on Student Records 4. Click on Degree Evaluation and select current term 5. At bottom of page click on the link titled, View Previous Evaluation 6. Click on your Program link for current evaluation if one is already there (i.e. Undeclared) 7. If there is not a current evaluation listed, click Generate New Evaluation Outlook Web App You have already been assigned your Providence College account and can access your log on with your Live ID/ address and password: LiveID/ address: Password: Last 6 digits of your Banner ID. is an official means of communication for all undeclared students. It is your responsibility to check your on a regular basis. 117

118 SAKAI Students have access to sites based on enrollment and other activities. To access course sites, students will click on a site name or on More Sites in the black Quicklinks bar. More Sites also includes any project sites the student is a member of such as advising groups, major, clubs, etc. Within each course site, there are tools in a column on the left-hand side such as: Syllabus: Sends the students directly to the syllabus as posted by the instructor. Resources: Contains files uploaded by the instructor. Announcements: A listing of announcements sent out by the instructor. Calendar: Contains important dates as specified by the instructor. Assignments: An area for uploading class work. Messages: the instructor and other students in the class. Roster: List of students in the class. To return to the course site homepage, click Home in the upper left corner above course tools. To return to a student s personal homepage, click My Workspace in the black Quicklinks bar. In your Workspace there are other tools, such as: Profile: Students can upload their picture. Preferences: Allows the student to customize their tabs, notifications, etc. Membership: A student can see all sites they re in, past and present. My Courses: Courses you re enrolled in, published (blue) and unpublished (grey). 118

TABLE OF CONTENTS Credit for Prior Learning... 74

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